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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Rebecca Judd

Your name: Rebecca Judd What you do: Design and Lifestyle Collaborator for R.Corporation, publisher of Rebecca Judd Loves blog, Channel 9 Postcards host and Ch 9 news weather presenter. Your latest project: Collaborating with R Corporation on their latest town house developments. R.Corp is committed to creating contemporary, design-driven townhouse developments achieved through unique features including landscape gardens by Australia’s most respected landscape designer, Paul Bangay and initiatives such as Townhouse Customisation Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) my husband 2) my good friends Jacob and Anthony from J'Aton Couture. Their eye for design in a couture sense is unmatched 3) I'm loving interiors stylist Julia Green's recent work What is your favourite… Car model: The new Range Rover Sport which just arrived this month Chair model: Ro chair by Jaime Hayon for Fritz Hansen. I bought two in salmon pink Residential space: My own. I'm currently building my dream home. It will be finished in 2 weeks! Commercial space: I love anything by Hecker Guthrie and the new Prahran Hotel by Techne Architects is pretty cool. Decorative product: Ebony stain by Sikkens Functional product: I love my new Victoria and Albert Napoli freestanding bath made of volcanic stone. I'm looking forward to lighting a couple of candles and christening it with a long soak. Handmade good: my J'aton wedding dress. Heaven. Mass-produced good: IKEA high chairs. Cheap, functional, easy to hose down and not precious at all. The best $20 any new parent will spend. Meal: The pork pancakes are hard to go past at Chin Chin Restaurant: cumulus Inc Drink: a glass of Billecart-Salmon. Perfection. Bar: Rose Bar at Gramercy Park Hotel, NYC Piece of technology: iPhone- can't live without it. It's sad really as it is like oxygen to me.  Vice: Chocolate - Cadbury! It's the best. Virtue: it's nice to be important but it's more important to be nice What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Constantly searching for innovative, pretty and functional wares. This is what I do on a daily basis in my hunt for new ideas for R. Corporation and to share with my loyal RJL readers. It needs to be attainable and relevant. I love making new discoveries...abc
Design Products
Design Accessories

DIY Concrete House Ring

The DIY Concrete House Ring is a high quality silver and concrete composite unisex ring. The ring is packaged in a DIY kit, which invites you to experience the unique and rewarding process of making. Created by architecture graduate Linda Bennett (aka archi-ninja), the design is rooted in the architecture and construction industry. diy_concrete_house_ring_3 The DIY Concrete House Ring is a statement piece, offering multiple narratives that are subject to each unique making and allow you to integrate your personal associations with the meaning of “home.” Find out more at: kickstarter.com/projects/lindab/the-diy-concrete-house-ring Archi-Ninja archi-ninja.comabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Irreverent Thai design

habitusliving: What is your design process? 56thStudio: Although we’d love to say our process is very organised and professional, we really can’t. In fact, it usually starts from casual conversation. It could be a comment on social situation at that time or an update on the latest prime time soap operas. 56thstudio_1 HL:How are your products communicative? 56S: We never really consider ourselves furniture designers or product designers. What we are trying hard to explore is basically a craft of visual communication but instead of picking up a pencil and draw we choose to cut wood, build up forms, tactile textures and tell our story via objects. 56thstudio_3 HL: What kinds of comments do your products make, and how? 56S: I find myself good at being sarcastic and making up sugar-coated criticisms. Therefore, we have the habit of commenting on serious taboos but in a light-headed, whimsical, humorous tone. 56thstudio_4 56thstudio_5 HL: You work on other projects and are learning how to mix cocktails at the moment. How does this give you new insight to your product design work? 56S: Definitely, time management skill. Both of us works 7 days a week and from 8:30am to almost midnight everyday. It has been our habit for almost 3 years now. You really have to love what you’re doing in order to tolerate this brutal routine. For sure, being a little tipsy is very good for creativity as well! 56thstudio_7 56thStudio 56thstudio.com Hero Image: Atirojt Rotratanawaleeabc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Design Accessories

Custom Luxury Bathware by apaiser

Headquartered in Melbourne and with offices in North America, UK, Hong Kong and Singapore, apaiser has a global network of agents servicing Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Asia Pacific. The unrivalled customisation and design versatility of the apaiser stone composite has seen it embraced by leading hotels and designers. Four Seasons, Mandarin Oriental, Hyatt, Ritz Carlton, Starwood and many more global groups have seized the chance to customise a point of difference in the bathroom. The-Leela-Kempinski-Hotel-Spa-Udaipur,-India The Leela Palace Kempinski, Udaipur, India A recent addition to the apaiser portfolio is the Cheval Blanc Randheli in the Maldives - high end luxury elegance at its finest. Opened in November 2013, Cheval Blanc Randheli is an exclusive new property from the luxury fashion group Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy. One of the most luxurious properties on the island, it required customised bathroom products of superb quality, making apaiser a perfect fit. cheval_blanc Cheval Blanc Randheli, Maldives apaiser’s hand-finished stone bath ware is designed in Melbourne and manufactured using sustainable materials such as crushed recycled marble and the highest level of stone content on the market. This superb raw material creates an enhanced bathing experience, while the unique manufacturing process has minimal impact upon the environment, allowing designers to create eco-sensitive bathrooms with confidence. W-Retreat,-Koh-Samui,-Thailand W Retreat, Koh Samui, Thailand The result is simply stunning bath ware – freestanding stone composite baths, basins, vanities and shower bases in sublime and fluid shapes with uniformity of colour, strength and integrity unachievable in natural stone. apaiser bath ware is versatile, light and durable, offering the option for installation in elevated floors. Readily adaptable, it allows freedom of creativity and unrivalled customisation capability for projects. The design flexibility allows designers and architects to create unique shapes and forms embedded with virtually any added component to differentiate a bathroom. Viceroy,-Maldives-Resort,-custom-bathtub Viceroy, Maldives  It's no wonder that apaiser is the stone bath ware of choice for the world's leading luxury hotels and resorts - properties with extremely high design standards - which typify excellence across all areas of operation, showcasing design quality and attention to detail. apaiser apaiser.comabc
Homes

Strangely Familiar

Hero Image: A welcoming entry Two years ago, the three siblings of the family acquired a 50-year-old house in a ‘modernist’ Bangkok housing complex. The complex originally consisted of mass-produced and standardised houses, but most of these dwellings have been variously transformed over the span of five decades. Despite the dilapidated appearance of the house, the location is ideal and the community is inviting. It offers a sense of tranquility hard to find in the bustle of Bangkok. The owners, despite having bought the house because of its setting, strongly felt something could be done to turn the house into something entirely new, and say, “we had a fluid vision of the spaces we needed and felt that the house could be transformed to accommodate those needs. We foresaw something more voluminous and airy.” strangely_familiar_2 From the entrance, looking through family space. The architect answered to these requirements and saw them as productive challenges rather than limiting constraints. Trying to work within the existing structural framework of the house, the architect both extended and re-organised the spaces to offer a new type of spatial sequence and sense of volume. Compartmentalised spaces were pierced through to give more light and natural ventilation. Areas that used to be closed off are now inter-connected to accommodate the individual lifestyles of the inhabitants. The footprint of the house was expanded to accommodate more spaces – the airy kitchen and another bedroom on the ground floor – while the rest of the walls were removed to create a better flow of light and air as well as improved sightlines. On the upper level, two bedrooms and common spaces were re-configured to create a sense of relationship that is at once both private and public. strangely_familiar_3 Leading to private spaces upstairs. The structural framework of the house, however, was almost untouched. Supporting structural elements were added and joined only where needed, adding no complication to the construction process. The familiar and overtly traditional gable roof was split and raised to offer more ventilation and volume. From a standardised and homogeneous mass-produced building, the house has become a strangely familiar structure that re-defines both the lives of its owners and its own identity. strangely_familiar_4 Voluminous and airy family space. The relationship with the natural environment was also taken into account. Specific environmental conditions were no longer treated as external contingencies – for the building cannot operate without or apart from them. The building’s content does not result from design or construction technique alone, but from the action of the surrounding environment, such as light and air, which variously saturates the spaces with a fluctuating quality. Thus, homogeneous walls enveloping the house were given specific performances and tasks, resulting in a variety of experiences throughout the house. Exterior and interior elements now work together to create an ensemble of spaces that answers the owners’ needs. Rather than acting as limiting constraints, the existing spaces in this house act as the embracing framework of every particular circumstance – the unlimited container of all possible contents. strangely_familiar_5 Smaller framed windows, create a dynamic composition. It is a building that does not present itself in a technical or aesthetic language, but it is seen through its workings. The building is its effects and is designed primarily through its actions or performances. Its character shows itself in what these actions and performances do or through the actions they take. The real character of the house does not reside in signs of identity added to its exterior surfaces. The house does not work for ‘everyone’, but responds to the specific habits and rituals of its residents. It was their vision which provided the guiding principles that drove the design to its realisation. As the architect states: “I did not design the house by myself – half the effort came from the owners whose input and spatial requirements became the pretext for the design.” strangely_familiar_6 Large windows allow light to penetrate the interiors. Kitchai Jitkajornvanich adds that “it is a project in which we, as architects, did not aim to create spaces. What we did was simply to envision a different spatial structure and look for possibilities within the existing spatial framework. And all of this was done with productive input from the owners, for they were the ones who knew how their house should perform.” strangely_familiar_7 From the street, a familiar site transformed. As it was to be a house that would grow with them, the owners also foresaw future changes, either through new needs, additional family members or changing lifestyles. They wanted the house to be flexible enough to be shaped and re-shaped by their constantly changing lives. The true measure of a building’s quality, in this sense, is its capacity to respond to both foreseen and unforeseen developments. Being able to respond to unexpected circumstances means that the building has not been so rigidly attuned to preestablished norms. “It may not look like other houses, but it answers our callings, and allows us to transform,” the owners add. And as the building’s performance is the key to its identity, architecture’s performative labour has no end. It is a task that continually presents itself anew. Laan Design laandesign.com Photography: Pirak Anurakyawachon portfolios.net/profile/pirakabc
Design Products
Design Accessories

Echidna Tea Towel

"I have my little studio and house up in Blackheath in the Blue Mountains and all this week the bush fires have been raging near by. So close to destruction and so lucky to be spared. Others are not so lucky. The native wildlife has had a particularly hard time of it so I decided I would create a series of tea towels to raise money for the local organisations that are there helping the animals out. The Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife is a charity set up to distribute funds to just where they are needed most. echidna_tea_towel_1 And I am an ambassador to this fabulous organisation so it makes sense that the money raised will go to them. This is the second design in the Bushfire tea towel series. I've chosen to draw an echidna because these animals are slow and vulnerable. They can't run fast. All they can do is curl up into a ball so there may well be injured ones around. The words on the tea towel tell you what to do if you come across and echidna needing your help." -Julie Paterson director of ideas & design, ClothFabic clothfabric.com/products-page/haberdashery/echidna-tea-towel/abc
Architecture
Homes

Maximum Potential

With a brief to unify living spaces and create garden access in a one bedroom home, Daniel Ash Architects faced the challenge of working within the existing footprint of 80square meters without changing the building envelope, so as to the need for planning permits. d_ash_windsor_house_15 “There was minimal new construction and the design capitalizes on the existing structure to create new and exciting spaces and expand the amenity of the house without demolition”, says Daniel Ash, Director of the firm. “The project was a careful exercise in maximizing the potential of the existing building rather than building a new structure.” d_ash_windsor_house_13 The exterior of the building was retained in full, so material changes were limited to new aluminium windows at the rear of the building and new timber windows for the existing rooms at the front, along with new paintwork and landscaping. d_ash_windsor_house_2 A small arbor was designed for the front facade to grow an ornamental vine over the existing front window to provide some additional shade in summer. d_ash_windsor_house_1 Internally the palette was kept simple, with stained timber floors, plasterboard linings, laminate joinery and Corian bench tips. White painted timber window frames and doors retain the period features of the existing house, whilst black aluminium frames to the rear add to the contemporary nature of the main living space. d_ash_windsor_house_5 The furniture and furnishings are an eclectic mix of pieces ranging from locally sourced artwork and locally made furniture to designer original chairs. d_ash_windsor_house_8 The inclusion of the small lightwell in the center of the house positively impacts a number of spaces in the center of the house. This small gesture greatly improved the quality of the central bedroom and bathroom.   Daniel Ash Architects danielash.com.au Photography: Richard Whitbread richardwhitbread.com.auabc
Happenings
Parties

L-P Bar at Jackies Launch

Kicking off a month long celebration of fine Champagne and French cuisine, The L-P Bar will be open to the public Wednesday through Friday evenings from 5PM to 9PM, with the final night on Friday 13 December. The Intersection's fashion designers and industry joined with Sydney locals to enjoy free-flowing, world-renowned Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé and Laurent-Perrier Brut, while dining on samples from the menu, all in an environment of ivy spilling over the walls, an abundance of candles lining the steps and beautiful florals and plants throughout the courtyard. [gallery ids="26996,26995,26994,26993,26992,26991,26990,26989,26988,26987,26986,26985,26984"] The LP Bar at Jackies thelpbar.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Architectural Landscaping

Landart Landscapes provide award-winning landscape design, construction and maintenance services to residential and commercial properties. The practice offer complete project management of outdoor spaces – from design and construction through to on-going maintenance and horticultural advice, as well as tailored packages to suit individual needs. landart_nov_adv_1 Landart is headed by Principal and Director Matt Leacy, who applies an experienced and widely travelled eye to landscape design, creating spaces that exist in harmony with the built environment and the local climate, and grow ever more attractive as they mature. landart_nov_adv_3 “Designing landscapes that soften the divide between nature and your home is what I love”, comments Matt, “Ideally, there should be a soft transition that leaves you … almost wondering whether you are inside or outside”. landart_nov_adv_4 A central element of Landart’s approach is the reconciliation of the built and natural environment, and when possible the practice aims to evolve the landscape design in parallel to a renovation or new build. Matt explains, “Once a client has a concept for a house that’s a good time to get us involved, we can then develop a design to create the best outdoor environment to complement the architecture of the home”. landart_nov_adv_6 Landart landart.com.auabc
Finishes
Design Accessories

Nebula Code by Cosentino

Inspired by natural stone, Nebula Code features beautiful, rich veins and seamless lines. cosentino_nov_adv_2 Nebula Code is available in five colours, Hélix, Pulsar, Daria, Istmo and Dreis. Just like natural stone, each surface features a unique pattern of veins and colour tones. cosentino_nov_adv_5 Characterised by their warm, natural tones, these new colours help to create striking environments that embrace contemporary design. cosentino_nov_adv_1 Nebula Code offers the same high standard of performance and reliability of Silestone® by Cosentino, including hardness, resistance to impact and scratching, extremely low absorption and an exclusive bacteriostatic property that improves its hygiene. cosentino_nov_adv_2   Silestone by Cosentino silestoneoceania.comabc
Architecture
Homes

Office of the Future

Futurespace, Schiavello and Bolon are design industry leaders focused on delivering innovative and dynamic workplaces through design and service excellence. Together they create intelligent workplace environments that inspire and engage employees and add value to businesses. bolon2 All three companies collaborated for office* 2013 to present the latest in interior workplace design, furniture and flooring. Utilising recycled and demountable materials, the space is designed to encapsulate a collaborative working environment in a multi- use space enabling end users to reconfigure the environment to suit their varying needs. bolon3 The concept revolves around a multi-use, agile space that offers flexible work settings such as team, breakout and hub spaces within a defined area. Bolon bolon.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Rustic Chic at The Shed

Officially named Queens Park Shed, but shortened to “The Shed” by locals, the plain red-brick building was previously used as a stable, sports shed and female changeroom. queens_park_shed_10 The Trippas White Group worked with architect Madeleine Scarfe to redesign and fit out the space, turning it into a community drawing point. The result is a surprising interior which is as functional as it is appealing. queens_park_shed_5 Upon entry, the eye is drawn by the strong leading lines which define the kitchen and preparation areas. Here, the corrugated iron wall and low counters made from fence palings evoke the Outback. queens_park_shed_8 In the main sitting area, a melange of reused furniture is brought into order by subtle but multi-functional sub-divisions of space: visitors can perch on a stool for a quick coffee, take a private meal at the soft seating area, or sit at the long industrial workbenches for group lunches. queens_park_shed_9 The walls, left mostly in their original state, were wire brushed, then sealed. Their patchy textures complement the rough timber and zinc table surfaces. queens_park_shed_7 Despite the industrial elements, the space has an airy organic atmosphere, helped by the warm pastels of the walls. The café benefits from improved light penetration due to the decision to knock out two large windows from the interior dividing walls. queens_park_shed_3 The rustic-chic pastiche is completed with small touches of detail. Metal frame stools are capped with painted wooden tops, adding a splash of colour to what is otherwise a subdued palette. Rusty garden forks and shovels mounted on the walls keep with the theme of the shed, but also recall forks and spoons. queens_park_shed_2 In the corner, a pastel-blue hospital desk serves as a water station, completewith vintage-style enamel jugs and a distinctive tap. queens_park_shed_4 A wooden set of drawers originally used to store nuts and bolts has been transformed into the waiters’ station. Each drawer, containing cutlery and condiments, is removed and placed at the table when a meal is served. queens_park_shed_1 Through careful and deliberate design choices, the team behind Queens Park Shed has pulled together a diverse set of reused elements to achieve a coherent vision of rustic-industrial chic. Trippas White Group trippaswhitegroup.com.au Queens Park Shed trippaswhitegroup.com.au/our-venues/Centennial-Parklands-Dining Photo credit: Trippas White Groupabc