About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

MAGAZINE

The Mountain Retreat

Fearon Hay has got to be one of New Zealand’s top architectural firms. We tell you this not to shape your opinion of their projects, but because we have a great admiration for their work. One of Fearon Hay’s projects (Sandhills Road) is in the current issue of Habitus magazine – a home that celebrates landscape and openness while maintaining privacy. We thought we’d bring you another of their works that offers a synergistic relationship with the rugged landscape of New Zealand’s Southern Lakes. The only thing marking the Mountain Retreat from the surrounding landscape is its cube-like structure. The home is clad in schist (stone from the surrounding landscape) used in the area since the 1840s settlement.   Described by the architects as “a simple arrangement of spaces within a predominantly open plan” this home literally opens up to the landscape – with structural interruptions minimised. The internal spaces have been designed to offer flexibility of use, with the retreat able to accommodate up to two families with children – perfect for the owners who do not actually live in New Zealand.       The has literally been inserted into the landscape, so much so that on approach all that can be seen is the steel stair railings and chimney stack – entry is through the roof.   The synergy with the landscape does come at a cost. In order to take advantage of the expansive views of the Lake Wakatipu and the beech forests, the home had to be oriented to the south west – hardly ideal for solar efficiency.   Fearon Hay’s solution was to use the significant thermal mass of the stone and concrete and earth to heat the house in the cold Central Otago winters, while insulated glass units prevent heat loss, but slide open in summer for cross-breeze. The aim for the interiors was to create a “cave-like space”, achieved through the use of materials – including sandblasted concrete floors and polished plaster ceilings – and the cantilevered roof. “The architecture seeks to be a subtle insertion in the alpine landscape,” the architects explain. “The internal environment is both muscular and refined, referencing the toughness of the environment while providing comfort required for a retreat in the mountains.” To see more of Fearon Hay’s work pick up a copy of Habitus issue 09 or download the App for iPad and iPhone.   Fearon Hay Architects
 fearonhay.com   Photography: Patrick Reynolds abc
MAGAZINE

The Mountain Retreat

Fearon Hay has got to be one of New Zealand’s top architectural firms. We tell you this not to shape your opinion of their projects, but because we have a great admiration for their work.

One of Fearon Hay’s projects (Sandhills Road) is in the current issue of Habitus magazine – a home that celebrates landscape and openness while maintaining privacy. We thought we’d bring you another of their works that offers a synergistic relationship with the rugged landscape of New Zealand’s Southern Lakes.

The only thing marking the Mountain Retreat from the surrounding landscape is its cube-like structure. The home is clad in schist (stone from the surrounding landscape) used in the area since the 1840s settlement.

 

 

Described by the architects as “a simple arrangement of spaces within a predominantly open plan” this home literally opens up to the landscape – with structural interruptions minimised.

The internal spaces have been designed to offer flexibility of use, with the retreat able to accommodate up to two families with children – perfect for the owners who do not actually live in New Zealand.

 

 

 

The has literally been inserted into the landscape, so much so that on approach all that can be seen is the steel stair railings and chimney stack – entry is through the roof.

 

The synergy with the landscape does come at a cost. In order to take advantage of the expansive views of the Lake Wakatipu and the beech forests, the home had to be oriented to the south west – hardly ideal for solar efficiency.

 

Fearon Hay’s solution was to use the significant thermal mass of the stone and concrete and earth to heat the house in the cold Central Otago winters, while insulated glass units prevent heat loss, but slide open in summer for cross-breeze.

The aim for the interiors was to create a “cave-like space”, achieved through the use of materials – including sandblasted concrete floors and polished plaster ceilings – and the cantilevered roof.

“The architecture seeks to be a subtle insertion in the alpine landscape,” the architects explain. “The internal environment is both muscular and refined, referencing the toughness of the environment while providing comfort required for a retreat in the mountains.”

To see more of Fearon Hay’s work pick up a copy of Habitus issue 09 or download the App for iPad and iPhone.

 

Fearon Hay Architects

fearonhay.com

 

Photography: Patrick Reynolds

abc
Accessories

Paratekton by Simeon Nelson

Are you a designer? The correct answer is ‘yes’, when it comes to Simeon Nelson’s interactive sculptural installation, Systems of Romance II, Paratekton Series. 
 
Simeon began his career as an artist in Australia during the 1990s and moved to the UK after finding international success as a contemporary sculptor.

Through his artistic practice, Simeon explores the way in which humans interface with systems of nature, science and technology, and is inspired by the nuances of objects such as tree branches, street directories and the human vascular system.

These concepts are projected through the Paratekton series, as its very purpose is to be designed by its viewer. 
Paratekton sits on the border between the art and design world. It is a series of curved, furniture-grade plywood planks and metal hardware that can be deconstructed and reconstructed in any way that the observer chooses.

 

 

 

 

The uniqueness of this design-artwork stems from the idea that both its structure and concept is analogous.

 

Paratekton was exhibited at the Ryan Renshaw Gallery, Brisbane and the Melbourne Art Fair in August and September 2010.

You can buy Paratekton through Ryan Renshaw gallery by visiting them in Fortitude Valley or contacting them here.

 

Simeon Nelson

simeon-nelson.com

Ryan Renshaw Gallery

ryanrenshaw.com.au

 

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MAGAZINE

Green Architecture Now!

In issue 10 of Habitus magazine we look at Sustainable Living and Choice in our Montage section, with reviews of The Sustainable Home by Cathy Strongman and 100 New Eco Designs by Rebecca Proctor.

Well, there was one that didn’t quite hit before the magazine went to the printers, Green Architecture Now! By Philip Jodidio.

Here’s a little blurb about the book:

Architecture as sustainable technology

The ecological impact of new construction, once a secondary concern, has become a crucial issue.

Badly designed buildings guzzle natural resources and pollute their surroundings; in an era of rocketing energy costs and environmental degradation, the need for a sustainable, energy-efficient architecture is paramount.

This book features the architects, artists and firms pioneering a new green architecture, and examines the emergent aesthetics.

We’re giving you the chance to win a copy of the book to review for yourself thanks to Taschen.

Simply fill in the form below and tell us how you green your home. The most creative response will win.

abc
MAGAZINE

Green Architecture Now!

In issue 10 of Habitus magazine we look at Sustainable Living and Choice in our Montage section, with reviews of The Sustainable Home by Cathy Strongman and 100 New Eco Designs by Rebecca Proctor.

Well, there was one that didn’t quite hit before the magazine went to the printers, Green Architecture Now! By Philip Jodidio.

Here’s a little blurb about the book:

Architecture as sustainable technology

The ecological impact of new construction, once a secondary concern, has become a crucial issue.

Badly designed buildings guzzle natural resources and pollute their surroundings; in an era of rocketing energy costs and environmental degradation, the need for a sustainable, energy-efficient architecture is paramount.

This book features the architects, artists and firms pioneering a new green architecture, and examines the emergent aesthetics.

We’re giving you the chance to win a copy of the book to review for yourself thanks to Taschen.

Simply fill in the form below and tell us how you green your home. The most creative response will win.

abc
MAGAZINE

The Space In-Between

It is the magic of dwelling as man in the world that if our gestures of dwelling – what we call homes, houses, residences – are friendly to nature, nature rises to receive us, gives us place to dwell.

So it is with the Utsav House, where the architects have created a dwelling place rising from a micro-habitat of water and plants, its architectonic expression delineating a space, capturing a piece of the rugged undulating coastal landscape and domesticating it. It is at once colonisation of space and territory as well as the satisfaction of a need in their client to find escape from the stresses of life in Mumbai.

As this piece is written, the principal architects of Utsav House – Bijoy and Priya Jain – are winning acclaim for their installation ‘In-between Architecture’, evoking Mumbai, at the Victoria & Albert Museum’s ongoing show: 1:1 Architects Build Small Spaces.

Seen together, the house and the installation represent the complexity of the conversation the Jains are having with their audience. At the V&A, they inscribe a “compact space” within an expansive courtyard by creating a wall that is itself a home. Their Utsav House is a compaction of landscape itself, capturing space within a rectangular composition of walls. Making walls is an abiding interest and creative preoccupation in Studio Mumbai’s work.

The wall both evokes the primordial act of marking space, with a staff or a line, and as well supports the spatial composition that originates from these lines, passes through them and rests against them...

Read the full story on page 133 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

Words: Jagan Shah
Photography: Helen Binet

abc
MAGAZINE

The Space In-Between

It is the magic of dwelling as man in the world that if our gestures of dwelling – what we call homes, houses, residences – are friendly to nature, nature rises to receive us, gives us place to dwell.

So it is with the Utsav House, where the architects have created a dwelling place rising from a micro-habitat of water and plants, its architectonic expression delineating a space, capturing a piece of the rugged undulating coastal landscape and domesticating it. It is at once colonisation of space and territory as well as the satisfaction of a need in their client to find escape from the stresses of life in Mumbai.

As this piece is written, the principal architects of Utsav House – Bijoy and Priya Jain – are winning acclaim for their installation ‘In-between Architecture’, evoking Mumbai, at the Victoria & Albert Museum’s ongoing show: 1:1 Architects Build Small Spaces.

Seen together, the house and the installation represent the complexity of the conversation the Jains are having with their audience. At the V&A, they inscribe a “compact space” within an expansive courtyard by creating a wall that is itself a home. Their Utsav House is a compaction of landscape itself, capturing space within a rectangular composition of walls. Making walls is an abiding interest and creative preoccupation in Studio Mumbai’s work.

The wall both evokes the primordial act of marking space, with a staff or a line, and as well supports the spatial composition that originates from these lines, passes through them and rests against them...

Read the full story on page 133 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

Words: Jagan Shah
Photography: Helen Binet

abc
MAGAZINE

The Good Neighbour

Cottesloe was originally created as a summer holiday location for well-heeled Perth residents to escape the heat.  As the city grew to encompass it, it became increasingly suburbanised. Its wide streets, characterised by the columns of tall Norfolk Island pines, still contain some restored turn-of-the-century beach residences.

However, as its desirability has increased, there are more MacMansions being built, often incorporating coastal ‘features’ such as limestone walls and rammed earth at their entries.

Increasingly, Perth architects are making their presence felt up and down the Cottesloe beachfront. Here and in the immediate neighbourhood, there are more and more well-considered modernist incursions into a suburban domain...

 

Read the full story on page 166 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

 

 


Words:
Sasha Ivanovich
Photography: Tyrone Branigan

 

[lg_folder folder="stories/2010/december_10/beyond/salvado/salvado" display="slide"]


  

abc
MAGAZINE

The Good Neighbour

Cottesloe was originally created as a summer holiday location for well-heeled Perth residents to escape the heat.  As the city grew to encompass it, it became increasingly suburbanised. Its wide streets, characterised by the columns of tall Norfolk Island pines, still contain some restored turn-of-the-century beach residences.

However, as its desirability has increased, there are more MacMansions being built, often incorporating coastal ‘features’ such as limestone walls and rammed earth at their entries.

Increasingly, Perth architects are making their presence felt up and down the Cottesloe beachfront. Here and in the immediate neighbourhood, there are more and more well-considered modernist incursions into a suburban domain...

 

Read the full story on page 166 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

 

 


Words:
Sasha Ivanovich
Photography: Tyrone Branigan

 

[lg_folder folder="stories/2010/december_10/beyond/salvado/salvado" display="slide"]


  

abc
MAGAZINE

No Front Door: Rob Mills House

It is fascinating to see how architects choose to live and what they choose to live with. A real moment of truth – where budgets have no real bearing and their personal acquisitions and decisions say more about them than any of their buildings built for the enjoyment of others.

At the core of architect, Rob Mills’ house is a narrative. It is an eight-year story encompassing collections, talismans, artwork and family memories. His objects take precedent over any architectural gestures and make their presence felt from the front right to the back door. In this case, it is really the other way around.

You see, Rob’s house presents from the street frontage as normal, but its real entrance is from the back door leading you into the slightly worn arms of a semi-sunken kitchen, adjacent to a two-acre park.

So his front door, to all but the postman and first-time visitors, becomes the back and visa versa. Understanding the value of the double entrance is the key to understanding the house and the way Rob and partner, Lucinda Marshall, use it...

 

Read the full story on page 145 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

 

 

Words and Styling: Megan Morton
Photography: Jason Busch

[lg_folder folder="stories/2010/december_10/beyond/rob/rob" display="slide"]
  

 

abc
MAGAZINE

No Front Door: Rob Mills House

It is fascinating to see how architects choose to live and what they choose to live with. A real moment of truth – where budgets have no real bearing and their personal acquisitions and decisions say more about them than any of their buildings built for the enjoyment of others.

At the core of architect, Rob Mills’ house is a narrative. It is an eight-year story encompassing collections, talismans, artwork and family memories. His objects take precedent over any architectural gestures and make their presence felt from the front right to the back door. In this case, it is really the other way around.

You see, Rob’s house presents from the street frontage as normal, but its real entrance is from the back door leading you into the slightly worn arms of a semi-sunken kitchen, adjacent to a two-acre park.

So his front door, to all but the postman and first-time visitors, becomes the back and visa versa. Understanding the value of the double entrance is the key to understanding the house and the way Rob and partner, Lucinda Marshall, use it...

 

Read the full story on page 145 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

 

 

Words and Styling: Megan Morton
Photography: Jason Busch

[lg_folder folder="stories/2010/december_10/beyond/rob/rob" display="slide"]
  

 

abc
MAGAZINE

Tropical Adaptations

Located on the idyllic Queen Astrid Road, one of Singapore’s oldest and most historical locations, stands a house that hints at old-world grandeur but with a modernity that complements its tropical setting.

Home to a three-generation family unit, its 27,000 sq ft offers ample space for each of its eight members as well as to their friends and relatives who are entertained in its generously large outdoors.

“This was one of the requirements we had to bear in mind when we started to design the house,” says architect Aamer Taher.“We, therefore, aimed at creating elements of interest and characteristic features that will make the outdoors an experience in itself."...

 

Read the full story on page 154 of Habitus issue 10, available on the iPhone and iPad here, or contact us to subscribe or buy back issues.

 

 

Words: Madhavi Tumkur

Photography: Derek Swalwell

 

[lg_folder folder="stories/2010/december_10/beyond/astrid/astrid" display="slide"]

 

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