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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Paper Queens

Hero Image: Opera Australia's THE TURK IN ITALY. Photo credit Lisa Tomasetti If you pop along to Opera Australia’s latest production of Rossini’s The Turk in Italy (at the Sydney Opera House until February 12, and in Melbourne from May 1-13) you’ll be blown away, not just by soprano Emma Matthews, but by the incredibly playful sets. aviatrix_4 Designer Gabriela Tylesova has captured the verve of the 1950s Amalfi Coast (albeit a highly stylised version) using a riot of candy colours, retro vinyl-clad furniture, Astro-turf, deckchairs and neon. However, it is the wallpaper (used in the day-glo kitchen set) that is really attracting attention. Featuring a blue aircraft motif against an orange background, Tylesova created the design not just for the production, but for her own new venture – Aviatrix. aviatrix_2 Launched last week, Aviatrix specialises in digital wall frescoes printed in Sydney on the finest quality German Vlies. Tylesova a former puppet maker from the Czech Republic came to Australia in 1996 to study theatre design at NIDA. She recently teamed up with Sydney-born graphic designer Emelia Simcox, to create a range of wallpaper designs, inspired by everything from the lavish gilded rooms of Indian summer palaces, to ancient Egyptian calligraphy. aviatrix_5 The funky Aerostat wallpaper featured on the set of The Turk in Italy is from the Bossa Nova collection and takes its cue from smoky mid-century jazz clubs and cocktail hours. “We’ve already had several enquiries about the Aerostat wallpaper from people who have seen the opera, and we’ve sent out some samples,” Tylesova says. “I reckon it would look really cool in a bar area, or even as a feature wall in a mid-century modern apartment.” aviatrix_6b The actual pattern, depicting air-ships and parachutes, is a lot denser than the version used in the stage production. It’s available in orange, green, burnt umber and white. aviatrix_3 A range of cushions based on the duo’s original designs has also been released this month and there are plans for a complete collection of soft-furnishings later in the year. aviatrix_8 Aviatrix aviatrix.com.au  abc
Design Products
Furniture

Milano Extendable

The table has built-in extension leaves hidden underneath the table top, allowing you to unfold the table in just one smooth pull: reminiscent of a butterfly flying out from the table. It’s easy, cool and clever. bonconcept The table has a light, floating appearance with thin top plates and geometric lines in both the table top as well as the base. The ingenious design makes more space for chairs around the table as well as more leg room. As the leaf is integrated into the base underneath the table top, there is no need to store the leaf elsewhere in the home. This elegant, contemporary design will appeal to design lovers all over the world. boconcept3 The table top and base come in white lacquered, oak, walnut or black-stained oak veneer and can be constructed in different material combinations. You also have a choice of either a light titanium or dark anthracite grey base as a contrast colour that enhances the details and gives the design a strong characteristic look. boconcept2 BoConcept boconcept.comabc
Architecture
Homes

Unified Perspective

The clients envisioned each garden zone to vary in function and context whilst still complementing the distinct architectural structure of their home. The front existing pool was to be relocated to the rear, with new entrances to the building from ground level and easier access around site. waxdesign3 Through a collaborative approach led by Wax Design landscape architects, the internal and external spaces were integrated into one cohesive, award-winning* design. Privacy from the street was achieved with a screen alcove and a semi permeable front fence and driveway gates. waxdesign2 Strong minimalist lines of the building were transitioned into the outdoor landscape with a series of off-form concrete walls. These walls contrast with the feature sawn-cut granite, providing a backdrop to the pool and a concealed pump house. The elevated pool adds an element of intrigue, with a blade wall negating the need for a pool fence. This creates a greater sense of connection to the central lawn area below. waxdesign4 The existing ivy along the red brick façade was retained with a new granite-raised garden bed beneath. Where finally, a concrete wrap to the granite edge creates a line of seating walls along the length of the lawn and connects the lower garden with the design intent of the pool. * Winner of LASA Awards of Excellence Design of Residential Landscape 2013. waxdesign1 Wax Design waxdesign.com.auabc
Design Products
Accessories

Design Intersects Everything Made

Designed by four of the district’s most acclaimed designers and showrooms, Martyn Lawrence Bullard, Phyllis Morris, Robert Kuo and DSI Entertainment Systems, Caesarstone's newest collaborations are both innovative and unique. These custom Caesarstone pieces were revealed at a press event at Wall Street Gallery, the new destination for Street Art and Pop Art in Los Angeles. With four diverse collections, the Caesarstone brand offers a wide array of colours, patterns and textures providing customers with the ability to create their own customised space. Caesarstone’s highly functional, fashion-forward product encourages freedom of design with enormous application possibilities including furniture. caesarstoneHigh Performance Loudspeaker by Adam Paper of DSI Entertainment, a VIA International company, and Brian Barr, CEO of CAT and Jie Rectangular Dining Table by Robert Kuo Participating designers were given the Caesarstone colour of their choice, and were challenged to design a unique, never before seen furniture item. Hero Image: Accordion Console by Jamie Adler, Brand Director for Circa by Phyllis Morris and Chevron Coffee Table by Martyn Lawrence Bullard   Caesarstone caesarstone.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Wonder Box

Presented with the stringent spatial and format constraints of the Singapore Housing and Development Board and a client brief for a clean, spacious home with ample storage in a 90sqm space, the project was sure to be a challenge. Chan reflects on the project's premise, "New HDB flats in Singapore today confine people in their homes, affecting quality of life and preventing higher interactivity. Our living spaces are getting smaller. We can’t even fit in large furniture like a proper dining table set at home without feeling the squeeze, so we need to make space more innovative." womderbox_3 The solution was to create a multi-purpose volume at the apartment's core that could accommodate utilities, bathrooms and storage, thus freeing up the surrounding space. womderbox_4 Dubbed by Chan the "Wonder Box”, this construction comprises of interior and lighting design as well as customised furniture. Measuring 9m x 2.4m x 1.9m, the floating Wonder Box is suspended and stretches from the kitchen to the sleeping zone, ensuring a visual continuity throughout the home. It conceals the bomb shelter, air-con ledge, two bathrooms and provides plenty of storage for the family. It contains the owners’ and their child’s wardrobes, TV and AV equipment cabinets and dining wares at the kitchen zone. Its glossy laminate finishing reflects the surrounding to achieve a spacious visual effect, making the apartment appear larger than it is. womderbox_2 Tube lighting is installed underneath to illuminate and show off the Box’s elegance to great effect at night. The original walls for the three bedrooms were opened up to convert the area into the master bedroom and the child’s room. Six panels of large sliding doors, doubled as privacy screens, outline the sleeping zones, as well as control the openness of space, light and ventilation. womderbox_6 Coupled with a crisp modern material palette of polished cement, steel and white paint finish, the Wonder Box creates a distinctly modern aesthetic animated by an unusual but highly functional spatial solution. womderbox_7 Explaining his approach to the design, Chan comments, "I have always enjoyed exploring undiscovered space and pushing the boundaries to produce ambiences that are artistic, unconventional, and do not conform to type.... I want to make my ideas tangible and ensure that my creativity is translated into practical solutions for homeowners. The elements I use would meet their needs, knowingly or unknowingly, so they will enjoy the experience of using my design." womderbox_1 Spacedge Designs spacedge.com Photography: Yong Woei Naabc
People
Design Hunters
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Old Glass Becomes Design Objects

Going for a drive with Amos Enders-Moje can be a time consuming affair. He slams on the brakes at every roadside rubbish pile to look for discarded glass. Old TVs are especially prized, with the screens becoming large serving platters and sushi plates alongside many other items, thanks to Amos’ incredible ability to turn glass into pretty much anything he can envisage. sushi_platters Sushi platters made from TV screens The 30-year-old from the south coast of NSW is from a long line of glass-makers. His grandfather owned a glass-cutting business in Hamburg, Germany. His father is the renowned glass maker Klaus Moje, a pioneer of the colour mixing of glass, and in 1981 established Australia’s now leading academic glass program at the ANU. glasses_blue The young Enders-Moje began helping his father in the home glass-studio when he was about 11-years old. His art project for the HSC was a pair of heavily cut lead crystal bowls, utilising found materials. “I’ve always had a passion for reusing glass,” he says. “I try to stay away from blowing glass as much as possible, because it uses a hell of a lot of energy. Those furnaces have to run 24/7 every day of the year, you cannot switch them off. “ lux_pendant_light Enders-Moje was recently commissioned by Canberra’s boutique Hotel-Hotel to create all of the glassware for the dining, lounge, bar and guest rooms. The elegant drinking glasses he produced were made from old stubby bottles sourced from local bars and restaurants (for the record, the green ones are Blue Tongue Lager bottles, while the amber are from German Oettinger). The bottles are cut on a diamond saw, with the rims tirelessly hand-polished. nishi_vase_hotel-hotelNishi vase series, commissioned for Hotel-Hotel “What’s so great about using these recycled materials is they have a memory and a sense of playfulness about them,” he says. “Somebody will grab a glass or water jug and suddenly realise it’s a repurposed object; they might notice the coding on the sides, or the stippling on the bottom when they put it on the table. I love to see that look of recognition on their face.” He says beer bottle glass is a “fantastic material” due to its strength and durability. “We’ve done tests with our glasses where we’ve held them high above our heads and dropped them onto concrete floors. They’ve bounced three or four times before they’ve broken.” vases The hotel also commissioned him to create the in-room pendant lights (one in cognac, the other in pine-tree gruen) for each of the 68 guestrooms. These were hand-blown by Enders-Moje and his team (Scott Chaseling and Hillary Crawford) at the nearby Canberra Glassworks in Kingston. He says he loves making utilitarian objects that people can hold and touch: “I don’t want to make things that people are too scared to use.” wine_glasses At the moment Amos and his colleague and long time friend Wade Briggs are working on more than 150 products, many yet to be released. We love the large cluster lights, especially the Godzilla Chandelier made from English cider bottles, each one hand-faceted to produce a ‘hammered’ effect that splinters the light in quite a stunning manner. godzilla_cluster_lightGodzilla Cluster Chandelier “Creating these lights is a zero waste operation,” says Enders-Moje. “The lip of the bottle is polished to make into a jewellery ring, and the bases are crushed up to be used in a new sustainable building material called Earthcrete. He is typically modest about his talent: “The glass is already there, all I’m doing is finding a vision in it.” profileWade Briggs (leftt) and Amos Enders-Moje (right). Photograph: Eryca Green Product images: Rob Little rldi.com.au Mo-En Design mo-endesign.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Java Balance

Named after the simplest method in manual brewing where 1:15 is the ideal coffee-to-water ratio, architectural designers David and Stephanie Getty have redeveloped an under-appreciated showroom into a unique, standalone café. one_fifteenth_3 “Being a standalone shop has its constraints, however it also allows the project an opportunity to stand out and evolve on its own”, mention David and Stephanie. “The openness and communal seating gives the space a sense of community and allows and encourages interaction and spontaneous conversations”. one_fifteenth_6 The economy of design played a significant aspect during the renovation process for the architectural designers. The designers explain, “The precedent for design reflects the efficiency and simplicity of form of the traditional street warung [a type of small family-owned business in Indonesia and Malaysia]. one_fifteenth_5 “When the client is in your immediate family, everyone is involved to some degree with [their] own unique set of skills,” they add. 1/15 owner Nathalia Gunawan, together with her family, owns a furniture manufacturing business where most materials were sourced. The design and furnishings inside epitomise the family’s love for slow brewing coffee and fine craftsmanship. one_fifteenth_2 Gunawan believes “in creating an atmosphere where the local and foreigner can find their own comfort within the walls of 1/15 to relax, unwind, or carry out business as usual. “We position coffee as an inseparable part of creative works and forward thinking. And with this modest philosophy we carry our dream to strengthen Indonesia’s position in the global map of coffee connoisseurs”. 1/15 1-15coffee.com Photography: Christopher and Retno Prasasabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Chris Lee

Your name: Chris Lee What you do: Founder of Asylum Your latest project: Johnnie Walker House Seoul Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Paul Harnden 2) Rei Kawakubo 3) Herzog & De Meuron What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Not really into cars, bikes, plane or boat! Sorry. Chair model: None Residential space: Any house by Marcio Kogan Commercial space: Dominus winery by Herzog & De Meuron Decorative product: Pig table by Front Functional product: Wine opener by Laguiole Handmade good: Paul Harnden wallets Mass-produced good: Riedel wineglasses Meal: Sushi Megumi in Kanazawa Restaurant: Kahala in Osaka Drink: La Tache from Domaine de Romanee Conti Bar: Piano bar in Tokyo Item in your studio: pen Piece of technology: Projector Historical figure: Oscar Niemeyer Fictional character: Chappie (Tokyo) Vice: Wine (it’s a vice cause I built a cellar for it!) Virtue: Generous What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Insatiable hunt for the impossibleabc
Design Products
Accessories

Satisfying Tastes – Alessi 2014 Collection

Alessi's Spring-Summer 2014 collection combines the creative minds of independent designers to display a scope of geometric form that enhances the average kitchen experience. Inspired by global culture spanning from Eastern rituals to Western history, Alessi compares the new catalogue to a light yet filling menu that would satisfy both the most refined and simplest palates. Australian Abi Alice designs the Octave series with reference to the musical octave of perfect intervals. This synergy between elliptical shapes uses a sheet of laser cut stainless steel with balanced proportions to create pure geometric harmony. ABI05_b_edit3 Octave, Oval Centrepiece Claudia Raimondo follows the success of her Joy n.1 centrepiece with the Joy n.11 round basket and Joy n.3 round tray.  The deceptively coarse crystallised texture motif sustains the digital inspiration of the Joy n.1 and responds to its surroundings by mirroring colour and illumination. CR02_B_Wamb_phLeoTorri_edit2Joy n.11, Round Basket Giulio Iacchetti delivers the essential tools for enjoying wine at its best. Called Noé (Noah), it is a tribute to the Bibical tale of the first man to create wine. In particular, the series features stackable bottle holders in curved geometric forms to easily accommodate the shape of the glass. These can be individually combined to create vertical or horizontal structures. GIA13DR_ins_editNoé , Bottle Holders Marta Sansoni explores the use and taste of olive oil in the series Fior d’olio. The glass container enhances human senses; when used for tasting it can be tapered at the mouth to preserve aroma. Freshly picked olives inspired the colour of the glass containers and the form of the stainless steel pouring spout. MSA32_edit Fior d’olio, Pouring Spout Combining the kettle and the teapot, Naoto Fukasawa creates Cha. A combination of insulation and materials allows this singular object to be used on any heat source and then brought directly to the table for serving – a modern take on the ancient ritual of drinking tea. NF01_edit_LS_2 Cha, Kettle and Teapot   Alessi alessi.comabc
Furniture
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Accessories

Misura Presents Cattelan Italia

Cattelan Italia presents modern solutions that often look to the past as a source of intense inspiration and culture. Amazing new fusions and forms spring forth in an uninterrupted flow, transforming and evolving into ideas. misura4 Party console - A console that can transform into a long table misura1 Domino table - Solid walnut base with a clear glass top misura2 Eliot wood table - natural solid wood edges in burned oak misura Vega desk - Available in two sizes and finished in walnut or burned oak Cattelan Italia is distributed exclusively through Misura in Australia. Hero Image: Seneca - a funky TV unit that has a solid walnut top Misura misura.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

Fashioning a Home

Above: Gesualdi looking over plans in the dining area. An army drill hall built in the mid-1930s is an unlikely place to create a home. It certainly wasn’t Piero Paolo Gesualdi’s intention when he bought the building ten years ago. Located in the inner Melbourne suburb of Fitzroy, Gesualdi was renting it while building a house for himself nearby. “I was more or less camping in the place. I used a portable barbeque to cook,” says Gesualdi. fashioning_a_home_2 The dramatic entrance is enclosed by a black steel canopy Austere by anyone’s standards, the red brick hall possessed a number of fine art deco features such as architraves, skirting boards and a stone fireplace. But it was the proportions of the rooms and their generous ceiling heights that made Gesualdi re-think his long-term plans. “I probably wouldn’t have persisted had I known then it would take six years to get permits through Council. Even when I thought I was nearly there, it took almost a year for the kitchen joinery to arrive from Italy.” fashioning_a_home_3 The spacious formal entertaining areas are panelled with original timber walls Others would never have started such a daunting project, particularly with many neighbours describing it as the ‘ugly duckling’ of the street. However, Gesualdi is recognised for his highly trained eye and for being just that little bit ahead of the mainstream. In the 1970s, Gesualdi opened the Mason fashion boutiques – two in Melbourne and two in Sydney – which became the word in high fashion in Australia through to the 1980s. Gesualdi was responsible for importing clothes from designers such Jean Paul Gaultier, Romeo Gigli, Claude Montana and Comme des Garçons. And, like his choice of home, these designers were unknown and adventurous. “There were no large advertising campaigns like there are today. It was like diving out of a window and just hoping you’d land on your feet,” says Gesualdi. fashioning_a_home_4 The meeting room adjacent to the offices of WorldWeave on the ground floor. Gesualdi left Masons to open Rosati’s bistro in Flinders Lane (evocative of a café in an Italian railway station) and is now returning to ‘fashion for the home’ with designer artist, Sara Thorn (well known for her 1980s fashion labels, Abyss Studio and Funkessentials). Gesualdi and Thorn’s business, WorldWeave, is based on the ground floor of the re-designed building. One room functions as an office and another as a meeting room. Athird room operates as the showroom, complete with dark-veneered shelves filled with cushions, scarves and throws. “I’ve known Piero since I was 16. We’d always run into each other at different stages in our careers,” says Thorn.fashioning_a_home_5Left: A guest bedroom on the first floor features a door clad in bluestone Right: The stainless steel kitchen features a retractable rangehood Separating the offices from the Grand Salon, also on the ground floor, is a moody lobby. Reminiscent of a great film set, the key ‘prop’ is a dramatic steel staircase. Spanning three levels, the sculptural form stops visitors in their tracks. Designed by Gesualdi and fabricated by Peter Drofenik, the staircase’s curvaceous lines are exaggerated by a twelve metre-high photo montage of Michelangelo’s ‘David’. “I’ve always had an affinity for Florence. The Masons headquarters was based there,” says Gesualdi, who with all of his designs, whether furniture, interiors, homes or accessories, appreciates the juxtaposition of old and new. “There’s something quite European in this approach,” he says. fashioning_a_home_6 Left: A photomontage of Michelangelo’s David sits behind the extraordinary steel staircase designed by Gesualdi Right: The head of David emerges in the open plan bedroom and bathroom on the third level The Salon is the epitome of refined Italian style. Gesualdi essentially kept the proportions of two combined rooms (one originally used as a mess hall), as well as the original dark timber veneer joinery, comprising built-in bookshelves and storage units. The timber was accentuated with grey polished plastered walls (stucco lustro). “The fireplace simply needed a good scrub,” says Gesuadi. One of the main changes to this space was achieved by extending the size of windows and adding glass and steel doors to the front lawn. “I didn’t want to start the renovation until this permission was granted,” he says. “I couldn’t have lived with the original chicken wired translucent glass windows.” While the ground floor is dedicated to WorldWeave, the upper two levels are Gesualdi’s private domain. On the first floor is an open plan kitchen and informal living area, together with a second bedroom. And while previously there was no outlook, new steel and glass windows and doors frame the city skyline. “I wanted to make use of these balconies,” says Gesualdi. And rather than fill the space (and there’s a considerable amount of it) with knick-knacks, it errs on the spartan side. The polished plastered walls are void of art and there are a select few designer pieces of furniture, including a modular lounge suite designed by Gesualdi himself. “Just sit on it. You won’t want to budge,” says Gesualdi, who eventually intends to bring such designs to market. fashioning_a_home_7A tall hedge creates privacy for the home and studio The all-stainless steel kitchen is also pared back. Stainless steel joinery conceals a fridge, a pantry, as well as storage. And the 3.5 metre stainless steel island bench even includes a pop-out power point to ensure the lines remain clean. One of Gesualdi’s ‘toys’ is his rangehood, also made from stainless steel. But rather than being a permanent fixture over the island bench, it retracts in the ceiling when not in use. “It took its time to arrive. But it was worth the wait,” says Gesualdi, who just has to touch the switch to demonstrate the rangehood’s gymnastic qualities. Like the living areas, Gesualdi’s bedroom is almost monastic in style. Adouble bed, flanked either end by fur-covered ottomans, is the centerpiece. The only other form that competes for attention is a sculptural stainless steel basin, cheekily revealing a voluptuous behind on one side. And instead of a separate shower, there’s a slight change in level and the shower head is attached to a beam. “I designed this space for myself. I’d rather notice the way the light falls into the space than a rack of clothes lined up against a wall,” he says. fashioning_a_home_8The stone-clad bathroom Gesualdi, who trained as an architect, has a clear vision of what he wants to achieve in design, and after decades of designing for others, so he should. “My years in fashion have helped me enormously. Whether I’m designing a chair or an interior, it’s about understanding the human scale. Understanding the way something is draped on the body requires the same skill as understanding the way someone sits in a chair or enters a room. You just know when something is right.” Photography: Derek Swalwell derekswalwell.com Design Morphogenesis morphogenesis.org Structural Consultant Optimal Electrical & Plumbing Spectral Contractor Bhayana Builders, Vadehra Builders Total FloorArea 1,508m2 ARTWORK Bar by Balasubramaniam, and Nitin Agarwal. Living Room by F.N. Souza, and Chintan Upadhaya. Staircase by V. Ramesh, Sanjeev Sonpimpare, and Amit Ambalal. Foyer by Probir, and Dhawan. Dining Room by Jyoti Bhatt, Manisha Gera, and Probir. Bedroom by Sonali Rastogi, Probir, and Ajay Rajgarhia. FURNITURE Bar custom designed by Morphogenesis. Chaise in Living Room from Molteni&C, molteni.it. Sofa in Living Room custom designed by Morphogenesis, made by Proform, upholstered in fabric from Shades of India, shadesofindia.com. Seating tall chairs in Living Room and hardwood seating in Courtyard custom designed by Mike Knowles at India Chic, (91 11) 2630 3968, chairs in Dining from Proform, and Calligaris chairs in TV Area from Stanley Boutique, stanleyboutique.com. Tables inlay table in Courtyard and benches in Dining are custom made by Kaaru, kaaru.com, red table in Dining custom designed by Morphogenesis and Mike Knowles from India Chic, Anchor tables in Dining from India Chic, and Jean Nouvel Less Table in TV Area from Stanley Boutique. Cabinetry in TV Area is custom made by Proform, and from Poggen Pohl, poggenpohl.com. Outdoor rattan furniture purchased in Hong Kong. FINISHES Flooring Oak planks and Travertine stone. Timber throughout is Teak ply and veneer and renewable forest timber treated with Linseed oil. Wall panelling handmade fabric and paper sandwiched in glass, and textured Limestone. Paint throughout is non-toxic paint (acrylic emulsion) from Asian Paints, asianpaints.com. Glass in joinery by St Gobain, saint-gobain.co.in. LIGHTING Bar lighting by Murano, muranolighting.com. Lamp in Living Room, Louis Poulssen lamp, louispoulssen.com. Rubber lights in Courtyard are handmade with rubber by Quasar, quasarled.com. Chandelier in Dining Room is Phillip Starck from Flos, flos.com. Recessed lighting in TV Room by Antares, antares.com. General lighting throughout by Erco Lighting, erco.com. FIXTURES/EQUIPMENT Bathroom fixtures Jacob Delafon, jacobdelafon.com, Kohler, kohler.com, Ceramica Flaminia, ceramicaflaminia.it, and Gessi, gessi.com, all from FCML, fcmlindia.com. Hardware from Hafele, hafeleindia.com, and Hettich, hettich.com. Fans antiques from flea market at Chor Bazaar in Mumbai.abc