About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Gascoigne & King

Your name: Bronwyn Gascoigne What you do: I hand-make a range of luxury scented candles in Surry Hills. I only use sustainably farmed, non-GM soy wax and have developed a range of my own uniquely blended fragrances. The packaging is all made locally from recycled products, but we have managed to do this and maintain a luxury style. The best of both worlds really. Your latest project: I am currently working on a new line of fragrances that are reminiscent of older times.  Classic fragrances such as tobacco, bay rum cloves and patchouli. I have been inspired by winter this year – this range will be perfect for cold nights inside. Who are two people that inspire/excite you: 1) My father Ray Gascoigne, who makes beautiful ships in bottles. He has spent his life on the sea and as a shipwright he is able to make exact replicas of real boats, some of which he even sailed in or captained himself. 2) Drag race car drivers. The drivers of top fuel drag cars sit behind an engine with 7000 horsepower and accelerate to 350mph in 4.5 seconds. Just watching from the crowd is deafening and the sound waves distort your vision and shake your whole body. These guys are sitting in the cars! It’s insane. What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: A 1968 AC Shelby Cobra. Very sexy and very fast. Caroll Shelby was a race car driver and also worked with car Vendors, to make they’re cars look amazing and perform even better. He mainly worked with Fords. However when he came across the AC Ace he worked with the manufacturer to redesign the body, and put a ford V8 engine into it and the Shelby Cobra was born.   Chair model: I love the Eames Recliner. It's beautiful, functional and suits any space.  Residential space: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water House. Truly inspirational, and you can watch it on fallingwater cam. Commercial space: I haven’t been there yet but it would have to be Mona in Tasmania. I’ve seen the pictures now I need to get down there.  Decorative product: Contemporary Art. We have lots of great contemporary artists in Australia, Hugh Ford, Krista Berger, Judith Wright, Paul Davies… I also love Contemporary Asian artists such as Zhang Xiagang and Fang Lijun. Functional product: a vacuum cleaner makes life a bit easier. Handmade good: My Father’s ships in bottles. Every one of them is astonishing. Each one is a little story from a particular place in time. Mass-produced good: The 1960’s Kikkoman soy sauce bottle is a classic design still used and recognised after all this time.  Meal: Hawker street food in Singapore. Absolutely everything is good but I particulary like Hai Nan chicken which is poached chicken on rice which has been cooked in the poaching juice. Its then served with a ginger and shallot sauce and chilli. Restaurant: The fantastic Argentinian restaurant Porteno, and Billy Kwong in Surry Hills. Chairman Mao in Kensington also serves up delicious and very spicy dishes from Hunan provence. Drink: a shaken Margarita with a very salty rim Bar: Gnome in Surry Hills. It's small and the people are friendly and it’s a great hangout for locals who live and work in Surry Hills. Item in your studio: a candle top melter. I made it myself to make my candle making process a bit more efficient. It comprises of a hospital style bedside table and an outdoor heater. It is a good example and function but not form. It's ugly but it works!  Piece of technology: my iphone and apps. I love getting text messages because they’re always from people I love. Historical figure: Albert Einstein. His theory of relativity has changed the way we view physics forever. fictional character: Sodapop from the book The Outsiders. I read it in high school and I had a huge teenage crush on him. The great thing about characters from books is that they look just the way you want them to. Vice: Extensive socialising in and around Surry Hills with my great friends. There are so many cool bars and restaurants in Surry Hills its hard to stay home.  Virtue: My candle making helper who was once homeless and a heroin addict now helps me on a daily basis making candles. It’s given him a purpose and has helped him to get straight. He just needed the break. We met in the local park a couple of years ago and we have become friends. He loves to talk and he’s slow to get things done but we enjoy each other's company.  What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? The first thing that comes to mind is ‘be open to everything around you’ Design is more important in our lives than many people recognise. Gascoigne & King gascoigneandking.comabc
Architecture
Homes

Urban Oasis

Above: Cathryn Wills in the sanctuary of her Brunswick home. Cathryn Wills’ pared-backed Brunswick pad looks like it hasn’t been touched since the Habitus photo shoot weeks before. For Cathryn, the creative dynamo behind Australian accessories brand Mimco, constant travelling means the home is kept like a sanctuary. For her partner John Wessels, a furniture maker and part-time personal assistant, who works from home in the small attic-style studio on the roof garden – its sloping ceiling had to be levelled out to accommodate his lanky frame – home needs to be ordered, uncluttered. urban_oasis_2-3 Left: George Barsony black figurine and fishbowl, which keeps the couple’s cats entertained. Right: Cathryn has been beguiled by a life-long love of fashion. Cathryn admits to being somewhat consumed by her role at Mimco, where she started in 2004 as a freelance knitwear designer. Within a few years was she overseeing design, visual merchandising and marketing. More recently, she added commercial operations to her hefty portfolio. “It’s what I do,” she says. “I love it and it feels like an extension of me. That’s quite a blessed state to be in.” When work and travel allow, however, Cathryn spends as much time at home as she can, unwinding in the renovated former printing factory she bought with John in June 2009. “I’ve definitely noticed a change in my stress levels since moving here, just the calm I feel when I come home,” Cathryn says. The rear courtyard in particular offers respite from a hectic world. There’s beautiful light, a small water feature whose restful sounds permeate the entire house, a tall bamboo garden and a private outdoor shower both of them prefer to the ensuite. urban_oasis_4 An antique timber dresser and Art Deco dining table with an unusual set of three brass bowls. Cathryn met John seven years ago. He had lived for years in Brunswick, north of the city and she was from beachside St Kilda and Elwood. For a time they settled half way, renting an apartment in glitzy Docklands, where they began editing their idiosyncratic collections of furniture, furnishings, art and design objects into a coherent whole. “I’ve been more the crowded, hectic person; he’s got a lovely clean aesthetic,” Cathryn says. It seems improbable that a fashion designer with a life-long love of dressing up and accessorising could join stylistic forces with another creative soul with apparent ease, and resist the urge to tweak their interior scheme on a regular basis. urban_oasis_5-6 Textures add warmth and drama to the home’s minimalist industrial Cathryn and John still seem to be pinching themselves over their good fortune in finding a fully renovated home they both loved instantly. So smitten were they with its existing form that they bought the previous owners’ massive indoor plants too, which clearly thrive in the interior’s lovely light and add to the ambience of tropical calm. The two-storey house is a minimalist box with an open-plan kitchen, dining and living area at ground level and a generous bedroom and ensuite above. French doors lead from the bedroom to a rooftop garden, complete with a workshop and a telescope to capture the surrounding cityscape, and a recent addition: arguably the world’s most symmetrical vegie patch. “He’s Dutch,” Cathryn says of John by way of explanation. urban_oasis_8 Open plan kitchen area with luminous seat light designed by graduates from RMIT. The interior is a study of a few well-placed dramatic gestures against a backdrop of restraint. Beyond the clean lines and monochromes of the white walls and unadorned concrete floor are some exquisite design objects that reflect the couple’s shared love of texture. These include photographs by Samantha Everton and graffiti art by dirtfish from the Melbourne Art Fair; a tiny pair of paintings by Chelsea Gustafsson from Linden’s annual postcard show; fabric screens handmade by John using vintage textiles; lampshades and ottomans in a riot of prints; a smooth, sheer, luminous teardrop seat light made by industrial design graduates from RMIT; a distressed, turquoise-washed industrial timber cabinet found at Tyabb Packing House Antiques, and an elegant deco dining table topped with three shallow brass bowls from Aimee McCallum’s homewares treasure trove, Tiger & Peacock, in Fitzroy. Each bowl totters on long, delicate, tentacle-like legs, with the look of creatures freshly emerged from the sea. urban_oasis_9 A futuristic high-shine plastic outdoor setting shares the courtyard with one of five bikes in the house. “I don’t so much collect things any more,” Cathryn says. “I prefer to acquire things slowly that I really love. And I love art.” It’s a philosophy that stems from her years in the 09 fast-paced world of fashion, her disdain for the copying rife in the industry, and her exposure to artisans at events like Florence’s bi-annual yarn exhibition Pitti Filati. “It’s not fast food, it can be Slow Fashion, it can be built from the ground up and it can come from an idea,” she says. urban_oasis_10 A small rooftop garden linked to the master bedroom accommodates John’s workshop, a veggie patch and a telescope. It’s an approach she’s brought to Mimco as well as her home, weaving whimsy and storytelling about inspirational muses into the creative process. “I hope that I’ve brought a story-telling and escapist mood to the business,” Cathryn says. “Buying product, buying things that you love, is an emotional response. It’s not just about a style number, it’s about a beautiful black bag that makes someone feel really great when they put it on, or great earrings that light up a face.” Mimco mimco.com Photography: James Geer jamesgeer.com abc
Happenings
What's On

Design Life Sydney

Continuing on after its debut success in 2013, the Design Life concept creates a sophisticated and inspirational buying atmosphere for Australian retailers.  Encouraging solid and lasting business relationships, Design Life provides an ideal setting for visiting buyers to network and engage with existing and potential suppliers. Exclusive to the Home & Giving Fair, and focusing on high end gift and homewares suppliers from Australia and New Zealand, Design Life will take place at 'The Dome', Sydney Showground between 15 - 18 February 2014. Design Life is an extension of the Home & Giving Fair therefore registration to the Home & Giving Fair will allow you to visit Design Life.  For more information on how to register for Home & Giving, go to www.homeandgiving.com   abc
Happenings
Parties

Cosentino Opens New Sydney Showroom

The new Alexandria showroom affords architects, designers and retail consumers the opportunity to see Cosentino‘s extensive range of products including Silestone®, a global leader in quartz surfaces, and Eco® a sustainble offering from Cosentino. Guests came in their hundreds to the rapidly expanding design hub at 69 O’Riordan Street that also houses KE-ZU, Tsar Rugs, Blu Dot, Gelosa, Cosh Living and more. Cosentino’s arrival only adds to the breadth of design on offer in the district. “We’re extremely excited to be opening our first showroom in Sydney,” explains Cosentino CEO, Gary Isherwood, “and we look forward to engaging with our customers more closely. We have designed the showroom to reflect the stylish, clean, modern style Cosentino is known for, and as a space where consumers, architects and designers can engage with our product range firsthand.” Eduardo Martinez-Cosentino, visiting Commercial Director and VP of Sales for the brand also attended the launch; ”We want this facility to be a creative, open space, which delivers the best constructive solutions, beauty and enduring value for those who use Cosentino products.” Cosentino cosentinogroup.com.au [gallery ids="25215,25216,25217,25218,25219,25220,25221,25222,25223,25224,25225,25226,25227,25228,25229,25230,25231,25232,25233,25234,25235,25236,25237,25238,25239,25240,25241,25242,25243,25244,25245,25246,25247,25248,25249,25250,25251,25252,25253,25254,25255,25256,25257,25258"]  abc
Architecture
Homes

Raw, Lean, Green

A first impression of the house, designed by Architect Dr. Tan Loke Mun, might be dominated by the solid, raw concrete structure that encloses it. However upon closer examination softer details become apparent, and it unfolds as a harmony of contrasting and complementary elements. no18house_1 Immediately visible on the western façade is the wrap-around second surface of louvers. Layering a semi-transparent horizontal pattern in an earthy ochre tone over the underlying concrete creates a compelling dimensional and textural effect, piquing curiosity about the half-hidden home. no18house_4 Internally, the house is assembled from intersecting volumes, producing cavernous vertical volumes and intriguing openings to other areas. Designed to accommodate a family of six, the 370 square metre home balances generous communal spaces against personalised private areas. The sustained material palette of concrete is interrupted with timber and brick surfaces and populated with a minimal but considered collection of furniture, lighting and artworks. no18house_14 A sculptural stair wraps around an off-form structural wall that takes one through to all the upper levels. The stairwell acts as a lantern contained by a double glazed enclosure and illuminated by the moon-like wall lights. no18house_2 A favourite space of the resident is the Japanese room, fondly referred to as the “quiet room”. Specifically created space for him and his wife to practice meditative forms of exercises such as qigong or taichi, it was designed by a Japanese builder, with the paper in the shoji screen doors and tatami mats specially brought in from Japan. The room size is also perfectly proportioned, with its ceiling height lowered to suit the tropics, and specific timber dimensions. no18house_8 The house as been designed with a strong focus on addressing the tropical climate in a sustainable manner. As such it is totally cross-ventilated with minimal mechanical air conditioning. The large roof has thick rockwool and two layers of heat reflective foil, in addition to a fully ventilated roof space that houses rainwater harvesting tanks. The roof also houses an array of photo voltaic panels that generate up to 5 KW peak of electricity, solar hot water panels and wind turbines to ventilate the house interiors. no18house_12 The successful resolution of aesthetic, functional and environmental considerations demonstrates the success of the project, which has also been realized with surprising economy. With a final cost of approximately $250,000, it is a refreshing example of how good design and sustainability can be achieved without astronomical budgets. no18house_9 DRTAN LM Architect Photography: Lin Hoabc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Accessories

Quick Pass from Parisi

Designed and manufactured entirely in Italy by world renowned Flaminia, Quick Pass embodies space-saving principles without compromising on quality, comfort or visual appeal. parisi_5 With smooth lines and minimal body, Quick sanitaryware is at home in the smallest places. Easy to install and maintain, the collection has been designed to work within spaces and not the other way around. parisi_4 Pass, consisting of basins, consoles and hand basins, embraces round purposeful lines, soft volumes and moderate dimensions. The wide range can be easily be mixed and matched with Quick according to one’s personal taste and available space. parisi_3 With Quick Pass, Flaminia has created a collection that is smart and considered, perfect for large commercial projects that need to maximise space as well as inner city dwellings where space is a premium. parisi_1 For a more modern look, Quick Pass comes in a variety of muted matt colours. Quick Pass is available nationally through selected PARISI retailers. parisi.com.auabc
Design Products
Accessories

Robert Gordon x Living Edge

With 60 years of pottery heritage behind their brand, Robert Gordon chose to collaborate with Living Edge on the exclusive ranges as both companies saw each other as a masterful fit. robert_gordon_2 “Living Edge celebrates authentic, hand-made design and the ethos of Robert Gordon and the aesthetics of the products match nicely with the Living Edge retail offering. Plus pottery is the next big thing,” Living Edge’s Residential Manager, Jo Mawhinney said. “Robert Gordon produces unique dinnerware for some of Australia’s best restaurants and we want to be able to offer our customers restaurant-grade, designer dinnerware, that they can’t buy anywhere else,” she said. robert_gordon_3 The current Living Edge X Robert Gordon range includes three distinctive collections: The Saltbush, Iron Dip collection and the White Scratch. The range includes salt and pepper bowls, dinner plates, right through to large oven proof dishes and is in store in the Living Edge Sydney studio now and will be soon distributed to other states and available for purchase through Living Edge. robert_gordon_1 livingedge.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

‘Tangents’ at Edmund Pearce Gallery

"Although a departure from the ‘Angry Black Snake’ series and ongoing landscape work, Tangents reflects Michael’s deep artistic practise and an ability to experiment confidently with different techniques and styles. Such strong technique reflects this photographer’s mastery of his craft." - Jason McQuoid, Co-Director, Edmund Pearce Gallery on the work of Michael Corridore, 2013 tangents_5 "Because I work everyday as a photographer, collage and still life helps me to look at things differently, while exploring digital media as photography changes.  In this series of collages, I have returned to a series that I had started in 2000. The original series resulted in about a dozen or so photographs. My first attempts at collage were through printing negatives onto black and white lithographic film and layering multiple sheets of those films onto a light box and photographing the assembled sheets as collages.  tangents_6 From there I decided to experiment with digital capture of the original components and assemble the layers in Photoshop so that I could preserve colour, which was lost in the lithographic printing process. This was my first foray into working with digital capture technology.  In the past year I began to explore this collage process again photographing various forms working with life models, mannequins and various household objects which offered me the opportunity to explore both malleable and solid forms and shapes that could be layered together in the assembled collages.  tangents_4 This exploration in collage stems from my interest in the Cubists approach to re-interpreting what we see from differing perspectives and synthesize those components of our observations and memory information onto a flat page." - Michael Corridore Tangents will be on display at Edmund Pearce Gallery from 11 September – 05 October 2013 Edmund Pearce Gallery edmundpearce.com.auabc
Happenings
Parties

Caesarstone New Colour Launch Party

It was a glamorous event with over 350 designers, home builders, kitchen retailers, stonemasons and media in attendance who were wined, dined and entertained by a star-studded line up of guest performers, speakers and chefs. Masterchef contestant Audra Morrice left the crowd in awe with her tantalising cooking demonstrations in the Caesarstone showroom kitchen, preparing her signature dish of salmon sashimi with ginger, spring onions, baby herbs and Szechuan dressing. An array of hand painted living art sculptures filled the showroom, representing each of the new Caesarstone colours on display, together with a stunning aerial entertainer pouring champagne for guests from high above while performing an acrobatic display. Special guest and interior designer Darren Palmer made a spectacular entrance into the event inside a specially made Vanilla Noir Range Rover together with Alisa and Lysandra, this year's winners on The Block Sky High. Caesarstone caesarstone.com.au [gallery ids="25093,25094,25095,25096,25097,25098,25099,25100,25101,25102,25103,25104,25105,25106,25107,25108,25109,25110,25111,25112,25113,25114,25115,25116,25117,25118,25119,25120,25121,25122,25123,25124,25125,25126,25127,25128,25129,25130,25131,25132,25133,25134,25135,25136,25137,25138,25139,25140,25141,25142,25143,25144,25145,25146,25147,25148,25149,25150,25151,25152,25153,25154,25155,25156,25157,25158,25159,25160,25161,25162,25163,25164,25165,25166,25167,25168,25169"]abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Work-Shop: The New Creative

Here, the two boys run a bunch of affordable and somewhat niche workshops, mixing in with Sydney’s creative scene. So far they’ve collaborated with Newtown’s own Young Henry’s brewery to teach a craft beer masterclass, learnt from some of Australia’s best street artists and held a free, lunchtime yoga class. work.shop_2 The project has been entirely self-funded, relying on zero marketing budget. Branagan says “it has been an awesome ride so far. We have met so many amazing creatives and the way the community has embraced the project has been so inspiring. We work long hours, but it is worth it when you see people discovering their lost creative sides!” work.shop_1 From their wholly up-cycled timber fit out, it’s nice to see an original idea pop up in an otherwise information-saturated society; an idea that focuses on fun, hands-on activities that steer clear of any form of current technology. Classes we’ve got our eyes on include the 'String Gardens with Georgina Reid' and the 'Make your own Cardboard Chair with Jeff McCann.' We’re also hanging out for Matt’s dream teacher to have at Workshop, Heston Bluementhal. work.shop_3 Sign up for one of their workshops, here. work-shop.com.auabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Pressed Juices (South Yarra)

Hero Image courtesy Share Design “The juices are the centrepiece of every store,” explains Alessia Pegoli, co-director of Every Studio, the multi-disciplinary design studio responsible for the suitably organic interior of Pressed Juices’ South Yarra store. Responsible for all facets of the company’s branding, The Melbourne-based studio were conceptually guided by the company’s core values of purity, simplicity and rawness, creating a (naturally) sympathetic material palette and a minimalist approach to the interior. “The brief was for the stores not to be just a shop front, but more of a wellness space, a place to soothe and recharge,”explains Pegoli.  As a result Pegoli and her co-director Sarah Crowley have created “moments” within the store including spaces for consultations with the in-store nutritionist, juice tastings as well a space to linger over the store’s collection of health and wellbeing books. pressed_juices_2 Image courtesy Share Design The store also doesn't feature a traditional shop counter.  “That was in a bid to create a more free flowing space for both the staff and customers,” adds Pegoli.  “In its place, we've provided a lot of flexible surfaces for staff and customers, like the plywood bar down the centre of the store which is used for tastings, consultations and a spot to sit!” The original store, whilst something of a generic white box, offered up a number of existing “quirks”, which the team used to their advantage.  “We tried to make opportunities of the existing fabric of the store as much as possible,” adds Pegoli.  “Existing wall niches were turned into multi-purpose blackboard menu niches which also function as shelving and places to drink.” The team even made use of the 1980‘s existing pink tiles, grinding them back to reveal the raw ceramic substrate. As expected, the modesty and simplicity of the material palette (which includes raw and untreated blonde timber, plywood and blackboard and clean white walls) really allows the vibrant colours of the juices to “sing”. pressed_juices_3Image courtesy Share Design “The fruit crates have become a signature feature, a modern take on the traditional fruit shop,” adds Pegoli.  “It’s used as a crate wall and a display wall that also doubles as a bookshelf, which folds over to become a dropped canopy over the communal dining area.  This creates a cosier, more intimate environment at the back of the shop and also acts as a neutral yet eye catching backdrop the entire store.” The crates also reappear as a pendant light installations at the front of the store. “The idea was to create a suspended artwork to act as a welcome to customers, to designate the window seating as a playful and more casual space, and to be create intrigue for passers by,” concludes Pegoli. For more images visit: sharedesign.com/inspirationblog/places-spaces-pressed-juices-south-yarra Photography: Brooke Holm courtesy Share Design brookeholm.com.au Pressed Juices pressedjuices.com.au EVERY studio www.everystudio.netabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Darcy Clarke

Your name: Darcy Clarke What you do: Designer / Businessman / Rogue entity - darcyclarke.com Your latest project: A Photographic shoot in artist Michael Cusack's Studio Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Sam Noguchi 2) Batman and Wonder Woman 3) Every person that does good things for others What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: 69 valiant/my black fixie/jumbo jets/handmade wooden rowing boats. Chair model: Exactly! I love naked models on chairs. Residential space: Anything on cabinporn.com Commercial space: Every space with Darcy Clarke products in them! Seriously!

Decorative product: Charles Rennie Mackintosh stuff.

Functional product: Apple Mac computers Handmade good: African drums. Practical and good to look at. Mass-produced good: Bitumen meal: Pesto pasta restaurant: Treehouse  drink: Coffee is pretty much the best thing on earth.  bar: Reo item in your studio: Wooden mallet piece of technology: My Camera in rocks historical figure: Winston Churchill fictional character: Captain Thunderbolt vice: Liquid with alcohol in it. virtue: Shoot from the hip. What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Stalkers that hunt in packs, in the wilds of the woods. On finding a good design they whack it on the head and bring it home for the family to enjoy. That is a committed design hunter. Darcy Clarke is featured in Hightide – Queensland Design Now hightide-book.comabc