About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Finishes
Design Products
Design Accessories

The Art of Stone

Following last year’s successful introduction of its Classico™ Supernatural designs, Caesarstone is delighted to announce its 2013 introduction of seven new designs into the Classico™ collection. This includes four additional Supernatural designs which feature for the first time, the exclusive wider veins, made using Caesarstone’s proprietary technology. Caesarstone3 The latest collection includes; Vanilla Noir™, a classic rich black base featuring wider delicate natural light veins; Alpine Mist™, a white cool grey background featuring wider delicate natural crisp white veins; Bianco Drift™, inspired by light natural granites; Calacatta Classic™, a long awaited featuring stronger light grey veins on a white base; Raw Concrete™, inspired by concrete colours and surface; Clamshell™ a beautiful soft fusion of light grey and white features, and; Summer Rye™ a warm light brown structure with soft wisps of white throughout. Caesarstone1 “The Supernatural designs have had an incredible response from consumers and professional designers alike," says Andrew Dixon, GM Marketing. "This combination of high quality nature inspired designs with the benefits of quartz are enabling great design freedom." Caesarstone2 All the 2013 new designs are backed up by proven and trusted quality, 10 Year Limited Warranty and after sales service. Caesarstone caesartsone.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

Reassemble Exhibition at Bondi Pavilion

Seven artists have been tasked with reusing found objects with surprising results. The stand out piece, by Kath Norman and Thierry Lacoste is based around the following premise: One beach For one hour Each week For six months At Congwong Beach NSW National Park, La Perouse Pop in to see this large illuminated artwork and much more until 10th November. Reassemble – 30 October -10 November 2014 Free admission, open 10-5pm daily. By Estelle Benfield, Mark Coulston, Thierry Lacosta, Katherine Norman, Cherry Piper, Caroline Quaine, Melissa Selby-Brownabc
Architecture
Homes

Sheltering Sky

Hero Image: Cladding is special rusticated horizontal Western Red Cedar weatherboards finished with Resene Woodsman Waterbone exterior stain. Roof is Trimdeck profile ZRX metal in metallic gunmetal colour. Over 50 islands pepper the Hauraki Gulf, the body of water off Auckland’s east coast. Many are in public conservation, and several have farms and holiday houses. Waiheke Island is the most populated, with over 7,500 permanent residents. Regenerating bush, an indented coastline, vineyards and olive groves define its unique character. The western headland, previously in pasture, has been developed into smaller private blocks with covenanted forest and coastal walkways. A small valley opening on to Owhanake Bay makes up one pocket of this changing landscape. sheltering_sky_2 Fixed glazed window panels beaded into copper surrounds by builder Erin and Gary Clatworthy purchased land on the eastern wall of this valley, where a young forest surrounds small grass ‘islands’ designated for human habitation. While preparing to build, they watched while some tree species failed to gain a foothold in the thin soils. They set about cleaning up the stream, and planting mature natives to advance bush regeneration and bring back the birds. The land is now ‘re-cloaked’, and with each passing season the forest becomes ever more lush. sheltering_sky_3 Left: Pill box windows to each end of house and angled vertical slot windows along hallway by builder. Right: Pools and ponds sealed and plastered masonry by Executive Poolshop. With such a strong commitment to the environment, they sought out architect Dave Strachan to design their home. For over 10 years, Strachan has devoted his practice to environmentally responsive architecture. “I like to think the moves we make are driven by that particular place, by that particular landform and climate,” he says. “Those moves are driven by what’s around you. Just open your eyes, feel the breeze, watch the light dancing off the water – that’s what informs. Hopefully when you do that, you can then say ‘yes, this building has a sense of place’, it feels like it belongs.” sheltering_sky_4 Oven/hob is Falcon 1092 Deluxe Range, rangehood is Smeg CK2000 Powerpack in custom stainless steel, fridge is General Electric A23SSAA Profile Arctica, dishwasher is Asko D3530. Kitchen custom designed by architects with Austral Hoop Pine panels and drawer fronts. Steep contours and the desire for a singlelevel home defined a long narrow footprint. Three pavilions – guest, living, sleeping/study – circle the valley bowl. The negative spaces created between let air and water ‘penetrate’ the building – one of the first steps the architect made to physically and metaphorically link to the environment. The existing dynamics of the valley catchment – water needing to find its way down to the stream and out to the bay – thus have an expression in the building. At each junction, an external pond sits against a bank of louvres. The water continues inside to create two ‘bathhouses’ – one has a plunge pool and the other a bathroom. Although thermally sealed, these spaces are detailed as though they are out of doors – slatted floors, pergola roofs and Cedar weatherboard lining. sheltering_sky_5 Western Red Cedar ‘under slats’ to pool house and bath-house ceilings (gapped to let light through polycarbonate roofing). By tucking the house into the hill just off the ridge line, Strachan has created a sheltered outdoor room and courtyard, and a building with a subtle physical presence. The walls peel open along this western elevation, at angles defined by the winter sun. These light shafts and the long corridor axes extend our view out into the garden. Typically, each one has a focal point beyond – a sculpture or an elegant Nikau palm – and the landscape is drawn into the architectural composition. sheltering_sky_6 Left: Rapsel Lavasca Mini bath, Paini floormounted bath filler tapware and shower, DC Short towel rails, all from Metrix. Custom mirror set into cabinetry. Walls are Western Red Cedar weatherboards and glazed east louvre banks. Hardwood decking over concrete floors. Häfele cabinet light from ECC Lighting. Right: Interior wall lining throughout is Austral Hoop-pine plywood, clear sealed with waterbased polyurethane. There is quite a different character and experience along the eastern side of the property. The intimacy of the hill contrasts with the openness of the valley, the view towards Owhanake Bay, and north-easterly light and breeze. Strachan has responded by conceiving of these rooms as a verandah. Large gas struts open awning windows to 90º and the jambs are detailed as posts. This allows an immediate connection with the outside, unencumbered by another layer of building had a verandah been built. By being cantilevered, the viewer is pitched further into the valley below. “These views and vignettes draw you in,” explains Strachan. “They are quite direct and quite powerful – you are almost forced to engage with what’s beyond.” sheltering_sky_7 APL magnum series ‘gas strutted’ windows, black anodised by Origin Windows. Ceilings throughout are Meranti Plywood finished with Sikkens. Samsara bed by Cuno Frommherz for Cassina, Bestlite 1930 reading lamps by Robert Dudley Best. Inside versus outside is a recurring theme in architecture. In New Zealand it is most often dealt with in baches, or holiday houses, where bedroom wings are completely detached from the main living space. The experience recalls camping holidays, where a group of small dwellings create a whole, and the elements are so much more tactile. The Clatworthy House is somewhat of a hybrid. It was designed for longer stays than just weekends and holidays, and yet the couple still wanted to feel as though they had left the city behind. sheltering_sky_8cConcrete floor with cantilevered edges, black oxide finish, clear sealed. Interior doors are Western Red Cedar finished with Sikkens, and glazed louvre windows all from Nick’s Timber Joinery. Furnishings: LC5.F Le Corbusier couch, LC13 Le Corbusier lounge chairs, all by Cassina; Frank Gehry ‘Wiggle’ chair by Vitra; dining chairs are Mario Bellini CAB by Cassina; PH Snowball pendant light by Louis Poulsen; Altitude dining table by Neal Smith; wall lights throughout from ECC Lighting. “We have blurred the edges between inside and outside. The halls are treated with exterior materials – there are Cedar weatherboards, copper blades, raw concrete plinths, a decking floor. When you go to the bedrooms or study you venture ‘outside’, you go on a journey. They are thermally enclosed, but it is the bedrooms and living spaces that act as thermal boxes. The halls are transition spaces,” says Strachan. sheltering_sky_9 As an environmental building, it generates most of its winter heating requirements with solar panels and an exposed concrete slab. Floor vents on the eastern wall bring in conditioned air that has passed over the bush, and high-level windows pull it through, creating natural air currents. The house catches its own rainwater and a bore is used for irrigation. Material selection is deliberately recessive – metallic gunmetal roofing reflects the clouds, black joinery and black-stained weatherboards absorb the light. Inside, there are no paint finishes – all walls, ceilings and built-in furniture are naturally finished timber and plywood. sheltering_sky_10 Three black pavilions (guest, living and sleeping/study) circle the valley bowl. This is a discreet building. It has been furnished sparingly to allow views and natural materials to remain the foci. And with the owners’ love of boating, the links between this finely tuned house and their boat out in the bay are evident everywhere. Gary’s planting and conservation vision – in association with landscape architect, Bryan McDonald – has advanced the forest regeneration by decades, a wonderful legacy for future generations. Strachan Group Architects sgaltd.co.nz Photography: Simon Devitt simondevitt.comabc
Design Products
Furniture

Marilyn’s Unforgettable Beauty

Marilyn from Bretz is a classic piece, full of dramatism and chic. The Swarovski crystals sparkle mystically like diamonds and emit an incredible force that draws you in. And each individual crystal button is lovingly stitched onto the upholstery by hand in the traditional Chesterfield pattern, creating that important Bretz finish. Bretz The Marilyn lounge is exudes sophistication in both looks and comfort.  Since the armrest is the backrest at the same time, the sofa can either be seated on in a communicative half-circle or counterpart. Bretz3 The collection contains a variety of elegant sofas, corner lounges, beds, dining tables and chairs, along with matching accessories – like benches and upholstered mirrors allowing you to create an exciting and diverse array of room compositions. Bretz2 Each item can be ordered in a range of fabrics, textures and colours and can be decorated with upholstered fabric-/leather buttons, customised to a personal taste. Bretz4 Pompadour is Marilyn’s accompaniment, a flirtatious and frivolous piece with a touch of humour.  The swivel-bottom chair is the ideal model for energetic souls whereas the fixed-feet Pompadour model provides an upright posture to those who prefer distinguished stability. Bretz bretz.comabc
Happenings
What's On

California Design 1930–1965: Living in a Modern Way

The first Barbie doll, classic Levi Strauss 501 jeans, prototype furniture by Charles and Ray Eames, and early designs of ‘leisure wear’ are all heading to the Queensland capital for Queensland Art Gallery's (QAG) exhibition, ‘California Design 1930–1965: Living in a Modern Way’. california_design_2 The highly innovative gallery is showcasing over 250 examples of Californian design, spanning the period of 1930 to 1965. Pieces curated for the exhibition display the vast and lasting effects that Californian design has had on contemporary culture. california_design_3 The style of design reflects the laid-back, relaxed ethos that California embodies - somewhat similar to a stereotypical Australian lifestyle. Further highlights from the exhibition include Van Keppel-Green’s all-weather loungers, graphic designs by Saul Bass and Alvin Lustig, architectural drawings, plans and photographs, and the futuristic looking Airstream Clipper (1936). california_design_4 The exhibition is on tour from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and is curated by Wendy Kaplan. Kaplan believes ‘so many of the exhibition's themes will resonate with an Australian audience. Both post-war California and Australia had burgeoning, newly prosperous populations, a benign climate that permitted life to be led informally and largely out of doors, and embraced design innovation and new materials.’ california_design_5 ‘California Design 1930–1965: Living in a Modern Way’ runs at the Queensland Art Gallery from November 2nd 2013 – February 9th 2014. qagoma.qld.gov.auabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Green Tea Steel

For Melbourne-based architects Techné, the central challenge of the project was to preserve the heritage status of the structure while designing a space flexible enough to operate across Melbourne’s varied seasonal conditions. barry_cafe_5 “We utilised a range of window types to address these challenges, including a combination of operable sash movements, louvers and fixed glazing,” explains Techné project architect Alex Lake. barry_cafe_2 “We also integrated fixed bench seating into the shopfront glazing to promote street activation and to capitalise on the operable façade during warmer seasons”. The end result is a façade of green tea-coloured steel louvers and a counterweighted steel window frame that lifts up and engages the freshly renovated Barry’s with the Westgarth streetscape. barry_cafe_3 The floor-to-ceiling bespoke windows from Windows on the World are also a welcome sight for patrons and passers-by. The design maximises natural illumination and accentuates the light-filled, white-walled interiors of the café. “The result is absolutely beautiful,” says Windows on the World director Charlotte Atkinson. “I believe it’s a first for Australia”.   Barry Café barrycoffeeandfood.com Techné Architects techne.com.au Windows on the World windowsontheworld.com.au Photography: Ari Hatzis arihatzis.comabc
Happenings
What's On

Man About Bundanon

habitusliving: How was the idea for ‘Man About The House’ born? Tim Ross: Ever since I was a drama nerd at Uni, I've been interested in all sorts of spaces for performing and as I’m a bit of a nutty Modernist it seemed to make sense that I use spaces that I love for a show. It seems a strange fit to put comedy and architecture together but when I began working with the Historic Houses Trust on new uses for spaces, it seemed logical that I do something in Rose Seidler House, which is one of their properties. Thankfully they are very progressive and were happy to take a chance. I have been doing music with Kit Warhurst for years and I wanted to expand the show from a straight standup/story telling event to once that has different layers so it became really important to me to have him involved. hl: What convinced you that the combination of a music/comedy show and quality architecture would be successful? TR: I knew it would take a while for us to get it right but I suppose I approached it with a purely selfish point of view and thought about all the houses this could get me into and I took it from there. Obviously all the properties are the stars and we needed to present something that worked in a small space and also made sense in the space. This has and still is a work in progress because every space is different. When we took the show to Auckland and got a standing ovation I knew that we had really got it right. What really has made me happy is that people have taken a chance and come to the show, particularly in Melbourne. My hometown really is a cracker when it comes to getting off their butts and going to see something. I've also had great support from our Creative Producer Stuart Couzens who has a fabulous company called Alfred. They have believed in the potential of the show since day one and have put time, energy and effort into it simply because they like it. A very cool company. bundanon_1 Boyd Education Centre, Riversdale, where 'Man About the House' will be performed on November 16 hl: When composing the material for the show, how did the different environment you would be performing in affect the process? TR: Despite the houses being amazing they aren't always a dream for Kit and I to perform in. Small crowds can be difficult for comedy and we often only have forty people in the room. Some people really find things funny but don't laugh and this is heightened in a small area. We also have a wide range of ages attend and I tend to modify the show based on the crowd. If they are design focused I tend to extend my material on the houses and their peculiarities but if it’s a late show where people are there for a good time I soup up the jokes. hl: To what degree is the material tailored for each home? Do you allow for some improvised material that links to the specific venue? TR: For every house I tend to deliver a simple backstory to the house and I spend a bit of time researching the house. It doesn't take much to find the best and funniest stories and I focus on very relatable family stories because houses are about the people who live in them. I also talk about our journey and the houses we've been to and the associated stories. I envision that a large amount of the show will end up being about our adventures or misadventures in wonderful homes. bundanon_2 Boyd Education Centre, Riversdale, where 'Man About the House' will be performed on November 16 hl: Have there been any unexpected challenges or opportunities involved in the new format? TR: The biggest challenge has been explaining how the show works so people get their head around it and come along. Financially it's challenging but we have been given great support from Tourism Tasmania, Tourism New Zealand and Jetstar. hl: What has been your favourite home to perform in so far? TR: This is hard, I love them all. As a walk-up-to-the-house and walk-around-the-house experience Rose Seidler House wins hands down. As an experience for seeing the show the Walsh St House cannot be beat. Tony Lee who is the Director of the Boyd Foundation has done a great job with assisting us put on the show and you really get the feel that you are going to a house party at Walsh St. The courtyard is a perfect theatre so that is what makes it so special. I also loved the Hobart Dorney house because of its view and the fact you really are walking into someone’s home. hl: Would you consider performances in other unconventional settings? Why/why not? TR: I think we will expand where we perform. I have my eye on a couple of unique spaces that are outside our normal criteria but will have a similar feel. We believe that if we like the space others will too. TIM ROSS - Man About the House from Toby Morris on Vimeo. Tim Ross will perform the next instalment of 'Man About the House' on Saturday, November 16 at the Boyd Education Centre, Riversdale. For tickets and further information visit the Bundanon Trust website: bundanon.com.au/content/man-about-houseabc
Architecture
Around The World
NOT HOMES

A Pearl in a Tin Mine

Located at the quieter end of Phuket’s Nai Yang Beach, Indigo Pearl is a local, family-owned hotel built out of passion and respect for the island’s pre–tourism legacy as a major tin mining area. The owning family’s mining business was given a rich transformation by Bensley Design Studio, evolving into a sumptuous resort. indigo_pearl_6 As Mies van de Rohe said, ‘God is in the detail’, and Bill Bensley, the founder of Bensley Design Studio and a patriot to antiques and art pieces, made sure that nothing was left without his personal touch. “We walked with the owner and drew hundreds of drawings on every corner of the site, not just showing one big drawing that says it all” he comments on the conceptual process for the design. indigo_pearl_4 Each public area is at once the product of a specific architectural vision and a continuation of a shared design theme, drawing on the aesthetics of the location’s background. The lobby space displays a fusion of in-depth research into the miners’ life and tools, abstracted through reclaimed building components, and various display art pieces throughout the hotel by John Underwood, an Australian resident artist. indigo_pearl_1 Interspersed among the contemporary industrial art are local Thai pieces and the mimicked floor tiles of the “Khid” pattern from Sedge grass woven mats. The dining hall below displays a faithful continuation of the mining theme – even down to the cutlery - while the hidden sports bar is a casual, western-orientated space set against a rustic setting. indigo_pearl_8 Smaller spaces also bear the mark of careful consideration, with the quiet library behind the reception desk maintaining the common indigo colour scheme from the lobby, but embellished with a chrome-finished mesh and a large ‘operation table-like’ lamp in the middle of the room, giving the impression of a chic laboratory. indigo_pearl_7 Accommodation is spread out over a modernist landscape of mature plantation trees, and serves as a visual palate cleanser between the intensely vibrant public areas and peaceful private dwellings. The rooms sustain the overarching theme in details from tissue boxes to faucets, however appropriately softened and muted. Balconies can be accessed from both bed- and bathrooms, establishing a connection with the peaceful landscape via the uses of daybeds and the oversized bathtubs. indigo_pearl_10 As Bensley comments, “We want to think outside of the box for a place with a story to tell that is more than to just sleep and stay at”. And what better story to tell than one that is so faithful to its heritage. indigo_pearl_5 Indigo Pearl indigo-pearl.com Bensley Design Studio bensley.comabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A: Kim Shipton

Your name: Kim Shipton What you do: Textile art, design and production of home and fashion accessories using plant dyes, botanical eco-printing and traditional fibre crafting techniques. fibrecraft.com.au Your latest project: Natural Base showroom and a three dimensional textile wall hanging naturalbase.com.au/eco-textile-wall-hangings/ Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Claudy Jongstra 2) Tomomi Sayuda 3) Jaquie Hagan What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: After my beloved Suzuki Gsxr750 I’m contemplating the next step. Perhaps a VICTORY Hammer S. I love the curve line to the cowl, the v-twin engine, the torque and the height features Chair model: How can there be only one? In terms of ‘phases’ of admiration, the current phase is Arne Jacobsen’s Swan chair. Residential space: Villa K by Cell Space Architects Commercial space: Nowhere by Sajima resort (Yasutaka Yoshimura architects) Decorative productNaminarquina rugs Functional product: Solar cells Handmade good: Dolls from Aguas Calientes, Peru Mass-produced good: Fair trade anything meal: My partner’s eggs (from our own chooks), stir fried haloumi, chopped sage with comfrey, asparagus, mushrooms, cherry tomatoes and mild peppers. restaurant: Mr Wong, Sydney drink: home-grown, brewed lemon verbena barGreen & Blacks Organic (chocolate bar) item in your studio: My godmother’s sewing machine. (I spent many days in her dress making studio as a child hiding among the endless rows of buttons, fabrics, dresses and the drilling sound of her over locker). piece of technology: My small quiver of camera’s; mainly Canons from different eras. historical figure: Salvador Dali fictional character: Leeloo (The fifth Element) vice: Spanish shoe designs virtue: Picking up elderly women who are hitch-hiking What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? A seeker of invention and expression within history, cultures and environments.abc
Design Products
Design Accessories

Space Furniture Accessories

Hero Image: Vitra Ball Clock Space provide the highest quality product and proud to be the exclusive Australian supplier of leading international design houses including Architect Made, Anna Torfs, Joe Cariati and Tse Tse. space_nov_adv_1 Alessi La Stanza Basket Joe Cariati produces the highest quality hand-blown glass out of his Los Angles studio. space_nov_adv_10Joe Cariati Glass Bottles Trained in the skills of Venetian glass-blowing, Cariati is highly regarded in the industry having received numerous scholarships, awards and residencies. Cariati uses a relentless ‘less is more’ approach to his work and sees his work from a unique viewpoint. "If I had to choose one word to describe my work it would be ‘Air!” says Cariati. “I love to blow the glass out very thin, I'd love to see it float off the table!” space_nov_adv_5 Tse Tse Igloo Tse Tse create beautiful, unique pieces straight out of France. Started over twenty years ago, designers Catherine Levy and Sigolene Prebois pride themselves on making timeless pieces that steer away from the current fashion, meaning these pieces are impossible to date and forever special. space_nov_adv_8c Moooi Delft Blue Collection Since their inception in 2001, Dutch design house Moooi has been impressing the world with their signature pieces that are as quirky asthey are beautiful. The Moooi collections are based on the key principles of being exclusive, daring, playful, exquisite and based on the belief that design is a question of love, making every piece a collector’s item. space_nov_adv_9 Kose Porcelain Bottle   space_nov_adv_6 The Dots Coat Hooks Perfect for gifting, here are the Top Ten Gift Ideas from Space 1. Alessi La Stanza Basket 2. Vitra Clocks 3. Tse Tse Igloo & Crockery 4. Tse Tse D’avril Vase 5. Avec Soft Furnishings 6. Praxis Soft Grip Torch 7. Moooi Delft Blue Collection 8. Kose Porcelain Bottle 9. Joe Cariati Petite Small Decanters Vase 10. The Dots Coat Hooks Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

‘Grove’ at Barometer Gallery

The photographs were taken over a three year period by journalist and photographer Jane Burton Taylor, who travelled to the south of Italy to experience and document the olive groves in all four seasons, including the time in which they are harvested using nets thrown on the ground  to collect the ripened olives. grove_6 The works are contemplations on the possibilities of human beings and nature working in harmony. "Olive trees need to be pruned and harvested to prosper, so it is a very healthy interdependency," she says. grove_4 Jane, who is a regular contributor to our magazines Habitus and Indesign and has been writing about architecture for the past two decades, says the olive groves attracted her for many reasons, including their distinct spatial dimension. "They are like  architectural spaces," she says. "They are after all really man-made natural spaces because it requires both humans and nature working together to create them." grove_2 The works are presented as triptychs to give a sense of the panorama and absorption one feels when standing in an old olive grove "The triptychs are not sequential. They are made up from different viewpoints taken within the same grove. I did this to give an idea of the dreamlike feeling of remembering, perhaps in an idealised way," Jane says. "The reality is usually different of course, but the former is arguably more essential and more potent for the way we add our own passion and interpretation to it." grove_1 The works were shot on a medium format Hasselblad camera (analogue) and are limited editions. Jane is nearing completion of a Master of Art in Sculpture and was recently represented by a work titled 'Clean Washing'  in the Rookwood Cemetery Sculpture Walk and also in October in Mosman's In-Situ exhibition. Some of the works from the former exhibition, Clean Washing, will also be on show at Barometer Gallery. grove_5 Grove will be on display at Barometer Gallery from 13th November until December 1. Barometer Gallery barometer.net.auabc