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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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ADVERTORIALS
Bathroom
Fixed & Fitted

Frame by Novas Has Achieved an Australian First

Making hundreds of tiny decisions is the most time-consuming and frustrating part of renovations and home improvement. Choosing every detail, from which shade of white paint to use, to sourcing fittings and fixtures that are matching (and also bring personal flair) throughout the home can prove an exhausting experience. Rather than digging through bathroom stores and catalogues to find almost-matching fixtures, award-winning industrial designer and Novas Creative Director Nicholas Johnston developed the Novas Frame range as relief for the most particular among of – those who see almost-matching as simply not good enough. “Frame was created to prioritise design continuity between interior spaces with a unified hardware experience which extends beyond the bathroom throughout the entire home,” says Johnston. “This transforms the Frame collection into a feature design statement, setting a new interior design standard which calls for cohesion amongst architectural fittings and fixtures.” Thanks to Johnston, Novas is Australia’s only creator and supplier of perfectly matched architectural hardware and tapware, meaning it's a one-stop-shop for your home reno details. At once both nostalgic yet contemporary, Art Deco yet industrial, “the flexibility of the Novas Frame collection’s hero bezel design allows it to look at home in limitless compositions,” says Johnston. The taps and door fittings feature reeded handles that are available in chrome, matte black, satin nickel, gun metal, satin gold and satin bronze variations. As such, they provide not only an easily procured solution for project-wide cohesion, but also for a dash of project-wide personality. The elegance and artisanal design of the Frame products allow touch-points throughout the home to be easily elevated to new architectural heights. “Taking inspiration from the elegance of a classic bag clasp and the mechanical detail of a timepiece, Frame was composed to be sophisticated and timeless, with the ability to transition through various interior aesthetics,” says Johnston. Designed to reduce the time it takes for designers and home-renovators to find “similar-enough” fixtures and fittings for their projects, Frame provides a perfect-match range of analogous tapware, showers, kitchen mixers, bathroom accessories and door handles. “We truly believe that the collection will raise the bar for Australian homes, creating a new and essential interior design rule, that similar simply isn’t enough,” says Paul Thornewell, Novas general manager. Novas’ collection of intricately designed objects not only reduces sourcing time for specifiers, but also builds the tactile connection that users share with door handles and taps, as a seamless integration of fixtures throughout a project elevates this connection beyond the current benchmark. Founded in 1996, Novas is a second generation Australian-owned family business that provides kitchen, bathroom and glazing products and services. Over the last two decades, the company has established itself as an industry leader in service and client care, but its Australian-designed Frame range is taking client-care to a whole new level by considering the inherent needs and thereby ensuring practicality for the design community. “We truly believe that the collection will raise the bar for Australian homes, creating a new and essential interior design rule, that similar simply isn’t enough,” says Novas general manager, Paul Thornewell. Playing into immaculate home design vision, the Frame range allows architects, designers and home renovators alike to master detail to a fine grain on finishes and fittings. Find out more about the Novas Frame collection here.abc
Kitchen
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Bathroom

Striving for the Perfection in Craft

A tapware brand is seemingly disparate from an orchestra. With entirely different elements that constitute each group, unassociated industries and clearly distinct audiences, they would never overlap. Well, almost never — Aarhus Symphony Orchestra appeared inside the factory at VOLA for a sudden celebratory performance. Despite the apparent differences between the tapware brand and a professional orchestra, this unexpected crossover shed light on their similarities and shared values. An orchestra consists of different melodies that converge into a beautiful harmony. Synchronicity emerges from their sensitivity to each other; an orchestra cannot operate without teamwork. From strings to brass to woodwind to percussion, an orchestra is all about how each of these elements complement and work together to form a single melody. Similarly, each stage of production for one of VOLA’s taps requires individual skills and discrete results, yet their teamwork creates a cohesive, sophisticated tap. We observe precision in both a professional orchestra and a tapware company — the musicians must have unwavering focus to produce each note, while the employees must have utmost attention and care to their craft to ensure the manufacturing of a high-quality tap. VOLA explains: “ It was about honouring the connection that the musicians and the employees share — the commitment to craft and precision that is intrinsic to both skills, even though they inhabit very different worlds.” In a beautiful performance of symphonies, the orchestra celebrated their similarities with VOLA, creating a strong feeling of unity. Like the sound of brass instruments, VOLA’s taps exude richness and depth. Their metallic finishes, brass fittings and metal faucets harmonise with one another and enhance any interior they are incorporated in. Although we can notice this unexpected relationship of character and materiality between VOLA tapware and a professional orchestra, it is their shared belief system that is the most illuminating. The values of a brand are often their most defining quality — what a company truly believes in shapes their vision, translating into the design, form and quality of their product. VOLA is distinctive in their biophilic approach to interior design which influences how they manufacture and design tapware. Informed by ancient Danish landscape and culture, VOLA has a deep-rooted belief system that values mindful living, harmony and longevity. These notions align with the professional orchestra, as their music resulted in connection and inspiration in the VOLA factory, enhancing the wellness of their audience. It is only through VOLA’s precision, cohesive teamwork and long-standing attention to their craft, that the tapware brand can translate these beliefs of wellness into their company. VOLA demonstrates how we can learn from other seemingly disparate industries; how the harmony of an orchestra can illuminate, celebrate and reinforce the values of a brand and bond over craftsmanship. VOLA en.vola.comabc
ADVERTORIALS
People

“Everything is connected, everything is impressionable,” with Roz de Waal

Roz de Waal is the charismatic Design Director behind Markian, one of the latest and most exhilarating arrivals to the Australian furniture design scene. Born in the midst of the pandemic, Brisbane’s new design destination was established to offer locally crafted and responsibly made products that were less affected by the wider international turmoil and logistical issues. But the launch of the venture has brought much more than that. Markian’s inaugural collection – the highly-resolved and cohesive VIEIRA – establishes the new brand as a bold, original, and innovative creative voice in the local design arena. And it comes as no surprise that five of Markian’s opening designs have already been selected finalists of this year’s edition of VIVID Emerging Designer. [caption id="attachment_116615" align="alignnone" width="810"] Roz with Ferdinand in tosca.[/caption] It’s impossible not to make an immediate link between the brand’s striking offering and the captivating persona of Markian’s lead designer. It’s also hard to believe Roz was close to forging a career in law instead. “My father was a barrister, or an advocate, which is what they’re called in South Africa where I grew up,” Roz explains. She is eloquent, engaging, and encouraging. Somehow, it’s easy to imagine her as a compelling counsel too. “As the eldest daughter, I felt like I had to follow in his footsteps,” she says. Driven by the family tradition – and love for justice, she adds – Roz did complete a degree in law but her passion for all things creative never abated. “I wanted to be an actress when I was a child,” Roz tells me. “I’ve always loved design and creative arts; I’ve always loved expression. That was the passion.” Her next academic choice, Masters in English literature, was somewhat more aligned with her affinity for arts – and it further cemented her commitment to creativity. “I was also interested in university for the sake of enriching one’s outlook and ability to meander through different concepts, and understand how they shift our own perception,” she explains the appeal of academia, which she still maintains firm ties to as a lecturer at the University of Queensland. After graduation, Roz became immersed in the world of luxury travel. With Dubai as her base, she travelled extensively which, she reminisces, was almost like getting another degree altogether – this time, in culture and people. It was on her travels that Roz fell in love with Brisbane – the perfect juxtaposition to the fast-paced life of Dubai. “I found it quaint, but not in the sort of archaic way. I thought, ‘I can do this here’,” she smiles. And so Roz de Waal’s love affair with Australia began – bidding farewell to her commitments to law, and taking her passion for design to new heights. She considered transferring her qualifications, but the Law Society required her to study for three more years. “It became clear that I could either spend a few years studying something I didn’t want to do – or start something new. I decided to study interior design,” she says. Unsurprisingly, she took to it like a fish to water. [caption id="attachment_116612" align="alignnone" width="810"] Markian Achille in Amarilla with Pantone flower.[/caption] Alongside her degree, Roz became involved with the Design Institute of Australia – today she’s Queensland State Chair – and started teaching at the University of Queensland. In many ways, those two experiences led her to Markian. Through the Institute she met Christopher McKenzie, her creative partner in Markian and in life, with whom she also launched a multidisciplinary design agency called Unlmtd Agency. Her involvement with academia, on the other hand, generated a platform through which she came to meet Andrew and Justin Barrett of Barrett Group, her now business partners. Barrett Group had a factory full of workers and nothing to do. “They asked if I wanted to prototype some stuff,” she recalls. And that’s how Markian was born. A true group effort, the brand’s inception aligns with Roz’s view of design as a joint endeavour. “I don’t believe design is singular,” she says. “I believe it’s something that is fundamentally collaborative.” And if it wasn’t for the collaborative nature of the partnership, Markian’s inaugural collection might have looked very different. Roz’s partners were so enchanted with a design she created back at university for the Andreu World International Design contest that the original design formed the base for one of Markian’s signature designs – the Ray Low table. “It’s what became the impetus for Markian’s first range,” Roz adds. [caption id="attachment_116619" align="alignnone" width="810"] Markian showroom with Ray low table.[/caption] What presents itself as a multidimensional, coherent, and cerebral collection, VIEIRA – Spanish for “scallop” – was born out of Roz’s appreciation of interconnectedness, and encapsulates inspiration that came from nature and the designer’s travels. “I love the idea of connection. I think that things are much more than what they are because of the interconnectedness that links them to each other,” Roz says. “I love it when things harken back to something else because it reminds you of a memory or it brings you straight back to a smell, or a texture. How often do you look at something or you touch something and experience that connection?” [caption id="attachment_116620" align="alignnone" width="810"] Scallop closeup on Marc large table in azul.[/caption] The shape of a scallop that is so pertinently celebrated throughout the range is certainly something that expresses this subtlety of connection. “It was a shape that I didn’t realise I was documenting in my travels,” the designer says. “It’s everywhere. I picked it up in the grand spaces in Milan, and I found it in Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia. While there is a perception that a scallop shape is very ‘now’, it is actually an ancient pattern.” Alongside the pronounced curvature of the scallop motif, Vieira’s colour palette – inspired by some of Australia and South Africa’s native flowers – evokes the very same idea of connection. Roz pulls up a yellow banksia, one of her favorite flowers. “If you look at it, you can see a dove grey, and a sort of citrusy yellow too. Those colours were actually what Pantone has put forward as the colours of the year. And here they are – in nature, together,” Roz explains. “And these flowers are native in Australia as well as in South Africa. So it’s that connection between space and vegetation, but also between what we see as native. We may live on opposite ends of the world, but both countries love the same type of flowers.” Roz doesn’t see the world in a linear way. “Everything is connected, everything is impressionable,” she adds. [caption id="attachment_116621" align="alignnone" width="810"] Spot closeup on Ferdinand in tosca[/caption] The stunning colours and shapes of Roz’s designs are brought to life through Marblo by Markian, a bespoke solid surface Roz’s team created as an alternative to stone. Roz explains that Marblo by Markian can be machined in the same way wood is, and has very low particle release. It can also be honed back. “It’s made in Australia and is almost infinitely recyclable, too,” she adds. Sustainability, and stewardship around responsible supply chains are incredibly important to the brand that are signatories to the UN Global Compact and that are in process of having the range GECA certified. “At the end of its lifecycle, we encourage clients to send everything back to us. It is then sent to the factory in Perth to get ground down, or reused into a different version of it.” The current collection features four different patterns – Scatter, Spot, Speckle, and Set – and Markian is working on the concept for project applications with the view of releasing Marblo by Markian as panels in the not too distant future. And while Roz’s focus is still firmly set on the inaugural collection which – due to COVID-19 – hasn’t had a chance to be properly launched across Sydney and Melbourne markets, that’s not the only thing she has in the works. [caption id="attachment_116613" align="alignnone" width="810"] Closeup of scatter Ray low in baja[/caption] “We want to release lighting next. And our ceramics have been in the mix for a while,” she says, explaining that because of their wonderfully intricate shapes, Roz is still working with mould makers on how these will come to life. Roz is also ruminating ideas for the new collection, which, she says, may be coming as soon as the middle of next year. “At the moment, I’m obsessed with sculptural paper folding and have been playing around with some shapes. We work with timber a lot, but I would like to shift into metalwork which I think will work best with the type of folding I’m looking to do,” she discloses, and says that they may prepare a capsule collection of what’s coming next for DENFAIR in February 2022. [caption id="attachment_116616" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Roz with gGiorgetto in azul.[/caption] There is no doubt that Roz de Waal’s multidimensionality fuels her multidisciplinary design practice. A force to be reckoned with, Markian’s creative lead embraces a non-linear view of the world, welcomes the complexity of contradictions, and steers clear of labels. “I contain multitudes,” Roz smiles as she quotes Whitman. “This always resonated with me because I don’t like it when people put you in a box, and expect you to be a certain way.” If the brand’s inaugural collection is anything to go by, the Australian design scene is bound to be enriched, enhanced, and expanded by the deeply original creative language of Markian’s visionary design lead. Markian markian.com.au Photographer Lauren Young HMU Haus of Hof Dress Zimmermann Shoes Jimmy Choo Furniture Markian Location Markian Showroomabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Finishes
Fixed & Fitted
Living

The art of living outdoors

The most successful outdoor living areas are achieved through a sensitive merging of cues, taken from the natural environment and from interior design. It’s that sense of inner life, masterfully carried into the outdoors where everyday activities and moments of rest and recreation are enhanced by an interplay of climate, plant life, functional features, furnishings and aesthetic flourishes. For award-winning landscape designer Justin Dibble, director and principal designer of Fluid Design, his practice centres around “creating outdoor living”.  His Brisbane-based studio works on residential landscape projects from the Sunshine Coast down to Sydney, and they all have one thing in common – they are designed for ‘living in’. Making the connection between lifestyle and landscape Dibble’s design approach begins with a thorough and deep understanding of what a client wants their garden and landscaping to do for them. What look and feel suits their family and the environment along with how it will increase the value of their property. “I want them to tell me a story of what their dream garden looks like,” he says. “Good design is not just about the block itself, it’s about the family who will be living in and enjoying the space. Meeting a family’s needs and wishes is our main focus.” The way we regard and use the outdoor space around our homes has really evolved over recent decades, Dibble says. People now consider the investment they make in their domestic landscape and have a better understanding of the value it adds both to their lifestyle at home. We are creative by nature, Dibble says, and people “get excited” thinking about how the outside space is designed and how it will look and feel once completed. “People also have a better understanding of the property market and the value a well-designed outdoor landscape adds to their property. They recognise it can be what sells a property and gets a higher sales price than others on the market. In the past, I don’t think people saw the value of it nor the return on investment.” From flowers to furnishings When Dibble designs a project, he includes conceptual layout for furnishing the spaces. There are places to sit and have a cup of tea, somewhere to sip cocktails and chat or take a sandwich outside for lunch. “Every space has got to have a purpose, a use. So there has to be some sort of seating arrangement that draws people outside. Within our designs, we love to create so many different spots for people to enjoy depending on the season or simply the time of day – or night.” There will be places that are full of sunshine in winter, and cooler shady areas for summer days. Designing outdoor rooms really mirrors many of the living areas found inside the house including a dining area, living area and an outdoor kitchen. He says by adding furniture to the plans it helps clients to understand the purpose for what the landscape architect is creating as an overall outdoor experience and helps them see themselves in the garden areas. “Most people want that – they want the table for meals, the garden seating area and the sunlounge by the pool.” The merging of interior and outdoors King Living crafts outdoor living furniture that elevates exterior space and landscaped garden rooms. The concept of the ‘great outdoors’ is expressed on the intimate, patio or garden level. David Hardwick, King global head of product, says the affinity with the outdoors in Australian lifestyles along with the diminishing of the distinction between indoors and outside in architecture informs the design of King products. The design ethos is relaxed, casual, unadorned and enduring. “Increasingly we’re designing products that are suitable in materiality, function and aesthetic for both indoor and outdoor living.  This reflects the increasing importance of outdoor spaces in people’s homes and with this, like in architecture, the distinction between the furniture for these two types of spaces has narrowed. “We devote a lot of time in the product development process to ensure we bring the same level of comfort and functionality to our outdoor collections as you would experience Indoors.” Design also connects inside and outside in an experiential and aesthetic flow. “With the spaces now so inter-linked it’s important that the styles and materials work well together and provide a seamless transition from one space to the next.  When designing outdoor seating, the spaces are much more dynamic and the furniture as a result is flexible and designed to be open and inviting from all angles.” Experiencing nature-enhanced wellbeing In a busy urban life, having an outdoor area that encourages spending time surrounded by plants and the elements gives a dose of the kind of mental, emotional and physical wellbeing that comes with going on a bushwalk or other nature-based recreation. Dibble compares being outdoors in the garden to being a cleansing, satisfying feeling like going on a hike in the mountains and breathing the fresh air whilst enjoying the sounds of nature. “A garden is that kind of restorative thing,” he says. “Once you have actually experienced having a nice well thought out garden you will most definitely appreciate the investment and the years of enjoyment it brings.”abc
ADVERTORIALS
Bedroom
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted
Flooring
Furniture

Designing for here: the emerging localised aesthetic

Compelling design echoes who we are and captures the spirit of where we are. In the Australian context, there has been a growing maturity in expressing the unique characteristics that define ‘Australian design’. The evolution of this aesthetic has involved soul-searching on the part of creators. The kitsch of the 20th century with its emphasis on gum leaf motifs, kangaroos and koalas has been transcended as the essence of landscape and climate became the font of inspiration. The quality of our light, the hues of stones and bushland and the elements that define the Australian lifestyle are foregrounded, offering a rich palette of colour and form to nourish an authentic localised identity. King Global Head of Product, David Hardwick, says that as designers become more comfortable and even confident with the expression of an Australian aesthetic, an increasing sense of confidence in what they do emerges. “Our design team and collaborators are beginning to embrace , drawing on the multifaceted nature of Australia’s cultural identities conceptually to create exciting opportunities for new ideas, forms and finishes.” Hardwick says the 21st century scene is coming of age and the international community is beginning to take notice. “The rise of Australia as a lifestyle superpower is helping to move the spotlight beyond the icons and clichés that were previously the limit of an outsider’s knowledge,” Hardwick says. While a melange of influences including the Indigenous and geological of this continent, and the influences from European and American cultures make it difficult to state a defined character or design culture – something unique is emerging. “What we have is a very distinctive environment, socially and physically, which designers are beginning to translate into an original expression through their work.  It’s an exciting time be a part of the industry and to hopefully play a part in what could be a definitive period in Australian design culture.” Hardwick observes that design of spaces and the objects we curate within those spaces are drawing from a similar source in capturing this localised identity. “In Architecture, light and space play a big part in defining form, and this has helped create a unique or common thread through iconic Australian houses and buildings.  With furniture, spatial and lifestyle factors more readily inform our design. “We like to think Australians know how to relax, which is why we place so much emphasis on comfort and the notion of personalised comfort.” King manifests this in functional qualities, such as seamlessly integrating adjustable elements for anthropomorphic allowances, making a sofa as comfortable to lie on as it is to lounge in. “A sense of space is also a unique feature of our landscape. This is reflected in the scale of our furniture, which interestingly resonates strongly in international markets where living space is more compact. “Love of the outdoors and landscape also informs our approach, drawing inspiration from the colours and textures of the diverse natural environment.” Cues from this rich living tapestry find their expression in the development of the King Rug collection and textile range. It also translates into innovative, tactile geometries, “As technology improves and new production techniques develop, this allows us to push more fluid and organic forms inspired by our natural environment,” Hardwick explains. “The Issho Dining Table is another stunning example of combining this organic expression through a series of repeatable elements.” King deliberately blurs the line between indoor and outdoor furniture, embracing our love of spaces that are permeable to the external environment and the elements. This connection to an unmediated experience of local climate is also a dynamic influence for King. “We often reflect the colour of the seasons with our images and fabric selections in our Showrooms. This approach seems to resonate subconsciously with our audience, creating warm sanctuaries or light and airy settings as the seasons change.” The quality of Australian light is also carefully considered. “Natural light is so important when photographing our collections,” Hardwick says. “When selecting homes and locations, this is the primary consideration as it provides a distinct character and brings the landscape and product to life.” Maintaining a conversation with customers over decades has also given the King team insights into the Australian lifestyle that continue to enhance its designs. They observe how the furniture is used, how it meets customer wishes and needs, and how it melds with both place and the narratives of people’s lives. “Designing as a response to the Australian lifestyle defines the aesthetic, function and enduring performance of our collections.” Hardwick says perhaps this resonates intuitively with those who own and interact with King pieces. “We know that often our sofas become a part of the home and are often handed down to future generations. It is perhaps this enduring quality in aesthetic and performance that develops this sense of emotional attachment.”      abc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted
Home Technology
Kitchen

Wolf M Series Ovens Bring Substance to Luxury

High quality, design flexibility and reliable performance: qualities we all search for when designing our homes, yet are properties often rarely observed together in one appliance -- we often settle for compromises, whether it be in its durability or aesthetics. However, this seemingly futile search comes to an end with Sub-Zero and Wolf M Series oven range. In a premium combination of high performance, reliability, quality and design, this range of appliances exceeds the demands of both consumers and designers. With four distinct styles, the Wolf M Series is versatile in its aesthetic application, allowing for a seamless integration into any kitchen decor. Since their establishment, Sub-Zero appliances have been fulfilling the highest aspirations in both function and design of home owners and designers. Wolf products are created in this same spirit of quality and flexibility -- refined through over eight decades in commercial kitchens, Wolf offers reliability and gives consumers a lifetime of satisfaction. Their highly specialized, innovative technology allows consumers to have precise control over their cooking. With the advanced Dual VertiCross™ convection system and its luxurious style, the Wolf M Series oven range truly allows limitless expression for individual tastes in both food and design. The Wolf M Series permits flexibility through its range of aesthetic options to choose from. With four distinctive design styles in a single or double oven option: professional, transitional, contemporary black and contemporary stainless, M Series ovens can complement and add cohesion to any kitchen. Whether it be industrial, contemporary or even rustic, the flexibility in oven design ensures creative freedom and a seamless integration. The Professional design is bold, confident and eminently functional, with the classic pairing of iconic Wolf red control knobs and gleaming stainless steel. The Professional design is distinctive in its classic pairing of iconic Wolf red control knobs with a gleaming, stainless steel exterior. It is bold, exudes confidence and is the epitome of adding function to luxury. With a timeless appeal is the Transitional design -- its smooth, stainless frame and black glass gives it versatility and flexibility for incorporation into any kitchen. The contemporary style oven has a minimalist handleless design and colour LCD touch panel, making it a truly unique design. Available in either a sleek, sophisticated black glass or a more radiant stainless steel, this oven style is perfect for even the most visionary kitchen. Each of these versatile aesthetics have an elegance that can elevate any kitchen, but it is this flexibility in design paired with its premium-grade materials that distinguish the Wolf M Series with any other oven. Its exceptional design is constituted of intuitive technology, superb ergonomics and considered detail, guaranteeing high function and performance. The advanced Dual VertiCross™ convection system ensures an even, consistent distribution of heat throughout the oven, with 10 cooking modes that control airflow and temperature to produce perfectly cooked dishes. LCD touch-screen controls, interior lighting, pyrolytic cleaning and a generous 144 L capacity give the Wolf M Series ovens added performance and convenience in control. With Sub-Zero and Wolf’s credibility among the industry of kitchen appliances, the M Series oven range only promises reliability and satisfaction. These ovens are distinctive in their combination of performance, dependability and flexible aesthetics, bringing substance and function to luxurious design.

Sub-Zero and Wolf

au.subzero-wolf.com/en/abc