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Architecture
Homes

Modernism Tailor-Made

Above: exterior view showing a playful assembly of expressed volumes. For Filipino architect and art collector, Ed Calma, designing his own home was an opportunity to test discarded ideas from previous projects. It allowed him the luxury to tailor-make spaces for his family and create a haven for his prized art collection. Ed Calma grew up in the Philippines under the strong influence of his father, Lor Calma, a prominent modernist architect and steel sculptor. He moved to New York to study architecture at Pratt Institute and continued his graduate studies at Columbia University. Having worked in New York for many years, he decided to move back to the Philippines for a more relaxed lifestyle. Bringing his new architectural style to a conservative culture met much resistance at first. Seeing this as a challenge, he created and immersed himself in a world that would manifest his own imaginative spirit. Today, as managing partner of Lor Calma Design, Inc., he has successfully defined himself by cornering the market for the modern approach to architecture in the Philippines. His patrons are young, successful professionals versed in modern design, and older clients who collect art. modernism_tailor_made_2,4   Left: stairs leading to the study on the top level, which overlooks the double-height living room below.  Right: the services pelmet folds down to become a kitchen counter. Calma’s own house is an assembly of ideas previously pitched to clients, but never implemented. The ‘Slice House’ as he calls it, started from a basic box that he slowly de-constructed. He moved volumes around and lifted floors so that living spaces overlap to let light enter every space. The result is an asymmetrical composition of inter-penetrating volumes that stand bold in a small corner lot of San Lorenzo Village in Makati City. Although it has elements of brutality with its juxtaposition of blocks and expression of structure and materials, finely detailed timber elements give the form warmth and depth. The entry to the home is emphasised by an orchestrated assembly of black steel frames and a cantilevered steel canopy dressed in timber battens. Calma trained in steel welding and also worked as a model maker using steel as a medium. His father’s influence and familiarity with the material led to an inclination to play around and decorate with steel forms. modernism_tailor_made_3 The open plan design opens to the garden and street beyond. Entering the house, a sense of visual overload can be felt. The extent of Calma’s art and furniture collection is revealed and the expressed structure from the outside continues its journey inside. All columns and beams are clad in timber to visually separate from the non-load bearing walls. As Calma’s tendency is to over-articulate utilitarian elements of the home, the timber-clad beams continue as a pelmet concealing air conditioning ducts and vents. The kitchen becomes a feature as this pelmet unfolds to become a countertop. Every space and function is expressed as a volume through materials or finish. Traditional strategies for security and privacy are re-defined as the main living area, dining and kitchen located on the ground floor are visible from outside. This is more evident at night when these spaces are lit. Having a small lot and living in a residential community where neighbours know each other gave Calma the assurance to explore this approach. modernism_tailor_made_5   The children’s double-height living room also overlooks the main living room on the ground level. The ground floor has an open plan arrangement. The double-height living room, dining room and kitchen open to the garden and the street beyond. The spaces flow freely, both horizontally and vertically. At less than 400m2 in area, Calma did not want to compartmentalise the spaces of his house with walls. There is a living area on each floor. The more private double-height children’s living room on the second level is poised over the dining room, allowing visual connection between all living areas. A volume on the east side defines the bedroom zone. A generous master bedroom is on the top level off the study room via a specially designed reading and prayer nook for Calma’s wife. The master ensuite’s shower is partially open to the sky, admitting light and rain into the space. Two children’s bedrooms are located on the second floor and one has a clever partition door that splits the room in half to make space for the occasional guest. Staff quarters, a staff courtyard, and a wet kitchen are tucked behind the main kitchen. An avid art and furniture collector, Calma has strategically designed pockets, niches and podiums in the house for major works. A tread is extended and turned up to allow a marble sculpture to sit on it. The balustrade from the second to third fl oor is a steel art installation by local artist, Reg Yuson, which he purposely designed for the Calma home. modernism_tailor_made_6   The master bedroom on the top level. The interiors are simply detailed to serve as a backdrop to Calma’s collection of designer furniture. A stylised interpretation of the Filipino tendency of visual clutter, he has fi lled his rooms with layers of art, books, accessories and furniture from Moroso, Flexform, Eileen Gray, Le Corbusier, Norman Cherner, Charles and Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen, Antonio Citterio, Richard Schultz and local designer, Kenneth Cobonpue, among many other pieces. Sustainable solutions are optimised in this home. The green roof doubles as insulation, rainwater is collected and grey water recycled. Although there is cross-fl ow ventilation, air conditioning is needed in this climate so an energy-effi cient inverter system is used and the living rooms partitioned by glass to contain the zones. The use of external timber louvres and internal shades is dominant on the western façade, while a dense group of trees in front of the windows fi lters the harsh afternoon sun and adds privacy to the second fl oor living room. modernism_tailor_made_7   The double-height living room on the second level is articulated by vertical timber battens from outside. The Calma house may overwhelm at fi rst, but its warmth, intimate scale and proportions make it very inviting. With its transparent lower level, the family share their art and space with curious people wanting to have a peek. modernism_tailor_made_plans Ed Calma Architect edcalma.com Photography: Jordi Canosa/Photo for Press jordicanosa.comabc
Happenings
What's On

Sopheap Pich at Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation

Above: Sopheap PICH, Cocoon 2, 2011, rattan, wire, burlap, beeswax, earth pigment,  191 x 85 x 75 cm Collection: Gene & Brian Sherman Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist Collection+ is devoted to an individual artist represented in the Gene & Brian Sherman Collection of contemporary art, which now contains in excess of 800 artworks. The exhibitions bring together work from other private and public collections, exploring in the process, how a single artist can unite collectors across time and place. sopheap_pich_6 Sopheap PICH, Cocoon 2, 2011, rattan, wire, burlap, beeswax, earth pigment,  191 x 85 x 75 cm Collection: Gene & Brian Sherman Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist Sopheap Pich is widely considered to be Cambodia’s most internationally prominent contemporary artist, having last year exhibited in a solo exhibition at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art as well as being included in dOCUMENTA(13), Kassel, Germany. sopheap_pich_2 Sopheap PICH, Hanging Around, 2011, rattam, wire, burlap, beeswax, charcoal, 167 x 30 x 11 cm Collection: Gene & Brian Sherman Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist Pich was born in 1971 in Cambodia, a country subjected to terror and genocide inflicted on the population by Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge regime. As a young boy during these turbulent years, Pich helped his parents make fish traps, and turned his hand to making toys and other hunting instruments from whatever material was available. sopheap_pich_4 Sopheap PICH, Hanging Around, 2011, rattam, wire, burlap, beeswax, charcoal, 167 x 30 x 11 cm Collection: Gene & Brian Sherman Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist At the age of eight, Pich fled with his family to a makeshift refugee camp on the Thai border before arriving at an official United Nations refugee camp. Further refugee camps followed in the Philippines, before the family secured passage to America, where they arrived in 1984. Pich was educated in the USA at the University of Massachusetts and the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2002 he returned to live and work in Cambodia where he turned from painting to making abstract sculptural forms – ripe with memory and presence - from materials such as bamboo, rattan and hessian, which are now his preferred medium. sopheap_pich_3 Sopheap PICH, Hanging Around, 2011, rattam, wire, burlap, beeswax, charcoal, 167 x 30 x 11 cm Collection: Gene & Brian Sherman Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist His elegant sculptural works – often over several metres in dimension – can be hung from ceilings or walls, or exhibited casually lying across a floor like elegant byproducts of nature, the shapes of which they so eloquently mimic. Sopheap Pich first came to the attention of Dr Gene Sherman at the 2006 Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art. Captivated by the materiality, resonances and form of his sculptural abstract works, two pieces were acquired for the Gene & Brian Sherman Collection. sopheap_pich_9 Sopheap PICH, Seated Buddha, 2011, rattan, bamboo, wire, plywood, 256 x 220 x 110 cm. Collection: The Franks-Suss Collection. Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist For Collection+, an active curatorium, consisting of Dr Gene Sherman, Erin Gleeson (Artistic Director and Co-Founder of SA SA BASSAC, Phnom Penh), Dolla Merrillees (SCAF’s Associate Director), Aaron de Souza (Gene & Brian Sherman Collection Manager) and Michael Moran (SCAF Exhibition Manager) worked with the artist to source works and collectors from far afield. Lenders to the exhibition include public galleries and private collections in Brisbane, Sydney, London, Cambodia and France. sopheap_pich_8 Sopheap PICH, Seated Buddha, 2011, rattan, bamboo, wire, plywood, 256 x 220 x 110 cm. Collection: The Franks-Suss Collection. Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist The exhibition features Seated Buddha, 2011 from the Frank-Suss Collection. At over 2.5 metres in height the transparent and majestic bamboo, wire and rattan piece is one of Pich’s most profound works perfectly capturing the elusive nature of Buddhism infused with a contemporary Cambodian aesthetic. Collection+: Sopheap Pich will be launched by Dr Michael Brand, Director, Art Gallery of New South Wales on Thursday 3 October at 7 pm and will be preceded by an artist conversation with Annette Shun Wah and Sopheap Pich at 4.30pm. sopheap_pich_7 Sopheap PICH, Seated Buddha, 2011, rattan, bamboo, wire, plywood, 256 x 220 x 110 cm. Collection: The Franks-Suss Collection. Photo: Brett Boardman Image courtesy the artist The exhibition will be complemented by a comprehensive Culture + Ideas series of talks, film screenings and children's workshops. A full-colour catalogue with a preface by Gene Sherman, essay by Erin Gleeson, artist interview by Dolla Merrillees and an introduction by Michael Young will be published by Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation. The exhibition runs from 4 October – 14 December 2013. sherman-scaf.org.auabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Against the Grain

Good design always considers context. Whilst this usually results in spaces that reference their environments, occasionally it is just as successful to react against them. Such is the case with design firm Betty & Wolff’s project on Flinders Lane. grainstore_10 With a site at the west end of the Melbourne CBD set amongst predominantly commercial residential buildings, the brief was to create, as designer Joseph Hamilton says, “a warm, delightful space with understated refinements”. grainstore_7 The site’s building had architectural qualities of its own including large masonry window reveals the glass partitions, which were retained and elaborated in the final design. “I think history is most meaningful in what exists here and now, and how we engage with that continues the story,” comments Hamilton. grainstore_6 The interiors were finished mostly in timber and stone, with the focus on natural materials reflecting the desire for warmth and graceful ageing. For decoration and styling the restaurant owners found local timber crates and assorted paraphernalia, and have continued to add to these over time. grainstore_5 The net result is a fresh, luminous space animated by considered details and spouts of colour, which could quite convincingly exist in a rural or beachside setting. grainstore_3 Which is exactly the idea – as Hamilton observes, “we wanted to offer an alternative to the prevailing vernacular and set up a contrast with the landscape. This is reflected in the lightness of the interiors, which is juxtaposed to the surrounding city streets.” grainstore_2 In this regard the Grain Store offers a unique escape from its surroundings, and, coupled with chef Ingo Meissner’s covetable offerings, promises a full suite of delights. grainstore_1 The Grain Store grainstore.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Duncan Ward

Your name: Duncan Ward What you do: Design Director at Satelight Design Your latest project: Creating a new collection of locally made light fittings and building an awesome production facility. Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Theo Jansen – Amazing kinetic sculptures 2) Olafur Eliasson – Beautiful lighting installations What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Wally Yachts Chair model: Marcel Wanders Knotted Chair Residential space: Isay Weinfeld Commercial space: La Trobe University Molecular Science Building by Lyons or Mona Gallery Decorative product: Satelight Aniseed Pendant Functional product: iPad Handmade good: Satelight Weaver Pendant Light Mass-produced good: Nikon D800 Meal: Tapas Restaurant: Movida Drink: Moo Brew Dark Ale Bar: Naked for Satin Item in your studio: Sketch pad and materials library Piece of technology: Light metre Historical figure: Niels Bohr Fictional character: Roy Batty - Blade Runner Replicant What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Finding the coolest stuff on the face of this earth, that is not found in a Google search.abc
Architecture
Homes

Lift & Extend

“The client brief was simple,”says carterwilliamson founder and director, Shaun Carter. ”We were asked to enlarge the footprint of a Federation, workman’s cottage in Wareemba to include two additional bedrooms and a living space, commensurate with the scale and proportion of a four bedroom house.” wareemba_7 However, what carterwilliamson brought to the brief, was the transformation of an essentially English model of development into a context-appropriate, Antipodean scheme that responds to the temperate Australian climate and distinctly ‘outdoorsy’ lifestyle. wareemba_6 “We proposed a model of development that didn’t involve a typical knock down replaced by a ‘McMansion’, hideous in bulk and scale,” explains Shaun Carter.  “We see this house as a typology.  An architectural strategy that involves adding a contemporary element that addresses context, climate and the family’s needs, whilst retaining the good parts of an old building.” wareemba_5 To this end, carterwilliamson removed the dark, cramped confused planning of the rear lean-tos, stitching the remaining house to the new extension via a light, thin connection which opens into a generous kitchen and entertainment zone. “The new open plan living areas centralised the services, allowing the house to open and embrace the landscape,” adds Carter, “whilst the stair, located across the plan, connects the house vertically, maximising spatial efficiency.” wareemba_3 The team have also integrated a small courtyard into the middle of the extension, which “allows the house to breathe,” through cleverly positioned window openings and louvres which also scoop light deep into the interiors. wareemba_2 As expected, the material palette is equally context-appropriate.  Bold use of FC-sheet external cladding, a cast concrete floor and a timber structure extend and underscore the simplicity of the original house whilst setting the tone for carterwilliamson’s crafty addition. carterwiliamson carterwilliamson.com Photography: Castle + Beatty castlebeatty.comabc
Architecture
Homes

Clifftop house on Great Ocean Road

Above: exterior is Spotted Gum cladding and off-form concrete, with double glaze window units from Viridian. Roof is Colorbond Midnight. Photographers Tom Berry and Mary Cooke had the foresight to purchase this majestic site 21 years ago. With only a few other homes sharing this prime cliff top location, it is outof- the-way for most travelling along Victoria’s Great Ocean Road. “We were looking for land to build a house on, but didn’t think we’d find something so close to the water, or with such a dramatic outlook,” says Tom. Surrounded by national park and literally on the edge of a cliff, the couple made their own investigations. Rather than wait for a sale sign to appear, Mary went to the titles search office to find out who owned the half-hectare property. After the Ash Wednesday fires (1983), “the owner wasn’t interested in re-building his house,” says Mary, “so we made an offer.” ocean_stage_2 Dining room features Concorde dining table, Grace dining chairs and Fortuny lamp, all from Poliform. In the early 1990s, Tom and Mary began excavating the site, which has a fall of 60º. They built a small self-contained weekender so they could take some time “to think about what we actually wanted, rather than rush in and have regrets later,” says Tom. Only about eight square metres, it is relatively bohemian compared to the recently completed house. Four years ago, Tom and Mary approached architect, Nik Karalis from Woods Bagot. They had seen his beach house at St. Andrews, an extruded, elongated, glazed pavilion. “We loved its simplicity and the way it connected to all the elements. We wanted a house that was fairly monumental, something anchored, rather than ‘touching the earth lightly’,” adds Tom. They were conscious of the high winds the area receives, and “there are times,” says Mary, “when the rain comes in horizontally against the windows”. ocean_stage_3 Mary enjoys the views. The name Tadao Ando cropped up at the outset. Tom and Mary are devotees of the renowned Japanese architect and were keen to include concrete in the design of their new house. “Ironically, even before we mentioned Ando, Nik emailed us a photo of one of our favourite Ando buildings in Tokyo. We knew the relationship with Nik was going to work,” says Mary. As well, it was important to both Mary and Tom that “Nik understood that we wanted to be part of the design process, and not just handed a finished scheme.” Inspired by Ando, Karalis designed three different schemes for the couple. “We had the rooftop access house, the cantilevered house and the double pavilion house, which is the closest to the final outcome,” says Karalis, With the rare cliff opportunities over the precipice of the Great Ocean Road, maximising the views was of paramount importance. ocean_stage_6 Left: Airport sofa and Gaston leather armchairs, from Poliform. 1960s chrome lights from BIBA London, owner’s collection. Right: Open treads of the stairwell provide a sense of transparency. The second design, the ‘cantilevered house’ captured the couple’s profession perfectly (two photographers with telescopic vision), but the design narrowed the view of Bass Strait. A simple 90º turn, however, provided the ideal solution. “Locating the house across three stepped terraces was the only way to position the main pavilion towards the edge,” he says. “It provides both orientation towards the night lights of the Lorne headland and the panoramic view.” The house itself comprises three interconnecting forms. The lowest level is constructed in off-formed concrete, with concrete walls extending to the interior. Directly above is a glazed pavilion, with large sliding glass doors leading to a terrace and swimming pool. The third element, the Blackbutt-clad form containing the stairs and circulation, links the other two. ocean_stage_7 The main bedroom is literally on the edge of a cliff, with the sound of crashing waves below. Along with the strong Ando-like forms, Karalis also acknowledges inspiration from more local landmarks. The Pole House (designed by Frank Dixon in the 1970s), also on the Great Ocean Road, has a 23-metrelong, bridge-like access. Like this bridge, the connecting external walkway between the garage and living areas in Tom and Mary’s home creates a sense of journey. The journey’s climax is the dramatic 15-metre span vista along the open plan kitchen, living and dining areas. Visually driven, Tom and Mary enjoy watching “the colour of the ocean continually change from jade, to blue to grey”. It’s a stark contrast to their photographic studio in the city, which has an internal focus. ocean_stage_8 Left: The lap pool forms a continuous band of water to the sea. Right: sanitary and tapware from Mary Noall. Internally, the kitchen is treated as a piece of furniture, clad in Blackbutt. And to make this area appear integral to the living areas, they steered away from some of the traditional hallmarks of a kitchen, such as a fridge. Fisher & Paykel ‘Cool Drawers’ concealed behind the kitchen’s timber joinery mean some of the fridge drawers can be turned off if they’re not being used. “Sometimes it’s just Mary and I down here. Other times, we arrive with guests,” says Tom. To ensure that the maximum number of guests could be accommodated, the couple preferred fewer and larger pieces of furniture rather than a smattering of chairs and sofas. “We wanted the furniture, like the architecture, to be fairly timeless,” says Mary, who selected a number of pieces from Poliform. And like the furniture, less is more for the artwork, with a few select photos taken by Mary from her exhibition titled ‘Tortured Nature’ adorning the walls. A maquette by sculptor Peter D. Cole on a buffet will soon appear in a considerably larger scale in one of the two courtyard spaces. ocean_stage_9 One of the most coveted rooms is the main bedroom and ensuite, safely ensconced within the solid concrete form on the ground level. Featuring glazed walls and large sliding doors to a gravelled terrace, it is closer to the crashing waves than almost every other property along the Great Ocean Road. “Sometimes, the waves can be pounding. But you always feel quite protected here,” says Mary. ocean_stage_1 Perched on a cliff, the house is one of only a dozen in the area. Photography: Tom Berry and Mary Cookeabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Profile: Eiffel Chong

Eiffel Chong’s recent photographic series of local seascapes are uncharacteristically quiet. In these beachside scenes, the shore is empty, the water is still and the horizon is seemingly endless. But out of this silence, Chong reveals an even deeper disquiet: man’s relationship to the environment. “Humanity has always abused Mother Nature,” says Chong. “I still see people littering, even though we all know it is bad for the environment. Yet people still continue to do it. Why?” eiffel_chong_5 Chong’s photographs aim to remind us that we are a part of a bigger ecosystem – that we are fundamentally connected to our natural environment, not apart from it. Taking in the neglected, empty spaces that exist between public and private land, Chong's photographs celebrate man as a producer, rather than as a consumer of the world. Whether it is the lone floating buoy, the abandoned pier or the rotting wooden boat, each image hints towards man’s influence over the space – even the image itself is a product of man. “My photographs are mainly an investigation into the sublime attraction we have for nature,” continues Chong, “an attraction that requires a nuance understanding of our human relationship with nature.” eiffel_chong_3 Much like the artists from the Dusseldorf School of Photography, Chong’s sober, ‘straight on’ documentary style blurs the line between photography and painting: his intricate detail could easily be absorbed into the wider minimalist art world without differential. And by transforming the ‘created world’ into a ‘fictional world’, where the viewer sees the landscape as a fabrication through a lens, Chong's seemingly highly constructed scenes strike a nostalgic, essentialist chord in the viewer. “I’m also inspired by Haruki Murakami’s fictions,” continues Chong, “the Japanese have the gift of turning something so mundane into something so interesting. And their attention to detail is amazing.” The starkness of the scenes, the simplicity of the composition and colours create powerful images that resonate deeply and emotionally with their audience. eiffel_chong_1 Chong’s works are all about engaging with, and commenting on, humanity’s contemporary landscape, his photographs documenting the existence of human actions and natural processes in ever-changing combinations. “I like how my photographs affect viewers through their own life experiences,” says Chong, “my photographs work like triggers to awake memories.” eiffel_chong_2 Eiffel Chong For Chong, art is about broadening people’s perspectives, about exploring and educating. But beyond this didactic purpose, Chong's pieces are stunning works of art – careful, considered and precise photographs that capture us intellectually and emotionally in a way that only the best images do. Eiffel Chong eiffelchong.com Habitus 21 is on sale September 26. Subscribe to Habitus hereabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Manufacturing Panorama

Officially reopened on the sixth of September, the refurbished Zense Gourmet Deck and Lounge Panorama, designed by Department of ARCHITECTURE, is located on level 17 of Bangkok’s Central World shopping complex. For a complete experience of the venue’s impact, it is best to use the glass elevators located to the front of reception only when leaving, and instead arrive at the restaurant from the shopping centre’s conventional elevators. The transition from a bustling shopping complex to tranquillity is achieved via a long corridor with full-height windows on one side, and on the other a wave of white painted metal sheet reminiscent of fabric accordion pleats. zense_1 The interior and the outdoor area playfully explore the fusion of four design disciplines (fashion design, interior design, landscape, and architecture) into the spatial design, with the abstraction of fabric pleating techniques consistently applied throughout interior components. zense_4 The aesthetic of the space is centred around the floating ceiling plane of angular steel tubes. These simultaneously crop the skyline beyond to create a curated visual experience, and obscure the exposed service pipes above them. Amata Luphaiboon, principal of the firm, comments that “this restaurant is neither the tallest nor best view when compared with the other roof-top dining venues in the city, that is why we need to manipulate the existing skyline scene by fabricating a new view via the abstraction from fabric pleating to be the foreground for the cityscape. This also works well to reflect the identity of the building owner in clothing and fashion design”. zense_8 The choice of a classic duotone Hound’s-tooth weaving pattern for the chairs further sustains this connection with fashion design, with the same pattern imprinted on the outdoor stone table top. The textile theme is further sustained by the layers of patterned and translucent partitions in restrooms, inspired by lace fabric. zense_9 With the exception of Bangkok’s historical buildings, the panoramic view of the city’s skyline is minimal and diluted, lacking a defining urban landmark or dramatic natural setting. Thus Zense has sought to change the Bangkok skyline by its own design articulation, emanating from its interior, and has manufactured a new skyline experience for the diners. zense_3 Zense Gourmet Deck & Lounge Panorama zensebangkok.com Department of ARCHITECTURE departmentofarchitecture.co.th Photography courtesy of Department of ARCHITECTURE, by: Ketsiree Wongwanabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with James Lohan

Your name: James Lohan What you do: CEO Mr and Mrs Smith Your latest project: The Smith Hotel Awards which will be revealed on the 7th November 2013. Not be missed if you want to find out which really are the world’s best boutique hotels. Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Sir Terence Conran 2) Nick Jones, Soho House Group 3) Andre Balazs, The Standard Group What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Porsche 911 (993 model),  I don't do bikes as my Mum says they're dangerous, the A380 as it’s so roomy for long-haul travel and when it comes to boats, I’ll have a Vintage Riva pretty please. Chair model: Hans Wegner wishbone chair Residential space: Villa Can Talaya in Ibiza you can rent it in the summer through my friend Seb at www.internationalvillas.net before the owner takes it back. Commercial space: The Telegraph's offices in London. They have a “spoke desk” system with every spoke of desks leading back to the central editors’, and above they project live stats and facts on a cinema size screen - it's inspiring stuff. Decorative product: The art we've collected from our travels. Functional product: My 1961 Rolex that I wind every morning and still keeps perfect time. Handmade good:  A vase we bought in Morocco Mass-produced good: The Dyson hot and cold fan Meal: Roast Beef and Yorkshire pudding Restaurant: Chin Chin, on Flinders Lane in Melbourne. Drink: Lychee Martini Bar: Rooftop of The Standard Downtown in LA - you feel like you’re drinking on the set of Blade Runner as its in the heart of the financial district and you're surrounded by tower blocks that the hotel projects onto. Item in your studio: Table Tennis Table Piece of technology: One click purchase by Amazon Historical figure: Winston Churchill Fictional character: Ben Hur - that chariot race still gives me goosebumps. Vice: The occasional cigar Virtue: Mentoring young entrepreneurs What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Someone on an aesthetically pleasing mission.abc
Architecture
Homes

Baxter Apartments

“The main goals of this project were to work with the integrity of the original building design wherever possible,” explains SJB director Kirsten Stanisich in reference to SJB Interiors’ upgrade of a distinctive mid-century modern building in Sydney’s Eastern Suburbs.  “The client, Philippe Reymond, was really open to using materials and finishes which were much truer to the period of the building.” baxter_2 In response, the SJB team selected a soft grey and lemon colour palette, white laminates with timber edging for the kitchens and a small white brick mosaic for the splashbacks.  “It was really refreshing to break away from the typical finishes palettes often seen in multi-unit residential projects,” adds Stanisich.  “We also retained the existing pine wall panelling and finished it with a light lime wash to maintain the personality of the timber.” baxter_5 The bathrooms also reflect the palette of the era as represented by mono-chromatic small format gloss mosaic tiles.  “To bring in some patterning to the floor in the kitchen, we selected a basket weave pattern Bolon floor to reflect the patterning of the original linoleum floor tiles,” adds Stanisich. “There was also an existing small black pattern parquetry floor which was restored, sanded and re-finished.  It gives a beautiful tapestry pattern to the apartments as well as a warmth against the whiter elements of the walls, ceilings and window frames.” baxter_3 Whilst some reparative work was needed, other alterations to the facade were decidedly minimal.  “We selected white to paint the faceted timber window frames and the cantilevered concrete slabs and contrasted it against a charcoal for the brick façade to maintain the expressions of the building as planes and frames,” adds Stanisich baxter_4 “It was a great opportunity to be able to work on a project of this type,” continues Stanisich.  “It would have been a lot easier, and probably cheaper, for our client to completely gut the apartments and install new contemporary designed interiors.  Instead he had faith in taking a risk to deliver a refurbishment which marries into the original building design, to provide a very unique outcome in Sydney’s multi-unit residential market.” SJB Interiors sjb.com.auabc