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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
Conversations

A Certain Electricity

Above: Amber and Adam share a laugh over the ottoman design pinned to their kitchen wall. It may sound corny, but you get the feeling Perth-based designer-makers Adam Cruickshank and Amber Ward were meant to come together. Both were born to Maltese mothers in the same area of New South Wales. Both were inquisitive with materials and ‘crafted works’ from just past toddler age. Both cite the world around them as their source of inspiration. However, the couple were separated by distance in childhood and didn’t meet until their thirties when they were both guest presenters at a mid-2010 Design Institute of Australia event in Western Australia. At a young age, Adam’s naval-officer father took his family around the world to the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom and most states along the eastern seaboard of Australia, while Amber’s family stayed put. Today, both credit their creativity to their experiences. Adam points to travel and his parents’ love of museums and art galleries as inspiring his design. Amber, feeling displaced in suburbia, became insular, retreating to her thoughts and developing a thirst for the knowledge and research which informs how she works today. a_certain_electricity_2 The living room’s Pippin Drysdale ceramics under a Linus Andersson artwork. Left, a prototype chair by Adam. “We were pretty similar as kids – inquisitive with materials,” Adam says. They laugh about their similar experiences of commandeering their respective fathers’ sheds and of experimenting with found materials, hammers and nails from the age of five. But, it is their childhood experiments with electricity that makes them laugh the hardest today. At age nine, both were fascinated with blowing up light bulbs. While we must acknowledge this was perhaps a little dangerous at the time, there is some irony in this when you consider that the pair’s first collaboration was a light pendant – the Cruickshank + Kietsu Willow Light. But they insist no light bulbs were harmed in its making... Today, the pair live in a cottage in the city of Fremantle in Western Australia (WA), where Amber works from home in her two studios as Kietsu Studios, and Adam under his own name as part of the designer-maker team at Midland Atelier, which is an initiative created through WA design body FORM, a not-for-profit organisation supporting the creative industries in the state. They work in different media – Adam is renowned for his work with wood, and Amber for hers with alpaca and wool felting and EchoPanel screens, themselves produced from approximately 60 per cent recycled PET bottles – but both studied design and across disciplines. They run independent businesses, but are increasingly coming together, with recent lighting, seating and kitchen collaborations. a_certain_electricity_3 Amber’s studio features commissioned felt. works and Adam’s Stream dining chair. “I think we both inherently like working independently, but [it is easy for us to] work together. We come up with a concept, then one of us will make up a model, then we’ll talk about it and refine and change it. One of us will take over a part of it at this stage. Although we both studied design, we have different training, so the person who [is best at the skill most] needed then takes the lead,” Amber says. The couple’s ability to work without ego and with acknowledgement and respect comes through loud and clear. “Our skills complement each other. Amber is great on the research side and I am good on the technical front. There will be some good collaboration projects coming about,” Adam says. And while they respond to shared inspirations in very different ways, there are similarities in their overall aesthetic. a_certain_electricity_4 Detail of Amber’s commissioned work for retail clients, including Habitat Votive bowls. “In probably many ways, we are quite opposing personalities, but when it comes to aesthetics, function and form – and those important things that are key to design – we both see things so similarly. When we first started working together, Adam would be talking about something and I would open my diary of a table or light that I had drawn and he would say ‘my God, that is the form I am talking about’. “So, that synergy was there from the beginning. And we never really have major clashes on what we think will be the right solution for a finish or a form,” Amber says. Their aesthetics are somewhat timeless – although time itself may determine how true that statement is. Both work in traditional materials – Adam in timber, Amber in felting. Each has an organic element to their work, with Adam’s a minimal look and Amber’s a holistic sustainable, ethical and environmental approach. a_certain_electricity_5_6 Left: The hallway displays a Symbiosis IV EchoPanel wall-mounted screen. Right: The living room features Adam’s Desert Cubes cabinet, felted glass vessels by Amber and a Symbiosis I handsculpted EchoPanel wall-mounted screen. chooses to work in mostly black and white, and the shades in between, used sparingly and cleverly, thanks to her ceramics and colour training under renowned Australian ceramicist, Pippin Drysdale. Adam adds colour only when necessary, preferring the natural tones of timber. Walking about their home, you find there is a synergy between their individual works. One point of difference, however, is the way in which they approach sustainable practices. Amber credits her mother with instilling her with an understanding of ‘natural is best’, while her “inner research nerd” has honed that knowledge into an overarching, sustainable approach to her alpaca and non-mulesed wool felting and the use of EchoPanel. It’s a philosophy that sees beauty in not only aesthetics, but also deeper environmental, social and ethical impacts, from farm to finished form. a_certain_electricity_8 The Cruickshank + Kietsu Willow Mini Pendant Light in handmade wool felt using non-mulesed Western Australian merino wool. “I guess that’s where the notion of merging art and design comes together – there is a concept behind the form. Because there is so much surface emphasis in one aspect of design, sometimes we underestimate the depth it can be looked at but still serve to function,” she says. On the other hand, Adam has developed techniques to minimise waste and his own impacts on the world. He cites Amber’s dedication and New Zealand furniture designer-maker David Trubridge’s approach as having a strong influence on his work. “I keep saying to myself that [sustainability] will be a bigger driver for my own work, but I seem to be driven by other things at the moment. It is a matter of stopping, testing and developing processes. There are alternatives I would like to explore,” Adam says. a_certain_electricity_7 A Midnight Pool rug from Amber’s Fallen Series I, handmade felt using alpaca and merino, as above. However, he says his main driver today is innovation. “There are so many different ways you can use a material and that’s the drive for me – finding different ways to push materials and get different forms. I find it fascinating that as far as we have come with using a simple material like timber, there are still so many different ways that we can use it that haven’t been tried yet. Considering it’s one of the oldest building materials around, that’s a big drive for me.” Adam has just returned from a jaunt in the desert with David Trubridge and fellow Midland Atelier designer-maker Nick Statham to prepare for an exhibition of the trio’s work mid-2012. He will no doubt be pushing boundaries in those prototypes. Meanwhile, Amber is planning a trip to Tasmania, which will be the catalyst for her own proposed exhibition next year. They are also fulfilling an increasing body of commissions, both individually and as a couple. a_certain_electricity_9_10 Left: Adam’s Desert Cubes cabinetry in Maple. Right: Jewellery boxes handcrafted by Adam in European Beech, Madrona, Maple and Myrtle. So, how do two creatives live and work – separately and collaboratively – in the one house? “We are both obsessed with our work,” Adam says. “Amber is so driven and has always been into creating with her own hands. It is how I feel about my work. “It’s great to work with someone who also has that drive. We can understand each other and accept we are both obsessed with what we are doing and give each other space and respect that. There is support, too,” he says. “And you know when the other person just really needs to push through – if one of us has to do something, the other one doesn’t try to interfere with that – but you also know when you need to say ‘you need a day off’, and you know when they can have that day off,” Amber adds. a_certain_electricity_11_12 Left: Adam’s Desert Cubes cabinetry in Maple. Right: Amber and Adam discuss Amber’s Midnight Rock Pool rug from her Fallen Series I. With these two creatives living and working together, it will be interesting to see how their collaborative aesthetic evolves. Both have an eye on the industry, both have enormous drive and both live and breathe design. However, above all, they both also have huge respect for each other’s skills. With the Willow Light just emerging on the retail market and more projects coming out of prototype stages, this is definitely a union to watch. Adam Cruickshank adamcruickshank.com Amber Ward kietsustudios.com Photography: Amber Ward and Michelle Taylor fotomich.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

SID Exhibitor Design Hunter Q+A: John Winning

Your name:  John Winning What you do: I’m CEO of the Winning Group which includes Appliances Online – an online business I started when I was 21 years old, Winning Appliances - my family’s century-old kitchen and laundry specialist business, online audio-visual specialist Big Brown Box and national installation company Handy Crew. Your latest project: In terms of work, I’m constantly looking at how to provide the best shopping experience in the world. Exceptional customer service is the backbone of the Winning Group and I’m passionate about thinking outside the square to elevate the shopping experience we provide our customers. When I’m away from the office, I’m working on renovating an old warehouse space. The project involves converting a 1000sqm warehouse into an entertaining house that suits my lifestyle. Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Steve Jobs 2) Ted Turner 3) Jack Welch What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Anything that is fast and comfortable Chair model: Anything that rocks Residential space: My new warehouse conversion Commercial space: The Winning Group Head Office of course Decorative product: My Rigards sunglasses Functional product: Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock Handmade good: My custom-made bed Mass-produced good: Sub-Zero Fridge meal: Sushi

restaurant: The Bazaar in LA

drink: H2coco coconut water bar: Lobo Plantation Sydney item in your studio: iPod piece of technology: Speakers historical figure: Nikola Tesla fictional character: Andy Kaufman vice: Music virtue: My lack of patience What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Pursuing an idea that is unique and innovative - pushing boundaries to create something worth sharing and talking about.abc
Design Products
Habitus Loves

Habitus Loves… An Unconventional Garden

 
Boskke Sky Planters
Created by: Patrick Morris Why we love it: We spied these planters suspended from the roof of Bill's Darlinghurst outpost (by the creative team at Pepo). Utilising the dead air space above our heads, the Sky Planter makes for a bold visual and a practical kitchen garden. The 'Slo-Flo' water irrigation system allows roots to be fed directly and avoids any spillages. Where you can get it: Terrace Outdoor Living
Easy Greenwalls
Easy Greenwalls
Created by: Landart Why we love it: Slowly replacing the feature wall, green walls are encouragingly becoming more popular. The best part is how simple it is for you to get your own green wall to look good. Try growing a vine over a cyclone fence, whilst filling up the gaps with 'air plants', which will gradually merge together for a cohesive look. Where you can get it: Landart
Silo by Joost
Silo by Joost
Created by: Joost Bakker Why we love it: One of the only cafes to support the zero philosophy, in which all waste must be either compostable or recyclable, and seasonal vegetables and herbs are grown onsite. Before plunging into your own inventive garden, see how the experts do it at Melbourne's Silo by Joost. Where you can get it: Silo by Joost
Eliooo Concept
Created by: Antonio Scarponi Why we love it: The resourceful idea of appropriating IKEA furniture for a higher purpose got us thinking. Architect and designer Antonio Scarponi’s book, Eliooo, illustrates how to upgrade a range of IKEA furniture into vessels for growing hydroponic plants; bringing an unseen dimension to otherwise cookie cutter furnishings. Where you can get it: Eliooo
Woolly Pocket Hanging Garden
Woolly Pocket Hanging Garden
Created by: Woolly Pocket Why we love it: Any company that's turning plastic water bottles into a flexible, breathable hanging garden has our vote. Made for herbs, succulents and tropical plants, the collection has a range of designs, including customised wall pockets and origami-like centrepieces. Where you can get it: The Small Garden
Gardenwall by Tait
Created by: Tait Why we love it: It's one thing to create a design to bring the outdoors into your home, it's another thing to be able to integrate it seamlessly into everyday life. The Gardenwall stays within the characteristic of Tait's collection, whilst dancing the line between a bold statement, and simple practicality. Where you can get it: Tait
Bacsac from Garden Life
Created by: Garden Life Why we love it:  breathable, fresh perspective on the humble garden pot, the Bacsac will grow your greenery in 100% recyclable fabric that is also UV resistant and permeable. And its simple good looks make creating your indoor garden just that much more pleasant. Where you can get it: Garden Life
Usuals Greenhouse
Usuals Greenhouse
Created by: Van Eijk & Van Der Lubbe Why we love it: Taking small to another level, the team behind the Usuals Greenhouse makes a spectacle out of the growing plants. Made to bask in the sun on the end of a coffee table, this greenhouse enables you to turn your herbs into works of art. Where you can get it: Usuals
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Happenings
What's On

From the Atelier by FORM

In a fitting tribute to these designers FORM celebrates the Atelier’s fifth anniversary with a suite of three exhibitions curated by Andrew Nicholls and Kara Pinakis. From the Atelier occupies the intimate front gallery of the organisation’s Murray Street offices. Of the three exhibitions it is the one with broadest appeal. atelier_5 It couldn’t be possible to walk into From the Atelier and not be drawn to at least one of the designs on show. From Henry Pilcher’s exquisite Block 2 light to Penny Forlano’s gem-like Terrain side table each work is a study in precision, craftsmanship and refined detail. Nicholls and Pinakis have chosen well. atelier_2 Where the curators are to be truly commended is in the exhibition’s layout. Their curatorial approach is light-handed and they simply let the works speak for themselves. It’s a real treat to see these designs up close but also in such close proximity to each other. atelier_9 Daniel Stewart Hood’s RGB Stool proves he’s a name to watch and Nick Statham’s La Lyonnaise chaise lounge reinforces his design mastery. But the real highlight of From the Atelier is Adam Cruickshank’s Plexus light. This custom piece spans one wall of the gallery and its branch-like pattern is simply stunning. It’s easy to imagine it working well in any interior because of its seamless integration in this particular space. atelier_12 The eight designers represented in this exhibition are either past or current designers-in-residence of the Midland Atelier. Their association with its studio has contributed to its fine reputation and shone the spotlight on Western Australia’s thriving design culture. Whoever follows in their footsteps will be keeping good company. Here’s to the next five years. atelier_7 From the Atelier Aam Cruickshank, Guy Eddington, Penelope Forlano, Daniel Stewart Hood, Tim Leaversuch, Andrew Nicholls, Henry Pilcher, Nick Statham FORM Gallery 357 Murray Street, Perth 14 June – 14 September 2013 form.net.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Rural Connections

Above: The house opens up to its surroundings, taking in valley views to the south and flowing into an outdoor dining area to the north. Jeremy Wolveridge’s architecture practice is based in the inner-Melbourne suburb of Collingwood, famous nationally for its Australian Rules football team, but celebrated locally for its evolving mix of fashion houses, galleries, furniture shops and hipster-magnet bars. Of course, the journey of gentrification is far more exciting than the arrival and Collingwood still has a way to go: amongst all the urban renewal, a few of the factories still make things. It’s a fitting habitat for Wolveridge. His practice’s signature innercity residential projects are characterised by a layered industrial aesthetic that responds to the architectural palimpsests found on site. rural_connections_1Custom-designed sliding shutters, made from Blackbutt to match the cladding, protect the interior from direct sun. Wolveridge Architects also does a lot of work in tropical north Queensland and along the Victorian coast – locations where ‘response to site’ demands mindfulness, not so much of architectural and social history as of the natural environment. But, despite this disparate grouping of architectural project types, common themes and ideas echo throughout the practice’s folio. This applies to the architect’s own house, even though, somewhat perversely, he eschewed both sea and city when choosing where to live, instead staking out 20 rugged acres of farmland near Kyneton, a little over an hour north of Melbourne. In many ways, the Hill Plains House has been designed as one element in a scene: the house sits on a ridge overlooking a large dam and bushland to the north, and undulating grazing land to the south. More than 700 native trees have been planted to create a wildlife corridor along the north-western property boundary, and two rows of Maple and Crab Apple saplings, which fan out in a gentle curve away from the house, have been arranged to mark the landscape with distinct autumnal stripes of red and yellow. The driveway – cut into the existing ridgeline under the guidance of the architect’s father, acclaimed golf course architect, Michael Wolveridge – describes a single majestic arch that leads visitors to the southern side of the house. rural_connections_2The warm yellow of a floating kitchen joinery unit provides a counterpoint to the prevailing dark colour palette and raw textures inside the house. Blackbutt island bench top from Steptoes, Collingwood. The building is intentionally naïve, its eaveless gable-roofed form and weathered timber materiality was inspired in part by a Victorian-era shed a few kilometres down the road that Wolveridge had long admired. Beautiful largely by accident, the old barn’s honest symmetry is thrown off balance by windows and doors positioned for accessibility and functionality. The Hill Plains House plays on this idea of asymmetry within symmetry: its southern elevation has a single large window at each end, lower than expected, and one wider than the other; full-height sliding glass doors in the middle; and a glazed, smoky-mirrorclad enclosed porch that protrudes from the façade. The porch is unmistakably Modern, a deliberate transgression from the rustic, and, as the entrance to the house itself, signals to visitors that the interior may indeed be more Mies van der Rohe than Massey Ferguson. rural_connections_3A blade wall in the living area conceals a small home office, which allows Wolveridge to work from home. Needless to say, the house is infinitely more refi ned than the old barn; with mitred joins at the corners giving the outer shell a seamless finish, it’s more handcrafted box than timber shed. The lineage, however, is undeniable, and it draws out the first link to Wolveridge’s oeuvre. The Hill Plains House represents an intersection between historical, vernacular architecture and 21st Century residential design; old and new overlap, and the line between residential and non-residential form and materiality is blurred. Programmatically, the house is relatively simple, but offers flexibility for the future. (This became increasingly important as the design process progressed – the project commenced as a bachelor pad but was eventually completed as a home for a young family). A services spine, comprising bathroom and laundry on one side and kitchen on the other, provides a buffer between the master bedroom at the south-western end of the house and the central living zone; at the opposite end, a blade wall clad in hundreds of timber off-cuts conceals a narrow study area, which, in turn, provides separation from the second bedroom and adjacent media/guest room. rural_connections_5The front of the blade wall, clad in irregular timber blocks, combines rusticity with a strong sense of order, much like the house itself. Adding the study came at the suggestion of Wolveridge’s wife, Christina, also an architect. It necessitated a commensurate shortening of the living area, but allows Wolveridge to work from home regularly. Christina also suggested constructing the house’s perimeter walls as reverse brick veneer, to provide extra protection against the often harsh weather. The resulting exposed internal brickwork adds to the interior’s warm, textural ambience. rural_connections_7The shower projects out from the southern window, framing a view of a gnarled Gum tree. Indeed, the bricks, the smoky mirror panels, the timber off-cut blade wall and the dark-stained messmate strips that line the pitched ceiling over the living area, all reflect Wolveridge Architects’ rich, tactile sense of materiality. These interior surfaces are also quite dark, intentionally so, as this intensifies the effect of the outward views, drawing occupants’ attention to the hills, trees, water and sky outside. To this end, windows and doors have been positioned to maximise their effect as apertures to the landscape: the full height window to the shower frames a view of a monumental old eucalypt; the enclosed porch is a vantage point for watching the weather roll up the valley from the south; and the window to the second bedroom is low and wide, to capture the best possible view of Mount Macedon to the south-east. Even the sliding timber window shutters fixed to the building’s outer shell on the northern and western sides have been designed to filter light rather than block it completely, keeping the interior cool while preserving outward views. And the positioning of the house – on the ridge line rather than tucked into the hillside – was determined to achieve the best outlook in all directions. Clearly, the Hill Plains House has more in common with Wolveridge’s tropical and coastal houses than may be assumed from first impressions. rural_connections_8_9Left: A bathing area adjacent to the master bedroom references the architect’s tropical Queensland pavilions. Right: With window shutters slid open, northern sunlight streams into the master bedroom, mitigating the need for heating in winter. Building the house atop the ridge also created scope for outdoor spaces to the north and south; the large outdoor dining area to the north enjoys winter sun and is protected from the prevailing southerly breeze, while the patch of lawn to the south provides shady respite in summer. Sitting here, looking down the valley that guides the eye to Mount Macedon, it’s easy to see what Wolveridge loved about the place. And, after all, ‘love of place’ – whether site of human history or natural environment – is the unifying theme at the heart of Wolveridge Architects’ varied output. The Hill Plains House, then, is at once the architect’s home and an emblem of his practice. rural_connections_4b Photography: Derek Swalwell derekswalwell.com Jeremy Wolveridge Architects wolveridge.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

Habitus Pavilion at Sydney Indesign

Developed with the extraordinary support of creative partners loopcreative, Landart Landscapes, Lo-Fi Design and Engineering and Promena Projects, the Pavilion is a rich and diverse addition to the Sydney Indesign experience. The 500 square metre Pavilion opens with a conceptual lighting and projection space housed in a Royal Wolf shipping container, representing Habitus’ online and digital presence.  Adventurous use of technology, including Barco Projectors (who provided equipment for Sydney’s Vivid Festival), creates a compelling visual and auditory experience launches Habitus into the digital future. Visitors then pass into a figurative internal area – covered by a cardboard canopy and finished in beautiful Antique Floors floorboards, the Habitus indoor experience manifests the warmth of natural timber, the artisanship and sustainability of responsible reuse, and the endless possibilities that alternative materials offer for cheaper, greener dwellings. The third area in the Pavilion is a recreation of an idealised Habitus external space. Beautifully landscaped with living vegetation and established trees and illuminated by Lightco products, this is also a place for relaxation and fun, with a variety of Classique outdoor furnishings providing settings for casual refreshment and socialisation. The Habitus bar by whatsontap will also be serving a range of drinks, including a special Habitus cocktail, throughout the event. habitus_pavilion_1 The outdoor space will host the Habitus ‘Home’ exhibition, composed of submissions from readers representing the concept of ‘Home’. Arranged on a series of Hills Hoist clotheslines, the exhibition explores this central issue in a quintessentially Australian context. The Habitus Pavilion competition will offer visitors the chance to win an amazing trip Brisbane to see the California Design exhibition at the Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art this November/December. More details will be available on the days. Audio throughout the Habitus Pavilion is generously provided by Advance Audio. The Habitus Pavilion will be open to visitors through Sydney Indesign, from August 15-17, at the Galleria Space in the Australian Technology Park, Eveleigh. To come and see the Habitus Pavilion and a whole lot more, register now for Sydney Indesign: The Experience.abc
Happenings
What's On

Sam I Am at fortyfivedownstairs

The commercial world is a place we inhabit, but the personal realm is where we draw breath. - Samantha Simpson, Managing Director, Sam I Am Management samiam_1 The world of photography is ever changing. We are becoming more image literate, and we love it. Smart phones and Instagram have created an avenue to share images for image sake. As a community we are becoming more finely attuned to what is ‘good’ and what is ‘bad’. Photography, more than ever, is a conversation point; it’s all about sharing and expressing the personal. At Sam I Am our artists are selected as much for the passion they have for their personal work as for their commercial expertise. Great artists share and ideas grow through community. Coming to have a show in Melbourne is our way of sharing in this creative conversation—sharing our work, ideology and passion for photography with Melbourne creatives and friends. This is why we think these artists are incredible. – Sam I Am Management. samiam_3 Artists exhibiting will be Paul Barbera, Michael Corridore, Ellen Dahl, Tim Georgeson, John Laurie, Vanessa Levis, Billy Plummer, Tobias Rowles and Cory White. Exhibition runs Tuesday 11 - Saturday 17 August 2013 at fortyfivedownstairs fortyfivedownstairs.com Sam I Am samiam.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

George Nelson: Architect, Designer, Writer, Teacher

George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher explores Nelson’s visionary work. Initially trained as an architect with a degree from Yale, Nelson went on to become design director of Herman Miller, where he created modern furniture classics including the Coconut Chair (1956), the Marshmallow Sofa (1956) and Action Office (1964). As an author Nelson was prolific. In his many essays on design, he was one of the most prominent to reflect on the working conditions, duties and objectives of his profession at a time when the field was in its infancy. Nelson’s vast legacy in areas from graphics to furniture, his notion of design as a fusion of interrelated interests, and his achievements as a design teacher, combine to give his work particular relevance and appeal in today’s context. The exhibition is divided into five subject areas, and includes furnishings from the Vitra Design Museum’s Nelson collection. george_nelson_5   1 Nelson and the House As an architect, designer and writer, Nelson was deeply interested in domestic living and interior furnishings. He was a pioneering planner and designer of the modern single family home during the 1940s and ‘50s. This section explores some of his work including the Sherman Fairchild House (New York, 1941), The House of Tomorrow (bestselling book on modern housing, 1944), the Holiday House (model vacation home for Holiday Magazine, 1950), and Experimental House (design of a modular prefabricated house, 1952-57). george_nelson_1   2 Corporate Design As design director at Herman Miller, Nelson had a major influence on the product line and public image of the company for over two decades. Nelson was responsible for collaborating with many of the iconic designers of the era from Charles and Ray Eames to Alexander Girard. Brochures, advertisements and vintage audiotapes on display document the development of corporate design at Herman Miller from the mid-1940s into the 1960s. george_nelson_6 3 The Office During his tenure at Herman Miller, Nelson was a prominent innovator in the development of the modern office environment. His L-shaped desk was the forerunner of the workstation (1947), Action Office (1964), and Nelson Workspaces (1977). george_nelson_3 4 Exhibition Design Nelson’s wide-ranging abilities culminated in the organisation and design of the American National Exhibition, Moscow, in 1959. Also featured in the exhibition is his work for the Chrysler Pavilion at the 1964-65 New York World’s Fair, and for the United States Information Agency. george_nelson_4 5 Designer of Influence Nelson was an accomplished author and editor, and one of the most important thinkers and visionaries in the realm of twentieth-century design. This section of the exhibition provides an overview of Nelson’s numerous articles and books. It also reveals some of his films and slide presentations, addressing urban planning, consumerism, and aesthetic perception in Western society.   George Nelson: Architect, Designer, Writer, Teacher will be on display at the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney from August 3rd 2013 until 10th January 2014. Herman Miller hermanmiller.com.auabc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Design Accessories

A hands-on Interactive Kitchen Experience

Established in 1986, Lincoln Sentry has built an unmatched reputation for quality products and expert advice. They are an industry-leading distributor of products into the building, kitchen renovation, furniture making and shop fitting markets. lincoln_sentry_2   True to their commitment of providing a genuine user experience, Lincoln Sentry’s iconic new space offers a select range of fully installed kitchens that replicate a hands-on, real-life environment. Architects and designers will be able to experience the products in use, open doors with the lightest touch and close overheads and drawers with perfect motion. Take an inside look at ergonomic Vauth-Sagel pantries, and explore Hera lighting options that create an ideal ambience with recessed illumination. lincoln_sentry_3   It’s ideally set up to demonstrate how ideas translate into everyday practicality. For even greater application insight the Blum kitchen test drive offers a tangible working model - complete with mobile cabinets that can be arranged and rearranged to bring design concepts to 3D reality. For the finer details in kitchen organisation, Blum’s ingenious ORGA-LINE drawer interiors demonstrate how to make a big difference to the storage of kitchen utensils such as knives, plates, wraps and cooking accessories. lincoln_sentry_4   The Lincoln Sentry Innovation Space is far more than a static showroom. It’s the perfect venue to learn about leading edge solutions, meet new colleagues, share ideas, enjoy exquisite catering and discover the finest the industry has to offer. lincoln_sentry_5   There’s even a chance to pick up some cool prizes, just for coming along! To see the Lincoln Sentry showroom and a whole lot more, register now for Sydney Indesign: The Experience. Lincoln Sentry lincolnsentry.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Modern In Place

The combination of a beautiful site, an affable and adventurous client, an abundant time frame and a generous budget would seem impossibly miraculous to most architects. Yet for Tony Vella of Rachcoff Vella Architecture, this was exactly the circumstance in which the Piermont House was developed. pyrmont_house_16 The structure sits on a prominent location overlooking 360-degree views. The bedroom wings respond to the contours of the land, bunkering down into the landscape and reducing the built form in these more private spaces, whereas the main living area, contained in a glass pavilion, projects over the landscape and connects with the surrounding panorama. pyrmont_house_9 pyrmont_house_8 The entry and gallery space offer a unique process of arrival, evoking a sense of mystery as to what lies behind the external façade. This in turn leads to a central hub which accesses bedrooms and living spaces, allowing traffic to be managed and dispersed into the three wings. pyrmont_house_13 The layout is a very literal interpretation of the clients’ brief; free flowing, zoned for separation, with central pods located within the main living wing providing functional spaces without compromising movement throughout the building. pyrmont_house_7 Despite having a healthy budget, the scale of the project required careful costing and value management. As Vella states, “Maintaining the overall concept and design intent was the paramount in all costing decisions. One-off designed objects such as bollard lights and vehicle entry gates were afforded due to an understanding of costs and a close working relationship with the builder.” pyrmont_house_3 Natural materials and imperfect finishes were used to avoid the building alienating its context, including spotted gum timbers, sand cement renders and bluestone and zinc cladding that will age and patina naturally. pyrmont_house_6 The home also manifests various sustainable strategies, from an orientation that maximises passive solar heating to heavy wall, ceiling and roof insulation throughout. A solar hot water system, photovoltaic panels, 80,000 litre rainwater tank and 10,000 fire fighting tank sustain the home’s self-sufficiency. pyrmont_house_2 Ultimately, this application of an architecturally stimulating design to an inviting and functional family context in a pristine natural environment is greatly compelling, satisfying just about everything we might need from a dwelling.   Rachcoff Vella Architecture rachcoffvella.com.au Bios Design biosdbs.com.au G&S Morris Constructions morrisconstructions.com.au Photography: Shannon McGrath shannonmcgrath.comabc
Design Hunters
People

SID Partner Design Hunter Q+A: Mike Abbott

Your name: Mike Abbott What you do: Operations and Logistics at Uber Your latest project: Launched Uber LUX, a new tier of vehicle that I recommend for date nights! Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Quentin Tarantino 2) Richard Branson 3) Anyone who is passionate about what they do. What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: I am not so much a possessions guy but if I had an open chequebook maybe a vintage Porsche. Chair model: Wing backed chair Residential space: Rustic beach house with a balcony and view Commercial space: Apple store, George Street Decorative product: Framed photography prints of my brother’s work in Arnhem land Functional product: My watch Handmade good: 18th century chess set my parents gave me for my 21st and my Simon Anderson surfboard Mass-produced good: Toothbrush meal: Sashimi restaurant: Busshari Japanese, Potts Point drink: Whisky on the rocks bar: Teo’s in Surry Hills, tacos and dangerous margaritas item in your studio: I don’t have a studio, but if I had a studio a set square piece of technology: iPhone historical figure: Galileo fictional character: Jasper Dean, if you have not read A Fraction Of The Whole by Steve Toltz, read it! vice: A tendency to force books on people virtue: Good taste in books! What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? I am a minimalist but I do get excited by designs that solve a problem or complement a lifestyle foremost and are also aesthetically pleasing.abc
Design Products
Furniture

Apartment Living Made Easy

In the current market, there isn’t much on offer between bold, statement pieces, and the cheap, cookie cutter designs. In addition, Lu realised there was something missing when he began searching for an apartment in Melbourne.“I saw an incredible opportunity out there for a lifestyle store that catered to small spaces because the current options were extremely limited to a certain Swedish mass production furniture store.” clu_3 Based on his personal experience, he began work on a collection built for small living spaces. Using local materials where he could, Lu worked with local suppliers and craftsmen on launching his twelve piece collection. “It has been an incredible experience working with local manufacturers, there is so much talent here!” Goods of this quality demand a high price bracket; but he managed to keep the final product affordable. clu_4 Both instore and online, CLU Living showcases Lu’s own work alongside designers like Jonathan Adler, Kunquad and Duende. This well curated group follows his vision that “making original designed pieces more accessible…”, means “…you can have your cake and eat it too”. clu_2 Clu Living cluliving.com.au abc