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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
What's On

New Weave: Contemporary Approaches To The Traditions Of Weaving

New Weave pushes the boundaries of the woven form: artists and designers re-appropriating traditional weaving techniques, using different materials to create intricate and striking wearables, objects and installations. new_weave_3 From the sculptural fibre vessels of Lorraine Connelly-Northey to Jenni Kemarre Martiniello’s work in glass, to other works in wood, textiles and paper, weaving will leap off the loom and into the future. new_weave_9 Curated by guest curator Lisa Cahill (who co-curated the Australian component of the Triennale of Craft in Kanazawa, Japan for Object) and Object’s own Carrie Mulford, New Weave explores the common language of weaving, showing how it can be used to create new forms by hand that are produced in different ways using collaboration, technology and methods of manufacturing. new_weave_6 Featuring the work of: Alana Clifton-Cunningham, Lorraine Connelly-Northey, Edward Linacre, Jenni Kemarre Martiniello, Rachel Park and from Courtesy of the Artist, Pennie Jagiello and Bin Dixon Ward. new_weave_5 Watch below a video interview with Jenni Kemarre Martiniello, discussing her process and inspiration. Jenni Kemarre Martiniello on her Inspiration & Process—New Weave from Object: Australian Design Centre on Vimeo. Object Gallery object.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Extended Living

The clients, a professional couple with a large, combined family, wanted a contemporary addition to their suburban cottage which would allow them to indulge in their love of gardening and to cook and entertain in style. yarra_street_house_7The design is a creative response to passive solar principles, a challenge as the extension is to the south of the existing house.A sun-court allows sunlight to penetrate the new living spaces from the north in winter, and serves to separate the new addition from the old house so that it reads as a clearly articulated pavilion in a garden. yarra_street_house_4 A number of dining and entertaining spaces work off the hub of the kitchen, which is designed to show off the home-cook in their best light. yarra_street_house_5 Conscious of the visual fabric of the suburb, the addition is designed to be contemporary but unobtrusive. yarra_street_house_11 As Firkins comments, “The original weatherboard cottage was not heritage listed. It was however in a narrow, tree-lined street of mostly fairly conventional one-storey houses with front verandas and hipped roofs, so the two-level addition was designed so that it was barely visible from the street.” yarra_street_house_8 The material palette for the addition is clean-cut and industrial, satisfying the utilitarian demands of a proper kitchen while providing a fresh, spacious living and dining environment. The combination of blond timber finishes, the white colour scheme, and the abundant windows and sliding doors fill the space with light and allow it to connect to the adjacent garden. yarra_street_house_9 The pavilion is an excellent example of how older structures that might not cater for modern lifestyles can be expanded or complemented by additions to extend their lifespans, creating interesting interactions between old and new elements as they are developed. yarra_street_house_plans yarra_street_house_elevations_sections JFA j-f-a.com.au Photography: Christine Francis christinefrancis.comabc
Happenings
What's On

Art Month Sydney 2014

Above: Exoskeleton Lift by Richard Goodwin, 2011 Running 1 to 23 March, this year’s program heralds “intersections and parallels” to embrace the blending boundaries between art and design, architecture, fashion and commerce. This year promises a range of art experiences designed for those from first-time gallery visitors to seasoned art collectors. To celebrate the vibrancy and diversity of contemporary art in Sydney, Art Month will present over 200 exhibitions and events with open galleries, varied art spaces and talks with a world-class line up of Australian and international artists, architects and designers. In particular, an inspirational Art Month programme unites leading creative minds in the exploration of art & architecture and art & design. Major highlights on show include: In Situ: Intersections Between Contemporary Art and Architecture 4 March (6pm – 8pm) at Royal Australian Institute of Architects Leading creative thinkers whose practice moves between art and architecture question how the two intersect in today's global art and architecture market. In Situ showcases the blurred lines between art and architecture. Participants will consider the role of art and architecture in city making on all scales. Guest speakers include: campfire_table Campfire Table, by Tomek Archer Richard Goodwin: a renowned artist and architect whose architectural practice concentrates on parasitic connections between private and public spaces. He has sustained a prolific and award-winning practice internationally exhibiting his art and architecture as well as holding major collections in the Art Gallery of NSW and the National Gallery of Victoria. Tomek Archer: a multi-disciplinary designer who established Tomahawk Studios completing a range of architectural projects and furniture development. He has worked across a broad range of large scale public projects with Johnson Pilton Walker and Hill Thalis architects. vide_poche Vide Poche, by Henry Wilson Philip Arnold: a practicing architect who teaches design, history and practice subjects at the University of New South Wales and the University of Technology in Sydney. He established Plus Minus Design in 2007. Designer Collections: Australian Designers on Art and Influence 14 March (6pm-8pm) at ECC Lighting + Furniture Five Australian designers share art works and how art inspires their practice, including: Henry Wilson, George Livissianis, Jonathan Logan, Tomek Archer and Liane Rossler.  the_apollo The Apollo Restaurant, Sydney. Interiors by George Livissianis Art Month Sydney is a not-for-profit festival of contemporary art produced by 10 group for the Australian Art Events Foundation. Art Month Sydney artmonthsydney.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Beyond the Box

Above: The garage within the house is a departure from the local norm, but makes perfect practical sense. The Cambridge Road neighbourhood located along the city fringe feels as if it belongs in another era – an old red brick Baptist church, 40 year-old terrace houses, and a quaintness that has escaped the ravages of time and redevelopment. In fact, with surrounding street names such as Bristol, Norfolk and Hampshire, you might well be in another part of the world altogether. When you least expect it, you stumble upon an intermediate terrace house that resembles a Brownstone, and you wonder: Am I in New York City? Purists may frown upon such architectural importation. But this is different from trying to replicate a temperate glass house in the tropics, or Corinthian column-fronted and pediment-capped houses. There is a legitimate reason for the Brownstone façade. “Having lived in New York for many years, we wanted to have something familiar that we could relate to. When we saw this inter-terrace, we immediately associated it with iconic row houses back in New York,” explains homeowner, Aun Koh, who lives in the house with his wife, Su-Lyn. But they wanted to translate the New York edition into a more contemporary version that reflects its time and place. beyond_the_box_4 Left: Unlike the traditional Brownstones of New York, this is a modern version, both inside and out. Right: Glass and mirrors offer surprise glimpses into various rooms and spaces. As directors of a boutique consultancy that handles luxury and premium brand clientèle, Aun and Su-Lyn appreciate the exclusivity that boutique firms can offer, which was why they approached K2LD Architects to transform their terrace house into something one-of-akind. “It is quite unlike the majority of our commissions, which are mostly detached houses,” admits K2LD principal, Ko Shiou Hee, “but we decided to take the opportunity and do something different.” And different they did; not just in terms of aesthetics, but Shiou Hee and his team of architects may well have created a new typology altogether. The 6 x 17 metre footprint is long and narrow, similar to the shophouse typology indigenous to South-East Asia, with the usual challenges of limited frontage and lack of natural daylight. beyond_the_box_3 Behind the façade, the living room has a contemporary setting in contrast with the Brownstone’s 05 traditional roots. A bold red brick façade more than compensates for its narrow width, making its presence felt along the streetscape. In traditional shophouses, intermediate courtyards and air-wells are employed to overcome the problem of limited daylight. Here, K2LD pushed the circulation to one side and introduced two strips of skylights flanking the party walls. By doing so, the interior becomes not just light-filled, but also free of the constraint of the rectangular box defined by the party walls, a concept Shiou Hee calls a “box within a box”, which allows him to then look outside the box. Despite off-setting the inner box one metre from the perimeter, the interior feels spacious beyond its four-metre width. Shiou Hee has accommodated all ofAun and Su-Lyn’s requirements without resorting to a ‘wedding cake’ arrangement of stacking spaces one above the other, proof that it is not how much space you have, but what you make of it. By cleverly tucking the home-office, pantry, storeroom, dog bath and even a walk-in wine chiller to the sides on the second and third storeys, the two onemetre- wide slivers of space are well-utilised. beyond_the_box_6 Left: In an ingenious orchestration of space, the small plot even accommodates a home office for six. Right: As publishers of the Miele Guide, featuring Asia’s top restaurants, it is not surprising that Aun and Su-Lyn indulge their epicurean pursuits with a spacious, organised and well equipped kitchen. “We perceived the interior as a three dimensional jigsaw puzzle with interlocking spatial volumes and light pockets,” explains Shiou Hee. The result is an interesting play of light and space, and a circulation that weaves its way in and out of the ‘box’. Spatial progressions are also somewhat unusual in the local context. Instead of the typical outdoor car porch, Aun wanted a garage within the house; and instead of arriving into a living room, you find yourself greeted by a welcoming staircase that runs the entire three storeys, bathed in abundant natural light from the skylight above. Another atypical move – elevating the living room, dining room and kitchen to the second storey – allows for a different perspective and positions them right at the heart of the ‘fl oating box’. Like jack-in-the-boxes, glass openings surprise visitors in the most unexpected places. One-way mirror-glass in the second-storey powder room overlooks the garage, full-height glass in the third-storey bathroom looks into the living room below, and a glass slit opening above low shelves in the home-offi ce on the third storey offers a peek at who is coming up the staircase. Other fun elements include bright red main entrance and master bedroom doors and a mezzanine-like catwalk over the doublevolume living room that provides access to the topmost shelves of the towering book wall. Even the furniture is an eclectic mix, collected from the homeowners’ holidays abroad, every piece with its own story to tell. Nothing is predictable, but the elements come together to create a look that seems both casually thrown together, and deliberately orchestrated. beyond_the_box_2 The dining room and adjacent living room, are elevated to the second storey ‘heart’ of the house and serve as focal spaces. Walk into the master bedroom and you are transported into a totally different world. In contrast to the bright and airy house, it is decked in black, from the fl oor to the wall and ceiling. “It is very Coco Chanel. Su-Lyn needed some convincing at fi rst but now we both love it. It is our dark sanctuary,” muses Aun. It would appear that the seemingly primand- proper Brownstone exterior and the boxy massing of the house is just a teaser that belies the whimsical, Alice-in-Wonderland touches beneath. K2LD was given a box, but returned the home-owners much more. beyond_the_box_5 Originally Published in Habitus#07, 2010.   Photography: Derek Swalwell derekswalwell.com Architect: K2LD Architects k2ld.com Project Team: Ko Shiou Hee, Gan Ren Ying, Maria Ines de Vilhena, Toh Juay Hai Civil & Structural Engineer: E123 Consultants Mechanical & Electrical: LAC Engineers & Associates Quantity Surveyor: CST Consultants Main Contractor: Bestec Construction Land Area: 143.6m2 Total Floor Area: 341.55m2 Time to Complete: 13 months FURNITURE Living black loveseat and Pumpkin side table by Autoban, autoban212.com, Eames lounge and ottoman in white leather by Vitra, vitra.com, Magister sofa in caramel leather and white Kidd tables by Flexform, fl exform. it, and red cupboard and beige ottoman by Cappellini, cappellini. it. Dining Pebble dining table by Autoban, dining chairs by Carmina, and Moka glass cupboards by Flexform. LIGHTING Chandeliers Double Octopus in Living Area by Autoban, and 2097 in Powder Room by Flos, fl os.com. Floor lamps tall industrial standing lamp in Living Area from Lambert, White AJ fl oor lamp from Louis Poulsen, louispoulsen.com. Lamps Black Caravaggio lamps in Dining from Lightyears, lightyearsgroup. co.uk. Wall lights in Master and Guest Bedrooms are Artemide Tolomeo Micro Parete from Million Lighting, millionlighting. com.sg. Other lighting throughout from LightPhase, (65) 6454 8832. FINISHES Floor in Master and Guest Bedrooms is parquet fl oor by Wood Doctor, wooddoctor.com.sg, in Garage is pebble-washed fl oor, and other fl oors throughout are cement screed. Walls in Garage are plastered. Joinery steel book shelves in Living Area custom-designed by K2LD, aluminium storage in Garage and built-in joinery in Kitchen designed by K2LD, made by Stema Furniture & Renovation (65) 6382 3028, wardrobe and wall panels in Master Bedroom are customdesigned by K2LD and made by Ling Ming Sing Furniture (65) 9723 4782. Countertop in Kitchen is CaesarStone quartz by Builders Shop, buildersshop. com.sg. Tiles and Stone from StoneTec Materials, (65) 6365 7800. Brick Tiles on Roof Terrace from Lian Wang Trading, bricktiles.com. Garage door is Raynor Centura from Gliderol Doors, gliderol.com.au. Power tracks by Eubiq from ASL Power, aslpower.com.sg. FIXED & FITTED Kitchen appliances by Miele, miele.com.abc
Design Products
Furniture

Baba Coffee and Side Table from Poliform

First released in 2012, the Baba has fast become a Poliform signature product, defined by its exceptional finishes and classic lines. The Baba collection is available in a painted metal structure in white, bronze or mat colours, as well as a range of tops with the choice of marble or mat and glossy lacquered finishes. poliform_march_adv_3 The Baba is available as either a side table or coffee table, exclusively from Poliform. Polform poliform.com.auabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Cecconi’s

Originally opening in 2006, Cecconi’s Flinders Lane Restaurant and Cellar Bar - the second of its kind following the 1996 establishment of Cecconi’s, Crown Casino - is the most recent offering from Melbourne’s Bortolotto family, the culinary aficionados and restaurateurs behind a succession of prominent venues launched since the 1960s. Re-opening in January, the new Cellar Bar offers a casual bar experience and adheres to a project brief specifying the refurbishment had to be “timeless, European, stylish, sharp”. cecconis_1 Mollard Interiors director Scotty Mollard says the goal was to create a “contemporary yet authentic Italian space”. “We decided to keep the colour palette restricted to black, white and copper yet incorporated varying textures and tones to create contrast,” Mollard says. cecconis_3 “We wanted the space to feel familiar, warm and contemporary while reinforcing that Cecconi’s is a long-standing family-run business. “The white-wash timber tables with copper edging made by Don, Maria’s husband, combined with the black bentwood chairs, low black dome pendant lights and copper wall lights create an inviting space.” cecconis_4 A wall of family photos and produce displayed in black steel carriageways above the bar and open kitchen provide a further reminder of the restaurant’s Italian heritage. The backs of chairs in the formal dining space were reupholstered to create cohesion between the restaurant and bar while the extensive use of patented brass and a laminated Italian images on the private dining room’s glass wall provided key elements. cecconis_5 Director Maria Bortolotto says design collaboration was vital. “…The idea of collaborating with Mollard Interiors seemed the best way to retain all we really valued and at the same time, set out a very precise expression of how we wanted it to be,” Bortolotto says. “Our interiors have always been of their time and context and here we are on the edge of a new beginning. A new definition.” Cecconi’s Flinders Lane Restaurant & Cellar Bar cecconis.com Mollard Interiors mollardinteriors.com.auabc
Lighting
Accessories

For the Love of Light

Above: ASTERIX Over the years, Boots has developed a reputation amongst design lovers for the integrity and artistry of his architectural lighting. His latest luminary offering will no doubt continue to impress his old and new followers alike. “In my mind there’s a dialogue here, between the art-deco aesthetic and the rise of fascism, [so] I’ll be exploring that for some time,” explains Boots. Three_lights_ChrBoots_PicChristineFrancis Left to Right: QUADRIX, TRIPTYX, UNIX The Asterix family consists of the Unix, Triptyx, Quadrix, Parallelogram and Asterix, with each geometric pendant ranging from simple to increasingly complex. The mirror polished, sleek brass shapes are all inlaid with environmentally sensitive LED lights to create glowing and highly decorative sculptural pieces. In 2013, Boots witnessed the launch of his products in high-end design stores around Chicago, Los Angeles and at Fiona Barrat in London’s Pimlico Road. PARALELLOGRAM_ChrBoots_PicChristineFrancis PARALLELOGRAM This year is set to be more dynamic for Boots, having recently impressed Australian audiences as a lighting judge on Channel Nine’s The Block. His collection of sophisticated lights will be stocked at select design stores across South East Asia – most notably in Singapore, Taiwan and Hong Kong. “Creating these pieces [are] super satisfying,” mentions Boots, “yet I’m aware that I have to pay attention to the business side too. That seems to be flourishing, so it allows me more freedom to create. One good turn deserves another,” adds Boots. Photograph: Christine Francis christinefrancis.com Christopher Boots christopherboots.comabc
Happenings
What's On

The Design Circus, Perth

The opening night of The Design Circus saw the Perth Architecture and Design community congregate at Venn Gallery, the main venue for the event and the site of its central exhibition. design_circus_6 A collaboration between Valencian event design firm CuldeSac and Perth retailer Mobilia, The Design Circus aims to celebrate Spanish design and includes pieces from Vondom, Kettal, Marset, Apparatu, Nanimarquina and Yonoh. Special guests from each of these companies have been in attendance to share their thoughts with the audience in a series of workshops held at the Mobilia showroom over the course of the event. design_circus_5 The Design Circus is the brainchild of CuldeSac's creative director Pepe Garcia, and was first presented in Madrid with the concept of creating an exhibition that was more than the sum of its parts. design_circus_3 “Sometimes what happens is that you have an object or a collection of pieces that are exhibited, but there is no uniting concept behind it, so at the end of the day all people are looking at is just product”, Garcia comments. “We wanted to make a concept that was bigger than the object, so we came up with The Design Circus and for us the circus was a fantastic concept to bring all these things together and to sell a concept.” design_circus_2 The exhibition continues until the 22nd of February, for more information visit: thedesigncircus.com.au. Mobilia mobilia.com.au CuldeSac culdesac.esabc
Lighting
Design Products
Accessories

New ‘Clone’ Light from Classiclite

With the release of a new size, the Clone range now comes in both 46x46cm and 80x80cm. Named for its ability to be applied in modular, repeated patterns, the Clone Light is composed of removable, washable elastic white fabric stretched over a metal frame. classiclite_feb_adv_3 The light can be attached to both ceilings and walls and creates a luminous but gentle glow. The congruous polygonal form allows several Clone lights to be arranged continuous to each other, reminiscent of an Escher-esque honeycomb. Classiclite classiclite.com.auabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Field Experiments

Above: Multi-brush From Melbourne, co-founder of design studio U-P, Paul Marcus Fuog, teamed up with Benjamin Harrison Bryant, an industrial designer from New York and Karim Charlebois-Zariffa, a designer and director from Montreal, to further the four years of research and travel they had previously completed in Bali. Fuog,-Zariffa,-Bryant-on-Sept-5,-2013-Field-Experiments-highres From left to right: Fuog, Zariffa, Bryant on Sept 5, 2013 Leaving behind their studio practices temporarily, they set up a studio for three months in Lodtunduh, a farming community on Ubud’s outskirts. Disposable Bottles_01 Field ExperimentsDisposable Bottles “For us, the story started to emerge when we looked at souvenirs,” Fuog says, who is based in Melbourne. “We wanted to create something that was much more personal.” observations_wooden_mask Observations - wooden mask Through a stringent process of observing, documenting, playing and collaborating, the design collective began to experiment and partner with the Balinese craftspeople to work with traditional making practices such as masonry, woodcarving, weaving, batik (fabric), painting and kite painting. Stone-Play_Field-ExperimentsStone Play As a result, they generated about 200 ideas, enjoying the infectious, loose energy that resulted from the daily act of doing. Rubber-Inflatables_13-Field-ExperimentsRubber Inflatables “Whatever we were doing felt right because it was just a response to our environment. It wasn’t being informed by contemporary culture,” Fuog says. observations_stairsObservations - Stairs In collaboration with a selection of Balinese craftspeople, they converted their ideas into a collection of more than 50 objects, including kites made from shopping bags, ad hoc lighting made from fishing nets and rods, furniture assembled from bamboo baskets and plastic stools found in the local supermarket. Precious-Stone_Field-ExperimentsPrecious Stone  With the collection currently in New York and plans for a book documenting their experience, Fuog hopes the project will effect a positive change not only for tourists travelling to Bali, but also the Balinese, with some of the objects to become prototypes for future products. Adhoc-Furniture_01_Field-ExperimentsAdhoc Furniture  “It was so good to really learn about the culture and people and the country through design,” Fuog says. “And then learn through doing.” Field Experiments www.field-experiments.comabc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Accessories

Zip HydroTap – Specified by the Experts

Sitting neatly on the Grigio Carnico marble benchtop, the Zip HydroTap is truly at home in this sophisticated space. The Zip HydroTap was chosen, along with the other state-of-the-art appliances, to suit the owners love of entertaining and it has now become one of the mostused appliances in the kitchen. zip_feb_adv_3   “I have been specifying the Zip HydroTap for many years because I am confident in its ability to meet the varying needs of my clients. Understanding the way people live and entertain, the Zip HydroTap is a wise decision,” says designer Lee Hardcastle. zip_feb_adv_1 The owner also enjoys an active lifestyle and appreciates the health benefits of having chilled filtered water on hand, with impurities as tiny as one five-thousandth of a millimetre removed. Filtered boiling water provides instant relaxation in the form of the owner’s favourite beverage. Zip HydroTap Boiling Chilled is now available with an additional Sparkling water option to deliver your favourite chilled sparkling water at the touch of a button. For more information on the range of Zip HydroTaps for your next kitchen visit www.zipindustries.com and request a brochure Zip Industries zipindustries.comabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Room to Move

Above: Hong Kong's endless apartment buildings, image by Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze In My Fair Lady, Eliza sings “All I want is a room somewhere, far away from the cold night air, with one enormous chair…Oh, wouldn't it be loverly”. Well, we all want shelter and that just about sums it up. But in the modern city, from London to Singapore, from Paris to Sydney, space is at a premium. Which is to say, it is increasingly expensive and all over the world people are having to learn to live in smaller and smaller spaces. womderbox_5An ingenious and space saving storage solution - read more As a Singapore architect said to me recently, “Space is the universal constraint”. This comes as a shock to Australians living in the land of the quarter acre block, but In the island state of Singapore with its rapidly growing population, space has been the universal constraint for a long time. unit_23_heroUsing natural and artificial light to expand perceived space - read more Of course, this has been the case in the large cities of Europe for a long time. It is, for example, quite common for apartments to have no kitchen. You either eat out or you have a portable kitchen, small enough to be packed up when you move. Some years ago I made a piece of television about a portable kitchen designed by Melbourne’s Crowd Productions in anticipation of the space crisis. Its day may soon arrive. singapore_heroA remarkable transformation of a Singapore apartment - read more In Australia, we are still building units with large kitchens and bathrooms as the selling point. The problem is that this comes with a price tag so big that most of the population is locked out. Which is why we are staring down the barrel of a major social crisis with a whole new generation unable to afford to buy a room of their own somewhere. singapore_apartment_9 An apartment that is anything but cramped - read more There are actually two issues: affordability and liveability. If space is the universal constraint, then how do we design within that constraint but enabling a satisfactory way of life? The problem with apartments is that they are standardised. The attraction of the freestanding house is that you can make it distinctively yours. hdb_4 Singapore Architect Jonathan Poh offers some advice on designing for High Density Buildings - read more To go back to Singapore where the government is committed to ensuring that every citizen has a roof over his head, the Housing Development Board which is responsible for public housing – as well private developers – is now experimenting with ‘semi-white’ plans which allow occupants to configure the interior space to suit their own needs. This not only optimises available space, but also allows for the individuality previously only offered by a house. And this is happening in the context of shrinking floor plates. As cities like Sydney and Melbourne face up to the space crisis and go for density, we urgently need to start exploring how to design liveable small space. Paul McGillick is Editorial Director of Indesign Media and editor of Habitus and Indesign magazines.abc