WorldWeave Walkabout Collection

Architecture meets art in WorldWeave’s latest collection of richly textured, colorful rugs, and Habitusliving hears from founders Sara and Piero (who's Church Street House is featured in Habitus 19).

19 Dec 2012

The product of a long friendship and professional relationship between architect and designer Piero Gesualdi and artist Sara Thom, WorldWeave was launched in 2009 with the aim of combining the pairs’ skills to create a unique and original collection of textile products.

The pieces have been strongly inspired by traditional weaving techniques and aesthetics from India, with the first collection created during a trip by Thom to the sub-continent.  This ethnic influence is then blended with a modern Australian style, rendering it more casual and versatile. As Gesualdi says, “WorldWeave takes it’s inspiration from ancient sensibilities and techniques … it exaggerates, collages and re-invents new ways of working with traditional and modern skills”.

 

The pair are emphatic about ensuring the longevity of the products, not only in the quality of the materials and the workmanship but also in their style: in Gesualdi’s words, “always be fashionable but never, ever trendy”.

A further defining feature is the brand’s focus on ethical production, ensuring that manufacturers are fair trade, do not use child labour and pay above average wages. “Do the right thing… be aware of the impact that you will make environmentally, socially and economically” says Gesualdi.

 

The resulting rugs are a treat for eyes and toes alike – ranging from wool/cotton blends through jute and camel hair, both tufted and woven, they are suitable for a variety of contexts. Luscious wool rugs are perfect for cozy situations where warmth and comfort are paramount, whereas the sturdy texture of natural un-dyed camel hair promises years of use, even under the heaviest foot traffic. Stylistically, the latest ‘Walkabout’ collection ranges from understated to bold, inspired, as Gesualdi says, by “color, weave, geometry and nature.”

Worldweave