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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
NOT HOMES

Visual Feast: GEOFFREY DE GROEN EXHIBITION

  It's like waiting on the next book by your favourite crime writer. Another hit, another development, another step further into a rich imaginary world. There are plenty of artists who repeat themselves. Not Geoffrey de Groen, who is known to have refused to continue painting successful series. Despite the pleas from collectors wanting one, he has always insisted on moving on.   De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living   For anyone who loves painting, his new show in Sydney is a must. It is yet another re-invention of painting. Tough but immensely pleasurable. Another exploration of what really good painting has to offer. As always, the paintings are visual conundrums. Just when we think we know what we are looking at, they transform themselves. Now we are looking at something else. Then it becomes an intensely exciting and sensual struggle to reconcile the two.   De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living   But what is really special about this show is that it is not just a collection of paintings. This is an installation. A total experience where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. It is a meditative experience. Gentle daylight filters down through the gallery skylights, reinforcing the sense that these abstract paintings may actually be landscapes.   De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living   Actually, there are two parts to the show. In the first gallery, de Groen shows a suite of richly textured indigo paintings. Then, in the main space, strategically placed long, rectangular paintings are punctuated by a series of squarish pictures - languid sensuality interrupted by taut, assertive composition. Just as we are not sure whether we are looking at landscapes or pure abstraction, so the textured surface of each painting seems to have endless depth. Just what colour am I looking at? If you only go to one exhibition this year, make it this one. Geoffrey de Groen at Annandale Galleries until July 5.   De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living De Groen Habitus Living   Annandale Galleries annandalegalleries.com.auabc
Architecture
Places

Sample, taste, touch: Brae restaurant

  Nestled into the countryside in Birregurra, along the Great Ocean Road of Victoria, Brae restaurant is not located particularly near to anything. You really have to travel to get to it. Or, better yet, make a weekend of it and stay in a coastal town nearby. Headed up by chef Dan Hunter, this relatively new restaurant is located on 30 acres of highly productive land. The food eaten by patrons is grown, selected, picked and then prepared by the very staff who serve it up.   Brae-Habitusliving-06 Brae-Habitusliving-04   But none of this is particularly obvious, there’s no sign pronouncing the ‘freshness’ or organic ‘goodliness’ of each ingredient. Rather it is felt, first-hand, as one samples, tastes and touches (yes you can eat with your hands!) the food. For Hunter it’s more than just food on the plate. “For a long time we’ve been ready to run our own business, to have more of our personalities [expressed] through different mediums within the business,” he says. And that is what Brae does.   Brae-Habitusliving-02 Brae-Habitusliving-03   “We wanted to establish something that you have to travel for, and once you arrive there, time stops for a little bit, your cares are taken care of,” says Hunter, of the temporary sojourn that most people experience while leisurely making their way through a multitude of delectable courses. Hunter and his tight-knit team place a strong emphasis on process, from the growing of the food, right through to bringing it to the table. Because “so much is lost between purchasing food and serving it. To be more connected… there’s more of an implication there,” says Hunter.   Brae-Habitusliving-05 Brae-Habitusliving-12 Brae-Habitusliving-11   What appears to be a hillside farmhouse is home to a simple, intimate and very thoughtfully executed fit-out by Hunter with Six Degrees Architects. “The minute you walk in the door, you can’t see anything else but 200 bottles of high-end seasonal alcohol,” says Hunter. If that’s not invitation enough, then there’s also the dining area, with its super comfortable Catifa chairs, all arranged facing the glassed-in kitchen where Hunter and his colleagues industriously prepare the food. A few key features, Hunter points out, allow the Brae style of service to be easy and free-flowing. Freestanding waiters stations are dotted around the room, allowing for guests to feel cosy and secluded within the open-plan space. The kitchen, encased in glass, establishes an inviting connection between dining and preparation area. There’s something of Hunter’s family values in this, as if he has invited his friends home for a meal. “We wanted to replicate that at a level that was mindful of the detail we wanted to achieve,” he says.   Brae-Habitusliving-08 Brae-Habitusliving-07   The use of raw materials throughout – glass, steel, timber and aged brass – pays homage to the food itself. “We wanted raw materials and ingredients to be a theme throughout.” Particularly as the food, when served, is very exposed, allowing the ingredients to stand out, alone. Craftsmanship too is a strong theme. The food, the structure of the wine list, the service: “We wanted craftsmanship to be noticeable,” says Hunter. Right down to the beautiful studio round-designed menus and business cards.   Brae-Habitusliving-09 Brae-Habitusliving-10   “We live in a very fast paced time, where things come in and out of fashion quickly,” reflects Hunter. “I still think there’s a strong connection for ‘old fashion values’: of time going slow, sharing, community and enjoying someone’s hospitality.” These are key philosophies that are inherent in every facet of the Brae experience. But it’s not all so serious. After all, you can eat with your hands! “It’s a festival. We get so sterile and clinical and intellectual about what is essentially a recreation, we want to try and have those things involved in the dining experience,” says Hunter. Brae Restaurant braerestaurant.com Studio Round round.com.au Six Degrees sixdegrees.com.au Photography by Colin Page colinpage.com.auabc
Design Products
Furniture

It’s more than a chair.

BoConcept’s collection of armchairs prioritise functionality and comfort, as well as aesthetics. The collection is also based on the concept that your chair should express your personal taste and comfort requirements, and as such, each chair is customisable, with over 100 fabric and leather choices, and plenty of leg, arm, base and footstool options to truly personalise your chair. BoConcept Habitusliving Fusion Chair BoConcept’s iconic Imola chair, designed by Henrik Pedersen was inspired by the structure of a tennis ball, its design is playful, yet luxuriously comfortable. This chair comes in either a high back or low back option, with a choice of legs or swivel base, over 100 fabric and leather options and optional matching foot stool. The new Fusion chair was designed by Oki Sato of Nendo for BoConcept this year. The design is based on the folded forms of origami. The sculptural, enveloping shape invites everyone to sit down and the fusion footstool is an elegant companion with its extra soft top cushion that fits with the soft, rounded lines of the chair.   BoConcept Habitusliving Hamiltion and Imola The Hamilton chair, also by Henrik Pederson embraces you with comfort in classic 60s style. This time, Henrik Pedersen has found his inspiration from Japan: - Danish and Japanese design traditions share the simplicity and purity in their expression. The smartville chair was born out of a collaboration with smart car its form echoing the edgy & urban design of the car and referencing both the car seat design, and the materiality and shapes in the cars dashboard instruments. Each chair in BoConcept’s collection has a broad range of options to customise the design, meaning you can truly create your own personalised chair. Explore the range in BoConcept’s Crows Nest showroom, or from August 15th, their new Moore Park showroom, or online. BoConcept Habitusliving BoConcept Habitusliving Smartville and Hamilton BoConcept boconcept.comabc
Design Products
Furniture

Furniture to pass on

  It’s both appreciation of quality and family tradition that makes this idea so important to her. "As a student in France, I had a beautiful antique armoire from my great-grandma," says Anne, and surrounded by her own mother’s antique furniture, grew up to value "the idea of investing in beautiful things of higher quality… They are items we want to take care of, keep for a long time or inherit."   anaca studio habitusliving anaca studio habitusliving   This sense of longevity comes through in anaca studio's latest range of furniture - which includes the Coco ottoman and Tetra table and stool. Like all her pieces, they're well made, pure in form and handcrafted in Melbourne from forestry-certified timbers and sustainable finishes. Continuing the anaca "less is more" philosophy, the designs are simple and elegant and made to suit both residential and commercial spaces – as well as make their way down into generations to come.   anaca studio habitusliving anaca studio habitusliving   This sense of timelessness probably owes much to Anne's approach to aesthetic, which is based on "practicality and simplicity," rather than current trends. "I try and stay true to myself," she says. "Of course it is inevitable that some things will at times influence your thinking and aesthetic but I do not wish for that to be my main focus." As well as simple designs saving anaca pieces from being short-lived, minimal forms are a response to our 'moving' culture. Anne wants her designs to be both accessible and easy to integrate into different interiors as people change and move.   anaca studio habitusliving   To further make them easy to fit into any space and way of living, the designs can be customised so that clients can work them into their own projects. "I believe in the collaborative process and totally embrace it," says Anne. "I have my particular aesthetic but I always find it fascinating and inspiring to see what designers can do when they use anaca’s products with their vision". Here, the Coco ottomans and Tetra table and stool can adapt to a range of interior tones and individuals, depending on your choice of finish or fabric. The table and stool come in different finishes, to create either a bold or subtle look, and Coco has the luxury of being able to be covered in various fabrics – which is where a play on graphic elements and basic geometric shapes comes in. With a bit of textured fabric, wools and stretchy ones being best, the classic piece gets extra shape and added 'oomph'. With a strong philosophy, and a head (or "design bank" as Anne calls it) full of ideas, we look forward to the next anaca range, released during the Design-Made-Trade show in July.   anaca studio habitusliving anaca studio habitusliving     anaca studio anacastudio.com.au   Words by Tess Ritchieabc
Design Products
Furniture

The Nicholas table by Savage Design

Nicholas by Savage Design Nicholas by Savage Design   The 5mm laser cut table is powder coated for durability and also creates a splash of colour or sophistication to your room. Each leg has a silicone foot, available in black and orange, to add contrast while protecting your floors. For the industrial look Nicholas also comes in Black Oxide, a process used to bring out the black colour of the iron with in the steel creating a raw feel. Also available is the special edition ‘bush fire’ finish. With a blackened top and copper underside this combination of colours are reminiscing of a burnt Australian outback. L1113mm x W613mm x H317mm Nicholas by Savage Design Nicholas by Savage Design Savage Design & Cafe Culture + Insitu savagedesign.com.au & cafecultureinsitu.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q + A: Ito Kish

  Name: Ito Kish What you do: Furniture (ITO KISH) & Interior designer and retailer (KISH). Your latest project: Re-designing iconic Filipino furniture and décor pieces for the new generation to appreciate. It will be launched this October during Manila FAME. And of course, my pieces to be available now in Australia gives me a crazy happiness! Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Wes Anderson – Crazy beautiful mind! 2) Zaha Hadid - curves and size makes a big difference 3) Tom Ford – attitude, style and sex appeal What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: MY Gary Fisher Mountain bike Chair model: Pantone chair. For its simplicity and making plastic high end. Commercial space: the Zuellig building Makati City, Philippines Decorative product: Crystal chandeliers. The brightest gems of all. Functional product: Door bell. It answers a lot of questions! Handmade good: Fan made of Buri Mass-produced good: Flip flops Meal: Green salad Restaurant: Noma. Tried to eat 2x during my visit but can not always get a table then saw a story at CNN how they can be crazy about food development. I will eat next time on my next visit to Copenhagen. Promise. Drink: Water/Fruit juice Bar: I do not drink Item in your studio: Murano table lamp Piece of technology: Mobile Phone Historical figure: Napoleon Bonaparte Fictional character: Superman Vice: Travelling. It feeds me creativity and energy. Virtue: Honesty   What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? I imagine them to be like Santa's elves. They work non stop to give you something, feed you excitement and design the way we live. K I S H kish.ph abc
Architecture
Homes

The Art of Everyday Affairs

  If we think of art as something to be viewed and admired, we may be perplexed by Rirkrit Tiravanija’s work. Transporting everyday prosaic affairs into other odd settings, Tiravanija is an artist whose work builds a new set of relationship and creates unexpected participation. Creating situation-related spaces for communication and interaction, his famous ‘installations’ include setting up sizzling food stalls, reconstructing his apartment, setting up a meeting place – all within the spaces of art museums. As we enter these galleries, we become participatory constituents of the work itself – even if we never intended to interact – and become almost delirious as to the question of where, when and how because the situations are at once both strange and familiar. Tiravanija’s house is equally puzzling.   Rirkrit House Habitusliving   Being in Chiang Mai, the northern province of Thailand, means the house is located in a place known for its strong historical, cultural and architectural heritage. Designed by Aroon Puritat in association with Fernlund + Logan Architects, the house seems at odds with any architectural preconceptions one may have about the place. Upon arrival, not only does the obscurity of the entry represent both a defeat of authorship and ownership, but from outside, little if anything of the settings within is disclosed through the passage. Along this passage, we are drawn to the marks cast into the surface of unpolished concrete panels, which in turn, form the shape of both the house’s interior and exterior spaces. Simple geometric shapes of concrete and glass give the house a mute or rather quiet expression, receding into the lush trees hovering above it.   Rirkrit House Habitusliving   The first and foremost requirement was to keep the existing trees in place. Thus they act as a pretext to the design: they give the framework of both the interior and exterior spaces. Along the design process, the roles of owner and architect gradually merged. Creative inputs and active dialogues from both sides allow the design to transform into something neither deliberately ‘owned’ nor ‘designed’. It would be a place that accepted and welcomed both prosaic and aesthetic transformation. Organised around a central courtyard, activities are simply divided into two groups of ‘private’ and ‘public’ activity. Yet there is never a clear line between them as the court allows both parts to participate in any daily activities that may occur. This is not much different from Tiravanija’s work. His art and his house can be seen as a transformation of place, merging different activities into a unified whole. The ‘public’ space of the house integrates four distinct settings into one ensemble: the kitchen or cooking area, the space for dining, the living room and the studio. Each is defined by its own equipment. The extended porches enveloping the spaces simply bind together settings for cooking, eating, living and working.   Rirkrit House Habitusliving   The climate – which encourages people to spend time out of doors – has brought forth the design, with its courtyards, verandahs and porches enclosed with glass panels. This makes it possible for inhabitants to live both inside and outside the house, and also in the in-between areas. Shadows produced by the brim of a solid slab allow for rest and for all the other daily domestic activities to unfold protected from the sun. In so far as the Thais are still the same people and the climate has not changed, these types are still valid, no matter how traditional or ‘modern’ the house may appear. By means of open-air covered spaces, interior and exterior can be bound together. In Tiravanija’s installation, art and the viewers can be seen as a network of relationships. This same notion of participation allows the connection between interiority and exteriority, as well as the transition between distinct activities. The connection is both spatial and actual. The extended terraces around the ‘interior’ space are the means by which the vision can be led beyond the walls and the house can sustain the sense of free flow. Yet, the physical connection between inside and outside is always a choice – never was there an opening without closable doors and windows. It is only that the presence of them is never apparent. Once opened, they seem to disappear. Thus the hints of threshold are given, but the actual separations are delayed.   Rirkrit House Habitusliving   As for the outward appearance of the house, it is simply formless, as if being shaped and re-shaped by specific circumstances and situations. We never feel that the house is being ‘designed’ to have its own distinct identity. Rather, it is being built as a framework or background to daily life and it is the presence which contrasts to the architectural heritage of the place. It is formlessly quiet. And because it contains specific activities whose relationship is transformative, had the house been different from the architectural culture in which it sat, it could not have been re-joined to both the place and the inhabitants so closely. In this case, the building, the place and the activities can be joined only if they are distinct, interlocked only if separate. For only when they are different can they perform their roles respectively and only then can the energy of daily activities animate the house. As with Tiravanija’s installations, the task of describing the place becomes clearer: it is to develop vocabularies and concepts that will demonstrate how settings that are distant and distinct from one another can also interconnected, how they can remain apart and be joined. To inhabit the house means to focus on the performances that the separate settings sustain, and to discover similarities between them. Only in this way will architectural setting be seen to exhibit not just remoteness, but familiarity – that is, the typicality of recurring situations in a different place.   Rirkrit House Habitusliving   Thinking of the specific situations of daily life as well as its possible adjustability allows one to witness more clearly the play of its different forms of articulation. In this case, both the architect and the owner have created the possibility of participation and transformation. The presence of the historical context is never obtrusive. On the contrary, it remains as a faint trace that allows current situations to perform. In this house, material, spatial and participatory quality is not an accomplishment, but a task: for both tradition and the current situation to stay alive, they must be re-made. Thus, both the owner and the architect allow the house to withdraw from an object-like situation in order to transcend itself into the conditions of its own becoming. ARCHITECT Aroon Puritat Architect DESIGN DEVELOPMENT ARCHITECT Fernlund + Logan Architects fernlundlogan.com LIGHTING DESIGN CONSULTANT Thaneeya Yuktadatta CONTRACTOR Settawut Pinyorid ARTISANS Ai Deang, Somkid, Ai Teaud, Uncle Neua, P Bann, P. Aod Photography by Jason Schmidt, Pirak Anurakyawachonabc
NOT HOMES
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Architecture
Accessories

Botanical Museum of English Tapware

  Habitus was selected by the premium tapware specialist to display their range in a creative way and to put the Habitus spin on the presentation. The creative team, Habitus Deputy Editor Nicky Lobo and Senior Designer Frances Yeoland, put forward the Habitus Botanical Museum of English Tapware with the statement: Habitus invites you to take a closer look at these fine specimens of English Tapware – see them flourish in their natural habitat and learn about their characteristics. Habitus encourages a deeper awareness of the products we choose to surround ourselves with every day. In taking this botanic museum approach of presenting English Tapware’s range of products, we aim to inform, delight, and arouse your curiosity. ETC had worked with the likes of Hecker Guthrie (designers of the Woollahra showroom), and stylists Megan Morton, Kathryn Madden, Georgia Boyd and Clare Lewis previously. The Window with Habitus was the official launch of the concept, with submissions open for creative to pitch their creative concept.     Download a proposal form here. English Tapware Company englishtapware.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

DESIGN HUNTER Q+A: TONY STEPHENS

  Name: Tony Stephens What you do: I am the Director of Artbank, one of Australia’s most significant collections of contemporary art which, we make available through a leasing program. Your latest project: Managing the design, construction and move from our Rosebery site where we have been located for over thirty years, into a purpose built facility that will house over 3000 artworks, our staff and a new public gallery. With our reopening scheduled for approximately eight weeks, nearly all of our time is consumed with this massive undertaking. Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Diller and Scofidio… does that count as two? 2) Chet Faker – a unique and amazing talent. 3) Cormac McCarthy – a storyteller like no other. What is your favourite… Car model: I have a thing for classic English automobiles and in my mind there is none better than the Jensen Interceptor. Chair model: Finn Juhl 133 Chair… restrained elegance at its best. Residential space: Villa at Sengokubara, by Shigeru Ban. Commercial space: The soon to be completed Artbank facility designed by the newly formed collaborative Aileen Sage Architects. Decorative product: Jielde lamps… ideally the vintage ones though. Functional product: The very sharp, handmade Japanese kitchen knives by Kuro Kuma Nashiji! Handmade good: My painting by Mark Rodda – ‘Golden Sky #2’, 2013. Mass-produced good: The modem. Meal: Anything I don’t have to cook myself… and that goes well with a glass of wine. Restaurant: Without a doubt – Fratelli Paradiso in Potts Point! Drink: Red wine – natural and crunchy hits the spot. Bar: At the moment, it would have to be Luke Nguyen’s Red Lily in East Sydney – great cocktails! Item in your studio: My laptop. Piece of technology: My iPhone – although it is a love/hate relationship, I am unsure how I would survive without one! Historical figure: Le Corbusier – I like the way he thought about space and place and connected this to ideas around social inclusion and equality. Fictional character: Don Draper. Vice: Anything sweet… and/or cooked by my mother! Virtue: … I take multi-vitamins??? What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? It is someone who can look through what they are told to like, instead listening to their own internal narrative to understand the truly special, unique and important. Artbank artbank.gov.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Two Homes, Two Generations, One Roof

  Separated by a sliding fence and joined by a large backyard, the two parts of HOUSE House become mirrors of itself, when it wants to. This sense of connectedness between the spaces is more than architectural too, with the occupants being two generations of one family.   House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   In a compact urban setting, and built around two terraces (known for their 'cosiness'), HOUSE House feels surprisingly roomy, with an outdoor area that's actually big enough to play in. Respecting the separate forms of the original terraces, Maynard Architects have restored them as two spaces under one roof, in a way that accommodates a new kind of family dynamic for an urban environment.   House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   Unlike Australia's tendency to "go wide and low" – with few topographical constraints to adhere to – Maynard Architects has gone up as a way to "maximise the backyard on a small site and challenge the idea that to have space, you must move to the suburbs". As Maynard points out, "Often people move to the suburbs under the false logic that they will have an abundance of open space and room for kids to play; however the enormous size of houses now makes this a convenient myth rather than a true outcome". It also results in "isolation from a rich and diverse urban community," says Andrew, which HOUSE House manages to rectify; here, they have a roomy backyard within a lively neighbourhood.   House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   By building on the back ends of the terraces and flipping the orientation of the existing houses 180 degrees to be north/south, HOUSE House has a large open outdoor space and, at three stories high, plenty of room inside. To make the interior feel even more spacious – a challenge when each floor is relatively small – Maynard Architects has utilised natural light, played with materials and opened the building up as much as possible. "The key to making a modest-sized home flourish is to provide a number of spaces with various personalities. The active family/living spaces don’t need to be large, yet they must have loose boundaries," says Andrew.   House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   Here, the original front sitting room was kept and the living spaces open from the dining room all the way to the rear fence so as to create an enlarged sense of space. With the mix of original and new design, the spaces are "different in personality and function" so as to "adapt to the various complex moods of its occupants." And, within the one space there's also a sense of privacy.   House House by Maynard Architects Photography by AMA Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects Photography by AMA Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects Photography by AMA Habitusliving (Above 3 photographs by AMA). House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   Like many of Maynard's projects, HOUSE House uses natural, sustainable materials and embraces what already exists. The new form is clad entirely in cedar, dark plywood panelling is used through the light-filled void between the structures and aged brick of the original terrace remains within the stairwell. Details like copper light switches and mirrored cabinetry make HOUSE House especially inviting, Melding old and new, and paying attention to each finish and space, makes HOUSE House feel truly homely and full of personality.   House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   Project location: Richmond, VIC, Australia Andrew Maynard Architects maynardarchitects.com All photography by Peter Bennetts unless otherwise mentioned.abc
Design Products
Accessories

Orchid Metamorphosis

  Exploring the relationship between art, design and fashion, the visual ideals of bold and sculptural were explored through both jewellery and fashion in this range, released at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in April 2014.   dinosaur-designs-maticevski-2   The tubular neck pieces and wrist cuffs, characteristic Dinosaur Designs forms, were hand-made in their Sydney studio. For this special collection, severe black and polite pink Swarovski crystals adorn the cut edges of select pieces.   dinosaur-designs-maticevski-3   The neutral palette of the jewellery – grey, pink, polar white, black and clear – complement the Maticevski range, echoing the strong, yet feminine aesthetic. The Melbourne-based fashion designer says of the collaboration, "Together we worked on forming art pieces with a feminine bold aesthetic". Louise adds, "For us they are like art works that stand alone whether they are worn or placed as sculptural objects".   dinosaur-designs-maticevski-1   The pieces will be available in Septembr 2014, from Dinosaur Designs stores in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, New York and London, as well as online. Dinosaur Designs dinosaurdesigns.com.au Toni Maticevski tonimaticevski.com abc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Accessories

Stormtech’s Slimline Linear Drain

  Good Design Awards judges set a very high benchmark for the Good Design® Selection with entries having to satisfy criteria including: Form, Function, Safety, Sustainability, Quality, Commerciality and Innovation. Linear drainage was invented by Stormtech to allow for a wider range of floor surfaces and flooring configurations than is possible with traditional centre wastes. The 65MND Series grates are manufactured from 2mm marine grade stainless steel, available in satin stainless steel, satin black, white, pearl brass and blue finishes. The drainage system is completed with a stainless steel or PVC channel.   Stormtech   “Aesthetically, drains and drain covers can stand out like the proverbial ‘sore thumb’ often reducing the visual concept desired,” says Stormtech managing director, Troy Creighton. “Our Slimline system has a minimal impact due to its narrow profile. The stainless steel provides a prestige finish with design flexibility to allow it to be used in contemporary or classic styles. The choice of colours in our Marc Newson 65MND Series can create a subtle accent to blend or contrast with surrounding materials and fittings.” For more of Stormtech's drainage, check out Habitus #21 where we showed a large range of their designs. Stormtech stormtech.com.auabc