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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Design Accessories

The Making of Muglexia, A ‘Dyslexic Object’ by Henry Franks

  The playful name 'Muglexia' resonates beautifully with a product range that celebrates a human condition. The set of mugs, also quirky in form, are part of Henry Franks' larger range of everyday objects that are altered by - improved by - dyslexia.   Muglexia-studio-2-web-res   Rather than for aesthetics - or the sake of humour - the mug is inverted to speak to this condition and, importantly, actually improve it. Through design, Franks has created "products with a higher emotional function", illustrating the dyslexic symptom inversion, and at the same time, be especially practical; they fall over less easily, balance well in the hand and keep drinks hotter for longer.   Muglexia-in-kitchen-3-web-res   On top of that, his range encourages us to re-engage with ordinary objects. And while we couldn't have access to the inner-workings of Henry's brain, there is clearly a fascinating process here that we are lucky enough to see part of through images. Thank you Henry.   Muglexia-prototypes-1 Tuning various wooden shapes to get correct mug mould shape before starting the slip casting process   Muglexia-prototypes-2 Plaster mould making for slip casting   Muglexia-prototypes-3 Cleaning up the prototype moulds before casting   Muglexia-prototypes-4 Close up of the flood slip casting process. The plaster sucks the water out of the slip to form the wall of the mug   Muglexia-prototypes-5 Slip casting the handles   Muglexia-prototypes-6 Pouring out the excess slip once you have the desired wall thickness   Muglexia-Factory-Moulds Professionally made industry standard moulds now used after my various prototype moulds   Muglexia-studio-Square-web-res Muglexia-studio-3-web-res Muglexia-in-kitchen-2-web-res Muglexia-in-kitchen-4-web-res Muglexia-in-kitchen-5-web-res   Henry Franks henryfranks.net   abc
Architecture
Homes

Theatrical Apartment in Little India

  Home, for Colin and Joy Seah, needed to be a retreat from the city and a very busy work schedule. Jointly running the spatial-design practice, Ministry of Design (MOD), the Seahs wanted to be in the heart of the city, yet able to withdraw to find peace and renewal. Their apartment provides intimate settings for simple daily routines, elevating living to an art form.   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living   Like much of the population, the Seahs grew up on a housing estate outside the CBD. As a young couple buying their first home, they preferred to be close to their office in Chinatown and the activity of the city. The government had recently opened up plots of land in Little India, building several new apartment blocks. As the historic and cultural centre of Singapore’s Indian community, Little India is full of local businesses, temples and shophouses. They co-exist to create a wonderfully diverse and colourful neighbourhood. Seah and his wife Joy were drawn to this character and purchased a top floor apartment on Klang Lane. Changing the standard interior to suit their needs was an opportunity for Seah to test highly conceptual ideas within a residential brief.   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living   When Colin set up MOD, his avant-garde design quickly attracted significant commissions, most notably the Sho U restaurant and New Majestic Hotel in Singapore. Both went on to receive international acclaim. “We have an ethos to question, disturb and re-define. So style and issues of that nature come very secondary to issues of ‘How do we re-invent typology? How do we re-contextualise something?”   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living   Theatre became the conceptual basis from which the interior could be re-created at will. They demolished as many walls as possible and ground back surface finishes to reveal the concrete shell. This neutral background is the stage against which changing settings and atmospheres play out. This allows for not only daily cycles, but also for long-term evolution in personal tastes and collections. Much of the character of the apartment is created by fabric, lighting and objects, which can be completely and easily substituted without expensive structural work. The theatre metaphor also offered a way to dramatise the experience of everyday rituals. As a young couple buying their first home, everything felt so new and exciting. “I felt life was so precious, there was a desire to celebrate every single gesture whether it was just the banal act of cleansing, sleeping, lounging, cooking or whatever.” Moody lighting, dark colours and theatrical thresholds serve to heighten this experience.   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living   Entry from the lift lobby is on to a raised catwalk that travels down one side of the living space. This zone has the greatest flexibility and has been re-arranged many times. From the catwalk, the kitchen can be accessed to the right, to the left, a meandering route takes you through the dining space and towards the bedroom. Finding the bedroom, however, is another matter. Like backstage in a theatre, heavy curtaining obscures what lies behind. “The funniest thing,” says Seah, “is people who have no trouble finding their way around a busy city, get lost in the bedchamber. They forget which curtain they came through, they try and walk out through the wardrobe!”   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living   Throughout the living zone, ceiling hooks allow for lighting, art objects and screens seem to be located almost anywhere. Electrical cables hang down as sculptural objects. Most of the furniture is custom- made and modular so it can be moved to create a different setting for events such as a birthday parties. As a retreat in which to relax and unwind, a palette of rich, earthy colours was selected. Curtaining is used extensively, softening edges, filtering sound and light. The fabrics can be pulled across openings to act as room dividers. Around the perimeter they conceal shelving and act as a textural backdrop. They veil, screen and mystify, creating a subtle spatial layering. The bedroom is completely cloaked in black fabric, creating an incredibly dramatic atmosphere. “It is the most sacred, the most private space,” says Seah. “Once you close all the curtains behind you it is literally just a bedchamber – no views to the outside, it is like a cocoon.”   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living   The apartment is just over 80m2, yet it seems much bigger. A visual depth is created by vertical elements. Catwalks and full-height mirrors give unexpected views. All these devices combine to create a sense of disorientation, blurring edges and increasing the perception of size. Seah says friends often over estimate the floor area by 25-50%. Furniture and sculptural lights were designed by MOD and made specifically for the apartment. Objects have been collected over time and find a natural home within the space, rather than from any orchestrated approach. Seah loves finding objects around the city and in the markets. An abandoned sign creates a beautiful ready-made art work. Its cracking paint and pictograms look so poetic, yet ironically it reads ‘Warning. Don’t park here. The Management.’ Fallen tree branches were hauled back to the apartment and installed for their beautiful sculptural qualities. “It’s a little bit like a work in progress. If things around them don’t work anymore, we re-adjust them and fine tune.” The Klang Lane apartment is a place of contrast – restrained yet luscious, industrial yet romantic, inwardly oriented yet set in the city – a stage against which the art and beauty of life can be expressed.   SEAH apartment by Ministry of Design on Habitus Living
Photography by Simon Devitt   DROPBOX
Architect: Ministry of Design Design Architect : Colin Seah Builder: Interior Composite Lighting: Custom-made by MOD Bathroom Fixtures : Sim Siang Choon Ministry of Design modonline.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Design that Captures the Essence of Thai Street Eating

  Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving   Q: Tell us a little about Pok Pok Jnr and its place within the local hospitality scene. Pok pok - an already established restaurant in the docklands - it's intention - to bring Thai street food from Bangkok to Melbourne. The new Pok Pok Junior restaurant is nestled within a variety of other cafés and restaurants in the new St James place plaza at 555 Bourke street. In my opinion it serves the best cafe in the strip in terms of taste and interiors. An absolute need for anyone to eat a meal there. The flavours and menu options are worth the trip - soon to be open for night trade and serving liquor.   Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving   Q: Tell us about the brief for the project and G.A.B.B.E.'s conceptual and design response. Well the clients came to us with the hope to create a sister restaurant to it's existing and already established Pok Pok cafe in the docklands... for this new restaurant, which they decided to call Pok Pok Junior, they specifically asked to create a place that was reflective of their restaurant concept - bringing Bangkok's Thai street food to Melbourne. They used words such as raw, rustic, relaxed and inviting. From this I decided I want to bring in inspirations and elements from the local markets and stores in Thailand. I looked at areas in Bangkok for e.g the Chatachuk Market stalls and authentic side street food stalls to draw my main inspiration and to tell the story.   Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving   Q: I really like the extension of flooring onto the walls – tell me a little about this? We wanted to make an impact on entry however nothing too empowering. We decided on a hexagonal tile pattern as a visual element to create a clear distinct between the entry zone and the rest of the patron area. To further dramatise this area we created a Lower ceiling bulkhead and through the combination of this lower height and the wrapping of the tiles - floor wall and ceiling- we were successful in achieving this drama.   Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving   Q: Can you expand on the experience you were looking to create within the restaurant and how you achieved this? I didn't want to recreate a Thai market place, yet rather combine elements from these local signatures and reference them throughout the design. I specifically focused on how the locals of Thailand gather on plastic or wooden stools on the street side to eat their quick meals which was a focal image I wanted to create in the cluster of the stools by the large shelter seating units I looked at common materiality within Thailand - hessian; which is often used as fabrics for walls in Bangkok markets as well as the woven plastic seen in their large market bags or fans - I used a woven vinyl Bolon material to represent this.   Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving   Q: Can you highlight some of the stand-out specs within the fit-out? I was really excited about the custom central seating unit. Bright pink Missoni Bolon (representative of local plastic fabrics) was used to wrap the internal of one side and hessian used to clad and wrap the internal of the adjacent side. A comforting and intimate booth shelter where great detailing and design meets elements of the 'raw and rustic'. STM projects (who built Pok Pok Jnr) worked tirelessly with us to make sure that our design was met with perfection as to the specifications. We were thrilled with the outcome. The custom light fitting pendants which the G.A.B.B.E team actually hand spray painted and hung (two baskets tied together one upside down) one evening, the intent was to reference the baskets used in the markets to catch and dry local fish and other delicacies. One visual element we wanted to appropriate was a street fruit stall; a Thai lady or man standing behind piles of rambutan, limes, star fruit, durian, mangos and lychees. As you enter Pok Pok Jnr you are immediately faced with trays filled to the brim with fruit, spices and vegetables the cooks use in their daily dishes.   Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving Pok Pok Junior Photography Amelia Stanwix webres HabitusLiving  
Photography by Amelia Stanwix DROPBOX Interior Architect: G.A.B.B.E gabbe.com.au Builder: STM PROJECTS stmprojects.com.au Pok pok Junior pokpok.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q + A: Nicolas Chiew

  Where you are from/live: Northern Beaches (NSW) What you do: Co-founder of Colonial Trading Company. We are dedicated to ethically procuring exotic recycled hardwoods for use in quality projects. We work collaboratively with designers to assist in bringing their designs to realisation. When did you first know you wanted to be a... timber guy?! After graduating from university I spend a number of years working as a consulting engineer in the building industry. It was at this time that I discovered that what really gave me a kick was not so much my technical work as a professional engineer but seeing great design being turned from concept to reality. Intrinsic to this process was the selection to fantastic materials. For me, recycled timber is one of those materials that proudly wears the scars of its life; scars that inevitably contribute significantly to the finished project. It only took me another 15 years, and a foray into owning a telecommunications consulting company, for me to realise my passion! Your latest project: Michael Geraghty (my business partner) located an enormous stockpile of railway sleepers from the historic Kuala Lumpur – Ipoh line in Malaysia. These sleepers are up to 100 years old and transforming them into bespoke banquette seating, bench tops and wonderfully rustic wall cladding has been an exercise in patience, persistence and passion. Thankfully we have some wonderful designers and artisans working with us. Where you find inspiration: Everywhere! It can be found flicking though magazines over breakfast, staying in a stylish boutique hotel, appreciating the creative fitout of a restaurant whilst dining with friends, checking out Instagram… Three people that inspire/excite you: 1) Brooke: the stunning woman I’m lucky enough to spend my life with 2) James Dyson: he made vacuum cleaners desirable! 3) Sibella Court: so many exciting, creative projects What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Bike: The collaboration between Victoire cycles and Berlutti. Team an iconic shoemaker/leather goods house with a bespoke bicycle manufacturer and the resulting product is eye wateringly elegant. Unfortunately it has the dreaded “Price on Request” price tag. Car: Mercedes Benz 300SL Gull wing- nothing more needs to be said Chair model: Featherstone B230 Contour Chair Residential space: Sagaponack by Bates Masi Architects Commercial space: Hotel-Hotel in Canberra. A sustainable development that combines amazing design & materials with support for the community of artists and businesses within its precinct. The use of recycled timber in the foyer is just stunning. Decorative product: Hublot Classic Fusion Skeleton Tourbillon King Gold watch. Quite a mouthful but one seriously beautiful watch… that I don’t own Functional product: My Ponte Vecchio Lusso coffee machine. It possesses the charm of an old Italian lever machine and can pump out a great espresso. Unfortunately it also boasts the reliability of an old Italian car, which means that my twin bro Luke currently has it in pieces whilst he attempts to fix it. Handmade good: My Feit vertical wallet. It’s hand moulded by Florentine craftsman from a single piece of leather and over the last 2 years it has aged beautifully. Mass-produced good: Reidel “O” Series glasses. Simple, elegant and oh so good at holding tasty beverages Item in your studio: My Seventy Eight Percent messenger bag. It holds everything I need to be fully functional at all times. Time of day to work/play: Early morning for working & afternoons for play. Preferably a long lunch that has stretched generously into the afternoon Meal: Authentic pizza with a bottle of quality red wine Restaurant: My 2 favourites remain Porteno for a fun night in the city with friends and Mexicano for a trusty local meal of fish tacos and perhaps a sneaky mid-week tequila Drink: hmmm… Clonakilla Shiraz Viognier is a favourite that I’ve been collecting for the last 10 years when it was an emerging winery. I do love a good Pinot Noir as well… my favourite right now is a tasty organic pinot from Kawarau Estate in Central Otago… I’m also partial to a great Chablis, or a Barolo… let’s just say that I love wine! Bar: At home with friends and family Piece of technology: My Macbook Pro. It’s with me when I’m at the timber yard checking on stock and when we’re presenting to architects or interior designers. Historical figure: Jesus Fictional character: Reepicheep from the Chronicles of Narnia (from my childhood readings of C.S. Lewis). A mouse possessing courage, impeccable manners, eloquence and a sense of adventure. Vice: Wine… and food Virtue: Misfit Aid. During a recent hiatus I spent a year volunteering with this merry band of change agents. I’m still actively involved with this bunch of misfits! Please check them out and support them, misfitaid.org What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? A Design Hunter is inquisitive and has finely tuned peripheral senses that spot unique items even when they’re not actively looking! Not only do they love the aesthetic of items, they also actively seek the history and the stories behind them. Whether it be researching the designer or investigating the history and origins of materials, a Design Hunter appreciates items for how they came to be available to fall into their greedy little hands. See Nic's opinion piece on aged timber here Colonial Trading Company colonialtrading.com.au  abc
Design Stories
Design Hunters
Conversations

Why trends, and being trendy, is not a good thing

  I heard from trend forecaster Lidewij Edelkoort recently, who was in Australia to speak at an event. A group of around 25 design media editors were huddled around a table in a tiny room at the Park Hyatt, hanging on to her every word. Now these are seasoned design editors, not your average mum and dad viewer of The Block. They themselves dish out advice and opinion on trends. So why does someone like Li Edelkoort have such pull over them (us)?   minton The Minton, Singapore. Photography by Marc Tey   Trends is not a word I like to use. It sounds empty and shallow and impermanent. I don’t want to hear that ‘black is the new black’. But, I am very interested in collective movements – and what they represent. It’s a little like that scene in The Devil Wears Prada where Meryl Streep defends the fashion industry (which Anne Hathaway’s character has just derided), pointing out its influences, contextualising it and drawing a path from where a ‘trend’ might start and trickle down to a cerulean jumper in a clearance bin. That is the kind of conversation I’m interested in having about ‘trends’ in design. One that considers the social, psychological, emotional and cultural implications of a product, or a design strategy – not just what it looks like. For example, the explosion of vertical gardens in multi-residential developments is not just something that looks good, but also has positive impact on residents' health and well-being as well as general onlookers; because developers are recognising that these are important considerations in people living environments. This gives it much more meaning, relevance and longevity. ‘Trends’ become movements, referring to complex artistic philosophies rather than simplistic observations of consumption. oliv The Oliv, Singapore. Photography by Edward Hendricks Li Edelkoort takes this approach in her forecasting. The colours, forms and finishes she talked about were wrapped in the idea that we are moving towards that which makes us feel safe. For the first time in a long time, she says, there is not a single aggressive ‘story’ (see how much more depth the word ‘story’ has over trend?). That’s why we are drawn to her ideas. Trends, themes, tendencies are a reality. But let’s not be cheap and throwaway in our words, or our discussions about them. Let’s talk about them in an intelligent, contextual way, and with a long view. I’ll always be willing to take part in that. central-park Central Park, Sydney. Photography by Murray Fredericks Lidewij Edelkoort edelkoort.comabc
Design Products
Habitus Loves

Habitus Loves… WARP AND WEFT

  HERO KNITTED by Ariel Zuckerman Knitted is a series of light fixtures born of a collaboration between Israeli designers Ariel Zuckerman and Oded Sapir. The pair worked with designer Adva Bruner to develop a 3-dimensional skeletal structure made from wool threads in fixed patterns.
bloom BLOOM by Jun Murakoshi Bloom is a collection of vases and bowls that features embroidery and blown glass. “Glass and thread bowl are made of these different materials that have same impression,” explains Japanese designer Murakoshi. “The narrow lines create unlimited patterns; and the transparency and exquisiteness that each materials posses, foil each other.”
  bernotat Radiolaria { by Bernotat&Co } from Asteroids on Vimeo. RADIOLARIA by Bernotat & Co Bernotat & Co recently presented their installation Mikro/Makrokosmos featuring Radiolaria during Salone del Mobile in Milan. Inspired by microscopic organisms, Radiolaria is a collection of lamps composed of a 3D-knitted textile with glow-in-the-dark properties.
Tablenew SU RANGE By Tom Fereday Su Range by Tom Fereday, (a past recipient of the Space + Moooi Residency), is a modular, stacking outdoor table and seating range developed from recycled plastic fabric tape woven around a steel frame. The Sydney designer’s range was developed with Kenneth Cobonpue of design company, Hive.
  trifula TRIFULA By Eugenia Minerva The Trifula chair by Italian designer Eugenia Minerva was inspired by a study on the weaving process used by skilled artisans to form dense fish traps in the South of Italy. The prototype - exhibited at Salon Satellite in Milan - showcases the ancient tradition of weaving bullrush and wires to form dense structures. “Trifula also embodies a dialogue between the handmade and industrial production and is a tribute to the disappearance of ancient traditions as well as to the use of natural materials,” adds Minerva.
  NEST NEST by Edward Linacre and Viktor Legin Made from Bamboo and assembled without the use of glues or adhesives, the Nest pendant lighting references the natural honeycomb architecture of a bee’s nest, the interlocking segments creating a lightweight yet robust construction.
  green-chair WOVEN EASY CHAIR B by Alexander Mueller The Woven Easy Series by Austrian designer Alexander Mueller explores the designers obsession with the dynamics created by curves, kinks or twists in straight lines. “Woven Easy Chair B uses straight lines and angular planes in order to create a sense of movement within the chair’s form,” explains Mueller. The geometric seating pattern is created by weaving waxed cord around an ash timber structure, drawing on the deconstruction of traditional weaving methods and examining the relation between frame, cord and end user.
  acoo1 TRINITY by Adam Cornish Trinity is a series of three bowls designed by Adam Cornish for Alessi. The Melbourne designer’s prototype caught the attention of the famous Italian brand who launched the bowls at the same time as their partnership with Georg Jensen Australia. The bowls are created from sheet steel that undergoes a laser-perforating process before being twisted and fused to form an elegant woven structure. Cornish’s design was inspired by the concentric, spiral structure of the Nautilus shell.  abc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Design Accessories

In Oliver’s Workshop

  Wood Melbourne Habitus Living Wood Melbourne Habitus Living

\ I am finishing off the top a kiri spout, to get to this stage I have already made timber to size, routed out the section to fit the brass component and mitre cut to join up perfectly. Then I drill the bottom of the spout where the aerator comes out. //

Wood Melbourne Habitus Living

Wood Melbourne Habitus Living

Wood Melbourne Habitus Living

\ So the basic shape has been made and it all fits together, this is the stage where I find out if it’s perfect enough to keep, and go through to the next phase. //

Wood Melbourne Habitus Living

Wood Melbourne Habitus Living

\

I finish the timber with steel wool which gives the it an unbelievably smooth finish, so I work down from 80 grit-120 grit-180 grit-240 grit then steel wool(grit is the grade or roughness of the sand paper). Once I am happy with the feel of it I glue the 3 pieces together with brass component hidden away inside. After the glue has dried I sand back any of the exposed glue and hit it again with the steel wool. Then I seal it up 4 times with a light sand between coats. It’s a slow labour of love. //

Wood Melbourne Habitus Living Wood Melbourne Habitus Living Wood Melbourne Habitus Living   Oliver explains further: "In the top image, I’m setting the drill press. I use the drill press to drill the hole on the bottom of the spouts to allow the aerator to come out of the timber it is very important that the hole is as close to the same size as the aerator as possible. To do this I need to make sure the drill bit is set properly and to the right depth. If it is all set right it will make a perfectly clean hole, if not it can catch on the timber and ruin the whole thing which is a real pity when I have already done so much work! I have to set up all my tools and check them regularly to make sure everything is running perfectly." "I love the way timber looks and feels, its versatility, how it ages with you and tells a story"  
Photography by Tara Pearce Styling by Stephanie Stamatis Read our Design Hunter Q + A with Oliver here Wood Melbourne woodmelbourne.comabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Expecting The Unexpected On Your Next Bathroom Renovation

You’ve been inspired; you’ve met with an architect – now it’s time for the building and construction to commence. We meet back up with homeowner Damien, his architect Feras of FGR Architects and Rogerseller’s Daniel Robertshaw. The best strategy from the guys is to expect the unexpected when it comes to building. For architectural products, I now tell my clients to leave a 10 per cent contingency. Contractors might not be able to put things together the way you intend them to, and you need to allow for that slight change. Products may become discontinued!” says Feras. But before you even get to that point, Feras offers up some other noteworthy advice, “As people go through the process and educate themselves about things, suddenly they’ll have more factors to consider that they never had before. The deliberation time results in the most delays.” So the best approach, which Damien underwent, is to have a clear idea of your aesthetics, and to leave extra wiggle room in the selection stage of the project. Rogerseller’s Daniel adds, “I think as the project starts construction, as the frame of the house goes up, you’d want to have those big decisions locked down. This allows you to be free to deal with the inevitable queries that will come up as the builders undertake works, knowing the aesthetic is locked away, timeframes are in check, and budget costs won’t blowout.” Another key consideration for this critical part of the project is to get the help you need from the expert. This is where Rogerseller can come in. Through an extensive network of design professionals, the team at Rogerseller can help smooth over any unforeseen bumps. Read more of Rogerseller’s Insights series to help you through a bathroom design project. abc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
Design Accessories

Art Deco Ensuite in New Zealand

  This striking ensuite in Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand was designed to flow seamlessly from the master bedroom; the crackle wall tiles were sourced to match the vintage hues of the green and black Hemingway Diamond Deco wallpaper in the bedroom. The house has been renovated in keeping with the 1930s era of the bungalow but it is in the private space of the master bedroom and ensuite that the Art Deco aesthetic is most evident. The green, black and white palette is bold but works well in this compact bathroom, creating a precise, strong design statement.   2   Perrin & Rowe Art Deco bathroomware was selected for its classical geometric lines, complemented by the lush chrome finish of Perrin & Rowe tapware and bathroom accessories. The result is a room that echoes the glory of this distinctive period of architecture, while at the same time providing all the comforts of a modern bathroom.   3   The English Tapware Company englishtapware.com.au 1300 01 61 81abc