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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Furniture

‘Standard Sofa’ from Space

The dramatic form of the Standard sofa and its comfortable seating arrangement is the culmination of a 20-year project of typological and technological research. The process began after the introduction of the firm’s first flexible sofa, L’Homme et la Femme in 2003, and shortly after Francesco Binfaré began to design for Edra. space_feb_adv_3 The Standard is intended literally to become the high standard by which all sofas are to be judged. Representing the ultimate in flexibility and adaptability with countless configurations, each of the upper parts of the backrest/armrest pillow can recline individually, to provide seating arrangements for one or more people; it combines a dynamic design aesthetic with functionality suitable for most spaces. space_feb_adv_1 Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.auabc
Design Products
Furniture

Amélie from Rogerseller

Inspired by a traditional chaise lounge ‘the Méridienne’, a 19th century French name given to an asymmetrical daybed with higher headrest and lower footrest, Amélie is designed to be a furniture piece: the clean lines and fine edges provide a sense of lightness, while the lounge-like wrap around the head head support promotes comfort and relaxation. rogerseller_feb_adv_2 The single piece is manufactured in Lucite acrylic, presenting a seamless contour which tapers into the narrow stainless steel legs. Lucite is extremely durable, presenting ever-lasting colour with a non-porous surface for easy cleaning. rogerseller_feb_adv_3 Amélie, designed and manufactured by Rogerseller, is a unique character that will make an elegant statement in any bathroom. Rogerseller rogerseller.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Of Salt and Scrub

The driving ideology of this minimal yet inviting family home is one of interaction between the residence and nature. From the sweeping horizontal views of the peninsula to the intimate connection between landscape and decking, the project has brought the client closer to nature than they thought possible. ridge_road_residence_4 "The design for this house stems from an exploration into the absence of what is not necessary, in both building form and detail, which is at the core of sustainable design," explain directors Annabelle Berryman and Sarah Henry, "A great trust was built between studiofour and the clients, which enabled us to take them along the design journey, exceeding their expectations of what was achievable with the site, their brief and their budget." ridge_road_residence_3 This three bedroom home has been encased by dark timber and reflective glass, allowing it to sink back into its surrounds and permit the context's serenity to be the focus of the site. Indeed, the best vantage from which to appreciate the structure is from the adjacent nature reserve that separates it from the nearby golf course.In turn, the form of the house was defined by the need to satisfy the separation of the public and private space. ridge_road_residence_10 The site’s constraints and proximity to the road were determining factors in orientating the home towards its coastal surrounds, the ground floor opens up to the surrounds through the decks, with the private space and street entrance located on the first floor. The ground floor open plan is comprised of the kitchen, dining and living spaces, with several elements, such as the fireplace, being isolated to provide a level of intimacy on the natural ground level. ridge_road_residence_8 Elegant gestures, such as framing the beautiful existing tea tree with an unadorned double-height living space and picture window, and channelling the view from the front entrance, have been achieved through an intense interrogation and interaction of the context to maximise the budget whilst honouring the clients' need for a calming ambiance that welcomes the coastal mood into the home. ridge_road_residence_1 The interiors were composed to reflect native flora and fauna, with limed timber floors accented by light oak furniture to contrast the dark external walls. Full height double glazed windows not only maximise sunlight and provide natural ventilation but shield the house from the turbulent coastal weather, creating that inimitable sense of sanctuary at being warm and dry as a storm looms over the oceanic horizon. ridge_road_residence_2 The foundation of trust was integral in allowing the clients to be involved in studiofour's holistic design approach, which involved "a collective of designers with experience in architecture, interiors, landscape, art and fashion" that provided an unparalleled level of resolution. Studiofour went to the lengths of honouring this deep relationship with the clients by presenting them with tailored artwork as a house warming gift. External decks: Butterfly chairs, from Angelucci 20th Century Living: Bosko Sofa, from Jardan Nanna Ditzel Side Table in Oak, from Great Dane Furniture Planet floor lamp Custom coffee table + cushions, designed by studiofour Bemboka throw rug, from Hub Furniture Vincent Van Duysen Primitives Wooden Bowl, from Hub Furniture Cow hide rug, from Great Dane Furniture Tretford goats hair floor rug Hans Wegner plank chairs, from Great Dane Furniture Artwork piece is perspex 01, designed by studiofour Kitchen: Caesar stone benchtop to island bench, colour Snow Caesar stone benchtop to rear bench, colour Jet Black Smeg freestanding cooker Dining: Johansen Dining Table in Oak, from Great Dane Furniture Moller Dining Chair #77 in Oak, from Great Dane Furniture Master Bed: Lean floor lamp, from Great Dane Furniture Bemboka throw rug, from Hub Furniture Artwork piece is canvas series 01, designed by studiofour Secondary bedrooms: Eames wire base low table, from Living Edge Anglepoise Type 75 lamp, from Corporate Culture studiofour studiofournews.com Photography: Shannon McGrath shannonmcgrath.comabc
Happenings
What's On

Piranesi’s Legacy

Above: Montage of Piranesi's Veduta della Basilica di S. Paolo (left) and Rick Amor's Ithaca (right) “The Piranesi Effect” exhibition aims to use contemporary art to emphasise the originality of Piranesi’s practice. Although Pirenasi’s work has been exhibited with contemporary international artists before, this is the first time it will be shown with that of Australian and New Zealand artists including Rick Amor, Mira Gojak, Michael Graf, Andrew Hazewinkel, Peter Robinson, Jan Senbergs and Simon Terrill. 4 Piranesi's Veduta interna del Panteon As a response to its companion exhibition, the State Library of Victoria's “Rome: Piranesi’s Vision,” the connection between Piranesi and contemporary art continues to appeal to today’s artistic sensibilities. Simon_Terrill_Bank_of_EnglandSimon Terrill Bank of England 9am   The configuration of works is arranged to evoke a journey through one of Piranesi's prints. The comparisons aim to enrich our understanding of contemporary art, with the 21st century artworks prompting a refresh providing a new lens through which to see the historic prints. campo_marzioLeft: Piranesi's Pianta di Roma e del Campo Marzio Right: Campius Martius map The Australian and New Zealand artworks were not chosen because they merely resonate with the work of Piranesi; each of them amplifies elements which are fundamental to his prints such as the dramatic use of scale, viewpoint, light and perspective. Mira-Gojak_Blind-1_2013_smallMira Gojak's Blinded 1  In an interview with Nicholas Forrest, curator Jenny Long observed, “it is important to remember though that none of these contemporary works were made with Piranesi in mind. They were made at other times and with other intentions, all have rich histories and associations which until now did not include Piranesi or 18th-century Rome. And yet, when we see them together with Piranesi’s extraordinary prints – there are correspondences and collisions which set them talking” (for the full interview, click here). 2 Piranesi's Bianchini Camere ed Inscrizioni Over two centuries later, Piranesi's imaginative response to the built environment and the sheer volume of his work ensure that his art continues to be relevant in our contemporary culture. The exhibition runs at Ian Potter Museum of Art at the University of Melbourne from 20 February to 25 May 2014. art-museum.unimelb.edu.au The exhibition is also accompanied by two Symposiums: Rome: Piranesi's vision exhibition, 22 Feb to 22 June 2014 at the State Library of Victoria slv.vic.gov.au/event/rome-piranesis-vision Piranesi and the impact of the late baroque, 27 -28 Feb 2014 at the University of Melbourne artinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/events/piranesi_and_the_impact_of_the_late_baroque  abc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Nobody’s Fools

Above: Nick (left) and John (right) in front of the 10 year anniversary collection. Denim lovers are an obsessive bunch and John Condilis, 42, and brother Nick, 40, are no exception. John recalls the pair ‘tagging’ other kids at school for the iconic leather labels on the back of their Lee jeans, shrinking them in the oven and punching holes in one corner to turn them into key rings (a strangely popular pastime in suburban Melbourne in the 1970s). As teenagers the Condilis brothers spent hours designing back pocket signatures for imaginary denim labels. The lads learned the intricacies of handling and manipulating denim early on while helping out their dad, Jim, in a denim laundry he managed for former client, Dachet Jeans. When Jim decided to open his own denim laundry in 1992 it seemed inevitable his sons would join him. At the time, John was working as an engineer with a global hydraulics company, but says he knew the profession wasn’t for him. In the halcyon days of the early 1990s the Condilis laundry worked with a who’s who of Australian denim manufacturers, gained experience with a phenomenal range of fabrics, styles, cuts, wash effects and detailing, and built up a staff of 50. But the coming of freetrade agreements meant the whittling away of tariff protection. By decade’s end, with growing numbers of clients taking their business offshore, the boys saw the writing on the wall for the laundry and decided to try their hand at design. nobody's_fools_1Left: John’s role of laundry manager is particularly hands-on. Right: Brothers, John and Nick are complementary opposites. With no formal training they started small, drawing on an understanding of the medium formed in the washhouse analysing the hits and misses of other labels. Nick naturally gravitated towards design – “it’s in you or it’s not”, he says simply – and hired a pattern maker with a keen eye for colour, fit and placement, who still works alongside him a decade later creating collections and finessing a look he describes as easy, honest and not too contrived. John’s engineering skills helped him custom design massive industrial grinders and various power tools used by the trio – and as many friends as they could rope in – to hand-work every pair of jeans they produced. It was the era of sandblasted, ripped, dirtied and distressed denim, and the troops went to town. Twelve months after launching their new label (dubbed Nobody in a nod to the absence of a ‘star’ designer), the Condilis brothers experienced a transformative annus horribilis. In 2000 their mother passed away, the laundry lost a pretty packet in a client dispute and the continued exodus of local manufacturing overseas forced them to lay off 40 of their 50 laundry staff. John winces at the memory but says it forced them to choose clients more carefully and taught him he could survive just about anything. nobody's_fools_5The Brunswick Street showroom. In 2001, Nick met a 30-year-old philosophy graduate named Wesley Hartwell who had a few years’ retail experience at David Jones and a head full of ideas about postmodernism, personality theories, creativity and global branding. In a move even Wesley concedes was “kind of crazy” for a label consisting of just three people (including two co-founders), the no-nonsense brothers appointed the newcomer to a role that began as sales and marketing manager and quickly morphed into creative director of their label. John recalls trying to drill Wesley initially but responding to his ideas and, crucially, trusting his intentions. “Wesley became our eyes and ears to the market – making sure we were on the money or a step ahead,” John says. In 2002, Nobody launched its first ready to- wear collection and over the next few years attracted attention locally with group and solo runway shows at Mercedes Australian Fashion Week in Sydney, seasonal collections inspired by deliberately provocative themes, including ‘nihilism nothing nobody’, ‘vandalise the mind slums’ and ‘why do I love what I hate’, and tongue-in-cheek T-shirts emblazoned with puns like ‘Nobody loves you’ and ‘Nobody gives a shit’. Keen to distance the label from traditional marketing methods like billboards, catalogues and even fashion weeks, Wesley championed the launch of seasonal collections through themed books freely distributed via stockists and at celebrity-studded ‘events’, from nightclub parties to installations in art galleries – all created working in collaboration with a loose affiliation of artists, writers and photographers from Australia and overseas. nobody's_fools_4Washing, treating and dyeing other people’s denim gave the brothers a unique understanding of the fabric’s structure. For critics, all this is evidence of an overpriced label taking itself way too seriously but Wesley, John and Nick insist they’re sending up the pretensions of the fashion industry and encouraging consumers to be themselves. Whatever the reality, the label has attracted some high profile admirers internationally (including Lane Crawford in Hong Kong, American Rag in the US and Selfridges and Harvey Nichols in the UK) and now boasts around 150 stockists in Australia and about 300 more in 25 countries. Even detractors admit Nobody jeans are now found in some of the world’s coolest stores: Atrium in New York, Ron Herman in Tokyo, Skindeep in Stockholm, Glow in Helsinki, Lileo in Toronto and even the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. Keen to expand Nobody’s presence internationally, Wesley has re-located to New York, where he lives in a pared back 1920s apartment on the lower east side with 10-foot ceilings, a sunken lounge room, original floorboards and features and plenty of clean lines, overlaid with a riotous clash of colourful furnishings: a neon ‘grandma’ flock rug, a 1950s couch and an orange floral club lounge. It’s a style he describes as a blend of industrial, modernist and baroque, and it couldn’t be in greater contrast to the Spanish Mission-style home John shares in Kew with his wife and young daughters – all tasteful timber furniture, neutral tones and family portraits. Both homes are a world away from Nick’s high-rise apartment in beachside St Kilda West, with spectacular views across Port Phillip Bay, minimalist interiors blending midcentury and contemporary furnishings, and a kick-arse telescope he hasn’t quite mastered yet. nobody's_fools_2Left: Each pair of jeans is scored, scarred and distressed by hand. Right: Denim runs into the drains and through the veins of the Condilis boys. The trio’s personalities are just as divergent. John describes Nick and himself as opposites who complement each other, characterising himself as a cautious, methodical, “behind-the scenes man” and problem solver, and Nick as an instinctive, carefree, gregarious “front man”. Wesley is a philosophical thinker and persuasive communicator, he says. Wesley sees himself as a creative, big picture man and both brothers as genuine and passionate. “Nick is like a character who always reminds us of the essence... of why we’re doing it,” Wesley says. “We’re not doing it to kill ourselves working hard all the time, we’re doing it because we love it and have a lot of passion and fun.” Inspirations differ too. For Nick, ideas flow from all directions: Nobody’s burgeoning creative team, denim diaries he’s used to research their 10th birthday Heritage Collection, the expressive individuality he spots daily on passers-by in Brunswick Street (home to Nobody’s flagship Fitzroy store and design studio), or amazing fabrics he sources from denim mills in Japan. Ultimately, it seems, what unites and inspires all three is the dirty great industrial laundry where the label began. It’s an atmospheric, slightly surreal space, full of clouds of steam that billow like dry ice, swirls of airborne blue fluff and teams of men in masks and overalls roughing up sexy jeans with huge, unwieldy grinders. It’s a far cry from the glamour of runway shows and VIP parties, and a place that easily accommodates all their disparate personalities, tastes and ideas. Nobody nobody.com.au Photography: James Geer jamesgeer.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Long Shot

Long Shot is an intimate 48m2 cafe, the second of six Walker Baker Evans Restaurant Group collaborations in Melbourne’s developing Dockland's Collins Square precinct. The result of a design collaboration between Emily Pedersen & Colab (Anna Drummond & Trish Turner), the cafe occupies what was once a a redundant lift well and lobby. longshot_5 “The design for the cafe was initially based on the idea of a florist or  chocolatier,” explains Pederson.  “Although we felt that the typologies wouldn't give us the mall activation we required, we felt that they would bring a personalised element to the space, that would be welcomed by broader business community.” longshot_2 Located in proximity to the development’s food retail offering and a number of the more formal restaurants, the designers have differentiated the cafe’s interior by creating a traditional, intimate “corner store” ambiance, one particularly well suited to a early morning breakfast meeting or casual business lunch. longshot_4 “However, spatially, the existing architectural shopfront made the space feel very tall and disproportionate with regard to depth and height ratio,” continues Pederson.  In response, the team chose to keep the finishes light, clean, simple and familiar to celebrate the food on offer.  “The narrow shelves allowed us to add a transparent layer of personal keepsakes and trinkets without the feel of 'contrived propping,” adds Pederson.  “We also created seating options that would suit a range of different uses ranging from small team meetings to casual lunches and quick coffee breaks.” The overscaled banquet seating also acts as an alternative wall treatment and brings an “inviting cosiness” to the rear corner of the shop.  The marble table tops bring a “feminine appeal” and reference traditional surfaces used in European pastry kitchens. longshot_3 “The timber shutters, ISM wall lights and timber furniture also give the space an endearing quality and assist in dividing up the long bench in front window, adding visual protection from the sheer glass fish bowl shopfront,” adds Pederson. Stragetically, Dutch origami pendant lights encourage customers’ eyes up and through the space, rather than just stopping at the front door.  “It was important for them to be spotlight worthy,” adds Pederson.  “My hope was that they would add warmth, colour and a 'handmade' feel to the space. Appropriately, they directly connect to the amazing hand crafted food on display below.” Long Shot long-shot.com.au Colab colabdesignstudio.com.auabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Museum of Mortality

Above: Julia’s studio and home is a converted factory. Old rusty nails mark out the number of Julia deVille’s studio in inner-city Melbourne. Originally a button factory, then a scout hall, the building was last occupied by a sculptor who combined his practice with teaching Kung Fu. “I bought the place about a year ago. It was ideal to combine a home with a studio,” says Julia, whose jewellery was included in the Primavera 2006 at Sydney’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Her work was also part of the Cicely & Colin Rigg exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria in the same year. Originally from Wellington, New Zealand, Julia came to Melbourne in 2001, initially with the intention of becoming a shoe-maker. She switched to jewellery partially as a result of the time involved in cobbling – “Jewellery gave me instant gratification. I was able to complete a design in a day,” she says. Past the courtyard-style front garden, a timber door opens to Julia’s studio. Instead of a welcome mat there are the stuffed heads of two goats and a gerenuk, a long-necked African antelope. “The first comments are that it looks like a museum,” says Julia, who works as both a taxidermist and jeweller. museum_of_mortality_2 Left: Notes, like Julia’s jewellery, adorn the surfaces of her studio. Right: There’s a museumlike quality to the space. Timber shelves in her studio, filled with objects and artifacts, are a visual feast. One shelf is covered with dried moss that has the appearance of Victorian lace. Others are filled with Julia’s latest jewellery, ready to be delivered to stores both in Australia and overseas, including the prestigious L’Eclaireur stores in Paris. “My father [still in Wellington] made all the shelves with a friend who is a cabinet maker. I gave them the rough measurements,” Julia says. “We were slightly out with this shelf,” she adds, pointing to a gap where the shelf should have ended. While the warehouse was built at the turn of the last century, it has been embellished with Victorian details. Julia added the ceiling rosette in the studio and Victorian-style timber doors and windows that frame the space. “The timber floors are original. They were just buffed up and polished,” she says. And although shelves and work benches were relatively 03 easy to install, her studio required a special booth called a ‘flume’ cupboard, which contains the somewhat sulphurous process where skulls and bird bones are oxidised before being fashioned into silver brooches, earrings, bracelets and pendants. In the centre of Julia’s studio is an unusual arrangement of vintage mannequins, dating from Victorian times through to the 1940s and 1950s. Only Vivienne Leigh’s waist size would come close to those of the mannequins on display. Some mannequins are draped with beaded Victorian shrugs and other adornments designed by Julia, who initially contemplated studying fashion in New Zealand. One jacket features particularly unusual extensions – she describes how she “used scapulae [shoulder bones] and covered these with velvet”. For another Victorian jacket, edged with a faded lace collar, Julia added a couple of exposed bones to the back, capturing the colour and form of the lacework. museum_of_mortality_3Left: Julia appreciates the morning light when doing her intricate work. Right: Vintage mannequins create an impressive centrepiece in the studio. Although each arrangement in Julia’s studio has been painstakingly created, they haven’t been altered since she moved in. “I like things to find their own niche. I don’t have time to keep moving them around,” she says. Her rigorous routine starts “before seven in the morning. I’m ready to work soon after eight and I generally work seven days a week”. Fortunately, Julia only has to walk down the corridor to get to her studio. And like her studio, her bedroom is filled with stuffed animals and birds. A raven, presented in full flight, is precariously attached to her 1940s armoire. A baby goat looks up from a table at the end of her bed. And while her New Zealand heritage isn’t plastered on the walls, she has an extensive collection of boots from New Zealand designer, Zambesi next to her bed. “I’m slowly working through the place. The upstairs needs a complete make-over,” Julia says, leading the way up a timber staircase. “The first floor was only added five years ago, but it already looks dated,” she comments, pointing out the scalloped timber joinery and granite splashback in the kitchen. museum_of_mortality_4Left: The entrance to Julia’s home has a Victorian feel. Right: Julia in front of her warehouse-style home. Julia’s two dogs sleep in their own miniature ‘Persian tents’, sourced on the internet. And large, worn 1930s leather armchairs give the place a lived-in feel. “I’ve always been interested in old things, particularly things from the 19th Century. I also prefer some chaos, with things being a little messy” she says. Most people visiting her home tend to gravitate towards different parts of the studio every time they visit. Whether attracted by the vintage rhinestone and ivory necklaces, or the sculpture by Aly Aitken titled ‘From the House of Edvard Munch’ (a leather bound creature with twig-like legs and mouth full of teeth), the senses go into overdrive. Like her jewellery label, Disce Mori, Latin for ‘Learn to Die’, the themes of life and death are interwoven through her collections and the spaces she inhabits. It’s a theme Julia will continue to explore – “It’s about accepting mortality and understanding death,” she says. Disce Mori discemori.com Photography: James Geer jamesgeer.comabc
Finishes
Design Products
Accessories

Bucchero by Skheme

Bucchero, in fact, was a type of black ceramic material produced by the Etruscans from around 700 BC to 500 BC. 3 The Bucchero tile collection expresses enormous decorative potential based on the availability of a large number of high and low relief surface structures. 4 Bucchero is available in three colours: white, greige (natural bone) and black (anthracite). 2   Skheme skheme.comabc
Design Hunters

Vale: Lord Wedgwood

“Lord Wedgwood was a true English gentleman,” says Pierre de Villemejane, CEO of WWRD, the holding company of Wedgwood. “The Wedgwood family has lost a passionate visionary, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Those of us who were fortunate enough to know and work with Piers have lost a dear friend and an inspiring mentor.” Anthemion-Blue_2Athemion Blue Collection Born September 20, 1954, on his family’s farm in Kenya, Piers Wedgwood assumed the Wedgwood legacy at age 16 upon the death of his father in 1970. Above all it was the Wedgwood ceramic business that was Lord Wedgwood’s passion. He started at the firm, based in England’s famed Potteries area of Stoke-on-Trent, in his teens cleaning the pottery kilns and learning the production methods. It was soon clear however, that his natural charm, enthusiasm and uncanny resemblance to his ancestor Josiah Wedgwood I, (the 18th century “father of English pottery”), made him the ideal spokesman for Wedgwood. Anthemion-BlueAthemion Blue Collection Lord Wedgwood went on to devote his working life to the art and industry of English ceramic manufacturing and was very active in the contemporary Wedgwood business helping to open new markets in India, China and Russia. He also served on the board of trustees of the Wedgwood museum. He was overjoyed to see a 255-year legacy of great innovation and design adapt and thrive in the modern age. Passionate about the design journey, vision and experimentation in the pursuit of artistic excellence, Lord Wedgwood was instrumental about educating new markets about the design, quality and craftsmanship in every Wedgwood piece, enabling customers to enjoy the collections in their own homes. WWRD wwrd.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Light Industrial

The client's brief was to convert a 29-year-old apartment into a contemporary house for a young family, with specific requests to maximise natural lighting at the staircase and introduce a bath tub into the master bathroom. The primary challenge of the project was to adapt the mass-produced, utilitarian look and feel of a 1980's government-built high density residential tower into a contemporary, well designed home. g_maisonette_7 The typology of the double storey maisonette, with access to both an external and access balcony, created an opportunity for abundant natural lighting and ventilation; in particular, the removal of the second flood wall allows illumination and air from the balcony to penetrate across the volume and filter down the stairwell. g_maisonette_1 The other major structural intervention was necessitated by the constraint of maintaining the existing sanitary position. Thus, to satisfy the client’s desire for an additional bath tub, the designers took the opportunity to reduce the oversize corridor and expand the master bath, converting the reclaimed space into storage shelves. g_maisonette_15b Materially, the approach was to expose and highlight existing industrial elements while complementing them with introduced textures. Thus black metal steel frames express solid functionality, raw concrete finishes are deliberately left unpainted, and recycled solid teak wood from the existing staircase balustrade was deconstructed to bring out the natural grain. g_maisonette_6b A considered and coherent selection of fixtures, fitting and furnishings completes the pared back space, creating a minimal but animated space that accommodates the requirements of the client family. g_maisonette_16     0932 Design Consultants 0932.am Furniture Schedule: Dining Area: Dining table (Paddle Oak Dining table from Foundry) Dining Chairs (Tolix Side Chair by Xavier Pauchard - Solid Wood Seat) Dining Pedant Light (Blub and Mega Blub by sofie refer from Foundry) Stair Case Void: Rug (Pinocchio Rug by Hay from Foundry) Living Room: Ceiling Fan (Haiku Fan) Sofa (Mezzo Sofa from Boconcept) Floor Lamp (Kuta Floor Lamp from Boconcept) Rug (Handwoven recycled Sari Silk grey rug from CB2) Ottomans (Recycled Pouf from CB2) Balcony: Chair (Dusty Pink Condensa Chair from Grafunkt) Master bedroom: Bed (Sprog Bed from Foundry) Cloth Stand (Tilt cloth stand from Grafunkt) Throw cushion (From Grafunkt)abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Surf in the Suburbs

With a brief to provide the industrialised community of Rosebery with a friendly and welcoming clubhouse-style environment, Bernadette Bellwood of Bellwood Group turned to the immediate and not-so-immediate surroundings for inspiration. clubhouse_3b The site for the project was a blank canvas - housed in the headquarters of Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA), and Bellwood leapt on the beach theme as a means of interrupting the light-commercial/industrial monotony of the area with a relaxed and inviting aesthetic. clubhouse_5 For Bellwood the link to SLSA also sustained a personal connection to the project; "My prior career as a professional athlete and early years competing within the surf life saving community inspired me to conceptually develop an environment which you would generally find within the surf life saving community... Mateship, community service, working towards a goal, patrol hours, having a time for competing and training followed by a drink in the clubhouse amongst friends hold a strong sense of nostalgia for me. It’s something I look back on fondly and am proud to have been a part of." she explains. clubhouse_6 Paying homage to SLSA’s history is a series of archival black-and-white photographs depicting surfing and beach times – these adorn the walls to showcase the SLSA’s heritage. clubhouse_1 The material and colour palette for the interiors also echoes that of beach clubhouses, evoking the natural materials and colours of a Bondi Beach sunset. Sandy yellows and muted pastel tones abound - in Bellwood's words, "what you see looking back from sea to shore at sunset, amongst an eclectic environment at Bondi Beach". clubhouse_2 The combined effect offers a contrast to and escape from the feel of the surrounding area. "Whilst it was important to fit within the local landscape using a conservative look and feel" Bellwood concludes, "the entry experience is designed to give an unexpected and pleasant surprise." Bellwood Group bellwood.net.au Photography: Sue Stubbs, Andy Yee suestubbs.com.au andyyee.com Clubhouse clubhouseaustralia.comabc
Design Products
Accessories

‘Red’ by Dinosaur Designs

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the collection explores the colour red. The colour palette varies from deep reds and bright oranges to soft peaches, complimented by accents of cream and gold, which create harmonious colour relationships. New ‘art-range’ colours have also been developed combining powerful reds and an earthy tortoiseshell. DD_red_2 Olsen says, “Red is a very emotionally intense colour. Red is the colour of fire and blood and is associated with strength, power, passion and love”. DD_red_4 The range is a compilation of shapes and forms from previous collections such as Earth, Ocean and Modern Tribal, which have come together by being cast in a unifying colour palette. DD_red_7 Red will be available in Dinosaur Designs’ Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, New York and online stores from 11th February, 2014. Dinosaur Designs dinosaurdesigns.com.auabc