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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

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Architecture
NOT HOMES

Souvenirs by Julie Paterson

The Australian bush can be deadly, but many still choose to remain living there, particularly in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney. Fashion designer Jenny Kee is one well-known figure (see her home in Habitus 23, out now); another is Cloth artist Julie Paterson who has had a studio in Blackheath for 10 years. souvenir5 Following devastating fires in October 2013, Julie met a fellow local, whose home in Mt Victoria had been destroyed. Julie was invited to pick through the debris for any possible pieces of interest. “It must have been heartbreaking for them. It was upsetting even for me, looking at the devastation caused by the fires,” says Julie. “And there I was picking through the charred remnants of their things and all the memories they held.” souvenir2 Tobacco tines, a glasses case, a family member’s old hand mirror and a Teak dish, a staple item from the 1970s, were salvaged. They have become the canvas on which Julie has painted local mountain vistas, combining the majesty of the bush surrounds with the ominous knowledge of their destructive potential. souvenir3 All watercolour landscape works are on wood or tin, sealed in polished beeswax. Hear Julie speak about her work at Hat Hill Gallery 2pm on Saturday 19 April. souvenir1 Souvenirs: Blue Mountains landscapes on found tin and wood Hat Hill Gallery 12 – 26 April hathillgallery.com.au Julie Paterson juliepaterson.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Art and Object

Above: A soft street appearance conceals a large family home. John Gow’s art expertise is diverse. As a collector, dealer and sometime book publisher, he has a passion for Maori carving and early colonial depictions of people and place. His passion for history and heritage led him to be one of New Zealand’s first dealers to specialise in these works, previously the domain of auction houses and second-hand bookshops. Out of Time: Maori and the Photographer 1860-1940, a book John co-wrote with art researcher (and ethnographic expert) Michael Graham-Stewart, documents 80 photographs from 15 years of joint collecting. He also owns the highly influential Gow Langsford Gallery in partnership with Gary Langsford, specialising in contemporary painting and sculpture. “When the kids were young, I remember being perturbed about how to keep them in touch with their Maori culture,” recalls John. “So I began collecting Maori carvings. Every carving is like a painting, it has different marks and techniques, and different tribes carved in different ways. On that realisation, I started really looking and studying, and became quite obsessed with it.” art_and_object_2 Left: The cooking surface is shared with the outdoor veranda in summer. Right: A Max Gimblett painting overlooks the adults’ lounge. John grew up surrounded by the visual and performing arts by way of his parents’ hobbies and later professions. “We were not your typical farming family,” says John. “Mum was a singer, Dad potted and painted. We were unusual in that we had a contemporary house and an art collection.” A move from rural Waikato to Auckland came about in 1977 when the family bought shares in the John Leech Gallery. Following his overseas trip to London, John became involved in the business and he now runs the gallery in partnership with Langsford. A 100-year-old Herne Bay villa accommodates John and his partner Sara’s extensive collection of art and objects, along with the needs of a growing and blended family. With 200 artworks and six children between them, finding the right balance between a functional home and one that could contain the art was critical. But they haven’t been precious about it. Art is everywhere. The children each have collections in their bedrooms, it hangs in the stairwell and in bathrooms. Every wall is animated with giants of contemporary New Zealand art and photography, not to mention the historical work. Set behind an ivy-covered wall, the transitional villa has clean unadorned lines in contrast to the more ornate timber villas of the area. Its atypical construction is of hollow glazed clay blocks that are plastered inside and out. art_and_object_3 The main living spaces overlook this eastern courtyard. Good friend and architect Richard Priest designed renovations 15 years earlier when it was converted from three flats. The major work then was to excavate and create a bedroom floor below, and to bring light into the typically dark villa interior. The result was a house pivoted around a central double height space. The conservatory-like void is floodlit with sun and overlooks an enclosed courtyard. Glassbacked shelves allowed for artefacts and objects to be seen from several rooms. The void adds a spectacular scale and caters to the social needs of a modern family. A new round of alterations to the house, completed last year, has allowed it to adapt once more to changing family structures, ages and stages. The children range from eight to 19 years of age so they needed more rooms, catering for differing social needs. The rear of the house has been pushed out in order to create more bedrooms, to add another living room upstairs, extend the kitchen and create a large enclosed concrete veranda for dining. The three-wall kitchen designed by Brasell + Ojala has two benches with a sink in each. The island bench allows the family to hover and circulate around the kitchen efficiently. The ingenious use of an electric Shugg window suggested by builder, Jerome Box, means the cooktop can be part of the veranda and accordingly function as a BBQ in summer. New finishes include stained American Oak flooring used throughout the first floor, plastered block walls and stone tiles for the veranda, a marble bench, and floor-to-ceiling stone tiles in the new bathroom. With most New Zealand houses built in timber, the Gow villa has quite a different character and quality. art_and_object_4 Left: Italian marble lines the upstairs bathroom. Right: Outdoor dining veranda glowing with soft southern light. John’s personal and professional interests are displayed in his art collection. There is a commitment to diverse artistic practices and different cultural voices. The historical artefacts have a quiet presence and speak of their time and place, while the contemporary Finding the right balance between a functional home and one that could contain the art was critical work is more expressive and sometimes political. Shane Cotton’s work entitled ‘Whakakitenga ki te Kenehi’ (1998) is a multi-layered work based on the chapters of the Bible in Maori. He draws from the remote empty landscapes of McCahon and populates them with words, the tiki figure, the American eagle and a ghostly figure of Christ. Niuean artist, John Pule’s 1993 work, ‘Moe (Sleeping)’ records family history and place within the framework of a traditional hiapo (tapa) panel. Born in Niue, Pule is a major local artist and poet and has been with the Gow Langsford Gallery for 15 years. These moody works are in contrast with the bold and expressive Max Gimblett painting, the pop humour of the Dick Frizzell and the light box works by Michael Parekowhai. The children have grown up with all this and, like John, have absorbed it by osmosis. As Sara reflects: “They are all quite involved and know who the artists are. When they bring new friends around and are asked questions, we hear the kids start up a dialogue with more knowledge than we had realised.” The softness of the house comes from its age, natural materials and gentle light. New architectural spaces and finishes are sympathetic to the old while catering to the ever-changing needs of a busy family home. art_and_object_5b Left: Sara’s daughter Imy and friend Olivia in the stairwell. Middle: The study houses John’s early New Zealand painting and photographic collection. Right: Two carved figures by Bryan McCurrach c. 1965. Photography: Simon Devitt simondevitt.com Architect Hillery Priest Architecture Design Architect Richard Priest Architectural Documentation Steve Davis Builder Jerome Box Structural Engineer Harris Foster Consulting (Rob Foster) Kitchen Design and Interior Finishes Brasell + Ojala (Richard Brasell) Hillery Priest Architecture (64 9) 376 6337 hillerypriest.co.nz Brasell + Ojala (64 9) 361 1103 brasellojala.com Artwork Main bedroom The Clouds are Pink at Sunset, 2001, Reuben Paterson. Living room View of the Pink Terraces, c. 1880, T.A. McCormack. Cathedral room Cave Drawings, c. 1950, by A.R.D. Fairburn. The Red Parrot, 2000, by Allen Maddox. Drawing for a Song Cycle, 1976, by Ralph Hotere. Toku Whanau Ataahua, 2001, by John Walsh. Still Life with Sheep Skull and Cork Screw, 1986, by Dick Frizzell. Mondrian’s Studio, 2004, by Max Gimblett. Untitled Tiki figure, 2005, by John Walsh. 19th Cenury photographs of Maori subjects by Arthur Isles. Untitled Walking Sticks, c. 1993, by Peter Robinson. Upstairs hall Baked Bean Boogie Woogie, 1997, by Dick Frizzell. Garden ceramic Pepolic figure, c. 1992, by Barry Brickell. Furniture Outdoor antique table from the Paris market Porte de Clignancourt. Outdoor chairs and stools from ECC Lighting + Furniture, ecc.co.nz. Kitchen vintage Marilyn Sainty chairs. Hallway credenza by David White, davidwhite.co.nz. Study 08 built-in shelves also by David White. Dining vintage Swedish dining suite purchased in 1960 by John’s parents. Lounge Louis Vuitton chest, louisvuitton.com. Finishes Verandah floor Iserna Southern Italian limestone from Artedomus, artedomus. co.nz. Interior floor stained American Oak floorboards from Artedomus. Walls Aalto paint, aaltocolour.com. Bathroom Elba marble tiles from Artedomus. Kitchen joinery by Hafele, hafele.co.nz, and Blum, blum.com, handles from Katalog, katalog.co.nz, and Morato Anticated benchtop from Artedomus. Lighting Lighting from ECC Lighting + Furniture. Fixtures/Equipment Kitchen Viking oven and hob, vikingrange.com, Miele dishwasher, miele.com, and Fisher & Paykel fridge, fisherpaykel.co.nz. Shugg window, shugg.co.nz.abc
Finishes
Design Products
Design Accessories

Mind Becomes Matter Collection by Tretford Custom Rugs.

“Mind Becomes Matter” are the new made-to-order designs and the choice can be as simple as choosing your specific Tretford colours in the Collection’s standard sizes – or you can use these designs as a starting point when creating your own custom rug. 5 Using Tretford carpet as the material for construction allows for flexible design and potentially unlimited dimension in a space which can take it well beyond the standard rug format. With its unique fusion bonded construction, the Tretford Custom Rug can be cut to any shape and won’t fray or unravel – assembled without the need for binding on the edges. 1 Gibbon Group have a consultant available to solve any design questions. We are also looking for designers to contribute to the Collection, which will result in the creation of an impressive design repository. 6 This is an exciting development for Tretford Custom Rugs and already there are inspiring designs from talented designers who have collaborated with Gibbon Group to expand this collection. Gibbon Group gibbongroup.com.auabc
People
Design Hunters
Conversations

Augmented Australia 1914 – 2014

With Australia’s permanent pavilion under construction and only due for completion in time for the 56th Venice International Art Exhibition in 2015, the Australian architectural committee found themselves without a pavilion for the first time since Phillip Cox’s temporary structure was opened in 1988. The question arose as to how Australian would be represented in its temporary, open-air Giardini location at the upcoming Architecture Biennale in June. biennale1 Harry Seidler, Olympic Stadium, Princes Park, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Competition Entry 1952. Digital Reconstruction by Daniel Giuffre and Paul Sawyer. Courtesy: felix. In response, The Australian Institute of Architects, who have been pivotal in Australia’s attendance at the Biennale since 2006, selected a creative team to spearhead the campaign which includes Rene van Meeuwen, Matt Delroy-Carr and Craig McCormack from felix. - a multi-disciplinary, Perth-based design company - along with Sophie Giles, Winthrop Professor Simon Anderson and Professor Philip Goad. “The theme of this year’s festival (curated by Rem Koolhaas) is ‘Fundamentals’ with a particular focus on the sometimes competing, sometimes complimentary forces of regionalism and globalisation,” says De Meeuwen.  “Koolhaas poses the question as to whether we can revitalise the historical richness inherent in regional architecture.” biennale2 Pier Luigi Nervi, Antonio Nervi, Carlo Vannoni and Francesco Vacchini, Cathedral, Abbey and Benedictine Monastery, 1958, New Norcia, Western Australia, Australia. Digital reconstruction by Matt Delroy-­‐Carr, Keith Reid, Scott Horsburgh. Courtesy: felix. felix._Giles_Anderson+Goad’s response to Koolhaas’s provocative approach is an exhibition entitled “Augmented Australia 1914-2014”, a virtual bringing to life of a selection of most evocative, unbuilt works designed in Australia within the last century.  “Each project was driven by an extraordinary commitment to research and innovation, highlighting Australia’s exceptional heritage and its commitment to a technological future,” explains De Meeuwen. The exhibition  space for “Augmented Australia” will take the form of a large steel cloud that will appear to hover above the earth, providing a physical portal to an “augmented reality” experience. biennale4 Sophie Giles, University of Western Australia, Cloud Space, Australian temporary pavilion, 14th International Architecture Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia. Leveraging the latest technology, the team have developed an app which will bring all the projects to life via 3-dimensional augmented models, images, voiceovers and animations.  Once visitors have downloaded the ‘Augmented Australia’ app they will be able to  trigger augmented models of each project while ‘real world scale’ 3D models will be geo-positioned around Venice. The app - called Augmented Australia - once downloaded, will trigger 3-d augmented images of the projects that will be shown at the exhibition. Currently, this app will only work with three trigger images which will 'come alive' when you activate the 'Start 2D Trigger' function on the app and point your smart phone at the images. Hero Image: Minifie van Schaik, Caught Unawares, 2013, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Digital reconstruction by Ben Juckes. Courtesy: felix. Augmented Australia wp.architecture.com.au/venicebiennaleabc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Design Accessories

Accademia

Inspired by the neoclassical balance between material and shape, Accademia embraces old-world influences. delsa3 By linking the choice of materials and more classical luxury stylistic features with the most sophisticated designs, Accademia adds a touch of classic style to the most modern settings, while further enhancing existing classical environments. delsa2 Duralight®, Teuco's exclusive patented material which affords the utmost flexibility of design, is the versatile interpreter of the designer soul ofAccademia bathtubs. desla5 Delsa delsa.com.auabc
Fixed & Fitted
Finishes
Design Products
Design Accessories

iLOOK MOVE

Designed by renowned German studio Tesseraux + Partner, the Keuco iLook Move Cosmetic Mirror impresses with a slim, elegant design and innovative hinge technology. roger1 Recognised by the 2013 ISH Design Plus Award for Product Innovation, the glare-free mirror, with a magnification factor of five, includes an exceptional hinge system for complete flexibility - the mirror can be tilted up, down or to the side for the ideal angle, whether standing or sitting. roger Available in both round and rectangular, the iLook Move will be an indispensable companion in the modern bathroom for years to come, availability exclusively at Rogerseller. roger2 Rogerseller rogerseller.com.auabc
Design Products
Furniture

Maxalto Febo Collection from Space

Febo, first presented as a collection of sofas, armchairs and chairs, has been expanded to include a chaise longue, bed and a highback chair offering comfort and wonderful style. space_adv_april_5 The bed is available in six different sizes, with an elegant headboard and the added comfort of two backrest cushions. space_adv_april_4 space_adv_april_2 The new pieces align with the current collection, with all chairs available upholstered in fabric or leather and featuring detailed blanket stitching or with legs in smoky, grey, brown, light brushed or black brushed oak. space_adv_april_7 The Maxalto Febo collection is available exclusively at Space Furniture. spacefurniture.com.auabc