About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

Learn more

Architecture
Homes

Scale and Light

Above: The downstairs living space, looking north. As architect of the recent Auckland War Memorial Museum developments, Noel Lane has an impressive record in weaving contemporary needs through the fabric of an old building. Whilst the museum’s interior had to be protected from direct sunlight and a humid climate, Lane has visually, spatially and functionally opened up his own family home to the landscape. His approach can be viewed not only in the context of his museum work and its aesthetic and cultural separation of old and new, but also within the context of previous houses. In particular, the house he designed for his wife Amanda in 1989 – the A.B. Gibbs house – is perhaps Auckland’s most dramatic residential building. The desire for light, privacy and views drove the design, leading to an inversion of local forms. A mono-pitch roof floats over the second storey to enclose space, and then soars out over an enclosed courtyard. Salvaged industrial windows were combined with weatherboards, concrete block, steel cladding and exposed framing. It was a defining moment in New Zealand’s architectural history. By comparison, this new home – located in Remuera, one of Auckland’s oldest suburbs – appears far more restrained due in part to its rational orthogonal layout and a more ‘traditional’ treatment of materials. However, in the same spirit as the A.B. Gibbs house, it makes some incredibly agile moves spatially and is not bound by an accepted or expected style. sunshine_and_light_2 The original house has been opened up. Virginia creeper is slowly engulfing the garden walls, providing very little evidence from the street of the transformation that lies beyond. The house has been completely refurbished and extended in five directions. Original building fabric was restored and sits in contrast to the modern interventions. On the exterior, new metal-clad forms push out through the old, highlighting the mammoth social and technological changes in the 90-odd years since the house was first built. Inside, the dialogue between old and new is a whole lot more subtle and mannered. As Lane describes, “We set the existing interior work aside and clearly differentiated it by a shift to a more quiet and neutral aesthetic.” A highly articulate language and interlocking of materials allows the building’s modifications to be clearly read. Existing walls have an embossed paper finish, and where part of a wall has been altered a negative joint separates it from the new painted surface. Gaps left in the floorboards by demolished walls have been infilled with rubber flooring. Where the old staircase was removed, a flush panel ceiling has been put in its place and the exact location of original mouldingsand panelling has been left untouched. This elemental handling of the building is a recurring theme in Lane’s work at both a formal design and detail level. sunshine_and_light_3 The kitchen is adjacent to all four living areas. The entry sequence is beautiful. From the street a bamboo-lined pathway takes you to a white gate. The space beyond is a fully enclosed southern courtyard with a large glass entry door, through which you can see to the northern end of the house. The three spaces in view include entry vestibule, a room that projects into the garden and a living room. Panelled ceilings, bay windows, stone floors and contemporary and ethnographic art combine to create spaces that are highly individual in character, while full of warmth and intimacy. The previously heavy stucco western façade has been opened up to the garden and the light with large glass doors. The landscape also has a wonderful mix of old and new. An original Oak tree is retained along with camellia bushes. Introduced into this are mosses, Japanese blood grass and bamboo. New concrete retaining walls and planters layer the street edge and allow maximum use of the yard. sunshine_and_light_6 Left: The living room has original timber work. Right: Shelter and privacy in the eastern courtyard. At this main level, the central billiard room that previously controlled all movement is now part of a lattice of circulation. “We chose early on to keep the billiard room intact” Lane explains. “It is in the very heart of the house and is a dark sheltering private space, around which we wrapped other rooms with functions that connect in various manners to the outside.” A large living area has been created downstairs with its own fireplace and two courtyards. Its double height links it and the eastern courtyard to the kitchen, family room and main circulation route. This is where the scale of the house transforms – 1920s proportioned rooms perch above the void and look along a threestorey steel-clad extension beyond. sunshine_and_light Left: The downstairs living space opens onto two courtyards. Right: The front door is off an enclosed courtyard. “In spatial terms, most of the domestic architecture I do is about the family structure and the needs of not only the family as a unit, but also the needs of the individuals within that,” says Lane. “In this house there are a lot of places for groups or individuals to withdraw.” The kitchen is situated so that the four main living spaces are either adjacent or within view or earshot, allowing the three boys and their socialising to remain close while giving them a level of independence. Lane has collected artefacts since his high school days. The family’s art collection is extensive and diverse. The house had to cater for these additional ‘family members’, and does so with varying scale and light levels. “In this house we created the opportunity to live with our collections and move them around,” describes Lane. sunshine_and_light_5 Old and new also come together in the planting. “Art for me is about the depth and diversity of thinking it stimulates. At the moment I am looking at the possibility of purchasing a Peter Roche painting. It is the most unsettling work I have ever seen – incredibly disturbing, yet unbelievably beautiful and alive.” This could easily be a mirror image of Lane’s own work – challenging and unsettling at times, all the while exquisite in its concept and detail. Photography: Simon Devitt simondevitt.com Architect: Noel Lane Architects Design & Project Architect: Noel Lane Assistant Architect Matt Brew, Mike Farrant, Mike Marshall-Harrington Builder: Ogilvy Construction Structural Engineer: Structure Design Electrical: Neal Electrical Painter: Union Coatings Swimming Pool: Streeter Pools Furniture: Cabinets de Bruin-Judge Furniture, dbj.co.nz. Garage and laundry furniture Essex Cabinet Makers, essexcomshape.co.nz. Fireplaces Fires By Design, warmington.co.nz. Furniture Danish by Design, danishbydesign.com. Finishes: Interior handrails mahogany and mild steel with epoxy paint finish, material by Necklan Engineering, (64 9) 827 7892. Roller blinds NZ Windows, nzwindows. co.nz. Rubber flooring Crown Flooring, crownflooring.co.nz. Joinery Owairoa Joinery, (64 9) 273 3699. Walls painted with Resene, resene.co.nz. Corrugated cladding Paton Roofing Services, (64 9) 838 7905. Tanking and sealants Gunac Central, (64 9) 576 4426. Bridge and glass screen Necklan Engineering, as before, and Woods Glass, (64 9) 526 8656. Stone and tiles Trethewey Stone, trethewey.co.nz. Timber fencing Town & Around, fenceandgate.co.nz. Tile roofing and shingles MacMillan Slaters & Tilers, macmillanslaters.com. Aluminium joinery Miller Design, millerdesign.co.nz. Lighting: Targetti, targetti.co.nz. Fixtures/Equipment: Bathroom fittings Metrix, metrix.co.nz. Plumbing supplies Paterson Trading, paterson.co.nz. Under-floor heating Heating Partners, heatingpartners.com. Security and phone systems Security Concepts, securityconcepts.co.nz. Audio Soundline, soundline.co.nz. Garage doors Ashton Architectural Garage Doors, ashtondoors.co.nzabc
Design Products
Furniture

Form Function Style

Form Function Style was developed to provide a shopping experience with awareness and insight, originating online. form_function_style_may_adv_6 Form Function Style source and stock a wide selection of high quality home wares and furniture, so that customers can make their own decisions to suit their individual styles. form_function_style_may_adv_5 Form Function Style look for enduring pieces that equally prioritise form and function, designed for the long term. They work closely with designers and brands to support, promote and move their work out into the market place and ultimately into happy homes. form_function_style_may_adv_1 This allows Form Function Style the opportunity to offer the highest standard of customer service, all the way through. The business has three wings - eCommerce, Trade and PR. It doesn't hide behind an online portal and loves to work at finding solutions for both brands and customers face-to-face. form_function_style_may_adv_2 Form Function Style now have a showroom (by appointment), Level 1, 102 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy to view the larger pieces up close and in the flesh. Form Function Style formfunctionstyle.com.auabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Strength and Security

Above: Trophy Vase (left) and Stelingnight Formation (right) The patterns of life and growth within our surroundings correspond to geometrical formulae that echo throughout our existence; there is no doubt how closely the spirals of natural occurrences such as snail shells, ferns and the growth pattern of leaves resemble the structures in our own bodies such as the cochlear of the inner ear and the corkscrew formations of protein molecules. It is thus obvious to see the resonance that exists between us and our environment in a pre-existing atomic relationship. spiral_3 Spiral Tide Mark At a molecular level, it is possible that we connect more strongly with certain shapes and that the geometrical structures of our surroundings also influence our ‘life force’ or biological electromagnetic fields. Andrew Bryant uses his arts practice to connect with the natural world in an attempt to better understand the patterns of our environment and to blend a visual language of his terrain into human communication. He employs the basic, natural elements of earth, water and fire to create forms that are reminiscent of the local topography in which he lives and which energise space on a level that speaks to an intangible and ancient power. lateral_spaceLateral Space 021 The concept for his work is underpinned by the caprice of a ceramic form being akin to a living, breathing entity. For most of his work he uses techniques that reveal the skeletal components that could be imagined within and transforms them into sculptural pieces. Clay originates from the earth and is the most ancient of all worked material. In many cultures it is the belief on a mythological level that human kind is fashioned from clay and this is a well-considered addition in his choice for its use. His surfaces encapsulate the beautiful rock formations of sandstone and granite that make up the shore line of his home at the Sunshine Coast in Queensland. Using various paper clays, heavily grogged clays and porcelain for his work, he employs different firing environments to produce pieces that transmit strength and security in their rocky mimesis. spiral_1 Spiral 30 As part of our natural balance, our desire to exist in a place that is healthy for the mind and spirit is strong. Dwellings that have an exchange between interior and exterior materials and properties seem to accomplish this need. Bryant’s sculptures carry ancient symbolic patterns, which compress the external into a form that seems to unleash raw natural energy into the space it occupies. lateral_space_2 Lateral Space 18 Bryant has worked in the ceramic field for 25 years. His experience ranges from production pottery to lecturing in Visual Arts. He currently lectures at the Sunshine Coast Institute of Tafe. He has exhibited across Australia and South Korea. Andrew Bryant - Carbon Made andrewbryant.carbonmade.com About the Author: Caroline Ezzy has worked as an interior designer, radiographer, decorator, drawer and painter. In 2012 she become a convert in the field of ceramics. Writing about other ceramic artists has become a recent pursuit with published articles in two international ceramic journals. carolineezzy.comabc
Happenings
Parties

Iconic Australian Houses Exhibition Launch Party

Distinguished guests, including Glenn Murcutt, Lindsay Johnson of the Australia Architecture Foundation, curator Karen McCartney and a host of other members of the architecture and design community attended, enjoying Penelope Seidler's opening address. sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/exhibitions/iconic-australian-houses [gallery ids="30338,30337,30336,30335,30334,30333,30332,30331,30330,30329,30328,30327,30326,30325,30324"] Images: © James Horan, for Sydney Living Museumsabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A with Danielle Nichols

Your name: Danielle Nichols What you do: Own and manage Form.Function.Style which involves eCommerce, trade and PR. We essentially support, promote and sell quality home wares and furniture worldwide. Your latest project: Establishing our naturally occurring PR wing of the business. We're always working with exciting and interesting people. We’ve established a well respected platform and have an amazing network of creatives - with different skill sets - to achieve the best possible result for our clients. Who are three people that inspire/excite you:  1) my 8 year old son…he has a mind that freaks me out for ALL the right reasons…he teaches me so much. 2) Piero Gesualdi of WorldWeave. With a background (40 odd years..he won't mind me saying!) in Architecture, Fashion and Design. He's taught me so much… always in the most entertaining and uncensored manner. 3) Sofia Coppola – So talented with, such great style. What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: I've always had a thing for Alfa Romeo's ever since I was little. The shapes have always captured my attention. Chair model: Big fan of the DC09 Chair. A beautifully proportioned chair with a perfect blend of Japanese and Danish influences. Residential space: The image shot for Dwell Magazine (U.S) by Jessica Antola - featured as our signature image on formfunctionstyle.com.au - captured one of my favourite spaces. An apartment in Paris belonging to the Dimanches, which featured a garden wall by Patrick Blanc. This image has never left my mind and inspires me daily. Commercial space: Aesop Stores. They cover all the senses – to the highest of standards…consistently. Decorative product: Megan Park Cushions. My favourite is my circa 2010 design. Functional product: My linen Jardan Leila Sofa… a perfect resting place at the end of the day. Handmade good: The TIDE Tuki Desk… it's a masterpiece of craftsmanship! Mass-produced good: My Aldi Coffee Machine…it makes a pretty decent espresso! meal: Tapas style of eating - small portions - lots of different flavours to share. restaurant: Cumulus Inc or The European - both very Melbourne. drink: I'm a bit of a seasonal cliché…i love a glass or more of Champagne in the warmer months and a nice Barossa red in the winter. bar: Naked in the Sky Fitzroy…it has an incredible urban view, or Cumulus Up. item in your studio: The gorgeous ‘Havana’ Tempes de Reves scarf i have hanging above my desk. I see something new buried in the image every time. Closest i've got to a holiday in a while... piece of technology: Predictable and entirely boring…but it has to be my iPhone. It's allowed me the freedom to multi-task on the go. fictional character: Juliette Binoche's character in Chocolat - Vianne. A cool example of a woman living life on her terms, strong and still sensitive to what matters. vice: I'm told I'm stubborn… I like to call it determination! virtue: Kindness. One of my favourite sayings is 'don't mistake my kindness for weakness'. Kindness doesn't counteract strength or intelligence. What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? It means actively seeking out, supporting and celebrating clever, fresh ideas.abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Peddling Coffee

It would seem that a Lycra-clad culture has altered the way, and the where, we caffeinate. In the country’s capital, where a very serious and buoyant cycling culture has even reached Capital Hill, coffee houses with a bent for bikes are on the rise; a trend that has spawned the beginnings of a new café culture. mocan_godspeed_5 Inspired by this synergy between good design, sustainable practices and daily life is Canberra’s Močan & Green Grout café. Run by Myles Chandler, David Alcorn and brothers Nectar and Jonathan Efkarpidis of Goodspeed Bicycle Company, Močan & Green Grout is a café with a conscience. Regularly inviting artists to reinterpret the space and its surrounds, the café not only serves good coffee and food, it also fosters a unique Australian art and design scene. And with reclaimed materials sitting alongside commissioned art, with found objects next to design classics, it has the warmth and familiarity of eating in a good friend’s kitchen. mocan_godspeed_13 A deep fryer, an oven, an electric stove, two chefs and an array of filled bowls are at a small bench in the centre of a room that feels more like the common room of a sharehouse. Led by chef Sean McConnell the dishes being put out from this quasi-kitchen are of impressive quality. His weekly changing menu takes cues from across the world while sourcing produce locally; serving eggs from a free-range farm near Temora, sustainable seafood from the NSW south coast, bacon from woodland-grazed pigs near Young, and fresh water trout from Tumut, Močan and Green Grout is certainly an ethical café. goodspeed But beyond these design and culinary aspects, Močan & Green Grout is a café that is, at its heart, all about cycling. As the home of Goodspeed Bicycle Company, an Australian manufacturer of Steel bicycle frames, it is clear that this café offers more to the cycling community than just a good cup of coffee. mocan_godspeed_7 “As keen cyclists with a strong design/manufacturing background,” says owner Myles Chandler, “my partners and I were always keen on the idea of an Australian based bicycle business.” mocan_godspeed_2 “We’ve been to great lengths to get the design and build quality right,” continues Chandler, “and we have been using quality materials and working with great craftsman like Luke Laffan to ensure a great result.” Chandler and his brother-in-law Alcorn first created Mocan Brothers in 2007 as a hobby – restoring and rebuilding vintage bicycles. Working together, the pair continues to grow the venture; organising races, building custom bicycles and producing handmade cycling clothing under the same label. mocan_godspeed_4 Locally designed, manufactured and assembled, the unique Goodspeed frame represents the penultimate goal of the Mocan Brothers – to build a bicycle company that showcases the talent and ability of local craftspeople. “I think it is fantastic that these frames are made in Australia,” says Chandler, “they stand tough and practical in an age where so many things are made impersonally and even designed to be disposable.” mocan_godspeed_8 Only recently established in 2012 under the now four Mocan Brothers (Chandler, Alcorn and the Efkarpidis brothers), the Goodspeed Bicycle Company only continues to grow as local craftspeople, fabricators and enthusiasts are drawn towards the New Acton precinct in Canberra, and more importantly, are drawn towards their hub at Močan & Green Grout. “One of my greatest hopes,” adds Chandler, “is that as these bikes spread out, they will reignite an appreciation for handmade products.” mocan_godspeed_6 Europe has for long embraced this form of sport, and Europe, of course, has always had a passion for coffee. But this affinity between coffee and cycling has only just started to reach fever pitch in Australia. And with a cyclist’s dream of wide roads and little car traffic, it is only fitting that Canberra is now putting its own spin on the tradition. A tradition, that for the Mocan Brothers is also paramount to a certain way of life. Images: Lee Grant and OnceTwice Močan & Green Grout mocanandgreengrout.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Local Global

“Cape Town has come into its own as more than just a scenic destination,” explains Trevyn McGowan, one of the five ambassadors on the International Advisory Council for WDC2014 and a fierce supporter and proponent of South African design, locally and in the global marketplace. Oranjezicht-City-Farm Oranjezicht City Farm   “Visitors are now recognising the creative talent that abides in the city and residents are more attuned to their own creative potential.  There's a spirit of collaboration and connectivity that has emerged in the city's design community that has resulted in a super spirit of creating, experimenting and performing.” projections New Year's Eve Projections With a strong focus on the exposure and export of Southern African design to the global marketplace, McGowan is certainly one of the foremost authorities in the field.  “South African design is definitely having its moment,” she adds. Silo Silo “With Southern Guild, we exhibit at various international design fairs and the response is always one of extreme excitement. Local designers stand up to their international counterparts and it goes a step further because people are fascinated by us as a young democracy and a young entrant to the world of contemporary design.  I think that all of the members of the IAC felt that our primary function was to challenge, provoke, stimulate and encourage those who were tasked with the enormous responsibility of shaping CT WDC 2014 from our own unique perspectives.” Greenpoint-Urban-Park-Climate-Festival Greenpoint Urban Park Climate Festival Given their exceptional commitment to South African design, it comes as no surprise that McGowan and her partner Julian McGowan, leveraged the WDC platform to launch GUILD, an international design fair - the first of its kind in South Africa - to coincide with the year’s events,  “I'm very proud to have introduced to this city during this momentous year of design.  We were able to bring collectable design from around the world to this city.  Never before had the city's residents and visitors been exposed to such a high level of design in their own back yard,” McGowan explains.  The McGowan event kicked off the WDC year alongside the Cape Town Art Fair and the Design Indaba. design_indaba Design Indaba  Drawing on the role that design can play in shaping the future of Cape Town, the WDC 2104 programme offers over 450 events throughout the year including 100% Design SA, CIties Exhibition, The Density Project (workshopping solutions to urban sprawl), Re-Blocking of Mtshini Wam (a community-led township upgrade), Design Policy Conference and Too Good to Waste (an exhibition of upcycled products).   World Design Capital Cape Town wdccapetown2014.com Southern Guild southernguild.co.za Guild Design Fair guilddesignfair.comabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Launch Pad: Calling All Emerging Industrial Designers

Above: Dollop by Ash Allen If your work is one of the top 50 submissions from Australia and New Zealand, you’ll be eligible to attend the intensive mentoring sessions held in Sydney and Melbourne. Richard-Harrod_CHEVRON-PENDANT Chevron Pendant by Richard Harrod If you’re one of the 15 finalists, you’ll come out with an industry network, national publicity, practical advice and guidance from leading industry figures, and your prototype will be exhibited as part of Melbourne Indesign 2014, a commercial design trade event that attracts thousands of industry visitors, from architects and designers to manufacturers, developers and retailers. And that’s just if you’re a finalist. Andrew-South-Wood-JonesAlexander-Kashin_NUMERAL Numeral by Andrew Southwood-Jones & Alexander Kashin The winner receives the Launch Pad Ultimate Package: a $10,000 grant to help develop their prototype, mentoring sessions, personalized production plan management from an industry expert, as well as media support and PR. Edward-Wong_Ella-Table-Lamp Ella Table Lamp by Edward Wong Former judge Adam Goodrum says, “No other award offers such a thorough and rigorous mentoring programme to assist the winner to commercialise their design… There are very few platforms that nurture wonderful young Australian designers in such a practical, career-defining way.” Past mentors and judges have included Louise Olsen, Helen Kontouris, Brodie Neill, Brian Parkes, Aidan Mawhinney, and international figures including Tom Dixon, Nathan Yong and Harald Gründl. Edward-Linacre_DUSK-PENDANT Dusk Pendant by Edward Linacre Entries close on April 30, so start burning the midnight oil. You don’t need to have a complete prototype by then - Launch Pad accepts high quality drawings and renders for the judgment process – but you need to be able to have a good-looking prototype fully developed by Melbourne Indesign, Friday 22- Saturday 23 August. Enter here http://control.launch-pad.com.au/abc
Design Products
Furniture

“The Vintage Jewels” by Megan Hess for Designer Rugs

A name synonymous with elegance and high-fashion, Megan’s signature style of illustration is in high-demand, globally. Megan-Hess-Designer-Rugs-New-York Counting Tiffany & Co., Chanel, Dior, Bergdorf Goodman, The Ritz Paris and many more illustrious brands as clients; the Melbourne-based illustrator now turns her hand to interiors with this collection of hand-tufted and intricately carved wool rugs - a chic coming-together of decadent furnishings, couture and fine art. 19159922_the_palazzo_jewels   “Creating my first collection with Designer Rugs has been one of the most exciting collaborations that I’ve ever worked on… standing here with the finished rugs under my toes, they are just as I imagined them to be; three Illustrations brought to life by the finest artisans in the most beautiful wools, ready to fill a room with all the same inspiration that went into creating them. 19159918_the_emperors_pearls “I really wanted each design to tell its own story and be the anchor to everything that surrounds it. Like the conductor of an orchestra, a rug is often the piece that sets the tone and leads the other elements.” 19159916_megan-hess-for-designer-rugs-the-emperors-pearls-detail Inspired by an age of glamour and refinement, Hess has imbued her collection with a degree of elegance which sets it apart from all others. 19159917_megan-hess-for-designer-rugs-colour-selection “I've always loved classic images from a bygone era where women wore elaborate jewelled turbans and sipped champagne! When designing the collection, I imagined beautiful rooms filled with antiques jewels, velvet chaise lounges, gilt mirrors and beautiful buttoned upholstery. The tones of gold, silver and peach felt very old-school glamour and reminded me of the classic Parisian Atelier...” The Vintage Jewels Collection consists of three designs: The Lost Vault – 200cm x 300cm The Emperor’s Pearl’s - 250cm The Palazzo Jewels - 250cm All designs can be custom shaped, re-sized and re-coloured. Hand Tufted from Semi-Worsted New Zealand Wool with Bamboo Highlights. Now on display at Designer Rugs Edgecliff. Coming soon to Leichhardt, Fortitude Valley and Designer Rugs’ state-of-the-art new Richmond Gallery, opening April 2014. Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Concrete Extension House

A project of contrasts, the site of this house is tightly bound by the street and neighbouring structure on two sides and completely opens up to national park on the others. concrete_extension_house_6 The house reveals itself sparingly, divulging its nature only through the process of arrival. On approach, a glimpse of the new concrete roof hovering beyond the original house, hints at an alternate world of sunshine and bush valley views that lies beyond the front door. Similarly, the modest single storey street facade belies a two storey volume created by the slope of the site. concrete_extension_house_2 ‘Alterations’ to the existing house were ‘deconstructed’ rather than constructed. The strategic removal of walls created open living spaces. The balcony that ran the length of the north façade was demolished to reveal a dramatic two storey ‘curtain’ façade of glass. concrete_extension_house_9 ‘Additions’ comprise of a contrasting concrete box that sits independently of the existing house. This new structure is orientated perpendicular to the existing building in an ‘L’shape, so that the building form itself edits out the neighbours and street. The ‘box’ is dimensioned to ensure the existing living room retains glorious afternoon winter sunshine. Pivotal to the design is the large outdoor living room. concrete_extension_house_4 The slender concrete columns supporting the large overhanging concrete roof sit comfortably amongst the surrounding white eucalyptus. Tucked underneath this terrace is the main bedroom, fondly referred to as the ‘concrete bunker’.  It is a place of peace and quiet, protected from the chaos of family life. concrete_extension_house_10 The vision of a passionate ‘owner builder architect mum’, this project completely transforms the way the family lives on a very modest budget. Nearly all meals and living occur outside, especially in winter in front of the blazing fire. The family showers outdoors, with the outdoor bath a centre for kids play. concrete_extension_house_1   Inside the kitchen is the central hub for everyone to gather and cook together. To be able to provide the kids a ‘bush’ childhood at home in stark contrast to the highly urban environment of the Chatswood multi-storey towers and school five minutes up the hill is the biggest reward.concrete_extension_house_3 Polly Harbison Design pollyharbisondesign.com.au Photography: Brett Boardman brettboardman.comabc
Happenings
Parties

Indesign Milan Party 2014

We were pleased to host an exclusive Indesign event to gather with friends, guests and colleagues in celebration of Milan 2014. [gallery ids="30200,30201,30202,30203,30204,30205,30206,30207,30208,30209,30210,30211,30212,30213,30214,30215,30216,30217,30218,30219,30220,30221,30222,30223,30224"]abc