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Art, Design and a Dinosaur

Above: One of Stephen’s paintings hangs at the entry. After almost 25 years of creating, the trio behind Dinosaur Designs hardly needs an introduction. Their name has become synonymous with contemporary Australian design, and the prolific collection of jewellery and homewares produced since their first experiments with resin in 1986 are testament to their relevance and longevity. Stephen Ormandy is the intriguing male counterpart to the glamorous duo of Louise Olsen (his partner, with whom he has a child) and Liane Rossler. But he brings a particular element to the group dynamic that is expressed in his individual creative endeavours. Art has recently returned to the forefront of Stephen’s creative psyche. After graduating from art school and due to the growing popularity of Dinosaur Designs, “there was a period of about eight years of not painting,” he remembers. Art,-Design-and-a-Dinosaur_2 Left: Form and colour are celebrated in every corner. Right: A diverse collection of tribal, modern and classic design and art find harmony in Stephen and Louise’s home. Then, about five years ago while drawing with his daughter, Camille (now 10), he “suddenly realised something was missing”. This simple and intuitive act became the ‘seed’ of this return to painting. These crudely cut paper squares he coloured that day hang on the wall of his studio today as mementos of this turning point. Perhaps this realisation was also inspired by two of Stephen’s favourite artists. Introduced to the work of British artist, Victor Pasmore, there was an instant attraction – “I saw his work in an art catalogue for an auction, and the minute I saw these images, I thought – ‘Wow, look at that. Who’s that? What’s going on?’ So I went straight down there to the auction and I just had to have them.” The series of five paintings he purchased that very day is hung on the wall across from the dining table, where he and his father-in-law, painter John Olsen, “sit and talk about them for hours,” says Stephen. Art,-Design-and-a-Dinosaur_3 Left: A wall of Stephen’s work, including the drawings that mark his return to painting. Right: Stephen in his light-filled studio. It is clear that Pasmore originally followed the Impressionist school, before experimenting with abstraction, which he pioneered in Britain (he also had an interest in architecture). Turning the pages of a long-sought-after Pasmore tome, Stephen explains the development in style: “Most people thought he was crazy to do this abstract stuff after his impressionism stuff. But it was so bold. I love that.” Some might say that Stephen’s recent refocusing on his own art practice is just as bold, but it’s “all one expression” to him. The move is not exactly out of the blue – he is a trained artist deeply connected to the Olsen creative dynasty, which includes his partner, Louise, her brother, gallery owner Tim and their father, John. For Stephen, the creative process for his art and his design is quite similar, the difference being that Dinosaur Designs is a planned team event whereas with his own painting, “spontaneity and the unconscious play a large role,” he says. Looking at the developing works, echoes of the Dinosaur aesthetic are clearly recognisable and he admits that his own art and Dinosaur Designs work “inform each other.” Art,-Design-and-a-Dinosaur_4 Left: Sculptures by Tapio Wirkkala in Stephen and Louise’s home. Right: The dining table faces a series by Pasmore. Finnish designer and artist, Tapio Wirkkala, is a similar character in terms of crossing creative boundaries – in fact Stephen sees him as “an older version of where I’m headed.” His works range from exclusive glass sculptures in galleries to industrial concepts with a significant commercial run, such as the Finlandia vodka bottle, iittala’s Ultima Thule glass range, and the Finnish currency, the markka banknote (in use until the changeover to the Euro in 2001). In all Wirkkala’s works, Stephen says, there is a particular aesthetic – “like that Aboriginal concept of songlines, the handing on of tradition, those threads that join the dots.” Stephen enjoys the way that Wirkkala “took his sculptural sensibility to the everyday”, an approach that also characterises Dinosaur Designs. Stephen sees people as being like bowerbirds, that industrious and selective Australian native species that search for bits of blue to decorate their home. “We as a human culture have an interest in things aesthetically pleasing to us, in putting things together. Of course, a salad bowl has to hold salad, but if it can also look sculptural and beautiful, why not?” Art,-Design-and-a-Dinosaur_5b Left: 'The Garden of Eden – Blue Symphony', 1981, Victor Pasmore. Middle: A work in progress by Stephen. Right: Tools of the artist’s trade. Stephen has a refreshing take on Australia’s design culture. “I think it’s pretty dynamic here. We’re lucky that modern Australia doesn’t have a massive cultural cloud looming over the top of us. It’s liberating – there’s a certain freedom. Imagine the pressure of being an object designer in, say, Scandinavia.” This optimism permeates all that Stephen does and he has an organic approach to creativity and life. He searches out inspiration relentlessly, this eternal hunt a joyful sacrament of the soul – “There are all sorts of new discoveries ahead, whole new worlds. That never stops.” His simplified abstracted aesthetic is one thing. But it is his ethos, an unashamed enthusiasm for design and for life, that are the songlines of this particular bowerbird. Photography: Chris Chen chrischen.com.auabc
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What's On

Colours of Country

It’s no secret that the indigenous art market has been severely depressed for a number of years, but it’s the correction the market needed. For far too long, mediocre work was being sold at a premium price, solely on the basis of its Aboriginality, rather than its merit. colours_of_country_6 Well at least now we are seeing the cream rising to the top. And nowhere is this more apparent than in this quality exhibition – Colours Of Country – presented by a humble little gallery in Sydney’s Bronte shopping strip. The exhibition, held at The Gallery Shop, showcases a mixture of senior and emerging Aboriginal artists with a strong connection to the country around the infamous Canning Stock Route in remote Western Australia. colours_of_country_4 We think it’s one of the most exciting indigenous exhibitions in many years, especially when it comes to relatively affordable art., with major pieces by recognized artists going for a maximum of $5,000 and works by emerging artists such as Jean Rangi (winner of the 2013 Kimberley Art prize) for as little as $1,400. colours_of_country_3 There are 25 selected works, with many not actually hung because of the small gallery space. Four key pieces have already sold (two by May Chapman, and one each by Nora Wompi and Bugai Whyoulter). colours_of_country_2 Several communities and around 10 artists are represented in the exhibition. The key body of the work comes from Martumili Art Centre in Newman, although the art itself was collected by a field officer from very remote desert areas. colours_of_country_1 “I spent a day looking over more than 800 images with the art centre manager,” says The Gallery Shop owner Nichola Dare. “Considering there’s a major exhibition of Martumili art planned for the MCA, we felt a bit lucky that we had first pick of some very important pieces. “Some of these women are in their 80s and we won’t see the likes of them again. They paint very freely because they have had very little western influence. They are great colourists, especially Bugai and Norma Wompi. It’s getting harder and harder to get this work because these women don’t produce so much anymore.” colours_of_country_5 Art Month will be organising a free bus tour of art locations in Bondi and Bronte on Saturday 22 March, including a stop at The Gallery Shop to take in the new exhibition.   Colours of Country Runs through April 10 2014 The Gallery Shop, 254 Bronte Road, Waverley, NSW 2024 thegalleryshop.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Paranaque House, Manila

Located in a low density neighbourhood of houses and low rise buildings in Paranaque City, Metro Manila, the family home extends over 465sqm on a 360sqm plot. The entrance foyer, garage and service area face the access road while dining, living room and kitchen overlook a private courtyard. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_6 The ground floor is organised around the courtyard, where a wet wall faces the dining living space. This typology, widely used during Spanish colonial era, has been chosen for its qualities of efficiency and privacy. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_16 The courtyard is bordered by a pond, with a vertical water feature facing the living and dining room. Small shells and crushed Adobe stone are crusted into the render, and at night, the wall is lit up by the pond. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_4 The first floor hosts a family room and a private quarter with two bedrooms, along with a guest-office room with access to a roof garden. The master bedroom occupies the second floor with its own salon, changing room and bathroom. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_11 The roof of the garage is a green roof and garden. Thanks to the use of the courtyard typology, total landscaped garden and terrace space is more than 250sqm. The top volume is kept behind the façade line in order to not have too imposing a mass visible from the courtyard, with a screen-like layer of floating bamboo screens. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_2 Bamboo, a low cost and sustainable material that grows intensively locally is the chosen material for the project. It has been historically used in the country for the fabrication of handicrafts, native architecture and utilitarian objects. The bamboo poles are treated against moulds and pests and then stained and varnished. They are protected by ledges that also prevent the direct sunlight from penetrating into the house, while on the top floor the layers of bamboo are doubled. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_13 The base of the main house and the entrance foyer is clad with Araal - local granite. All windows, cabinets and beds have been designed and fabricated with Mahogany wood, also available locally. Stones for the bathrooms and living room come from the nearby island of Romblon. There is also a wall featured made of coconut bark in the master bedroom. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_1 Internally, a simple palette of white render offsets the richer finishes of stone and timber, with delicate timber built-ins and stairs sustaining a minimal aesthetic. house-in-Paranaque-Manila_plans The house is a considered study of how simple volumes can be assembled into a harmonious and functional sequence of spaces, and animated by relevant, inviting materials.

Atelier Sacha Cotture ateliersachacotture.com

Photography: Luca Tettoni corbisimages.comabc
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Q+A with Matthew Woodward, Architect of Wirra Wirra Pavilion

As your first project, how did the project affect your self-awareness as an architect? What have you learned about yourself and your approach to your work? The project highlighted the layers of complexity associated with transforming a conceptual idea into a resolved architectural solution. Each stage of the design process brought a new set of challenges. I realised that, as an architect – the success of a project is substantially dictated by our ability to deconstruct problems and provide alternative solutions in order to achieve a level of resolution that we are happy with. This project has made me realise the significance optimism plays in the delivery of our craft. wirra_wirra_4 How did having your father as the client affect the design process?  Having my father as the client helped to streamline the design process. We have a good understanding of the way each other think and operate. It can make the lines of communication relatively less complicated and time intensive, which allows for more time to be spent on the exploration of ideas. wirra_wirra_1 Were there any unexpected opportunities or challenges during the design and construction phases? There were plenty of challenges to overcome when seeking approval for the project from the local council. One challenge was the fact that the building was being erected within a flood prone area. The local council made us raise the building twice during the process as the finished floor level was required to be at the 1 in 100 year flood level + 0.5m, even though the existing dam has two overflow spill ways during times of flood. This was frustrating from a design perspective, as conceptually we wanted the pavilion to float over the water so the user would feel like they were walking on water. The second time we were informed to raise the building, we left the steel floor fascias where they were and just raised the internal timber floating floor up to the required level to satisfy council requirements. That way the language of the building would still visually read at a level we were more comfortable with. wirra_wirra_5 With Mies’ Fansworth House as inspiration, did you have any considerations on which elements would need to be adapted for the Australian context and the specific site? The site of the Farnsworth House is very much a flat, horizontal plain landscape. The horizontality and simplicity of the house is pronounced due to it floating effortlessly above the landscape. The site for the Somersby pavilion is a sloping site towards a flat surface of water. From a conceptual approach, and visual perception - it was important to connect the building to the earth with a sandstone mass on the bank of the dam. This roots the building to the earth on the site before horizontally projecting and floating out over the flat surface of water. wirra_wirra_2 With a very successful first project under your belt, what would you like to tackle next?  That is a good question... I think all projects bring with them a unique set of challenges, no matter what size or scale. I have currently been doing some master planning which is a completely different project but the thought processes and generation of ideas are conceptualised in the same manner. The challenges faced are unique, but what matters is how we deal with these challenges to progress and move towards the destination. Matthew Woodward Architecture matthewwoodward.com.au Read the full story on Woodward's Wirra Wirra Pavilion in Habitus Issue 23, on sale March 26 habitusliving.com/current-issueabc
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Habitus 23 Photoshoot – Feasting

While I have been writing my new book Happy, I learnt the world is going through an epidemic of loneliness. We seem to have lost the art of conversation due to the chronic use of social media and dreaded emails.  Life has become more about the individual rather than a collective group.  As designers and architects I believe it is critical to solve this human problem and bring people together and simply get them talking. feasting_8 Designing forced spaces to bring people together often doesn’t work and feels very contrived. This is why it’s important to create spaces that subconsciously pull people together like a magnet. My simple conclusion is we need to ditch the stifling, old world term ‘dining’ table and ‘dining’ room and instead name them the ‘Feasting Table’ and better still the ‘Feasting Room’. When it comes to describing the dining table or room instantly the mind goes to formal outdated living inhaled with very boring conversations. feasting_6 Swapping dining to feasting instantly transforms the table and room into a friendly space where friends and family come together, conversation flows out as much as the wine does and the food is delicious, healthy and generous. feasting_7 Every feasting table should always have a bowl of fruit on it, carafe of water and glasses, and flowers. The feasting table should be the heart of all homes in my opinion where the family subconsciously flock to talk, do homework and share meals. feasting_2 When researching the history of the table I discovered it’s humble beginnings was simply a plank of wood placed on diners laps to help balance food and wine. After the meal was finished the board of wood would be hung on the wall out of the way. This is where interestingly we get the term “room and board”. feasting_4 I wanted to prove in Habitus magazine that it doesn’t matter what size your home, it’s possible to include a feasting room into any space. I embraced what is one of the biggest challenges for designers and architects in the twenty-first century in creating a multipurpose space that can constantly change to the needs of the family who live in them as our urban homes keep shrinking. feasting_1 It was really important to show the key to successfully transform a living room into a feasting room was by using the same furniture in the living room for the feasting table. Some of the furniture’s functions changed from storage to seating, lounging to feasting, artwork to table but what remained was comfort and the interiors didn’t weaken in good looks or function. By creating a hanging table it was important for me that it would look beautiful when hanging and I loved the idea that it could be artwork in a living room when not being used as a feasting table. Read more on the feasting table and creating spaces to create conversations in Amanda's new book Happy, published by Murdoch Books, released this September 2014. Habitus Issue 23 habitusliving.com/current-issueabc
Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

A Living Space

Above: The living areas are framed by garden views and a lap pool. With a built-in fireplace, the large terrace functions as an outdoor room. Melbourne is recognised for its leafy streets and gardens, a feature that was not lost on both the architect and owners of this house in Toorak. “The house was designed around a 60-year-old Pin Oak. We were extremely careful not to damage its root system,” says architect Rob Mills. This palatial new house not only benefits from views of the tree, but also has glimpses of tennis courts directly opposite. “Even a slow game of tennis animates the vista,” says Mills. Designed for a couple with two young children, the new house replaced a 1930s clinker brick home. “Originally, our clients were looking to renovate a house in the area. I asked them if they’d consider building,” says Mills, who was surprised to hear from them three days later with news they had purchased an old house on a 9,000m2 site. Rather than present Mills with an endless wish list the clients simply said, ‘You know what to do, just go ahead,’ recalls Mills. “The only thing specified was the number of bedrooms,” he says. a_living_space_2 Left: The main bedroom, oriented to the west, features external shutters that diffuse the afternoon light. (Photo: Trevor Mein) Right: The curvaceous staircase provides a contrast to Mills’ rectilinear design. Constructed in concrete and rendered brick with lightweight upper levels, the house is loosely based on a warehouse model. “I wanted to break down the walls of a traditional house verdant avenue house — VIC, australia and create one grand open living area,” says Mills. One of the few divisions on the ground floor is a graphic circular steel staircase that links three levels within the home. Completely detached from surrounding walls, this staircase has a force of its own. “I was fortunate to find an elderly German steel maker to create this form,” says Mills, of the staircase that stands in a nine-metre high void. The staircase not only animates the interior, it also separates the formal living areas from the informal areas. White painted steel columns in the living areas also create a subtle delineation of spaces within the home. “I didn’t want to carve up these areas, but I also wanted each area to be enveloping,” says Mills. The kitchen, located to one side of the informal living area, is of a similar scale to other areas within the home. Loosely defined by a honed black granite bench with American Oak cupboards, the kitchen joinery was treated as furniture. “I didn’t want the kitchen to dominate the living areas,” says Mills, who included at the rear of the kitchen, two walk-in pantries, an area for wine storage, and a laundry. a_living_space_3 Left: Laser cut screen along the lap pool will eventually be covered in ivy. Right: The double height space in the living area accentuates the grand proportions of this home. Also important for Mills was the link between the house and the garden. Large glass sliding doors open to a western terrace on one side of the living area and to a 25-metre lap pool on the other side. Given his clients’ propensity for outdoor dining, Mills included a sophisticated arrangement of cooking appliances on the terrace, as well as an outdoor fireplace. “Our clients wanted a garden they could enjoy rather than spend time mowing lawns,” says Mills. “This screen [a contemporary Moroccan steel screen framing the pool] will eventually be covered with vines and creepers.” The scale of the first floor is as vast as that of the ground floor. At one end are two children’s bedrooms, together with a guest bedroom. The children’s wing also includes a television area. At the other end of the floor plate, separated by a large pivotal door, is the parents’ retreat. “The main bedroom was modelled on a hotel suite. Instead of a traditional bedhead, there’s a limestone-clad nook offering views of the ensuite bathroom, also finished in limestone.” To reduce glare from the western sun, Mills designed a series of operable steel shutters across the home’s façade. a_living_space_4 Left: Looking down the staircase from the top floor. Right: The ensuite features extensive built-ins. Some of the features in this Toorak house have been developed by Mills over a number of years. Sliding doors in the bedrooms, for example, feature a second layer of toughened glass that functions as a balustrade. Water is both visually and audibly integral to many of Mills’ designs, including this one, as is the inclusion of two staircases. “The children can run in after school, get changed and jump in the pool. They don’t have to cross paths with parents and can make as much noise as they like,” says Mills. “This is not a static house,” says Mills. “It responds to the elements as well as providing the level of privacy required.” a_living_space_5 Photography: John Wheatley uacreative.com/portfolios/john-wheatley/bio/ Architect Robert Mills robmills.com.au Landscaper Jack Merlo Design Builder VCON Artwork Living room painting by George Tjungurrayi from Cross Cultural Art Exchange, ccae. com.au. Sitting room painting by Ningura Naparrula from Sotheby’s, sothebys.com, and Sweetheart by Todd Hunter from Scott Livesey Galleries, scottliveseygalleries.com. Dining room Untitled by Boxer Milner Tjampitjin, and painting by George Tjungurrayi from Utopia Art Sydney, utopiaartsydney. com.au. Study painting by Patrick Olodoodi Tjungurrayi from Scott Livesey Galleries. Furniture Furniture supplied by Hub Furniture, hubfurniture.com.au. Rugs Flower Rug in theatre by Moroso, moroso.it, Mongolian goat Leon Rug in living room by Redaelli. Armchairs Hi-cove armchair in living room by Molteni & C, molteni.it, all others by Moroso. Sofas in living room by Moroso, all others by Molteni & C. Dining chairs Bloomy Chair by Moroso, Glove Chair by Molteni. Dining table by Lowe, lowefurniture.com. Side tables by Moroso. Bed by Molteni. Finishes Exterior rendered in Irving by Toscano Roman Render, toscanoromanrender.com.au. Cladding aluminium in Castle White by Alpolic, alpolic.com, and motorised louvres by Reflex Shading Systems, shadingsystems. com. Interior walls finished in White Sand paint by Porters Paints, porterspaints. com.au, in study stucco-finished in Fresco Finish paint also by Porters Paints. Veneer Oak in study and living room from Briggs Veneers, briggs.com. au. Stone in bathroom Bianca Perla marble from Artedomus, artedomus.com. Floor in living room Brown Black American Oak by Harper & Sandilands, harper-sandilands.com.au, in study honed Zimbabwe black granite from City Stone, citystonevic. com.au. Carpet Torcido Negra from Velieris, velieris. onlinegalleries.com.au. Lighting Lighting from Hub Furniture. Floor light in dining Alfa by Anta, anta.de. Table lights Post Krisi by Catellani & Smith, catellanismith.com, Half Moon by Karboxx, karboxx.com, and Eclipse by Objekto, objekto.fr. Pendants in Stairwell by Bocci, bocci.ca. Fixtures/Fittings Bath by KOS, kositalia.com. Vola Bath spout, vola.dk. Basins from Parisi, parisi.com. au. Other sanitary fittings from Rogerseller, rogerseller.com.au.abc
Happenings
What's On

Embassy

Above: Future Wagon by Matthew Bird and Phillip Adams (2013) Experimental architect Matthew Bird (Studiobird) and choreography artist Phillip Adams (BalletLab) will collaborate once more as the 2014 Summer Residents at Pin-Up Architecture and Design Project Space, in Melbourne’s inner north. Their installation - EMBASSY - is the first iteration of a two-year design research project, and presents as a playground of experimental architecture along with a visual design and performance component, which will be in full effect on opening night. Bird says: “The premise was conceived in Brasilia, which contains over one hundred foreign embassies. I like the tension created by national architecture in an exotic location, and exploring issues of territory, identity, boundaries and gateways.” future_wagon_1 Future Wagon by Matthew Bird and Phillip Adams (2013) With an open brief plus support by MADA Monash University and curator Fleur Watson, the installation comprises a grid-like frame – referencing modernism – containing four neon white garage doors in a cross section, each operated by a central motor. On opening night, the some-200 guests will be ushered around the space via markings on the floor. Once safely inside the gallery, the garage doors of the illuminated structure will start to open and close in a balletic sequence, before some of the guests are invited to transfer inside it. “It’s about moving and ushering people through thresholds,” Bird says. “Phillip is interested in exploring issues of other and the unidentifiable, which I think we’ll find more about on the night.” future_wagon_2 Future Wagon by Matthew Bird and Phillip Adams (2013) For Bird, the architect and Adams, the choreographer, EMBASSY is an evolution of their unconventional work together, which includes Aviary (2011), All Things Return to Nature Tomorrow (2013), and Future Wagon, Melbourne Now NGV (2013-14). And while both typically layer their work with rich, decorative elements, in EMBASSY the approach has been quite different. “It just comes back to these four doors, and stripping it all back. There is no explicit baroque layering, rather testing spatial thresholds and experience through everyday garage doors and body in motion,” Bird says. EMBASSY Opening night 6pm – 9pm Thursday March 27 Exhibition runs 27-29 March Studio Bird studiobird.com.au Ballet Lab balletlab.com Pinup Projects pinupprojectspace.com  abc
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Minnie Pwerle for Designer Rugs

Designer Rugs exclusively represent the works of the world's most collected Indigenous artist, the late Minnie Pwerle. The Atnwengerrp Collection is a range of 100 % New Zealand Wool rugs, each design limited to an edition of seventy-five, every piece meeting stringent quality standards befitting the artist's acclaimed body of work. As Australia's custom area rug and wall-to-wall specialists Designer Rugs pride themselves on delivering creative, custom-made solutions. designer_rugs_march_adv_2 Designer Rugs are proud to represent twenty exclusive collaborator collections, pairing industry-leading Australian talent from the worlds of fashion and interiors with the time -honoured process of producing hand -made rugs. designer_rugs_march_adv_1 Designer Rugs' team of consultants and in-house designers achieve exceptional, tailored results that today adorn many of the world's leading hotels and resorts, countless private residences, and Australia's Federal Parliament. Despite their similarities they have one thing in common – they are all unique. That, to us, to Designer Rugs, art. Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.auabc
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Dulux on Board for The Project 2014

This year, the crowd-pulling installation series The Project, that has featured at Indesign: The Event (formerly Saturday in Design) since 2008, will reach all new heights with Major Sponsor Dulux now on board. This is the first time Melbourne Indesign: The Event has brought a partner on board for The Project, which has been one of the most popular features of every Indesign event, attracting thousands of industry visitors in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Singapore and Hong Kong. dulux_6Earp Brothers + Kit Webster + Chiara Kickdrum, 2012 Dulux’s support will take this much-loved installation series to a new level. The Project installations at Melbourne Indesign 2014 will have a slew of new resources, as well as more publicity and exposure than ever before, dedicated ‘The Project’ street signage and even a small supply of creative materials. dulux_5Signature Floor Concepts + HBO+EMTB, 2012  One of the most exciting developments is that for the first time ever, there will be live, mobile voting for the People’s Choice Award! The Project always shows what talented, ambitious creatives are able to achieve with a freewheeling brief, and at Melbourne Indesign 2014, visitors will be able to vote for their favourite installations on the day, as they go. dulux_4Smeg + SJB, 2012 ‘Inception’ is the unifying theme chosen by Dulux and Melbourne Indesign for The Project 2014:  “From false starts and crumpled paper to accolades and applause. Sometimes a day’s work is fruitless daydreams and, sometimes, it is the INCEPTION.” dulux_3Space + Hassell + Condensed, 2012 The Project theme has always inspired a very diverse set of interpretations and mediums - interactive, temporal, projections, special builds, visual illusions, utilising a certain product, dramatizing a space. This year, however, there will be a small visual cue uniting all the installations. dulux_2Temperature Design + Archilux + Clare Cousins Architects, 2012 Dulux is providing sample pots of colour from a new paint palette they will launch at Melbourne Indesign, and the creatives will be able to incorporate these in any way they choose. We’re looking forward to seeing how this small visual link unites what is sure to be a wildly imaginative range of Inception-themed installations. dulux_1Zip + Studio Equator, 2012 The Project is the result of collaborations between Indesign: The Event Exhibitors (high-end suppliers to the architecture and design industry) with artists, designers, architects, studios and other diverse creative teams. If you are interested in taking part, see more information at melbourneindesign.com.au. If you simply want to visit Melbourne Indesign and see these amazing collaborations come to life, stay up to date with the latest event news and programming updates by signing up to the newsletter here. Melbourne Indesign: The Event August 22-23, 2014 melbourneindesign.com.au Dulux dulux.com.au  abc
Happenings
What's On

UR[BNE] Collective and UR[BNE] Festival.

President and urban designer Brooke Williams says the group, with its focus on tactical urbanism, aims to test innovative ideas for adaptive use of Brisbane’s underutilised areas, to model and build support for design interventions and activities. urbne_1 “Following the success of the Albert Street picnic during Ideas Fiesta 2013, we seek to flip people’s perception of urban spaces and demonstrate better use of public spaces,” Williams says. “We hope, through our (UR[BNE]’s) experiences and collaborations with local and state government bodies, a clearer pathway for individuals to realise their aspirations will develop and our city will become a stage ready for public engagement. urbne_4 “Brisbane tends to lose creative talent to other Australian and international cities that already have an established creative culture. It is our belief that Brisbane’s youth gives us a great opportunity to influence and cultivate its emergence as a progressive city of ideas and enterprise.” In line with this philosophy, the Collective is this year running its third annual UR[BNE] Festival from March 28 – 30. The community-driven event aims to activate and transform tired, one-dimensional areas into inspiring hubs of pop-up activities. The Collective will convert Queen’s Wharf, on the CBD’s western bank beneath the Treasury Casino and Hotel, into a mecca of creative play, celebrating one of the city’s “forgotten spaces” and highlighting its historical significance. urbne_3 “Queen’s Wharf features in Brisbane’s earliest European history when bustling trade at this dock necessitated the construction of many buildings and the emergence of key industries such as saw milling,” Williams says. The event will also make use of the Wharf’s Commissariat Stores, originally built by convicts in 1828 when the city was a penal colony. 2014’s UR[BNE] Festival is set to combine art installations, creative lighting, markets, pop-up food stalls and bars, dancing groups, skating competitions, casual bike rides plus live musical performances and painting shows via the Project 24 and Blank Canvas events. urbne_5 Founder, Amy Grey (far left), President, Brooke Williams (centre left), Founder, Sonia Kirby (top right), Founder, Yen Trinh (bottom right) “The festival hopes to awaken Brisbane’s creative spirit with a wealth of things to taste, make, photograph, listen and dance to, and experience,” Williams says. UR[BNE] www.urbne.comabc
MAGAZINE

James Powditch

Above: James Powditch with 'Days of Heaven V' (detail), 2005 For mixed media artist James Powditch, life has always been about art; about the love of creativity. It was his early work as a construction and prop builder for the Sydney Dance Company and the Sydney Theatre Company (1989 - 2001) which ultimately launched his career. During this time, Powditch also acquired key joiner skills that would influence his later artistic work. powditch5 The Exorcist (detail), 2010 Powditch has since held solo exhibitions in Melbourne and Sydney and has been a finalist for the past 12 years in the Archibald, Wynne,and Sulman prizes at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. He has also shown in group exhibitions at the S.H. Ervin Gallery and Sculpture by the Sea in Sydney. He has completed commissions for commercial clients including Audi and Suncorp. He was co-winner  of the Blake Prize for religious Art in 2005, winner of the Mosman Art Prize in 2007 and his work is held in a number of regional galleries including the Tweed River Art Gallery, NSW and Ballarat Regional Gallery, VIC powditch4 Enjoy Civilisation (detail), 2007 Inspired by film, the environment, architecture and politics, Powditch's work endeavours to combine time and space. powditch3Planet of the Apes II (detail), 2006 James Powditch's house is featured in Habitus 23 James Powditch is represented by Australian Galleries. Australian Galleries australiangalleries.com.auabc
Architecture
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Places

Swine & Co.

Entering Swine & Co. is a dramatic progression from a detailed art deco street façade to bright, triple height interiors in original cream travertine. While the recent fit out is certainly commendable, in the case of this grandiose arrival the credit goes to the building's original incarnation as the Bank of NSW, designed in the late forties by Architect Bruce Dellit. The site's function, of course, has in the meantime changed, however the offerings are no less rich. Sw_3_1 Interior Design for the project Melissa Collison was presented with a brief for a brassiere style restaurant suitable for both a quick lunch and a special occasion. “We needed a space that would primarily entice the areas ‘weekday locals’ - corporate customers looking for a business lunch or evening meal. As well as catering to the business diners we were also trying to appeal to a wider community by providing a bustling venue to grab a drink with friends, family and colleagues after work,” says Collison. Sw_5_1 In response, the venue was divided into distinct areas, spanning bench seating, casual dining, mezzanine booths and a more formal downstairs dining room. Arranged in an open plan, the island bar on the ground floor acts as a fulcrum from which bench seating and dining spaces radiate. Overhead are rich, brass and milk glass deco pendants which embrace the movement of the active space and guide the eyes to upper level mezzanine. sw_8_1 Collison's holistic approach unifies brassy amber tones and bold geometric décor to accommodate for the different modes of dining across levels. The atmospheric changes reveal a much welcome contrast between spaces that hint at the historical heritage in the rich display of interiors. Here, what were once bank teller stalls have now been incorporated as lounge bar booths in the original brass, glass and travertine. These subdivide the space and present a quirky, clever way to incorporate the space's previous function into the bar experience. Sw_7_1 “The heritage listing of the site meant we were restricted from touching the architectural fabric of the building - but why would we want to when the rich existing travertine provided a luxurious setting to our venue?“ Collison muses. Sw_2_1 The downstairs dining room is sensuous but strong with a sense of fun in the unusual detailing of pigs. References to the client’s German heritage and memories of his father (a butcher, naturally) generate an almost cellar-type space with vintage knife-cabinets on display. Sw_1_1 This distinct contrast between the voluminous and light-filled space of the bar and the intimate closed proportions of the lower ground dining room was intentionally elaborated. “This dichotomy allowed us to create two very distinct moods between the two spaces, one vibrant and grandiose and the other intimate and almost secretive, with a dramatic transition between the two by way of small curving stair.” explains Collison.   Swine & Co. swineandco.com.au Melissa Collinson melissacollison.com.au Photography: Anson Smart ansonsmart.com  abc