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Design Hunters
Design Stories

Design Hunter Guide: 5 ways to hibernate during winter

 

1. Partake in hot drinks 5 ways to hibernate like a Design Hunter habitusliving

Pantone mugs available from top3.com.au Drink copious amounts of tea, coffee, hot chocolate or hot toddies (for a grown up evening version) from your favourite mug. It will not only keep you cosy, but if you choose herbal tea, also hydrated. Whether your mug of choice is nostalgic, a contemporary pattern or a traditional classic, there’s something so soothing about sipping a hot drink through the cold and rainy days.

2. Invest in a designer fireplace

fireplace 5 ways to hibernate like a Design Hunter habitusliving Gyrofocus 360º pivot fireplace, image via domusweb.it Spend some time researching and money investing in a good-looking, energy-efficient fireplace. While a wood-burning or campfire is ideal – particularly if enjoyed on holiday – there are some beautiful standalone or integrated bioethanol designs that can instantly transform your interior into a winter haven. Check out Oblica and EcoSmart Fire for ideas – or go for the original 1968 pivoting design, the Gyrofocus.

3. Plan your summer holiday

hotel 5 ways to hibernate like a Design Hunter habitusliving Plan an exotic, sunshine-filled holiday – the thought of an island escape could be just the thing to beat the winter blues. Luckily, there are a few choice sites out there that have done all the work so you can find Design Hunter accommodation on their recommendations. Check Mr & Mrs Smith, visit the newest addition to the Art Series Hotels portfolio in Adelaide, or check our very own projects section on Habitusliving for some Regional gems including the Raas Hotel in Jodhpur, Limes Hotel in Brisbane’s Fortitude Valley and the Hilton Hotel in Pattaya.

4. Get inspired

paola antonelli how to hibernate like a Design Hunter habitusliving Paola Antonelli portrait by Meet the Media Guru via wired.it With no fear of being distracted by sunny weather, impromptu barbecue gatherings and the like, you can devote a good portion of minutes (or hours if you tend to get carried away like us) on delving into creative and design ideas on the world wide web. TED is always a great source, the eloquent and charming Paola Antonelli a particular favourite and you could seriously lose an afternoon with the handy Design Giants or the Architectural Inspiration playlists.

5. Don’t hibernate

sydney indesign how to hibernate like a Design Hunter habitusliving Yes, it’s cold and it’s winter, but if you meet Jack Frost head on you can take the sting out of him. Vivid Sydney is the perfect example of a winter festival with enough creativity and inspiration to get you outside. Following up is Sydney Design and Melbourne Indesign in August, which is packed full of creative installations, and the opportunity to discover the latest residential products and engage with the Melbourne Design Hunter community.  

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Happenings
What's On

ARCHITECTURE FOR EVERYONE – MELBOURNE OPEN HOUSE 2014

Above NAB Docklands   In its sixth year, this year’s event saw more than 100 buildings open their doors to the public, and a better organised ballot system for high demand and limited access sites. The perennial favourites drew the biggest crowds, but we took a different approach instead on innovation in work places and how some of the most progressive new office spaces are shaping up.   Open House Melbourne on Habitus Living NAB Docklands   The biggest of them all – NAB 700 Bourke – at the Docklands was designed by Woods Bagot and opened last year. It accommodates 5500 staff, features 1000 lockers and 600 bike racks, plus an impressive 5340 triangular façade panels reflecting the site’s triangular shape. Highly collaborative, the workplace has a 6 star ‘Green Star’ office design rating, and is NAB’s latest iteration of an activity-based workplace. The highlight is the 14th floor rooftop, where a green canopy presents occupants with an opportunity for fresh air and spectacular city views.   Open House Melbourne on Habitus Living Space & Co - Photograph by Daniel Aulsebrook Space & Co takes the hot desk concept to another level – level 10 to be precise – within The GPT Group’s building on Elizabeth Street. Only open for two months, this new co-working space is available to the public on a casual or permanent basis to work at, with a modern fit out by BVN Donovan Hill, who loved it so much they moved in permanently.   Open House Melbourne on Habitus Living Slattery – Photograph by Peter Clarke   A fresh, open plan design by Elenberg Fraser has transformed quantity surveying and cost engineering firm, Slattery, on the top floor of a 1960s building on Queen Street. With architecture by Bates Smart, the firm wanted to move from a traditional to a collaborative approach, with a muted palette of blonde timbers, white leather and black and white furniture.   Open House Melbourne on Habitus Living Library at the Dock – Photograph by Emma Cross   Finally, we headed to Library at the Dock in the Docklands. Braving the wind and the rain, we joined a tour indoors for a walk through of Australia’s most sustainable community building. But designed by Clare Design, with Hayball as the documenting architects, this library isn’t just about books. It features a technology floor with a recording studio and creative editing suites, indoor/outdoor room with artificial grass and a retractable roof, plus a 120-person performance venue. Best of all, they’ll accept members from all over Melbourne.   Open House Melbourne openhousemelbourne.org   abc
Design Products
Furniture

20 Years on: Zuster

  This year, Zuster reaches their 20-year anniversary. A sister duo from Melbourne – who draw on their European heritage and combine it with the Australian environment, committed to using local talent and design for the way they "like to live" – Zuster epitomise the kind of design we can celebrate, years on.   Zuster-Habitus-Living-02   Made up of sisters Wilhelmina McCarroll and Fleur Sibbel, using the Dutch word for ‘sister’ as their brand name, their commercial and residential timber furniture has been designed and manufactured in Melbourne for the past 20 years. Making each piece significant to the entire collection is clear, paying attention to the making of furniture and appreciating those who do it. “Our craftsmen are true artists who create each piece from start to finish, adding their own touch while achieving Zuster’s signature style. There is such a skill in making refined furniture and we are proud to support Australian talents”, says McCarroll. In the 20 years since their founding, Zuster’s dedication to local craftsmanship has stood the brand apart. “Our clients really appreciate the impeccable workmanship, design flexibility, customisation and each item being made to order specifically to suit their project or residence.”   Zuster-Habitus-Living-03   To mark this milestone, Zuster will launch a 20-year anniversary collection ‘Tribute’ at Melbourne Indesign. Designed to celebrate favourite elements of Zuster furniture from the past 20 years, the collection includes Dulux-painted finishes from the Echo and Traverse collections, fine American oak bases, a new interpretation of the Pearl Y base on a chest of drawers and many more new favourites. ‘Tribute’ will be a ‘best of the best’ and can be seen at Melbourne Indesign: The Event in the Richmond Design Precinct.   Zuster-Habitus-Living-04
  Zuster will be exhibiting at Melbourne Indesign - 22-23 August Zuster zuster.com.au  

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Design Products
Furniture
Lighting

Celebrating Design from our region and beyond

Above: One Nordic distributed by District246  
WEYLANDTS Habitus Living Africa: Weylandts From the other side of the Southern Hemisphere is Weylandts. Founded in Windhoek, Namibia, Weylandts is a world-class retailer of contemporary furniture and homewares from all around the world. Today, they’re well-established as the leading furniture and décor retailer in southern Africa and have recently opened a showroom in Melbourne - their first store outside the African continent, extending this link to us here.  
Lump Sculpture Habitus Living Australia: Lump Sculpture Design Studio Closer to home, Melbourne’s own Lump Sculpture Design Studio has quietly established itself as one of Australia’s premier design and production studios for contemporary art and outdoor sculpture. Their original designs reflect their sense of artistic purpose. For Melbourne Indesign, they’ll be launching new sculptural work and a range of large-scale outdoor planters in an animated, highly decorated laneway at Temperature Design.  
  District Habitus Living New Zealand: District246 Crossing the Tasman to New Zealand, we find District246. Launched just last year, they've been making a name for themselves supplying contemporary designer furniture, indoor and outdoor, as well as lighting and rugs. Covering the residential market, as well as corporate, commercial, hospitality and retail furniture, District246 is a strong player in bringing an international design community closer and across all areas.  
Apato Habitus Living Japan: Apato From the other side of the Pacific, we have Apato who brings to Australia some of the finest Japanese furniture designers and ancient Japanese woodcraft made for the modern era. Some of their brands have rarely been seen outside Japan before, making their presence even more significant. Maruni, Dan Project, Miyazaki Chair Factory and Ishinomaki Laboratory are among the long-established design houses they have. Apato will make their Australian debut at Melbourne Indesign.  
Goldsworthy Habitus Living New Zealand: Goldsworthy Studio A New Zealand Design company explores the beauty inherent in the basic functions of furniture and in the process of making. Their collection focuses on materiality and machines, longevity and aesthetic, using materials such as steel and brass, aluminium and oak. Products from the studio can be found in Australia through Cult  
Kenneth Cobonpue Habitus Living Philippines: Kenneth Cobonpue Graduating in Industrial Design from Pratt Institute in New York, Kenneth Cobonpue integrates locally sourced materials and handmade production procceses in his work. Well-known around the world, his unique designs have won him many awards including being named the Designer of the Year in the first edition of Maison et Objet Asia held in March, 2014 in Singapore. Furniture and lighting from the designer and manufacturer from Cebu can be found at KE-ZU  
Make your way to Melbourne Indesign to see a flavoursome mix of design cultures - from small designers to distributors, as well as talks, activities and events that celebrate design around the globe.  

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Architecture
Homes

Regional architecture in this Sydney home designed by Arkhefield inspired by Geoffrey Bawa

Above | A series of ‘garden rooms’ entwine the new home within this historic and leafy Sydney suburb. An original sandstone perimeter wall was refurbished and rebuilt, paying homage to the history of the site. Hunters Hill Arkhefield Habitus Living The house is simultaneously earthy and organic, modern and inviting, while reflecting the clients’ combined Italian and Sri Lankan heritage Hunters Hill Arkhefield Habitus Living A seamless flow through the interior outwards to the courtyards and gardens creates a connection between the textural, raw concrete and timber to the outdoors and sky. Hunters-Hill-Arkhefield-Habitus-Living-03 Elements from the previous home that stood on the site were reused in the new build, engraining the past into this next part of the site’s history. Hunters Hill Arkhefield Habitus Living The interior is warm and comfortable, with detailing designed to provide clarity of space and form. Hunters Hill Arkhefield Habitus Living The living pavilion exemplifies the vision of the project – to create a space built of raw materials that integrate inside and outside. Hunters Hill Arkhefield Habitus Living Generous natural light and a warm, textured palette combine to create a tranquil retreat. Hunters Hill Arkhefield Habitus Living Large bespoke sliding doors and high ceilings allow a natural light and a sense of openness to emanate throughout the space.
Photography by Angus Martin DROPBOX
Architect: Arkhefield Location: Hunters Hill, Sydney, NSW Completion date: August 2013 Gross floor area [m2]: 334m2 Excluding 180m2 driveway / 45m2 external paving Excluding landscaping (417m2) Site area: 900m2 Arkhefield arkhefield.com.auabc
Design Products
Accessories

Art that changes your experience of place

  Unlike canvas art, or even sculptures where spatial destiny can be of little importance, place is a priority in the creative process of site-specific art and installations. The work is always in play, to varying degrees, with the people who enter the space. And like architecture, such art is very much about human interaction – to be engaged with. Working with and adapting a space to serve a new function, the two disciplines seem to cross at more than one point. Becoming more widespread, even sought-after by architects and the public alike, site-specific art shows a shift in how we're interacting with our urban spaces. Walking around our cities, we experience artworks like this on a regular basis, such as major sculptures by metal artists KORBAN/FLAUBERT or the wonderful guerrilla-style wool installations by Suki. Some are more temporary, such as the bold, saturated painted works by Emma Coulter, or the gritty tape art by Klara (both that you can see in action at Melbourne Indesign in August) – which adds a level of timeliness to the experience. We’re interested in this spatial-driven art and the creators behind it: what are the motives for making art within a landscape rather than for a white wall? And how do these works play into our lives? We spoke with Emma Coulter, KORBAN/FLAUBERT, Klara and Suki to find out.
  spatial-deconstruction-no-1_emma-coulter_2014 Emma Coulter
"...I’m exploring the boundaries between painting and the built environment through a series of spatial works, which involves the manipulation of two and three dimensional surfaces. Each new spatial project is about responding directly to the site; a unique opportunity to respond to the inherent characteristics, and existing constraints."
Read the full interview with Emma here
  klara1 Klaras site specific work for Vodafone event curated by Alleycat Creative Klara
"There’s a romantic connection between [site and work] that heavily resonates with me and hopefully the viewer also. I’m all about making ideas a reality, thoughts become things. To see a site and have intentions of developing on it and creating something new excites me."
Read the full interview with Klara here
  korbanflaubert3 KORBAN/FLAUBERT
"There is a physical response to the perception of movement in sculpture. A sense of physical involvement and unwilled mirroring or imitation (motor simulation)."
Read the full interview with KORBAN/FLAUBERT here
  suki2 Suki's site specific work for Space & Co refurb curated by Alleycat Creative Suki
"I like the idea of art working with and adding to the surroundings, it draws you into the environment and helps you to appreciate the quiet beauty of the landscape."
Read the full interview with Suki here
 

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Accessories

Site-Specific Art: Emma Coulter

  How do you approach your projects? Do you find a site and see it as a potential place to work with, or do you have an idea and search for a space? I am currently undertaking my Masters at VCA to further investigate enquiries into spatial practice, which has enabled me to experiment and push the limits of my painting practice into new dimensions. Through my practice I’m exploring the boundaries between painting and the built environment through a series of spatial works, which involves the manipulation of two and three dimensional surfaces. Each new spatial project is about responding directly to the site; a unique opportunity to respond to the inherent characteristics, and existing constraints. Through painting I reconstruct the space; deconstructing what exists, drawing out important aspects, whilst reducing others; altering spatial encounters and the perception of these; reinterpreting the outcome through adaptation. Embedded in the site specific work is the language of my practice. Predominantly I’m working with hard edge geometry and my hue and chroma choice is very deliberate. Working from a range of set colours that I have refined over time, the adjacency, proportion and placement of hues most often determines how the outcome of the work is perceived. The colour relationships exist in a metaphysical space, resonating their own intangible sensibilities. I am always thinking about ways to engage with the space around me; interesting unused buildings, vacant shopfronts… empty transitory spaces…disused stairwells; old and new, I’m not discriminatory, space is space and it all excites me as an opportunity to be reinvented.   spatial-deconstruction-no-6_emma-coulter_2014 What interests you about art that is built into a landscape? I think for a long time I kept my practices quite separate; having a background in both interior architecture and painting, they each had their own parallel trajectories, but recently I started exploring this idea of something that exists between painting and space. The idea manifested itself last year with my exhibition, ‘transposition’ at pieces of eight gallery in Melbourne CBD. The unique double height circular façade presented an opportunity to develop works specifically for the space, and so began this journey of exploring the area between the built environment and painting. Can you tell us a little bit about how the viewer plays into your art? My spatial installations have a relationship to the body as they are human scale, and they are also about the phenomenological experience of space, so engagement with the viewer is an important aspect of the work. The participation takes the work to a whole new level. And whilst precision is a critical part of the work, I don’t see the work as being precious. I invite the users to inhabit my installations. Often people tell me that they’d like, ‘to sit in the corner’ and experience the work, and if they do, that’s ok with me.   emma-coulter-3-2 What is most challenging about your kind of art and how do you combat that? The biggest challenge is the tight time constraints involved for installation; decisions need to be made quickly, and the creative process is organic. Whilst I typically have an initial idea about how I might respond to a space that can change on site, in the making of the work. The process is very much a large component of the work and the physical testing of ideas can change the final outcome. I guess the only real way to deal with that challenge it to be flexible in the approach to the work. Understand that it may take more time planned, or that if something doesn’t work it will need to be readdressed and reworked. The only way to get the best outcome is to have this adaptive approach. Otherwise, you have to be happy to settle for a less resolved solution, which doesn’t really fit with my expectations. What is most rewarding? Audience engagement with the work is really rewarding. There is also something really satisfying for me in this process of making the work; that is the intuitive aspect of responding to space, and the rationale of applying logic and shifting a white empty shell into a sublime fourth dimension.  
Read our Design Hunter Q + A with Emma See Emma's site-specific installation for Melbourne Indesign , 22-23 August. Her exhibition 'Threshold' will run from September 5-27 at Five Walls in Footscray. Emma Coulter emmacoulter.com.au  

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SITE-SPECIFIC ART: Klara

  How do you approach your projects? Do you find a site and see it as a potential place to work with, or do you have an idea and search for a space? It can work both ways. The further I delve into my practice the more site-specific work I seem to be creating. I started putting my work on the streets, regardless of space or placement. So the process would begin with the work, then placement would follow. The more I did, the more I understood the relationship between work and the site. Now I prefer to be quite site specific, beginning with the site, it will scream an idea to me and I have to make it happen. Make it a reality. There's always potential in any site, you just need to create or find it. What interests you about art that is built into a landscape? The relationship between site and work. There's a romantic connection between the two that heavily resonates with me and hopefully the viewer also. I'm all about making ideas a reality, thoughts become things. To see a site and have intentions of developing on it and creating something new excites me. I can have these ideas or thoughts constantly, but actually making it happen interests me. Making my visions a reality.   klara3   Can you tell us a little bit about how the viewer plays into your art? Depending on the work, the viewer can play a large or small role. Some messages are strong and I want them to be heard, some not so important, more personal even and to me the viewer doesn’t even come into it, I'm doing it for my own sake and sanity. So I guess it depends on the work and/or it's message/concept. What is most challenging about your kind of art and how do you combat that? I love the challenge. I try to challenge myself with all my work. Whether through design, process and/or installation. Generally the logistical side of installation is the most challenging, but this is what I love, it's so rewarding when you overcome the challenge. What is most rewarding? Apart from overcoming the challenge... All of it. I wouldn't do it if I didn't find the whole process rewarding. The creative process, making an idea become a reality, overcoming challenges and logistics, whether small or large, messing up or making 'happy' mistakes, enjoying the final product/work. It all means so much to me, every part played.  
Klara's work will be showing at Melbourne Indesign - 22-23 August. Klara thisisklara.com Curated and managed by Street Art Consultancy - Alleycat Creative alleycatcreative.com.au  

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Accessories

SITE-SPECIFIC ART: Suki

  How do you approach your projects? Do you find a site and see it as a potential place to work with, or do you have an idea and search for a space? A bit of both, sometimes I see a spot that needs something and other times I have an idea that I need to get out of my head and then I search for a place. What interests you about art that is built into a landscape? I like the idea of art working with and adding to the surroundings, it draws you into the environment and helps you to appreciate the quiet beauty of the landscape. Can you tell us a little bit about how the viewer plays into your art? I like changing and adding to the environment to emphasise the beauty there is in the world and I do it to inspire people and make their days a little brighter. What is most challenging about your kind of art and how do you combat that? Time is probably the most challenging aspect in my creative pursuits but I try to remember there are 24 usable hours in a day so I do my best to make the most of every minute. What is most rewarding? When you stand back and see the finished piece and how it fits beautifully into the surroundings. And when you see that something you have created makes a positive difference to someone's day. Anything else noteworthy to add? My creative pursuits are many and varied, I'm a passionate printmaker, paper, textile and yarn artist and spend my days designing and creating. I love learning and exploring old techniques and skills and using them to express contemporary ideas, feelings and themes.
  Curated and managed by Street Art Consultancy - Alleycat Creative alleycatcreative.com  

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Accessories

SITE-SPECIFIC ART: KORBAN/FLAUBERT

Volatile and Involute featured above How do you approach your projects? Do you find a site and see it as a potential place to work with, or do you have an idea and search for a space? Our site specific work tends to be commissioned, as a part of an architectural project. We develop sculpture for architectural interiors and external public spaces. We tend to treat these spaces as landscapes as much as real landscapes. The surrounds. What are you working on and what excites you about a project that's built into a landscape? Currently we are working on a massive screen sculpture wrapping across the front of a project on New South head Road in Rushcutters Bay. This project is a great opportunity to work with a fast kinetic traffic dynamic, we’re building into a massive roaring unidirectional landscape, very exciting. Other pieces seek to work against the landscape they are embedded into, to create a compelling moment by contrast. Sydney sites often conceal intriguing hidden stories. For example we have worked on a few sites where the work can tell the story of Sydney’s shifting waterfront edge, nature and development, reclamation and instability. korbanflaubert2 Unison and in the KORBAN/FLAUBERT workshop Can you tell us a little bit about how the viewer plays into your art? There is a physical response to the perception of movement in sculpture. A sense of physical involvement and unwilled mirroring or imitation (motor simulation). We have recently created our own installation space above our workshop to explore this idea. We are using a travelling line to describe movement in a moment that explores the tension between instability and equilibrium. The lines also trace an elastic kind of volume in outline, an outline which expands and contracts as you walk around it. For the last few years we have explored slow, centralized lines. This year we have been working on a series of maquettes and larger pieces that look at the speed and intensity of compressed fast lines. Our studio installation space lets us experiment and experience. What is most challenging about your kind of art and how do you combat that? We love the ductility and lustre of metal. Janos has spent 20 years wrangling metal: testing and manipulating it. He has developed pretty amazing technical skills but metal is always a challenge. The stresses in metal can be like heightened stresses in a living human or animal body: creases, muscles, fluidity. Metal can express emotion this way too. The energy and motion of something animal. Contained energy, ready to spring or run or attack or recoil. Anything else noteworthy to add? Visitors have commented that workshop space becomes an installation space in itself. The action of the manipulation and work laid bare becomes an experience in itself. The close connection between the workshop and the studio gallery space we have found to be critical in moving forward with the theme. Our setup can be considered a bit hermetic, but being control freaks we like it like that. These smaller works in our space then inform our larger commissioned work.  
KORBAN/FLAUBERT korbanflaubert.com.au  abc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Accessories

Perfect match for the heart of the home: Fisher & Paykel

  Now that kitchens are the heart of the home and are required to merge elegantly with living areas, the busiest and perhaps most practical room has to look at least as good the rest of the house. Beautiful, streamlined appliances are integral to the contemporary aesthetic which most seamlessly blends the practicalities of the kitchen with desirable design elements of living spaces.   CI302DTB2-CG302DNGGB1_Feature_291_CMYK Consumers want to invest in appliances which will stand the test of time and taste in both performance and appearance. Fisher & Paykel’s ‘designed to match’ range of ovens, cooktops, refrigerators and dishwashers are timeless and unlikely to ‘date’ while their manufacture from top-quality materials ensures their all-round longevity. Kitchen appliances share the same materials and finishes, the same details in handles or dials and exactly the same proportions. Materials such as black Stopsol glass, brushed or polished stainless steel and anodised aluminium maintain the standards for durability and desirability. Details such as machined stainless steel dials and edge-lit LED controls are easy on the eye and easy to use. CI905DTB2-CG451DNGGB1_Feature_308_CMYK Appliances are deliberately designed to line up with each other to create a sleek look. Designers love the consistent product sizes which make appliance lines fit or echo kitchen cabinetry. This is true for all kitchen products including smaller DishDrawer™ dishwashers and CoolDrawer™ multi-temperature fridges which can be distributed around the kitchen (or home) and are more ergonomic and economical. Fisher & Paykel’s ‘designed to match’ approach has been recognised internationally, most recently by German-based Red Dot Awards for Fisher & Paykel’s 60 cm oven and its mix-and-match Gas-on-Glass and Induction cooktops. These offer home-chefs the chance to configure their choice of gas and induction - all with stylish minimalism. Fisher & Paykel fisherpaykel.comabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q + A: Emma Coulter

Where you are from/live: I was born in Northern Ireland, and grew up in Queensland. I relocated to Melbourne seven years ago. Melbourne is the place where I belong now, but Queensland and Ireland will always be home as well. What you do: I’m a visual artist, and my practice is concerned with the phenomenological experience of space and spatial relationships, executed through the manipulation of two dimensional and three dimensional surfaces. How did you get into this practice? I have a hybrid background in interior architecture and painting; having straddled both fields for quite some time, I had a burning desire to explore the relationship between painting and space. Your latest project/s: I have a busy few months ahead of me, with up and coming projects. These include an installation for the galleria space at Melbourne Indesign, a solo exhibition, ‘threshold’ at Five Walls Projects, as well as spatial installations for group exhibitions, ‘parking lot’ at VCA, and the Windsor prize, situated in the Windsor Hotel in the Melbourne CBD. What excites you about these projects? Each project is a unique opportunity to respond to the inherent characteristics, and constraints of the site, exploring this connection between painting and the built environment. Through the practice of painting, these spaces will be deconstructed and reassembled; engaging the viewer in an altered experience of space and challenged spatial relationships. Three people that inspire/excite you: 1) My Dad; intelligent, kind, driven. It’s a bit soppy, but most things I know I learnt from him. 2) Local business woman Melanie Katsalidis, a talented creative herself, she runs pieces of eight gallery, and channels her passion into creating opportunities for others. 3) Artists – everywhere. Too many to mention... you know who you are.    

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I had a burning desire to explore the relationship

between painting and space.

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What is your favourite… Residential space: I believe in liveable domestic interiors; well designed to facilitate easy living, low maintenance and natural daylight. I was fortunate enough to spend a night in the Dononvan Hill Z House recently. That was pretty special. I wouldn’t mind living there… Commercial space: Allens Linklater workplace at 101 Collins in Melbourne that I designed whilst working at BVN Donovan Hill a few years ago. The whole client floor is a gallery space, and it is connected by a vertical gallery and interconnecting stair. Decorative product: My Muji, ‘city in a bag’ collections; I have New York + Berlin mixed up! The perfect hybrid city!! Functional product: My Opinel knife a friend bought me recently. Every girl needs a good practical knife. Handmade good: Drawings from my six year old niece; she’s quite prolific and talented I must say. These gems arrive in the post for me from time to time. Mass-produced good: My iphone, it’s not very original, but I can’t live without it. Item in your studio: My painting jeans, saviour to my wardrobe… otherwise I would have paint on everything I own! Time of day to work/play: So much depends on deadlines; the best thing about being an artist is being able to be flexible with your schedule. There are times when working through the night is required, but there’s no alarm clock in the morning. I can normally sleep in if I want to. Meal: Home cooked anything. I must be getting old, when I say I’d rather eat a good home cooked meal than eat out! I’m also lucky that my partner is a pretty mean cook... Restaurant/ Cafe: We are spoilt for choice in Melbourne, but South of Johnston is a favourite for a casual breakfast. Drink: I love a glass of good red vino. Bar: The Supper Club is always a favourite. Joe's Shoe Store, in Northcote is always good too. Historical figure: Louise Bourgeois has always been an idol, Eva Hesse too. Vice: Chocolate… daily (always). Virtue: Honesty… there’s not enough of it. What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? To me a ‘design hunter’ is someone who considers and takes care and rigour in the construction of their surroundings, regardless of age or income.  
Emma's exhibition 'Threshold' will run from September 5-27 at Five Walls in Footscray Her installation at Melbourne Indesign: The Event can be seen on 22-23 August in Melbourne. Register here or show up on the day Emma Coulter emmacoulter.com.au  

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