About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
Parties

English Tapware Company’s First Birthday Party

The evening was all about thanking the design community for their support over the past year and launching new products for the year ahead: the Perrin & Rowe satin brass tapware, and the new brass David Moreland Design Pendant45 light. The English Tapware Company englishtapware.com.au [gallery ids="27326,27327,27328,27329,27330,27331,27332,27333,27334,27335,27336,27337,27338,27339,27340,27341,27342,27343,27344,27345,27346,27347,27348,27349,27350,27351,27352,27353"]abc
Furniture
Design Products
Accessories

Bronze, Stone, Leather from Henry Wilson

The STRT (Square Table Round Table) was conceived as an open structure to support materials in their most basic state and geometry. Examples show variations of square plus square or square plus circle in glass and/or stone. strt_2 The 'Vide Poche' or (empty pockets) is a reversible, double-side dish for all your daily bits and pieces. One side features a single scoop for those who like a bit of chaos. The other is divided in two for people who prefer more structure in their day. Vide Poche' are 180 x 180 x 35mm and come boxed. 20% of the profit of each sale will go to Amnesty International. vide_poche The Leather Desk Mat is Die-cut from Imported Italian saddle leather, lightly tanned, and will mark with age and use. leather_desk_mat   Henry Wilson henrywilson.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Room with a View

Understandably for a site set in a dramatic ocean panorama, a key element of the client’s brief was to access as large-a-swathe of the view as possible. Combined with a strict demand that the resulting home have a five star energy rating and specific ideas of what constitutes good design, however, and the task faced by Seeley Architects became somewhat more complex than simply designing a run-of-the-mill beach house. dame_of_melba_house_2 In firm Director David Seeley’s own words, the clients wanted a “a groovy four bedroom beach house weekender with big protected decks and large windows to capture the panoramic views from the property”. The dimensions of the home also needed to be generally exaggerated, as the home was to accommodate the owners, their three adult offspring and their extended families, several of whom are very tall (one is a professional basketball player). dame_of_melba_house_7 Replacing an uninspired 50’s fibro shack, the new structure succeeds at powerfully connecting with the coastal context with a full-length, upper floor window spanning the coast across 180° from east to west. Bordered by a copper-clad frame, which extends out onto the adjoining deck, the window anchors the house in its context, evoking the aspect and composition of a panoramic photograph. The sliding screens and the operable roof on the Wind deck allows this space to be both an outdoor type space and an internal space depending on how the roof and screens are configured. dame_of_melba_house_4 As Seeley points out, however, “Large south facing windows and 5 energy ratings do not generally mix well.” To address this the house is passively heated and cooled, with no air conditioning, relying on the occupants’ opening apertures such as ventilation flaps, sashes and sliding doors to capture the breezes and cool the house. dame_of_melba_house_9 The internal colour scheme and furniture are a reflection of the Danish heritage of the owners, hence the responses are direct, functional and elegantly pared back. A focus on timber finish, both internally and externally, sustains this cultural reference, whilst also suiting the leisurely mood of a beach house and the surrounding bush land. dame_of_melba_house_6 For both architect and client, the favourite space is the kitchen/dining/living room; as Seeley observes, “the space has a sense of grandeur with its scale and proportions, not to mention the views from this room.” Seeley Architects seeleyarchitects.com.au Photography: Shannon McGrath shannonmcgrath.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Bar Nacional

The brainchild of internationally-renowned chefs, Pete Evans and Gavin Baker, Bar Nacional is an intimate tapas bar, inspired by the vibrancy and culinary sophistication of Spanish cuisine and the character of traditional pintxos bars. bar_nacional_1 The result of a design collaboration between Emily Pedersen of Walker Corp and Anna Drummond and Trish Turner of CoLAB Design Studio, the interior is an elegantly crafted series of overlapping lounge and dining spaces.  “Honest and genuine are the two words at the core of this design,” explains Pedersen.  “We wanted to create an atmospheric and authentic space that also referenced the beautifully crafted food on offer.” bar_nacional_3 As a result, the materials palette features a variety of tactile finishes including exposed brickwork, distressed charcoal timber, copper and brass detailing and stitched leather seating.  “I also wanted to challenge the city’s preconceived notions of the Docklands end of Collins Street,” adds Emily Pederson, “and prove that we could create an intimate, laneway-like hospitality experience within the parameters of a super-modern architectural shell.” bar_nacional_6 The team have also created a sense of drama in the space, drawing patrons into the theatre of Bar Nacional’s kitchen through the articulated use of screening, louvers and carefully curated lighting.  “We desired a space with stage presence that was also comfortable and welcoming,” adds Pedersen. “Collins Square will ultimately evolve into another dynamic and activated city hub and Bar Nacional is part and parcel of that long term vision.” bar_nacional_5 Photos: Peter Tarasiuk ptphotography.com.au Collins Square collinssquare.com.au Bar Nacional barnacional.com.au Walker Corporation walkercorp.com.au CoLAB Studios colabdesignstudio.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

tenthings First Birthday Pop-up Shop

It has been one year since tenthings launched their online store and to celebrate they'll be offering all of their regular collection plus new products chosen exclusively for the pop-up and perfect for Christmas. Enamelware from Noda Horo and Riess; textiles from Kauniste; bags from Southern Field Industries; prints by Charley Harper; lights from East London Furniture; designer clocks from Lemnos; and hand-carved wooden utensils from Warang Wayan. tenthings' unique collection of jewellery, scarves and accessories will also be featured. In addition, they will be stocking some fabulous local wares including candles from White Horse, Christmas cards from An April Idea, festive pickles and relishes from Cornersmith and delicious Katie Swift cordials. The Pop-Up will be held at: Blank Space Gallery 374 Crown St Surry Hills, NSW 2010 From: 14 – 23 December 11am – 6pm Dailyabc
Happenings
Parties

Weylandts Melbourne Launch

Leading South African retailer, Weylandts, launched its first Australian store with a spectacular event for 300 guests. The Weylandts showroom is a 4000 square metre rustic former match factory in Abbotsford, and the event showcased the stunning range of furniture and décor. Guests were treated to a visual feast with innovative food installation, global music and a spectacular fashion moment. Weylandts is South Africa’s leading furniture retailer and is synonymous with beautifully curated, designer pieces at affordable prices. Its first Australian store is located at 200 Gipps Street, Abbotsford and is now open to the public tomorrow. Weylandts www.weylandts.com.au [gallery ids="27241,27242,27243,27244,27245,27246,27247,27248,27249,27250,27251,27252,27253,27254,27255,27256,27257,27258,27259,27260,27261,27262,27263"] Weylandts Melbourne Launch from Weylandts on Vimeo.abc
Architecture
Homes

The Good Neighbour

Cottesloe was originally created as a summer holiday location for well-heeled Perth residents to escape the heat. As the city grew to encompass it, it became increasingly suburbanised. Its wide streets, characterised by the columns of tall Norfolk Island pines, still contain some restored turn-of-the-century beach residences. However, as its desirability has increased, there are more ‘McMansions’ being built, often incorporating coastal ‘features’ such as limestone walls and rammed earth at their entries. the_good_neighbour_2 To a greater extent, Perth architects are making their presence felt up and down the Cottesloe beachfront. Here, and in the immediate neighbourhood, there are more and more well-considered modernist incursions into a suburban domain. For architect, Philip Vivian of Bates Smart, a quiet street lined with the aged Norfolk Island pines, with an open view down to the Indian Ocean, and a stone’s throw from the beach, makes this location one of the most desired beachside settings in Perth. Working in collaboration with architect Madeleine Blanchfield and his Bates Smart design team, Vivian’s design solution for his parents’ retirement home in a street of romantic cottages from a by-gone era can’t be missed. the_good_neighbour_3-4 On approach, one is struck by a simple yet impressive modernist composition. From the street, it appears as a glass box set delicately on a stone base (which conceals the garage) with a single plane of travertine for the floor, glass walls and a flat roof which seems to float above the rammed limestone walls. Mies’ Barcelona Pavilion comes to mind – an image reinforced by the generously sized travertine floor finish that unites the inside and outside spaces. “It is not a matter of style,” says Philip Vivian. “One designs from the inside out... creating places for people to inhabit.” the_good_neighbour_5 Once in the house, the composition of volumes is easily grasped. Internal space is clearly ordered – an ornamental pond delineates the living, dining and kitchen from the bedrooms/study and bathroom wing to the north. The house embraces its surroundings. Various panoramic tableaux engage the viewer – the sunlit northern courtyard and pond with its random, dry-stacked limestone wall background, while to the south, panoramic views through to the street (with its Norfolk Island pines) and the ocean. the_good_neighbour_plans This is a small house with generous proportions – and generous openings connecting the relatively modestly sized interior to the open space, street and landscape that surrounds it. In plan, it consists of two simple rectangles – the living pavilion on the south, and the private/sleeping pavilion on the north. The duality between the public (living) spaces and private (sleeping) spaces is the conceptual parti of the house. The public spaces are open plan and outwardly oriented – unenclosed spaces gathered under a floating Miesian roof that unites internal and external space. The private spaces on the north side of the block are inwardly focused and enclosed within thick masonry walls which create a sense of privacy and retreat. The pond in the courtyard separates the two spatial types, emphasising their duality, and providing a cooling effect. the_good_neighbour_6 There is simplicity of line, pleasing proportions and scale, and elegantly resolved details such as the concealed picture rail tracks at the junction of the walls and ceiling, and the wrap around curtains which can be recessed behind the joinery when not in use. “We have to acknowledge the builder, George Allingham, for his exceptional attention to detail,” says Vivian. Quite an achievement, as in Western Australia, builders committed to fine detail are still few and far between. In this project, various innovations tested the builder’s skills to deliver. For example, the fullheight screens and sliding timber doors that provide privacy and sun control to north-facing rooms were externally mounted on galvanised steel angles. Only skilled labour could have delivered good quality outcomes in the use of these materials. the_good_neighbour_7 A restrained palette of local materials creates a calm and timeless feel. The travertine floor is continued from the garden to the interior. Locally sourced limestone is used as a textured random-patterned garden wall. This material then becomes crushed stone constituting the rammed limestone walls of the house – all harmonising with the smooth uniform surface of travertine floor and simple flat ceiling. As a relief to the rammed earth textured wall, the internal wall surfaces are finished in polished plaster. “It is a continuation of the tradition of the courtyard house,” says Vivian. Hence, the two pavilions – living to the street, the public space, simple parapet wall punctured by door openings, sleeping to the rear separated by a passage, private space, stair to garage and on the living room/master bedroom (east) side by the pond, a garden – the whole of it over a mere 300m2 site. the_good_neighbour_8-9 The articulation of indoor to outdoor spaces, the use of materials, and the positioning of openings are all set to respond to another program: energy conservation and climate comfort. Underfloor heating throughout retains creature comfort that is essential for people in retirement age, even in coastal Perth where temperatures can drop to 0ºC at night and 12˚C in the day for a few weeks of the year. The courtyard pond reflects northern sunlight into the living room. Below ground water tanks recycle captured rainwater to the gardens and pond. Limestone as rubble garden wall or crushed in rammed house walls delivers lowembodied energy and retains thermal mass. the_good_neighbour_10 Lounge chairs by Perth architect, Don Bailey, reclaimed from the iconic 1960s Perth Council House, a Neil Burley sofa, and an Akira Isogawa rug emphasise the point – this is a home firmly in the classical modernist realm, yet of a climate-responsive genre. This house received the Marshall Clifton Award for Residential Architecture at this year’s Institute of Architects Annual Awards 2010, Western Australian Chapter. Photography: Tyrone Branigan tyronebranigan.com Bates Smart Architects batessmart.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Geometric Expansion

The central brief for the project was to convert an occasional holiday home into a main home, and thus required both an internal reconfiguration and that addition of a new structure. fearsn_south_durras_4   The site was well suited for the addition of a studio in terms of position and orientation as it was able to face north, connect well to the house and yard, and have large areas of glazing, shaded by adjacent tree canopies and screened from neighbours by thick understorey. fearsn_south_durras_6 Matt Fearns, director of Fearns Studio, took the project as an opportunity “to explore a little bit with irregular geometry, which was done both as an experiment and because it related to the existing pitched roofs and raked ceilings in the existing house.” fearsn_south_durras_3 While appearing simple because of the regular square plan, the studio geometry is in fact quite complicated, due to the angles created by the different corner post heights, the diagonal ridge and the fold-down roof. “It’s actually hard to pin down once you start thinking about it,” muses Fearns. fearsn_south_durras_11 Materially, the house is simple, and responds to its context. As Fearns comments, “Bush fire constraints, surprisingly, were relatively incidental - they actually were a good excuse to use hardwoods for cladding, windows and doors.” Interior surfaces are predominantly hardwood for flooring and plaster walls. fearsn_south_durras_12 Overall the project has reinvigorated the existing structure and augmented it with a dynamic new space. As Fearns concludes, “The addition of the studio and changes to the main house greatly improved the experience of being at the house – it’s basically just a nicer place to live now.”   Fearns Studio fearns.com.au Photography: Tom Ferguson tomferguson.com.auabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Nomad’s Roost

It took two years for Interior Architect Rebecca Littlemore and her partner Al Yazbek to find a venue that fit their brief. The final choice is a site that occupies the ground floor of an early 20th Century building that had hosted throughout its life a gaming hall for Navy ex-servicemen, a Chinese brothel, an office furniture showroom and finally Spence and Lyda’s design showroom. Given its age, the biggest challenge, as Littlemore states, was “to get a restaurant into the ground floor of a building built in 1927”. nomad_4 Its varied use in the past had left the windows along the main dining area covered with white plasterboard, and stripping this back and exposing the original windows and walls was the starting point for the positioning of the dining room. “I always wanted a central kitchen that was really open”, comments Littlemore, “so the windows dictated the orientation of the whole space.” nomad_14 The columns, a deciding factor in the partners’ attraction to the space, are solid hardwood, and Littlemore was adamant that they “sit proud of their surroundings”.  Again, their positioning affected the layout of kitchen and seating, adding a jigsaw-esque dimension to spatial configuration. However the greatest hurdle was yet to come: 530sqm. of asbestos above the ceiling. Whilst its removal was grueling, there was a silver lining: “what it exposed was amazing, we went to great lengths to leave the ceiling structure exposed,” says Littlemore. nomad_14 The material palette stems from the natural environment, whilst surfaces and lighting play with opacity. Utilitarian fine metal mesh features strongly, and whilst humble, with correct lighting and bottles stored within the shelving it attains a textured aesthetic, filtering light and vision. nomad_12 The space is at once spread out and richly animated, with distinct personalities inhabiting the various areas. Details such as the foot rail around the open kitchen and bar (a large I-beam that anchors the freestanding structures) and a striking artwork of a pig’s skull give the space just enough tension to make it interesting, whilst the generous spaces make it comfortable and allow individual groups to feel intimidate in their settings. nomad_9 Furnishings, like the wine list, follow a local theme, including Henry Wilson A-Joints for the tables, Beclau joinery, Ross Didier chairs and custom-made stools from Melbourn.   Nomad restaurantnomad.com.au Photography: Nicky Ryan nickyryan.comabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

An Architect’s Ale

You may know his architectural projects in Brisbane, but the latest project from Stuart Vokes of owenandvokesandpeters explores another of his passions - beer. The Old Persuader, brewed by Stone & Wood, is a collaboration between Vokes, writer John Birmingham (whose home Owen & Vokes designed, see Habitus#09), photographer Ingvar Kenne and graphic art studio We Buy Your Kids. This lager is the third from The Mash Collective , which brings in creative minds from outside of the industry to experiment with flavours, concepts and design. the_old_persuader_2 Sounds like a tough job. Not surprisingly, considering the writer in the group, this collective took a narrative approach to the process. They discussed (and perhaps did some field testing on?) “The quick beer after work but before heading to dinner; the long slow beer cradled around a fire and a good long chat with a friend; the icy sharp beer you down in one mouthful straight after mowing the lawn,” describes Vokes. the_old_persuader_4 “These narrative discussions informed the evolution of the beer style, selection of hops, alcohol content, and the graphic design of the label – an abstraction of the ‘setting’ of our beer narrative,” he continues. The result is a blend of reddish, dark roasted malts in a high-alcohol, dark lager. “We recognised that dark lagers were not well represented in the local and national market,” explains Vokes. the_old_persuader_5 Jasmin Daly, from Stone + Wood says it’s more than just a gesture; the collaborations in The Mash Collective take full ownership of the process: “Our brewers assist the group, but essentially, from selecting a style, to formulating a recipe, to designing the label and of course coming together on the brew day, they are the ones who bring the beer to life.” But why not use actual beer-brewing experts? “The people who collaborate all share a love for beer, and so they bring a real passion and raw honesty that comes from not necessarily understanding the science behind brewing,” Jasmin explains. the_old_persuader_1 We agree. And are available for future projects. The Mash Collective themashcollective.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

Melbourne Indesign: 22-23 August 2014

Melbourne is now famous as the world’s most liveable city, but locally we know it as Australia’s most art-focused and aesthetically conscious location. The boutique architecture and design trade event Saturday in Design has been held there biannually since 2004, and despite beginning in Sydney in 2003 and having been welcomed by the industry scenes of Brisbane, Hong Kong and Singapore, there has always been something particularly special about the Melbourne event. Perhaps it’s because in a city where street art takes precedence over street signs, good design is a matter of local politics. mid_2014_announcing_dates_6b In 2013, it was time to evolve the event, and instead of Saturday in Design, we premiered its re-imagined format, Indesign: The Event. Its debut in Sydney attracted our largest industry crowd to date - almost 8,500 visitors - and in 2014, we hope you will join us to celebrate the Melbourne premiere of our new look, new name, design event evolution: Melbourne Indesign: The Event, Friday 22-Saturday 23 August 2014. mid_2014_announcing_dates_4 Melbourne Indesign: The Event (or Melbourne Indesign for short) is everything you’ve loved about the past ten years of Saturday in Design expanded across two days, giving you the time to experience every facet and immerse yourself in the design festival atmosphere. There will be product launches, talks, design trails, international guests, surprise collaborations, evening events and so much more. mid_2014_announcing_dates_2 If you were thinking of visiting Australia’s most liveable, artist-run, fashion-conscious city, our humble suggestion would be to visit during that beautiful time in late August when autumn gives way to spring - and when the inner city unites in design precincts for Melbourne Indesign, Friday 22-Saturday 23 August 2014. mid_2014_announcing_dates_1 Sign up here for updates: melbourneindesign.com.au  abc
Fixed & Fitted
Finishes
Design Products
Accessories

Not Just For Cooking

Kitchens have to prove themselves during everyday activities for up to 20 years; a well equipped kitchen can lesson the work load and support kitchen users in their daily tasks. That’s why it pays to carefully consider your personal shopping, cooking and storage requirements and how you will use your kitchen day-to-day. It’s too late to change a kitchen once it has been installed. Blum wants to help ensure practicality is addressed during the planning process, not after. blum2 Good workflows, enough storage space and top quality motion. For Blum, this means: workflow, space and motion – the three essential features of a practical kitchen. blum3 We call our ideas for practical kitchen 'Dynamic Space'. Following these principles will help ensure comfort and enjoyment of your new kitchen well into the future. Blum blum.com.auabc