About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

Architecture
Homes

Home by Design

Hero: Upstairs is a gallery filled with Varakan’s personal collection of art pieces and everyday objects. In 1997, Varakan Tipprapa was happily working as an interior designer in Bangkok when the Asian financial crisis began to emerge. As economic stability and the sense of socio-cultural equilibrium were suddenly thrown into question, the notion of ‘design’ seemed out of place. What should a designer do at a time when daily concerns were far removed from design and aesthetics? home_by_design_1 Functional pieces become aesthetic subtleties in this house. With all this in mind, Tipprapa began to question his own design education and experience. Can one really be an expert in any design field and continue the same endeavour throughout his or her life? Or can one instead become multidisciplinary and allow the designer to move from one field to the next without limits? These wonderings inspired Tipprapa to move from Thailand to the United States (US) to study architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), where his previous education and experience in interior design was no longer the centre of his universe but became a handy background for his future visions. At IIT, Tipprapa was exposed to the limitless nature of design, discovering photography followed by countless other creative disciplines. A chance to study at Bauhaus University in Weimar, Germany, also re-familiarised him with the social and cultural implications of design. The image of a designer firmly attached to his desk trying to meet the deadline on a daily basis soon began to disappear. home_by_design_2Varakan Tipprapa, the curator of his own home-gallery. After working in the US for a while, Tipprapa began to focus on the social role of a designer and the nature of his contribution to the design community as a whole. Despite Chicago being a productive background for any design professional, Tipprapa felt that in order for him to create something worthwhile, he needed to truly understand the place as well as the people. No longer seeing design as an autonomous discipline, with designers creating objects that could belong anywhere, Tipprapa wanted his design to be born out of the place it is situated. It might be true that design nowadays can transcend the specificity of location and become something truly international in both intention and outcome – but this was not his vision. home_by_design_3 Flowing living spaces allow for clear sight lines and plenty of natural light. Tipprapa decided to return home in 2006 and to begin again with newfound possibilities. Architecture, interior design, photography, as well as other design endeavours were no longer separated. Teaching also became an exciting new task he discovered, somehow fulfilling the sense of civic contribution he longed for. All of these simply became parts of his daily life, an ensemble of design acts fused into one expression of self and creativity. home_by_design_4The living space is an ensemble of furniture and objects with various origins. Moving back to Thailand meant finding a place to live. With passion in art and photography, Tipprapa yearned for the rich museum culture he once had in the US. So his first instinct was to create an environment that could become an artistic sanctuary of his own. Simple and almost blank from the outside, the richness of the house lies in its interior. Located near his parents’ house, his newly-built home also became a design studio, a photography studio, as well as a personal art gallery. His aim was to create “A house that is a personal recollection of my past, but at the same time anticipates the transformation of my future.” home_by_design_6 A comparatively subdued entry belies the warmth and personality inside. Tipprapa is, in many ways, the curator of his own collection, which consists of not only art pieces but also objects of everyday living that he selectively surrounds himself with. Art, furniture and objects are the artefacts of his diverse interests. They record his life and travels, becoming physical memories. Because none of the things in his house are ‘designed’ to be displayed with any other, they do not require any specific setting and so offer a true freedom of arrangement. This type of re-arrangement is also facilitated by the fluid interior organisation of the space. Mostly open and free, the spaces of the house flow from one part to the next without interruption. Only a hint of territorial demarcation reminds the inhabitant of the place and activities he engages in. And because of the openness, when the house is filled with friends and family, it becomes a welcoming social space of familiar objects that make everyone feel at home. Nothing seems intrusive, and nothing screams for special attention. Every piece of furniture and every object is orchestrated into a unified rhythm, allowing all to stand quietly yet uniquely in their place, waiting to be discovered. home_by_design_7Left: The courtyard has a rustic charm. Right: Different shapes and forms, a creative exploration by the owner. Varakan Tipprapa’s house is a building that is truly productive, in the sense of its ability to modify what it inherits. This modification includes taking a stand against what the natural as well as urban environment offers. The task of the building is thus to discover what is, not given what might possibly be. It is not resistance nor resignation to the context, but an articulation and re-interpretation of the place, in order to construct a private environment through which the inhabitants can envisage their lives. Photography: Owen Raggett owenraggett.comabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

For the Love of Food

habitusliving: How did the idea for Scrag End start? Sascha Rust: There was a brief phone call between my Brother and I from virtually opposite sides of the world, and a seed was planted. We were both attending to some work away from home and entirely unaware, we had both came to the exact same realisation — there needs to be more transparent and honest discussions on food. We virtually announced it to each other in unison—we wanted to create a magazine. While these days we are calling it a journal, at the time I think we were both heavily influenced by magazines such as Lucky Peach and releases like those of the fantastic publication Meatpaper. scrag_end_6 hl: Who are the main people involved and what are their backgrounds? SR: At the core of Scrag End is a production team of two guys armed with laptops, Bjorn and myself. Bjorn brings with him knowledge and skills from a career in industrial design as the projects Creative Director. While my training as a chef in kitchens both locally and abroad brings some perspective as Editor to a lot of the work we do. While technically Scrag End was to be a side project for both of us, it very quickly escalated and we are now both diverting some serious time towards developing the journal further. Of course we work with a large number of contributors and collaborators and as well as this, some very talented and sympathetic people with far deeper backgrounds in publishing that have taught us much across various stages of production. scrag_end_3 hl: What is the core philosophy/objective of Scrag End? SR: Over the past few decades—particularly in the new world—there has been serious neglect in the sharing of knowledge that was once intrinsically linked to our livelihood. To me these are the convenience decades. Up until quite recently the vast majority of us had very little knowledge or simply did not know that they should care about what happened to our food on its journey to our plate. Much of the food media that has existed, largely focussed on what to do with the ingredients once they were already in your fridge of pantry. Scrag End positions its focus beyond these things, there are no recipes. Instead we direct our efforts towards divulging the personal stories of the people who are behind each and every aspect of the things we consume and sharing them in an honest and engaging manner. Of course there is also quite a lot of food porn too. scrag_end_4 hl: How was the process of developing the publication? Were there any unexpected challenges or opportunities? SR: We started talking about Scrag End around two years ago however serious production only began within the last eight months. As relative newcomers to publishing, yes, in short, there were false starts—we both had some harsh realities about journalism and publishing to learn. The least of these was perhaps the length of the editing process when engaging people who are not writers first, but chefs and producers. If you were to look at the Scrag End of two years ago, (it was not called that) it was a very different beast to the one you see now. Our methodology in the production of the journal however has yielded some very strong personal relationships in quite short amount of time—all of whom have been hugely supportive to us. It goes to show some of the huge amount of energy that exists in this industry. scrag_end_5 hl: How has the initial response to the first issue been? SR: Surprising. We both knew that we had created something that had satisfied our intentions, but I think we are both now enjoying how positively people have reacted to Issue Zero. For me, this proves that people are ready to start talking intellectually about food again and begin to repair a lot of the issues that exist in our food systems. We have created a publication with some very serious intentions however it tackles them in a manner that is fresh, often irreverent and entertaining. This engages people, our storytelling is unique in this way and people seem to be warming to that. scrag_end_7 hl: Where would you like to see Scrag End go from here? SR: The brand potential of Scrag End is enormous, our number one objective from the beginning however, has been to talk to, meet, and share the stories of those who dedicate their lives to the joy that all of us are able to derive from food. We are working on forging our journal's future, but we have already set our eyes on some collaborative events and you can expect to see us attached to other forward thinking food-centric organisations. First and foremost though, we began Scrag End to share stories and engage people in them, and that is precisely what we intend to do. scrag_end_8 Scrag End scragend.comabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Sample Pleasures

In the saturated beer market, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to stand out. Beer brands have to work hard to impress. For Melbourne’s latest brew, Sample, the reality was just as challenging. But six months in, its first batch is being consumed in over thirty of Melbourne’s top establishments and bars. “The level of interest was unexpected, but very welcome,” says founder Vedad Huric. He believes the intrigue comes down to Sample’s core philosophy – limited (batches), daring (design) and quality (taste). An architect by profession, Vedad has been experimenting with new possibilities in the built environment for the past decade. From designing towers with suspended sky gardens to state of the art laboratories, Vedad has always concentrated on the brave. sample_brew_3 Using the same philosophy, he explored making a different kind of beer, one that fitted our appetites for quality, taste and design. “I was finding a lot of good beer in bad bottles and bad beer in good bottles,” he says. “I just wanted to hold one I was proud of drinking, and when I didn’t find it – I thought I’d create it.” “Sample simply defines what we want to create; great examples,” adds Vedad. After almost two years in the making, Sample’s first limited edition batch was released in April this year - smooth American Pale Ale classic with a hint of novelty from citrus and stone fruit aromas balanced with a malty drive. sample_brew_1 Importantly for beer connoisseurs, Sample comes unfiltered and completely additive and preservative free. To retain 100% freshness of flavour, the batch is also un-pasteurised with a short shelf life. “Melbourne’s ethos is rooted in quality and design,” says Vedad. “Sample is a direct result of this. It’s born today for beer drinkers of today. It’s a beer that doesn’t scare away a glass of red wine. It suits it.” sample_brew_5 The last two months have seen a growing increase in bars and restaurants stocking Sample including Andrew McConnell’s Moon Under Water at Builder’s Arms Hotel, Mess Hall, the Meatball & Wine Bar, Tonka (the sister restaurant of fine-dining establishment, Coda), Los Barbudos, Von Haus, 99 Problems, Sweetwater Inn and Captains of Industry, who were first to adopt Sample as their staple beer in the establishment. With a line of collaborations already in the pipeline that align with Sample’s philosophy, and a secret brew for batch number 2, the future for this intriguing new beer brand looks to be one of hard work and fun. sample_brew_2 “We also just got an order from our first Sydney bar,” says Vedad. “It’s great but with it came a postcard from the future. I turned it over and it was blank. Guess we’ll see how things work out.” Sample Brew samplebrew.com.au  abc
Design Products
Accessories

Pret-A-Printer

The competition called for entries of wearable 3D printed fashion pieces that were water inspired and had a sustainable agenda. The 3D print was meant to be a conversation piece about the opportunities presented by 3D printing technology in the fashion world. electrolysis_2 The competition was organised in conjunction with the launch of NTU's $30 million Additive Manufacturing Centre which will house state-of-the-art 3D printers. Kaei Woei and Low comment on the inspiration for their deasign, "While researching on water technologies and sustainability, we were compelled by an image of the electrolysis of water to create hydrogen. Focusing on the water molecules’ transient change of state, we express this in the design with a series of solid and “open” spheres. electrolysis_3 "The network of “open” spheres created a lace-like fabric, which created a contrast between the solid and transparent pieces. At a micro level, stillness is embodied by the ripple-like patterns, which has a texture that alludes to a traditional textile weave. "The silhouette of the design echoes a traditional Chinese cheongsam, creating an intriguing dialogue between tradition and technology." electrolysis_4 The final fashion piece was made up of 26 different sections and took approximately 170 hours to print in Flexible PLA. (Polylactic Acid). A version was also created comprising of only five parts for printing on a large format 3D Printer, allowing one to streamline its production. "We wanted to showcase how disruptive 3D printing has become," the duo state, "and how it has empowered the end user. We had challenged ourselves to create the design on a simple desktop 3D printer and the experience has proven to us that you don’t require access to an expensive large 3D printer to create unique wearable pieces. Merely using highly accessible domestic 3D printers we were able to create a fashion piece that reflected our vision. electrolysis_5 "We started the design process by creating a 3D scan of a tailor’s mannequin. By connecting a Kinect Sensor to our laptop, we were able to create a 3-dimensional point cloud of the object which was then processed to produce a 3-dimensional mesh from which we based our geometries. "Using the Rhino 3D modelling software, we mapped out patterns of the model’s much like a traditional tailor would. The model “skin” was then “unrolled” and sized to be able to print within the constraints of our 3D printer." XYZ Workshop xyzworkshop.comabc
Design Products
Accessories

Kartell by Laufen Bathroom Accessories

The collection features washbasins, vanities, bathtubs, shelving, furniture and accessories which mix to create open, flexible spaces designed to work more like living rooms. space_dec_2014_adv_2 The Kartell by Laufen accessories will be available exclusively in Australia from Kartell Flagship Store at Bondi Junction and Space Furniture in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. space_dec_2014_adv_3 Accessories include the Kartell by Laufen mirrors, container units with shelves, stools/occasional tables, wall shelves and towel holders. space_dec_2014_adv_4 Kartell spacefurniture.com.au/kartellabc
Architecture
Homes

Thinking Inside the Box

This trending practice of shifting, stacking and linking the versatile containers has allowed Stevens to construct an urban holiday home for his family that upholds values of the new and old. Old industrial waste products have been reused to create a new home that expands living spaces beyond what may be expected of the humble vessel. container_house_1 In their most basic form, shipping containers are an inexpensive solution to living spaces and in this instance, when applied to a difficult site, they allow for an experimental approach.  The industrial feel both internally and externally has been softened through the warm tones of natural and artificial lighting. A mixture of matte and reflective finishing textures animate what could otherwise be a cold, hard interior. container_house_6 The site was excavated from a seven-metre rock face near a local rubbish tip. It had little virtues, which was critical to the experimental approach, especially with regards to the re-use of industrial waste. In response to the strong winds and the utilitarian design intent, Stevens had opted for a smooth aerodynamic surface as opposed to the corrugated surfaces of conventional containers.  The rock face was left untreated, allowing for plants to grow naturally around and within the home. container_house_5 Achieving a low maintenance structure was a driving forced for the design. Cost and energy efficiency were a key outcome for the project: the shipping containers are structurally insulated and lower the need for heating and cooling the spaces within, and by reusing discarded prefabricated materials in construction, the embodied energy of the home was drastically reduced. The result is a sustainable holiday home that strikes a perfect balance between rugged engineering construction and minimalistic modern form. Photography: Simon Devitt simondevitt.comabc
Design Products
Furniture

A Hand Crafted Approach

Design has many functions in our society. There are practical considerations – to provide the spaces, products and accessories required to live our daily lives as efficiently and pleasantly as possible. There is the motivation to explore the new frontiers of technology in the aim to continue moving ever forward. But another concern is sustainability. designer_rugs_dec_adv_4 Although most often used these days in an environmental sense, design also plays an important role in cultural sustainability. For all the benefits of globalisation – the blurring of boundaries between continents, language and economies – there is a real risk of cultural homogeneity, the potential that we develop into a single, dominant society with no variation. As with genetics, diversity is key to our cultural development, and so the need to preserve traditional crafts of various geographical areas is widely recognised. designer_rugs_dec_adv_2 Designer Rugs offers six ranges that celebrate the art of Tibetan knot weaving. This ancient technique is unique, using a rod to assist the warp and weft yarns in the construction of the rug. The knots are hand-tied over a rod, and as each row is completed, the pile is cut and the rod slipped out. Once the rug is finished and applied with hand shearing or carving, the resulting surface is full of interest, depth and variation. Not only does this technique achieve a beautiful finish, but also has a more dense, luxurious and durable quality than is possible with machine weaving. designer_rugs_dec_adv_6b Designs can take up to 16-18 weeks to manufacture, due to the intricacy of the construction method. But, far from being seen as negative, this approach accords perfectly with the popular Slow movement. A reaction against our fast-paced lives, this movement thrives on slower, more conscious action and behavior. It means that, contrary to a hyperinstant mentality, waiting a bit longer for a special piece is not only completely bearable, but also provides time to fully anticipate and appreciate the finished product. designer_rugs_dec_adv_7 Designer Rugs’ Mystique, Wool and Silk and Contemporary Hand Knot ranges from the In-House collections are crafted in Nepal using New Zealand and Tibetan wool with pure Rejecting the ready-made convenience of mass-produced products, Tibetan hand-knotted rugs urge us to slow down and appreciate an ancient craft. silk highlights. They are available in stock sizes (200x300cm and 240x300cm), or can be fully customised. This enables you to be involved in the conceptualising of each individual piece, becoming part of the creative process and ensuring the finished product is perfectly suited to your interior. designer_rugs_dec_adv_5b As well, the Designer Collaborations with Catherine Martin (Deco), Caroline Baum (Sand Script) and Bernabeifreeman feature the same artisanal Tibetan hand-knot technique. These highly sought-after designs are created by some of Australia’s best-known and regarded personalities from the design and arts communities, bringing their expertise and insight together with the centuries-old wisdom of an ancient society. designer_rugs_dec_adv_3 In many ways, the world of Tibetan knotting is far removed from our every day lives. But it is the values that it represents – quality, a slower pace, complexity and texture – that we are craving. And by appreciating items like these, and incorporating them into our living environments, we choose to invite these values in and affirm their benefits. Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.auabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Love Me or Die

Entang Wiharso’s artworks are not for the faint hearted. From fully consummating acts of sex or violence, to erect phalluses and naked limbs, his representation of supernumerary bodies dangling aimlessly, some of them defensively wielding blades, convey a confused realism of deformation rarely seen in such explicit and graphic forms. entang3 Untold Story: Floating Island, 2012; acrylic on canvas But these crushing forms are not only screams of distortion but are also an invitation, an almost masochistic solicitation, which Wiharso only subtly hints at. “I want people to respond to my content, to question it,” says Wiharso, “I want the work to make them think about their own conditions, to question the reality we live in.” entang7 Your Power is Mine (Comic Book Series), 2009; aluminium, car paint, screws “I seek only to depict the condition of humans who are often divided by complex, multi-layered political, ethnic, racial and religious systems,” continues Wiharso. To him, creating work is a way of understanding the human condition, of heightening our ability to perceive, feel and understand human problems like love, hate, fanaticism, religion, and ideology. In this regard, Wiharso sees more truth in deformation and distortion than in accurate accounts of reality: through his deliberate use and manipulation of scale, light and human forms, he underscores that reality is never fixed, that our reality is incomplete. entang5 Beyond American Dreams, 2011; aluminium cast It is a reality that speaks of deeply entangled histories, and entangled stories that have been rendered possible. “I’m interested in trying to go much further back along the timeline, to trace events (small actions) to a historical and geological history that we feel we no longer know.” In forcing the viewer to strain, to see through the forms belied by shadow and light, Wiharso invites us to ‘see’ more, to access truths beyond the surface. Underlying meanings are exposed, adding a further component to the complex artistic language of his work. entang6 Temple of Hope Hit by a Bus, 2011; cast aluminium, lava stone, resin, thread But beyond these micro-stories is Wiharso himself, positioned as both the story and storyteller – the storyteller embedded in the story. The meanings exposed throughout his artworks are not only necessarily ours, but also Wiharso’s who has carefully integrated the micro-politics of his personal life with the macro-politics of a nation. Confronting the nation’s prejudices in part also means confronting the world’s view of him, mainly the perceptions some possess of Wiharso as a Muslim married to a Western woman. “My Indonesian-ness will always be inside me,” says Wiharso, “and when I work and exhibit in different places around the world, this identity will always be in play.” entang1 Temple of Hope Hit by a Bus, 2011 “However, my time spent in the West has also allowed me to see my culture more clearly, to question and understand it,” continues Wiharso, “it has made me committed to create a dialogue with Western culture.” The distorted and dismembered bodies also become entangled in Wiharso’s story, in Wiharso’s personal narrative. Their unravelling and confusion is also his, their elements seem to end and begin with his dreams, as he brings his world into being. Entang Wiharso's artworks were featured in Habitus 22. This issue on sale 19 December, 2013.  Entang Wiharso is represented by ARNDT Gallery www.arndtberlin.comabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Monica Ford

Your name: Monica Ford What you do: I’m the founder and stylist of Hamptons House Sydney hamptons_house Your latest project: Just finishing curating all our Hamptons House collections from the living room to the library to the bar. Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Ralph Lauren   2) Mother Theresa 3) Audrey Hepburn What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: my husbands Fiat Pininfarina Azzura open top Chair model: my super comfortable Wingback that’s covered in white Belgian Linen Residential space: Ralph Lauren's residence in Bedford, New York Commercial space: There are many to choose from but I think it would have to be David Jones City Store. I love the feeling when you walk through the doors, rich in heritage and its Australia’s oldest department store. Decorative product:  it would have to be “Tia” my Chital deer head I have at home. Functional product: Andrew Cope ceramics. Every kitchen needs them.  Beautifully made in his country pottery barn at Barnawartha Handmade good: My Queen B candles. Pure Bees wax from Australian bees. Mass-produced product: Georg Jensen for its refined, organic modern design and elegant simplicity. Meal: White wine Mussels Restaurant: Bathers Pavilion, I love the building Drink: Champagne Bar: My very own bar I have at Hamptons House. Item in your studio: My books and my magazine collection Piece of technology: My iPhone can’t work with out it. Historical figure: God Fictional character: Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) from Vice: I like a chat and am easily distracted. Virtue: I love people What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? It means thinking, dreaming, sleepless nights, collecting, finding, creating, learning, meeting people.abc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Accessories

Teuco’s Innovative Designs

Duralight® is an innovative acrylic based composite material, patented and made exclusively in Italy, by Teuco. Due to the characteristics and strengths of Duralight® it is resistant to fading and staining ensuring its pristine whiteness is maintained over time, invaluable when used in the applications of cladding buildings and the fit out of luxury yachts exposed to all the elements. Duralight® is the result of Teuco's innovative heritage.delsaDesigners such as Carlo Colombo, Fabio Lenci, Luca Scacchetti, Matteo Nunziati and Giovanna Talocci have all designed products using Duralight® from Teuco. This technologically advanced material was also used in the Renzo Piano designed, Central St. Giles in London, Great Britain. delsa3 The amazing exclusivity of Teuco is that it produces Duralight® in-house and can therefore implement the very best design solutions for commercial and residential uses. The pliability of Duralight affords the total freedom of design to create complex forms, large objects and forms without joints, considerable thickness without adhesive and customised products and installations. Each beautiful Duralight® product not only reflects the artistic creativity of each designer but the technical know-how of Teuco, through their Unlimited service, to realise these concepts and make them a beautiful reality. Delsa delsa.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

From the Inside Out

Hero: The open-plan living space extends onto north and south decks. Life on Medlands Beach is like stepping back in time. There is no piped water or electricity, and the small local store is 15 kilometres away over a gravel road. In summer, when bach owners arrive for the holidays, there is a burst of social activity. Longboard and fi shing competitions become a focal point for the small community. However, for most of the year, it is a quiet solitary place, which requires much self-sufficiency. These qualities are exactly what attracted Anne and Steve Jenkins to Great Barrier Island nearly 30 years ago, and they have been returning here for family holidays ever since. In 2007, an empty plot of land came up for sale along the beach; purchasing it triggered a lifestyle change. from_the_inside_out_2The main bedroom and deck overlook farmland. They engaged architects, Jeff Fearon and Tim Hay – who had designed a house further down the beach at Shark Alley – to design their new home. It is where the Jenkins’ love to spend time with family, and where they now live fi ve months of the year on the island. As a semi-permanent residence rather than a holiday home, the owners wanted privacy and a very direct connection with the land. A view of the sea required a second storey, so locating the living spaces on an upper fl oor was ruled out. Instead, the house is single storey with a roof deck, and sited at the rear of the section to connect with farmland behind. from_the_inside_out_7An old, red shed and farmland create a textural background.  The architects began exploring notions around permanence versus temporary, keying off local caravans, holiday cabins and rural sheds. They chose to place the house lightly on the site, with decks to connect it to ground level – in the straightforward manner many local baches do. There are notionally two ‘sheds’ – one at the front and one at the rear – which contain bedrooms. In between, a large ‘tarpaulin’ connects the two, and provides a sheltered living space. A central post anchors this room, and full-height glazing opens it on to the full width of the site. North and south, decks extend the space to the boundaries. “One of the things we were interested in was what makes it a Barrier building,” says Hay. “Medlands hasn’t been gentrified like some other beach communities, and there is a beautiful haphazardness to some of the buildings. The challenge was to maintain that communal fit for the building rather than create an individual piece.” from_the_inside_out_1A grassed area in the front creates a relaxed approach. A morning deck and an afternoon deck determined the configuration of the house elements. Main entry and kitchen flow off the morning deck. The living, dining and main bedroom flow onto the afternoon deck, and look out across a quiet rural view of old rusty sheds and the odd cow wandering past. The owners lived in Vietnam for five years, and return there every few months. This experience enhanced their awareness of noise – natural and ‘man-made’. One of the special moments of the house for them is the experience of rain. “We love sitting in the lounge and being able to see the rain bucketing down in winter,” describes Anne. from_the_inside_out_4 The guest bathroom with reading platform above.   While the living space is incredibly open, in contrast, the bedrooms are very contained and private. From the outside these volumes are shed-like – rough-sawn plywood cladding, ‘barn’ doors, simple in form and detail. The dark skin of their exterior absorbs the harsh New Zealand sun. Steel shutters veil a light and layered interior. Behind each set of shutters is a private verandah, set off a bedroom. When the inner layer of glass doors is open, the verandah increases the depth of the room, and gives it a semi-outdoor mood. One can feel totally contained and sheltered, yet feel the breeze and hear the sounds of nature. The corridor side is more like a cloister. The floor is external decking, the bedroom walls are clad as the exterior, and the ‘external’ wall is a series of hinged shutters. The bedrooms thus feel more like cabins, and separate from the rest of the house. from_the_inside_out_3 The reading platform skylight pops up through the roof deck. “Layering and veiling has become a significant aspect of our work whether it be interior, residential or commercial,” comments Fearon. “We allow spaces to overlap and share the experience. Not only inside and outside space, but living and sleeping, bathing and sleeping, bathing and outdoors. We work in layers from a solar and seasonal point of view, and also for privacy. If you want to experience the whole of your site, and avoid limited openings, then screening is logical.” Fearon and Hay use a carefully selected palette of materials to filter view and light. The results are often quite theatrical and moody. A recent fit out of a Tribeca loft uses multiple fabrics to differentiate zones, resulting in a drapey, soft and slightly surreal air. Clooney Restaurant in Auckland uses fabric fringes to delicately enclose each table, with glass orbs floating through each ‘space’. Transitions create opportunities for this, and at the Barrier house, visual and spatial layering inside the bedroom wings shows these devices to their fullest. from_the_inside_out_5A 180° view of the bay from the roof terrace. “We like a building to have an active life”, says Hay. “When it is used properly, there is an activation and manipulation of the enclosure that changes at different times of the day and seasonally. This house changes depending on the light: it is quite solid and singular in the harsh midday sun. Then at night, when lights go on, it becomes backlit and illuminated with different skins open. That is something I really enjoy – it can be tuned and have its own life.” Fearon Hay Architects fearonhay.com Photography: Simon Devitt simondevitt.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Concrete Orchids

It’s not often you get a brief for a project that you know will be demolished in just two years. And yet for Leo Einstein Franciscus, Director of Einstein and Associates, this was exactly the challenge faced. wilshire_6 “In just two years, the site will be demolished [to make room for] the highest building in Indonesia. The client wanted something different” within a budget, without looking second-rate, says Franciscus. Undeterred by this fleeting tenure, Franciscus bent to the task, creating Wilshire Restaurant, Jakarta’s latest culinary offering. wilshire_1 Tucked away in the upcoming urban district of Foundry No 8 and influenced in name by the iconic Wilshire Boulevard of Los Angeles, the relaxed ambience of the venue aims to introduce Californian cuisine to the Indonesian market. wilshire_11 The trendy interior of the restaurant is separated into two spaces: the main dining area and bar, and the private function room and wine post. wilshire_10 The flooring combines sections of polished timber boards, mosaic tiles and concrete whilst the wall is composed of raw concrete, perforated steel and weathered metals to showcase an industrial yet stylish space. wilshire_2 Particularly striking is the recurring orchid motif – Indonesia’s national flower – lavishly adorned along the walls, floors and tables. Layered over the more robust, textured material palette, this floral design softens and brightens the interiors, introducing a local, tropical element into the otherwise more European aesthetic. wilshire_7 Despite disappointment that Wilshire won’t be around for long, the project heralds an exciting new energy in hospitality design for the Indonesian capital. Photography: Fernando Gomulya fernandogomulya.com Wilshire Restaurant, Jakarta facebook.com/Wilshirejkt Einstein and Associates Architectsabc