About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Furniture

Storytelling through Furniture

  Having launched ITO KISH just two years ago, Ito is considered a 'new' designer, as he puts it. Since 2000 though, he has been running K I S H, an important design destination for "A niche market of well-travelled, stylish, industry practitioners and design-savvy homemakers," a growing community in the Philippines.   Ito Kish Habitusliving Ito Kish Habitusliving   While travelling abroad working as a merchandiser, Ito decided to open his own boutique store, one that would be "on par with the best the world had to offer." Now, living up to his Storyteller title, Ito personally chooses every item in K I S H with the idea that together they make a coherent story, one that can continue on into the buyer's home and be built on over time. As well as bringing beautiful objects from all over the world into one place, an important idea behind K I S H is to "influence the way people live." For Ito, design plays an important part in a person's way of living, and it's something he set out to explore, beginning with a personal experience at age 11: "We used to live in a small house 87 kilometres south of the capital and it was less than 50 square metres and all made of wood on stilts. The windows were made of framed capiz shells and when it rains and it dries up, you can see a weird map of the world. One time I was left behind and I saw how bad looking our small house was. With the money I saved from selling sweets at school during break time, I bought plaid pastel wrapping papers and wallpapered the inside of our house. It was so beautiful to me and I told my self that one day I would have the most beautiful home store where people could go and get inspired and change the way they live."   And now with K I S H, he says, "Influence comes in creating the same story in their own personal space."     Ito Kish Habitusliving Ito Kish Habitusliving   As for Ito's own design, this came slightly later, in fact after 12 years running the store. Prompted by a design intern who asked him which piece he designed, and realising there was nothing, Ito decided "now is the time to do it." Again, story is what drives his practise, "You can say you want to design a chair but what is the story? Because it might end up as the same chair a designer is working on in Tokyo, Copenhagen or Libreville … A story adds value to every piece I design." Most of his pieces, for example, were named after family members and friends who have influenced Ito, and his designs are a clear expression of his culture, melding "traditional Asian crafts techniques with forms culled from the country's unique European-influenced history" as well as contemporary design practise. ITO KISH is strongly about who Ito is and where he comes from; it was his "instinct" to design "as a Filipino with my culture and heritage in mind. That for me was a clear point of view." As the only country in Asia to be colonised by Spain, it is a unique vantage point, which Ito values deeply – especially creatively. "They have influenced our lifestyle, love for music, art and even language. They were here for almost 300 years. Add the heart and soul of our culture such as the indigenous materials of the Tasaday and T’Boli and what do you get? A strong point of view of who I am and a very original design." Ito saw this European/Asian history angle as something the rest of the world could appreciate them for.   Ito Kish Habitusliving Ito Kish Habitusliving   As well as turning out as beautiful product, embracing heritage in design can encourage, "Filipinos to be more appreciative of our culture," says Ito, "for the new generation to see the beauty of our culture and tradition." With the government's new branding initiative called Design Philippines, to help existing and new designers by showcasing their works in the bi-annual Manila FAME trade show and international shows like Maison, Salone and ICFF, there is a lot of positive encouragement that exists for young designers too. "The truth is," says Ito, "there are so many creative Filipinos and every year fresh grads join the industry."   Ito Kish Habitusliving Ito Kish Habitusliving   While Ito believes there is nothing "original out there anymore. What you see is an update of combination of designs that have existed," his designs have a strong sense of originality to them. Ito has already won five international and two local design awards, and The Gregoria in particular has been featured in a Biennale and picked up by retail stores in Dubai, Bahrain, Connecticut, Hong Kong and now Australia. Among the Philippine design community, his work has been equally welcomed, with the chair already considered an icon in Philippine furniture design. "I am still learning but the excitement of the process is really charging my passion to do well and create more pieces and at the same time formulate a solid business and marketing plan which is important," he says. If this is him just "gearing up," there looks to be an exciting road ahead - the first stop being Australia, where GlobeWest will introduce the collection very shortly "and continue the story." K I S H kish.ph abc
Design Hunters

Launch Pad Shortlist

  This year’s Launch Pad competition had nearly 150 entries, of such a quality that the nine-judge panel had to select quite a long shortlist. In this exciting news for the Australian design scene, there were entries from all across the country, with an impressive calibre of creativity and social thinking demonstrated. The judges who selected the shortlist, and will now be deciding the finalists, are: Daniel Dalla Riva, Principal and Director of 6 Hats; Terri Winter of Top3 By Design; designer Ross Didier; Aidan Mawhinney, Managing Director of Living Edge; Richard Munao, Managing Director of Corporate Culture; Raymond Scott, Managing Director of Workshopped; Bec Findlay, artist and Content Manager for How We Create; and international judges Felix Low, designer at The Foundry and Ken Koo, President of the red dot design award, Asia. The Finalists will be announced at the end of June, and Design Hunters can see the next generation of Australian design in the Launch Pad Finalists Exhibition at Melbourne Indesign: The Event.   Launch Pad Melbourne Indesign: The Event [gallery ids="31676,31677,31678,31679,31680,31681,31682,31683,31684,31685,31686,31687,31688,31689,31690,31691,31692,31693,31694,31695,31696,31697,31698,31699,31700,31701,31702,31703,31704,31705,31706,31707,31708,31709,31710,31711,31712,31713,31714,31715,31716,31717,31718,31719,31720,31721,31722,31723,31724,31725,31726,31727"]abc
Architecture
Around The World
NOT HOMES

Somewhere Beyond the Sea

  The Drift lounge can be discovered, together with a spectacular bay view, inside the vertical resort of the multi-awarded Hilton Pattaya Hotel, in the popular seaside city of Pattaya near Bangkok. The journey through the hotel’s interior encourages spatial contemplation. From the cave-like ground lobby to the first encounter with the mesmerising main lobby on level 16, the interior is one that commands respect.   Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com   The main lobby is a harmonious space inspired by natural elements, with pebble stone-inspired furniture and lights, and rug patterns reminiscent of tide marks on the sand. The feature architectural intervention covers the entire ceiling plane, where an abstracted rippling effect made from heavy fabric installations recalls large sand dunes. “Specifically, we were inspired by the idea of a person standing in shallow water and looking up at the sky towards the light, with the sand and pebbles beneath their feet," says Amata Luphaiboon, Principal, Department of Architecture Co Ltd. "When choosing a colour scheme we opted for soft, pale hues to reflect the neutral tones of sand, wood and pebbles. The aim was to replicate within the lobby the feeling of walking along the beach.”   Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com   With the visual flow from within the Drift lounge always beckoning towards the seafront, the soft colour scheme of the interior landscape complements, but never overshadows, the natural beauty of the bay outside. Each time a breeze passes through the door to the outdoor lounge area, the fabric installations gently flicker, and the sea whispers to the interior space, an audible sign of their intimate relationship. The lounge then becomes part of the journey, a border space between the natural beauty of the bay view in the front, and the mesmerising interior landscape behind.   Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com   The lounge is divided into two spaces of indoor and outdoor seating, faintly separated by full-height glass that emits daylight throughout the room. The finishing of the interior comes with a full-height mirror on one end, to elongate the visual length caused by the flow of the ceiling from the lobby area. On the other side the backdrop is a wooden wall with alcoves for oversized, recessed  daybeds. The outdoor space then opens up to the sea vista in a parallel manner, with the combination of a calming, shallow and reflective pond sprinkled with pebble-like chaise lounges and lamps.   Drift Lounge Hilton Pattaya Habitusliving.com   Though the idea of a day spent in a high-rise building by the beach could be deemed challenging, the Hilton has contradicted such thought with the Drift Lounge. Its abstracted interior landscape and spectacular panoramic view rather seems a much more sophisticated place than the crowded reality on the beach.   Hilton Pattaya Hotel hilton.comabc
Happenings
Parties

Herman Miller Collection Launch Party

  Exhibiting at the VIP Lounge at Lower Town Hall until this Sunday, June 15, is the largest and most comprehensive display of pieces from The Herman Miller Collection in Australia. Teaming up with Australia’s leading film event - a perfect fit due to the pioneering American furniture maker’s long association with filmmaking - the exhibition had its launch party last Friday, presented by Living Edge, national retailer for Herman Miller. Visitors to The Herman Miller Collection Lounge can experience and order famous designs like the Eames Lounge and Ottoman alongside some of the newest additions to the range, including the Eames Shell Chair in newly formulated sustainable fibreglass, and the Wireframe Sofa by Sam Hecht and Kim Collin, as seen in the gallery below. Enjoy! [gallery ids="31563,31564,31565,31566,31567,31568,31569,31570,31571,31572,31573,31574,31575,31576,31577,31578,31579,31580,31581,31582,31583,31584,31585,31586,31587,31588,31589,31590,31591,31592,31593,31594,31595,31596,31597,31598,31599,31600"]abc
Design Hunters
People

DESIGN HUNTER Q+A: NICCI GREEN

  Your name: Nicci Green What you do: Designer and Director of Articolo Architectural Lighting Your latest project: Adelaide Skycity Casino and high end residential lighting with various Interior Designers and Architects (too many special treasured companies to only list a few). Who are three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Christian Liaigre 2) Vincent Van Duysen 3) India Mahdavi and Tom Dixon’s Eclectic collection (stone spice grinder, chop long, bash vessel, form bowl and candle scented) What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: I love being outdoors and amongst nature so Boat or bike. When I am on or near the water I feel at peace. Chair model: Too many chairs I love... but Molteni & C’s Reversi and Glove chairs, Poliform’s Gaston Armchair by Vincent Van Duysen Residential space: Vincent Van Duysen designs a residential space like no other. Any of his work! Commercial space: Numerous commercial spaces designed by Tadao Ando Decorative product: Henry Dean glassware, Piet Stockman's Ceramics, Michael Verheyden tableware Functional product: Agape bath tub OR any lighting from the Articolo lighting collections Handmade good: Astier de Villatte Objets D’art ceramics, Teixidors artisanal throws and cushions Mass-produced good: Society bedlinen, Christian Tortu vases Meal: Anything from the Cicciolina Restaurant menu … all completely delicious! Restaurant: Zuma Japanese UK Drink: Buttery Chardonnay... (Very spoiling, special occasion... 2006 Tarrawarra Reserve) Bar: The bar is always open at home... that’s the best kind of bar when surrounded by family and friends with good music and a buttery chardonnay of course. Item in your studio: Lumi table lamps on my desk in the office Piece of technology: Instagram (@articololighting) Historical figure: Nelson Mandela Vice: Buttery Chardonnay and dancing like an elastic band and putting my back out (very regular occurrence) Virtue: Kindness   What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? For me a .. Design Hunter is a person with a sophisticated eye for detail and difference. Scouring the world for objects, carefully curated with a unique design sensibility. Objects, that are not easily recreated that have taken time for the artisan to perfect. Where the balance and proportion are in harmony. Understanding the layering of items from different cultures, mediums and styles to bring interest and the unexpected to the room or space. Articolo Architectural Lighting articoloarchitecturallighting.com.au  abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Immersive island dance

  The disciplines of dance and architecture have long been linked through their shared use of space as a medium for creative interpretation. They are also closely linked through the way in they can invite the audience to participate or immerse themselves within them. dancehouse2 This work, titled Island, brings the audience to the forefront of the stage, literally. Similar to the popular New York site-specific experience Sleep No More, Batchelor invites the audience to take part in the performance. Dancehouse-hero With no designated seating for the performance, audience members are encouraged to walk amongst the futuristic constructs, lit by the moving figures all in white and the illuminated floor highlighting the geometric nature of the design and the highly purposeful choreography of Batchelor. dancehouse7 By encouraging the audience to seek new perspectives, Batchelor’s choreography is given license to shift in size, orientation and reflection, allowing the surroundings to become a directing part of the movement, and the choreography to flow alongside the constructs. dancehouse4 Island is inspired by three remote islands in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans, which are documented by Judith Schalansky’s Atlas of Remote Islands: 50 Islands Ihave Not Visited and Never Will. dancehouse3 As well, Batchelor’s work also responds to science fiction writer Aldous Huxley’s works Island and The Doors of Perception, imagist poet TE Hulme’s exploration of the senses, and John Gray’s The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths, Batchelor’s Island is imbued with otherworldly senses of elevation and loneliness, mythological history and ritual. dancehouse10 This complex melting pot of influences and inspirations is cooked up by Batchelor along with key collaborators, architect and designer Ella Leoncio, sound designer Morgan Hickinbotham and fellow dancers Amber McCartney and Bicky Lee, to create an atmosphere that is distinctly eerie, engrossing and hypnotic. dancehouse8 With the Canberra season completed, Island will now travel to the Sylvia Staehli Theatre in Melbourne as a Dancehouse production. Photography by Lorna Smith Dancehouse dancehouse.com.auabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

New York in Manly

  In the beach suburb of Manly, on Sydney’s northern coast, is a rather un-beachy bar. Instead, there is a New York loft style space with an Asian feel (and taste), quite unlike its neighbours. This is Donny’s & Co Manly, a renovation by Luchetti Krelle. “With most hospitality fit-outs there is theatre and theming,” says Stuart Krelle, “and this was right on brief for a NY style of small bar.”   Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle   Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle   While the design might not directly reflect the local landscape, it comes as a refreshing change and certainly “suits a hole in the market in the small bar scene of Manly,” says Stuart. The design comes as a response to the client’s brief to “transform the space into a NY loft style space, reminiscent of something he had seen in his travels” – and on a tight budget. While a definite NY/China Town feel, the design is not a jarring addition to the community. Rather, the new drinking and eating spot, serving Asian style tapas, balances the urban and the rural, nodding to the Australian flavour, and finds itself quite comfortably on Market Lane opening onto the pedestrianised street.   Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle   Starting with a 160m2 stark white plasterboard box – a “very cold and hard” former spa treatment space – Luchetti Krelle had the pleasure of creating something entirely new. Not wanting to fall into an overly Asian themed aesthetic, or otherwise, they’ve taken a “pared-back approach to the design,” while incorporating a rural tone. Playing on the roots of the client from rural NSW, the proportions and scale of the space are barn-like, with a mezzanine set back in the room that allows “the volume of the space to be fully appreciated upon entry.” A number of recycled materials such as re-used railway sleepers, canvas lorry tarps and brickwork, “painstakingly clad to the walls,” – are central to the design. “Recycled materials play a big role in the palette,” says Stuart, and perhaps especially for the rustic tone they provide that balances out the slicker aspects, like the shiny copper and “perfectly mitred timber lining boards weaving diagonally across the lower ceiling and walls.”   Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle   The balance between urban and rural is perhaps why this design works so well, in part the result of a tight budget. As well as the rural tone being a consequence of the client, there’s a sense of ingenuity that comes from a more practical sense. “When budgets are tight we need to work harder to innovate within our means,” says Stuart. “We worked hard to nut out this concept and edit it back to its bare bones.” All brief, budget and designers, then, clearly make Donny’s what it is, as Stuart sums up perfectly. What was particularly special about this project, he says, was that “the space has a strong and clear identity that is reflective not just of the client’s brief and taste but our work and design methods of working to a brief and any budget.”   Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle   Looks like Luchetti Krelle have succeeded in making a “warm and friendly New York style loft bar,” as per the client's vision. The copper bar and spiral stair are the client's favourite parts (the two parameters he set in place), says Stuart, but "to be honest, the client is rapt with the result as it is all that he hoped for."   Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle Donny’s & Co Manly by Luchetti Krelle Architects: Luchetti Krelle Client: Matt Clifton (client and owner/operator) Project completed: November 2013 Cost of the project: $320,000 Duration of project: 6 months from conception to completion Materials: Recycled brick Copper bar tops Recycled train sleeper timber Particle Strand Board Chain-link (Hurricane) fencing Truck Lorry Tarps Steel Address: 7 Market Lane, Manly NSW   Photography by Michael Wee Photography.   abc
Finishes
Design Products
Design Accessories

Caesarstone’s New Marble Inspired Calacatta Nuvo

  There is no denying this new design is absolutely stunning. With wide, elegant, grey veins on a soft white base, Calacatta Nuvo has the grace and timelessness of classic marble - needless to say, a perfect fit for any interior. The subtlety of the design means it works with a range of materials. Crisp white, stainless steel, wood grains, and shiny surfaces will team up well with this beauty. And, with a gentle warmth, Calacatta Nuvo is homely too - in the most luxurious way of course.   Caesarstone Calcatta Nuvo Caesarstone Calcatta Nuvo Caesarstone Calcatta Nuvo   At Milan Design Week, if you were lucky enough to be there you would have seen, Caesarstone presented a major installation, designed by London based Raw-Edges, that showed the product. An 18 metre-long kitchen 'island,' the installation demonstrated the “subtle strength and impact that the large vein structure imparts on the overall look and feel of the kitchen.” The response - not surprisingly - was “exceptional.” As General Manager Marketing for Caesarstone Australia Andrew Dixon said, “Calacatta Nuvo is proving to be perhaps our most anticipated new design ever.”   Caesarstone Calcatta Nuvo Caesarstone Calcatta Nuvo Caesarstone Calcatta Nuvo   While we're unable to view the installation on this side of the world, showrooms across Australia and New Zealand have large panels of Calacatta Nuvo so as to offer a full(ish) experience of this beautiful, unique surface. Caesarstone Calacatta Nuvo RRP $750 m2 Installed 1300 119 119  abc
Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

Transparent Privacy

Above: The dark bluestone floor visually anchors the freestanding forms. In the past 10 years, a new type of apartment block has emerged on Auckland’s city fringe. Low-rise with large common courtyards, it is far more open and layered than its predecessors. Often addressing the public edge directly, it calls for a different response to apartment living. Jasmax director and architect, Tim Hooson, and his partner, Jude Hooson, took up this challenge when they refurbished their apartment in the Patterson Associates-designed Stratis building on the Viaduct Harbour. Surrounded by water – harbour to the east and a private lock for boats to the  west – the building effectively forms a pier. Tim has united two neighbouring apartments to create one large space occupying the south-east end of the building. Located on the ground floor, it hovers only two metres above the public realm. Friends knock on the windows or call out when they pass on foot or by boat. In such an exposed setting, and with three glazed elevations, Tim has maximised high-priority living space around the perimeter, and ingeniously concealed services and storage. Untitled-4 Left: A wireless office allows Jude to work throughout the space. Right Above: A lanai extends the living space towards the harbour. Right Below: Bedroom and bathroom are concealed behind Corian membranes. An urban retreat in such a public place would normally provoke the use of solid blinds, shutters or curtains. In this case, membranes have been used whereby the occupants are delicately and minimally separated from the outside world. Translucent rolling blinds screen the exterior, and large skins of DuPont Corian (an acrylic product that can be shaped and moulded) conceal private rooms within – the cocooning layers of Corian are only millimetres thick. The actual experience of privacy between public and private domains has been unexpected. “There is something about the lightness of the space that draws you closer to the outside. We feel we are in the same daylight space as the public,” says Tim. “Yet from the outside looking in, it doesn’t feel like that at all – it looks recessed and setback. Most of the time the public are completely unaware that it is they who are being watched – a very intriguing reversal.” Untitled-2 Left: The luminous interior creates a serene and slightly surreal mood. Right: Tim Hooson stands next to a sculpted Corian wall and built-in joinery. The conceptually-driven interior works on multiple levels to evoke a strong sense of place. Its nickname, Icestation, reinforces the apartment’s greater context of the Southern Ocean. Within the harbour precinct, bluestone from the building’s plinth and sea wall is continued inside as flooring, and the gleaming boat hulls outside echo the interior’s pure white surfaces. Memory of the site’s previous use – a lumber export yard – is retained in timber cabinetry. Commercial tug and fishing boats were replaced by leisure and sailing craft when the industrial harbour was redeveloped for residential use at the time of the 2000 and 2003 America’s Cup challenges. It is difficult not to draw on water and boating analogies when reading the apartment interior. While there are no obvious marine references, there are some very poetic water and wind allusions; a high level of craft was required to fit timber cabinets in and around curves; every nook and cranny has been utilised for storage; and, as in a boat, personal items are carefully stowed away. The Hoosons are passionate sailors with very busy professional lives. The streamlined and highly efficient interior offers them a city retreat in a location that is close to work, has a lock in which to berth their sailboat and direct access to the idyllic Waitemata Harbour, full of islands and bays that entice sailors. Untitled-3 Left: A subtle and continuous flow of rooms. Right: Main bedroom with dressing room cabinetry beyond. The billowy Corian membranes are self-supporting and combine with timber cabinetry to contain kitchen and bathrooms. These central islands allow the living and bedroom spaces to occupy nearly the entire glazed perimeter. “Spaces are segmented, but not cut by these suspended pours. They create a subtle and continuous flow of rooms and an equally subtle understanding of uses within each space,” says Tim. As sculptural objects they change character with the light – absorbing it, reflecting a soft sheen, or glowing when sunlight hits the surface. “Without edges marking its spatial shifts, the pour of Corian creates an effect of a white-out, a sea fog, with only occasional edges as defining points,” notes Tim. “Our mind is so accustomed to the built environment around us being rectilinear; it becomes quite hard to ascertain where the edges of the surfaces are.” He uses dark bluestone tiles to anchor the shifting forms – the mortar grid acting as a coordinate system. These exquisite white vessels are the heroes of the interior – artwork and furnishings are kept minimal to preserve their quiet presence. The apparently soft organic forms belie the high degree of innovation and precision required to create them. Tim had experimented with the product for a commercial installation. What he discovered intrigued him, so when he decided to build, he was presented with the perfect opportunity to experiment with the material and test its limits. “In hindsight I would have been keen to push it harder,” he notes. Utilising an innovative process he developed with Corian fabricator and designer, Murray Christensen of Muzarro, the room-scaled forms could be created in under a day. “By applying heat, the material liquefies, enabling exact manipulations and subtle pours which remain in suspended states,” Tim explains. This trait has been humorously sent up in the kitchen where Corian ‘flows’ down the wall to seamlessly morph into a table and two seats. Untitled-5 Left: Corian skins separate private and public spaces. Right: Ross Lovegrove-designed fittings for Vitra adorn the ensuite. Tim’s work is characterised by construction and technological explorations. “My passion for sailing, and the adjacent technologies of the marine industry, inform much of my design work. I’ve been intrigued with the idea that architecture can have a fluid nature to it,” he says. The Telecom Shed pavilion he designed for the 2003 America’s Cup used high-level industrial detailing to create a rolling tensile structure that referenced the dynamic tension of sails, wind and waves. Tim and Jude have lived in apartments since their university days. Ten years working in Europe cemented this way of life, so upon their return to New Zealand in 1994, they were naturally drawn to the city. Moving from their uptown loft to the harbour’s edge coincided with Jude’s decision to work from home. Her strategic consultancy is largely computer-based and wirelessly operates out of an ‘engine room’. She works from anywhere within the apartment, liberating her from a fixed desk. The freedom this offers is matched by a home and boat that are easy to maintain, batten down and leave. This serene and slightly surreal cocoon holds its occupants in a gentle luminous suspension. Abstract structures and spatial demarcations create a private retreat that posits a very different model for living. Photography: Simon Devitt Architect: Jasmax Architects Jasmax Architects Project Architect Tim Hooson (Principal), Valentina Machina Project Manager / Quantity Surveyor Practec Interiors (Stephen Davies and Carlos Kearns) Fire Engineer Holmes Fire (Martin Feeney) Structural Engineer Holmes Group (Jeremy Austin) Demolition Practec Interiors Concrete Penetrations Crystal Concrete Cutters Structural Steel/Metalwork Weldrite Carpentry Kaos Interiors Plumbing / Gasfitting JC McCall Plumbing Mechanical 1st Mechanical Fire Protection Entire Fire Artwork ’Indian Summer’ by Mal Bouzaid. Furniture Arne Jacobsen armchair for Fritz Hansen, Egg Chair in Hallingdal by Kvadrat and Fritz Hansen leather and wicker PK22 armchair from Living Interiors, kvadratmaharam. com / livinginteriors.com.au, also available from Corporate Culture, corporateculture. com.au. Le Corbusier chaise, Fritz Hansen Ottoman in Hallingdal by Kvadrat. Fritz Hansen Series 7 dining chair in white matte lacquer with polished chrome legs.  Le Vele sofa by Luigi Recalcati in White from Gelosa, gelosa.com.au. Eames office chair from Matisse, matisse. co.nz. Cowhide rug. Finishes Paint in assorted colours from Resene, resene.co.nz.  Appliance White powdercoat from Ameron, ameron.co.nz. Bluestone low-sheen honed floor tiles from Trethewey Stone, trethewey.co.nz. Feature flooring Glacier White DuPont Corian from Muzarro, muzarro.com / dupont.co.nz. Bubble wall from Interion 3-Form, interion.co.nz. Laminate joinery, laminex.co.nz. Sustainably-sourced white Oak veneer wall panelling. Lighting All lighting from Aesthetics Lighting, aesthetics.co.nz. Fixtures/Equipment Vitra Istanbul bathroom fittings designed by Ross Lovegrove, vitra.com. Underfloor heating from Omniwarm, omniwarm.info. Home automation from Automation Associates, aa.net. nz. Oven and dishdrawer from Miele, miele.co.nz. Westinghouse refrigerator, westinghouse.co.nz. KWC Eve kitchen faucet from Franklins, franklins.co.nz. Fireplace from Real Fires, realfires.co.nz.abc
Architecture
Homes

Viking by Crown

Located in the suburb of Waterloo, within Sydney’s upcoming Green Square precinct, and just moments from the sophisticated cultural milieu of artistic Danks Street is 30-36 O’Dea Avenue - well-known as Viking by Crown. Viking by Crown is an architecturally innovative, 10-storey residential development by leading Australian property developer Crown Group. The group has developed several award-winning luxury projects across the picturesque city of Sydney and is renowned for delivering five-star, resort-inspired residential properties. 1 Featuring a bold eye-catching design, Viking by Crown is no exception, representing a landmark in statement design, striking form and colour. Its considered aesthetic boasts a unique design inspired by renowned Israeli artist Yaacov Agam, founder of the post war kinetic art movement and creator of ground-breaking sculptures, paintings and architecture. 6 Presenting two main facades, the building features floor-to-ceiling glass and views to the CBD and Green Square district, while its bright O’Dea Avenue facade stuns with architecturally-designed, three-dimensional red, yellow and green panels. Hints of colour will also adorn the balconies, complements of custom-built aluminium bi-fold louvres which enable balconies to be completely enclosed for privacy. Acting as a second design skin, they will provide an ever-changing and transforming colourful layer to the building. Viking by Crown will treat its residents to refined luxury every day with its resort-style facilities including a 25 metre swimming pool, fully equipped gymnasium and sun drenched views of beautiful Waterloo from level three. With the allure of eclectic Danks Street on residents doorsteps as well as the sophisticated Eastern suburbs retail scene, Viking by Crown oozes lifestyle charm and convenience. Residents will enjoy all the spoils of an inner-city lifestyle close to Sydney’s best shops, cafes and nightlife. 5 Beneath its stylish residences, Viking by Crown offers a café at ground level opening onto a terrace, and will be an ideal spot to meet with friends, or simply watch the world go by. As it nears completion, Viking by Crown is expected to add a refreshing new dimension to Waterloo ahead of the redevelopment of the Green Square Town Centre. 3 Expected to commence redevelopment by the end of this year, the Town Centre upgrade promises to deliver the precinct quality infrastructure and community facilities. The prominent Crown Group has successfully completed major developments in Sydney’s best locations including Bondi, Bondi Junction, Parramatta, Ashfield, Epping, Homebush, Newington, Pennant Hills and Rhodes. Viking 1300 628 685 vikingbycrown.com.au  abc
Design Products
Habitus Loves

Habitus Loves… Kidding Around

 
Heico Lamps
Heico Lamps
Created by: HEICO Why we love it: File these ones under old-school banner. Heico night-lights are made in Germany from moulded PVC and hand-finished to the highest standards. There are numerous designs to choose from, including a goose and a rabbit and a squirrel, but we rather like the bright red toadstool. Where you can get it: bigdreams.com.au
Sydney Harbour Ferry
Created by: Natasha Skunca Why we love it: Natasha Skunca hit on the idea to create a range of cool designs drawing on iconic Melbourne and Sydney landmarks. She enlisted a local toymaker to create a wooden Sydney ferry for children. The ferry comes with eight passengers and two sailors. A similarly groovy Melbourne tram arrives with ten passengers and two conductors. Where you can get it: makemeiconic.com
Flensted Mobile
Flensted Mobile
Created by: Flensted Mobiles Why we love it: Okay, not so much a toy, but an objet d’art. It was way back in 1953 when Christian Flensted created his first mobile to celebrate the christening of his daughter. He founded the company the following year, so Flensted are currently celebrating their 60th anniversary. Where you can get it: Local Distributors
Oscar Dog
Oscar Dog
Created by: Hans Bolling for Architectmade Why we love it: 1953 was obviously a great year for design, as it’s also when Hans Bolling came up with the Oscar Dog. The cute little puppy can be arranged in a variety of poochy positions, so he can sit, beg, and stand. Made from beech wood and leather by Architectmade. Where you can get it: spacefurniture.com.au
Miniio Doll House
Miniio Doll House
Created by: Miniio Why we love it: If you are looking to turn your kids into design addicts, this is the doll house to buy them. Designed in Poland by two ex-advertising execs, the 1:6 scale homes are made from solid oak and birch plywood. They also feature the kind of modernist décor you would happily shrink for. Where you can get it: bigdreams.com.au
Bank In The Form Of A Pig
Bank In The Form Of A Pig
Created by: Harry Allen for Areaware Why we love it: Teach your child to save with this very funky and slightly disturbing piggy bank designed by Harry Allen. Cast from a pig that died of natural causes and made from resin and marble for Areaware, it holds up to $10,000 in American dollar bills. Comes in a large range of colours including fluorescent pink, gold, and orchid chrome. Where you can get it: Local Distributors
Lou Lou Ghost Chair
Lou Lou Ghost Chair
Created by: Philippe Starck Why we love it: Wacky French designer Philippe Starck gave us the Louis Ghost Chair in 2002 and it quickly became a design classic. The Lou Lou is a baby version of the famous Ghost, inheriting the same fabulous form but in a size to suit the rug-rats. Comes in a rainbow of translucent colours too. By Kartell. Where you can get it: spacefurniture.com.au
Softheads
Softheads
Created by: Sergio Roger Why we love it: Treading the boundaries between art and design, Softheads was initiated by visual artist Sergio Roger. The project puts an animal-friendly spin on the once fashionable practice of displaying taxidermic hunting trophies. All pieces are textile-based, soft, hand-made and produced in Barcelona. Where you can get it: ajar.com.au  
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The Origins of a Designer Rug

For her second visit since 2008, Pielli spent a whirlwind three days in Kathmandu and the nearby weavers workshops. The main purpose, as she says is, "to develop a new collection and understand some of the techniques and artisanship better." Designer_Rugs_Nepal_Hand_Knot_Lia_Pielli_Shearing_Rugs This is particularly the case with some of the new collections, which employ hemp and a technique called 'arbrash'. This involves uneven dying - rather than the usual pressure dying which is even, this is unevenly applied to the yarn for a greater variety in colour density and pattern. Designer_Rugs_Nepal_Hand_Knot_Lia_Pielli_Spinning_Wool_Rugs Pielli comments "you get a lovely transition of colour and texture, much more organic and textural - however it’s different every time you dye it. So it's important to have an understanding of the technique and its limitations." Designer_Rugs_Nepal_Hand_Knot_Lia_Pielli_Washing_Drying_Rugs Visiting the weavers also reinforces how meticulous and time consuming the processes are: "They allow so much time", observes Pielli, "the time it takes to produce a hand knotted (four-five months) rug vs hand tufted (six-eight weeks), a weaver will weave two and a half square metres a month. It’s amazing to watch the weavers because they’re incredibly skilled – to watch them make something tangible and beautiful which lasts forever." Designer_Rugs_Nepal_Hand_Knot_Lia_Pielli_Wool_Silk_Selection_Rugs And it is also remarkable to see how the designs for the rugs translate from digital to physical realisation - "The design process may be more technical and modern but the manufacturing process is very similar [to how it has been done historically]. You might have all this amazing technology but the technique is still that one. No modern substitutes have ever achieved the same quality or beauty." Designer_Rugs_Nepal_Hand_Knot_Lia_Pielli_Artwork_Rugs However beyond the specific purpose of this trip, travelling to a country such as Nepal is an enormously stimulating experience, a crucial source of creativity for a designer. Designer_Rugs_Nepal_Lia_Pielli_HabitusLiving.JPG Pielli remarks that "Anytime I travel I tend to absorb things - it’s always nice to visit other places and see completely different colour, how they all paint the facades of their homes different colours and there’s prayer flags everywhere. They’re incredibly positive, friendly people." Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.auabc