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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Lighting
Design Products
Accessories

3 Shapes, Multiple Combinations: Jon Goulder’s Glass Lights

  Inspired by by the master Louis Poulsen, Goulder's Glass Lights are designed specific to a production process performed by the skilled glass blowers at the Jam Factory Adelaide - where Goulder is the Creative Director of Furniture. Using three simple pieces, the lights are designed to make many shapes and colour combinations depending on the configuration.   LAMPE-007 LAMPE-COMPOSITION-002 LAMPE-COMPOSITION-001 LAMPE-017 LAMPE-DETAIL-002 94   The Glass Blowing Process IMG_3473 IMG_3484 IMG_3487 Above: Glass blowers Liam Fleming (lead) and assisted by Llewelyn Ash While currently the lights are well resolved prototypes, they're being assessed for production as we speak and in the market place by the middle of this year. Jon Goulder jongoulder.com Jam Factory jamfactory.com.au  abc
Happenings
What's On

See Australian Pop artists with their iconic Pairs: Pop to Popism

Above: David Hockney / Portrait of an artist 1972, synthetic polymer paint on canvas 213.3 x 304.8 cm. The Lewis Collection. © David Hockney No1 US Trust   Exclusive to Sydney, part of the Sydney International Art Series, Pop to popism is an exhibition that opened with much hype. For weeks prior to opening, bright yellow shipping containers were dotted around the city and we eagerly anticipated the show. And so we should have; this is a truly rich exhibition.   Roy-Lichtenstein_In-the-Car_1963 Above: Roy Lichtenstein / In the car 1963, oil and magna on canvas, 172 x 203.5 cm. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Purchased 1980. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein   Not only is Pop to popism huge, with over 200 works showing, it is unique. As well as masterpieces from the icons of Pop art - Roy Lichtenstein’s first comic-style painting Look Mickey, Andy Warhol’s Triple Elvis and David Hockney’s Portrait of an artist for example, for the first time, Australian artists, including Martin Sharp, Howard Arkley, Brett Whiteley and Maria Kozic, are showcased with their international peers. Having Australian works alongside those more famous gives depth to the exhibition, and adds another layer to the show we might have expected to see. It's exciting to see local artists in the international context they worked in, seeing the contribution they made to the Pop art movement.   Andy-Warhol_Marilyn-Monroe_1967 Above: Andy Warhol / Marilyn Monroe 1967. Silkscreen on paper. 1 of suite of 10: 91.5 x 91.5cm (each). Frederick R Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles © Andy Warhol   And while it's a lot to take in, the careful curation makes Pop to popism digestible. The show is split into decades, information about each piece is delivered clearly, and there is a Pop cafe to break it up. If you can slowly walk through the space, you'll have a well rounded overview of the developments this movement went through and the many various ways in which these artists worked to rebel against ‘high art’ and embrace the world of advertising, film stars, pop music and consumerism.   Martin-Sharp,-Tim-Lewis_Still-Life_1973 Above: Martin Sharp, Tim Lewis / Still life 1973, synthetic polymer paint on canvas 117 x 91.5 cm (sight). National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, purchased 1973 © Estate of Martin Sharp © Tim Lewis   Pop to popism shows at The Gallery of NSW 1 Nov 2014 – 1 Mar 2015 $20 adult $16 concession $14 member $10 child (5-17 years) $50 family (2 adults + up to 3 children) $30/$24 season pass $7 student (booked school group) Free for children under 5 AGNSW artgallery.nsw.gov.au   Tess Ritchieabc
Architecture
Homes

What does the home of Chef Roberto Scheriani look like?

  From the designer: The original terrace home chosen was actually next door. The one I convinced the client to buy was all about - "blue sky". On a corner allotment with typical multiple additions, the task was to create a new family home with work, living and play areas and to facilitate art. The addition needed to respect the location and the original structure but also had to introduce new areas, which would be far more fluid and flexible than the traditional period stock would normally allow.   Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156577 Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156503 Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156760   Opening walls and creating vistas internally, making connections from kitchen to living to dining to study, all to connect to the outside, was critical. A basement cellar and retreat connected the outside via an expansive portal view into the pool and blue sky beyond. A second storey addition needed to house sleeping and amenities. Both ensuite and bathroom view a light court insertion clad in red glass.   Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156691 Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156648   The lightcourt acts as the pinch point where the friction between old and new is released. It acts as relief , a point where you can appreciate the original fabric and understand that to live on, it needs new life which comes by way of the new extension. The pool and garden were integral to all - but everywhere "blue sky".   Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156323 Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156346 Undertow_Richmond_-®smg_156480   Newline Design newlinedesign.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A: SOPHEAP PICH

  Name: Sopheap Pich Where you are from/live: Phnom Penh, Cambodia What you do: Artist. I make sculptures using mainly rattan and bamboo as structures but in the last few years, incorporating other natural materials such as bees wax and sand stone When did you first know you wanted to be an artist: When I was 10 years old Your latest project: New sculptures for a solo show at Tyler Rollins Fine Art, NYC in October 2015 (Trfineart.com) Where you find inspiration: Living in Cambodia, music, films, architecture, friends Three people that inspire/excite you: Too many to list but the inspirational ones: 1) Ray Yoshida 2) Charles and Ray Eames 3) Frank Lloyd Wright   sopheap1   What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Vintage Italian bicycles from the 90’s. Datsun Roadster. Cambodia isn’t ready to accommodate such toys but I can dream Chair model: Eames Lounge Residential space: Falling Water by Frank Lloyd Wright Commercial space: Everything by SANAA Decorative product: Vintage movie posters Functional product: super glue Handmade good: vintage Kilim rug Mass-produced good: the battery Item in your studio: An axe. It’s very versatile Time of day to work/play: morning to late afternoon in the studio; evening/night outs in Phnom Penh with a few friends Meal: Sashimi and Japanese green tea, the definition of luxury Restaurant: Sonoma Oyster Bar Drink: San Pellegrino Water Bar: Metro/Rahu Piece of technology: my Mamiya 7 and Olympus OMD EM1 Historical figure: Darwin Fictional character: Mrs. Doubtfire Vice: I have to be honest - YouTube! I spend way too much time in front of it Virtue: Working to be better at showing my friends and family that I’m grateful What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you: I love design and architecture and I’m always looking for things made now and in history that can inspire the imagination  abc
Happenings
What's On

Unfold and Construct: Jewellery Exhibition

  For this series of new work Phoebe Porter combines geometric abstraction, bold colour and unexpected asymmetry to create jewellery that resonates with influences of the Bauhaus and Russian Constructivism. Porter manipulates simple geometry such as the line, circle, triangle and square and a reduced palette of primary colours using her typically restrained approach. The contrast of light and heavy line weights used in Bauhaus graphic design is referenced in pieces where solid coloured components are assembled alongside parts made from very fine stainless steel wires. The work demonstrates Porter’s sophisticated use of structure and composition to create forms where each piece is reduced to its simplest expression, embodying the precision and clarity of form that characterises her jewellery to date.   Phoebe-Porter-6_Unfold-bracelets_screenres   Porter’s deep understanding of the innate properties of her chosen materials allows her to exploit their characteristics to best perform their chosen function – the spring and fit of a clasp, rigidity and weight of a bracelet, lightness of an earring and suppleness of a necklace. As in her previous work, Porter successfully combines industrial materials and processes with the refined hand skills of a craftsperson. Each connection and fastening mechanism is clearly expressed: rivets, seams, clasps, connections and joints are celebrated and highlighted, sometimes with brightly coloured hand dyed aluminium spacers.   Phoebe-Porter-5_Construct-brooches-and-earrings_screenres   Included in the exhibition is a video work developed in collaboration with artist Sal Cooper. The video reveals the rhythm of each step in the making process and captures Porter’s patient and steady hand working with the tools and machines: moments hidden within each of the finished pieces. Porter’s decision to document and share her making process grew from her observations about the limited understanding many people have about how things are made and their fascination to learn about the making process. Through this work she seeks to highlight the true value of material things in our time of mass production and consumption. All the pieces in Unfold and Construct are designed to be worn. This is a particular challenge of jewellery: to make pieces that can stand alone as sculptural objects, yet come alive when being worn.   Phoebe-Porter-1_Construct-earrings_screenres   The exhibition will show at Bilk Gallery, Canberra, 13 February – 14 March 2015. Phoebe Porter phoebeporter.com.auabc
Architecture
Around The World
NOT HOMES

Excitement meets Relaxation: The Ultimate Design Getaway

  Designed by Agaligo Studio, the recently renovated Let’s Sea Al Fresco Resort in the heritage resort town of Huahin is a challenging elongated narrow beachfront section, with the commitment to retain the original single-level structure of the beachfront restaurant, in order to preserve the familiar beachscape. Thus, the other additional shared facilities could only expand away from the beach, while the middle section is designated for dwelling complexes.   lets1 lets8   By the context of the site, most of the resorts will succumb to the sea by the formal expression of a multi high-rise guestrooms with a view of horizon, but the architectural language of these modernist cubic living quartiers are instead orientate to omit the beach, and focus instead on the intimacy within the compound that embraces around the man-made saltwater canal. These 40 boutique guestrooms offer in the choice of either the ground level room with canal access via the private balcony of traditional Sal wood pier, or the upper level duplex room with a private moon deck to gaze at the stars.   lets11 lets7   On the interior, the room finished in an easy to dwell cool-white tone that enhances the wooden built-in components, the multi-colours fabric of the sofa, and the warm tone of the featured wall. While the impression of the expanded visual space given by the seamless fillet corners and the wall-recessed lights deliver a relax ambience for the rest of the evening. On the contrary to the conservative beachfront and the peaceful guestrooms, the impression from the road access offers a rather playful tone, with hanging plants drape from the top of a raised-level modernist concrete carcass of open lobby area, shelled solely by the series of full-height rattan panels, and together with the choices of interior wood finishing for the tropical touch. The spa facility on the upper level appears as a light house from the distance with its violet illumination at night, and together with the crimson front wall signage, it is a ‘hard-to-be-missed’ landmark when navigate back from the nearby night market.   lets10 lets5   The tempo combination of this spatial arrangement from the playful front lobby to the serene beach is of a mesmerizing impression, when only the lobby is exposed to the road, but paradoxically along with a secretive external appearance of an enclosed compound, that only to reveal itself in full glory upon arrival at the interior realm of the lobby space.   lets6 lets3   While the beach view is an obvious reason everyone after at the seaside town, but Let’s Sea rather represents those private getaway affections that people seek. The organisation of these spaces from the active lobby space, to the reserved beach behind are liken to the metaphor of our emotional journey that shift from the excitement of new discovery, that moulds into intimacy and relaxation once we settled in.   Let Us Sea letussea.com Architect // Agaligo Studio agaligo.com Lighting Design // Accent Light Studio accentlightstudio.com Images courtesy of the resort. abc
Happenings
What's On

Shifting Gear: Design, Innovation and the Australian Car

  Above: General Motors-Holden Ltd, Melbourne (manufacturer), est. 1908, Holden Hurricane coupé, concept car, 1969 designed and manufactured, 2011 restored. Designed and engineered by Don DaHarsh, Jack Hutson, Joe Schemansky and Ed Taylor, Collection of Holden Australia Ltd, Melbourne, © 2011 General Motors, Photo: Courtesy General Motors Shifting Gear will display 23 of Australia’s most iconic vehicles, including muscle cars, racing cars, performance vehicles and concept cars, alongside ephemera and memorabilia, to uncover and celebrate the most compelling moments in the history of Australian automotive design. Australian innovations such as the great Aussie ute and the Tarrant Roadster, the first petrol car produced for sale in Australia, will demonstrate the remarkable design talents of this country. The exhibition will also look to the future of the Australian automobile industry as it shifts from manufacturing to being a global contributor through specialist design knowledge. Tony Ellwood, Director, NGV, said, ‘Shifting Gear will be the first major exhibition of Australian car design and is exclusive to the NGV. As part of the NGV’s commitment to showcasing design, this exhibition will uncover how the modern automobile is far more than simply a means of transport; it is a sophisticated design object that reflects contemporary aesthetics and social values.’ Minister for Creative Industries Martin Foley MP stated, ‘Shifting Gear is an exciting showcase of the work and achievements of our creative industries – our designers and innovators – over more than a century. It celebrates the creativity and ingenuity of Australian car design, demonstrates Victoria’s strengths in this field, and tells the stories of the vehicles that have changed our lives.’ Shifting Gear: Design, Innovation and the Australian Car will be on display at The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia at Federation Square from 6 March 2015 to 12 July 2015. Open 10am-5pm, closed Mondays. Tickets on sale now from ngv.vic.gov.au Adult $15 | Concession $12 | Child $7 | Family (2 adults, 3 children) $41 abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Coogee gets a Lush Rooftop Bar

  The latest instalment in Merivale's expansive three level venue, Coogee Pavilion Rooftop is a local oasis where guests can enjoy sensational food, great company and an unrivalled view of the breathtaking Coogee shoreline. From overflowing lush greenery to mismatched Moroccan tiles, each bar possesses an entirely different aesthetic. Beautiful chairs covered in sketches of exotic birds and tables painted by local artist Mayriel Luke complete the stunning interiors.   CoogeeRooftop CoogeeRooftop2   Laidback and fuss-free, the Rooftop caters to a wide range of tastes and occasions, from post-beach snacks to cocktails at sunset. Executive Chef Jordan Toft leads the Rooftop kitchen. Inspired by his travels throughout the Eastern Mediterranean, the menu is defined by lip-smacking yet simple flavours befitting the Rooftop’s oceanfront home. Think whole baby calamari in ink vinaigrette; haloumi wrapped in grape vine leaves with lemon oil; adana - ground lamb and beef with washed onion and sumac; pork neck with sea salt and fresh dill; and kefta meatballs with warm spice and Arabic string cheese.   CoogeeRooftop5 CoogeeRooftop6   The drinks menu features a long refreshing list of summertime cocktails and sharing pitchers, alongside a beautiful selection of wine chosen by Merivale’s MS Group Sommelier Franck Moreau. Coogee Pavilion Rooftop merivale.comabc
Architecture
Homes

5 Inspiring Terrace Renovations

  Above: House House by Andrew Maynard Architects / Photography by Peter Bennetts See the full story here
  1 | House Bruce Alexander, Sydney, Australia bruce5 bruce4   Tribe Studio Architects / Photography by Katherine Lu See the full story here
  2 | Jewel House, Melbourne, Australia Jewel-House-Karen-Abernethy-Architects-Habitus-Living-01 Jewel-House-Karen-Abernethy-Architects-Habitus-Living-03   Karen Abernethy Architects / Photography by Scottie Cameron See the full story here
  3 | Skylight House, Sydney, Australia   Chenchow Little See the full story here
  4 | 1880s Terrace, Melbourne, Australia. fitzroy_residence_5 fitzroy_residence_1   Atelier Wagner / Photography by John Gollings See the full story here
  5 | House House, Melbourne, Australia House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving House House by Maynard Architects - Habitusliving   Andrew Maynard Architects / Photography by Peter Bennetts See the full story here
 abc
Design Products
Accessories

Watch Pencils become a Vase: Amalgamated Video

  From the designer: Pencils are utilized when giving form to our thoughts, illustrating our wishes and ideas. They are inseparably fused with craft and arts, representing diverse relationships between artist and their creations. Pencils are extensions of our minds which enable us to transmit information through different mediums and time, collecting knowledge and creating it. “Amalgamated” is a collection which explores the relationship of a mass produced ‘tool’ and its individual purpose. The beauty of the pencil as an object seems to go unnoticed if utilised only for their primary purpose. “Amalgamated” is a visual and tactile investigation by using pencils as a raw material. This holistic principle has been the fundament for creating this set of vases; let the pencils become a thing themselves.   amalgamated-003-2   The vases are created by individually gluing one facet of a pencil to another, taking benefit of their hexagonal shape forming a network of pencils. The block of pencils is machined with a lathe and turned into the final shape. The flow of each shape unveils a different pattern of the inner structure revealing the beauty of the pencil.     Studio Markunpoika markunpoika.com In collaboration with Studio Markunpoika, Gallery FUMI and Faber-Castell.   abc
Fixed & Fitted
Design Products
ADVERTORIALS
Accessories

Fisher & Paykel – Designed to Match

  Gone are the days when the kitchen was a closed-off room at the back of the house. It has now become the heart of the home, where people gather and socialize around food. Fisher & Paykel has responded, elevating the kitchen to centre-stage in the house with appliances designed to match in terms of finishes and design touchstones, allowing people to create a seamless, cohesive look throughout their home.   CG905DNGGB1-CG905DLPGB1_Insitu_208_CMYK---high-res   “Our ‘Designed to Match’ philosophy underpins every design decision we take and has evolved from ongoing interaction with architects and kitchen designers,” says Mark Elmore, Head of Industrial Design at Fisher & Paykel. “What they told us is that as the kitchen is not a static space. It’s becoming warmer and more personal, and an area that is not just used for preparing meals but for everything from socializing to homework, so there is an increasing demand for appliances that reflect the same level of design and quality as the rest of their living space.” It is attention to the finest of visual details that defines the success of Fisher & Paykel’s design strategy.   RB90S_Insitu_Pantry_7554_Blk-Cab_CMYK---high-res   The ‘Designed to Match’ kitchen appliances are crafted from the highest quality materials including black Stopsol glass, stainless steel, and anodised aluminium, with consistent finishes and design details, so that no matter how a kitchen is constructed the appliances compliment one another. A consistent size and design palette also ensures all appliances ‘line-up’ to create a sleek look, including the economical smaller DishDrawerTM dishwashers and CoolDrawerTM multi-temperature fridges, which can be seamlessly installed throughout the kitchen, or home, to suit the modern lifestyle. “At Fisher & Paykel, we evolve but we’re not fashion driven,” says Elmore. “The interior designers and architects we talk to, strive to design something that’s beautiful and easy to live with, like the gas on glass cooktop range, which allows for different types and sizes of burner to sit alongside each other, connected seamlessly but a fine stainless steel strip integrated into the induction.” “This is what we believe our customers want.” Fisher & Paykel fisherpaykel.com/auabc
Architecture
Homes

This House Applies the Surrealist Technique ‘Cubomania’

  Inspired by the 'cultural memory of the existing building' and a commitment to sustainability, the architects have created a modern and efficient home with a touch of Victorian charm. Rather than simply restore certain features (though they have where they could), what existed has been built into the makeup of the entire design.   131130-Alfred-Crescent-0336 131130-Alfred-Crescent-0334 131130-Alfred-Crescent-0358   An approach borrowed from the surrealist technique 'Cubomania' - a surrealist method of making collages in which a picture or image is cut into squares and the squares are then reassembled without regard for the image - the architects have catalogued, re-used and re-invented demolished building materials to create something new and uniques. "The technique is evident in the external brickwork, garden and is followed through within the carefully detailed internal spaces," says Architect Emma Young. "Elements which could not be retained and would otherwise have been discarded were up-cycled in interesting ways and are now represented as part of the design metabolism."   140811-Cubo-House-&-Portraits-0472 131130-Alfred-Crescent-1326  
"The intention was to use the old materials in a way that did not disguise their original purpose and therefore provides an accessible display of innovative upcycling."
  131130-Alfred-Crescent-0474   "The intention was to use the old materials in a way that did not disguise their original purpose and therefore provides an accessible display of innovative upcycling. Slate roof tiles salvaged from the old roof now form part of the new façades and the old security screens have been assembled to form a privacy & sun screen over the new rear window. Face kitchen joinery is made from upcycled timber flooring, salvaged during demolition. Even the existing bluestone slabs from doorstops have been re-used as fireplace hearths. A modern and bright black-white was chosen internally to create a clean, simple background for the feature design elements." It seems like the perfect solution to a beautiful but crumbling home.   131130-Alfred-Crescent-0547 131130-Alfred-Crescent-1181   The approach is also ideal for a the brief that called for a sustainable home. "The "Cubomania" and Upcycling (adaptation & re-use) techniques minimise embodied energy by balancing of the quantity of demolished materials against those brought in to replace them." Windows that remained in the Heritage listed front part of the house were all retro-double glazed, for example, and "those which were salvaged prior to demolition retained their original glass and formed a new 3 storey lightwell which feeds light and air into a new habitable basement & also acts as a thermal chimney."   131130-Alfred-Crescent-0716 131130-Alfred-Crescent-0971 131130-Alfred-Crescent-0996   The house also employs many less obvious sustainable techniques including: Passive solar & shading techniques; Active solar equipment; Improved thermal envelope; Increased light and air infusion; Capture and reuse of roofwater; Low energy consumption; and Use of recycled and resilient materials. As well as many more features, every space was carefully designed to enable multiple furniture layouts and therefore uses; they could "avoid building obsolescence".   131130-Alfred-Crescent-1220 131130-Alfred-Crescent-1250 140423-21-Alfred-Cres-0621   For the architects, the project proved especially fulfilling. "We are particularly fond of the salvaged and upcycled elements which have been celebrated as part of the design metabolism," says Emma. The chandelier (made from the old staircase) that is suspended over the new bespoke spiral stair being a stand-out feature.   140423-21-Alfred-Cres-0767_trimmed   The Owners are equally as delighted and their experience of the house "keeps evolving as they settle in and as the seasons change". Like PHOOEY, the family "love that so many of the old parts have been retained and in so many interesting ways. They are particularly happy that so many modern conveniences have been introduced during the invigoration process, so the house has become something very unusual and something very livable."   140423-21-Alfred-Cres-1030 140423-21-Alfred-Cres-1168  
Photography by Peter Bennetts DROPBOX Architect/design firm who worked on the project, including head and participating architects/designers: Architect: PHOOEY Architects Emma Young (Design & Project Architect) Peter Ho (Design Architect) Adam Gordon (Project Architect) Other Team Members: Jessie Cook, Rob Chittleborough, Helen Duong, Lucy Arundel, Anne-Claire Deville Builder: Conterno Group Interior Designer: PHOOEY Architects Landscape Architect: Simon Ellis Structural Engineer - Perrett Simpson Stantin Kind of project: Renovation Location: Melbourne Parameters of project : 270m2 Gross Floor Area (over 3 x levels inc an entirely new basement level). Open Plan Kitchen/ Family/ Dining Room, Living Room, Entry Foyer/ Stair with ancillary room-sized landings, 2 Kids Bedrooms & shared bathroom, 1 Master Bedroom w WIR & Ensuite, Study, Laundry, Powder Room, Habitable Basement (Guest Quarters) w Ensuite & Storage Room, External Courtyard with integrated bench seats, BBQ & bike shed. Date of project completion (month and year): Nov 2013 PHOOEY Architects phooey.com.au   abc