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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters

A brand new look for Sydney Indesign 2015

  Now in its 12th year of operation, Indesign: The Event returns to Sydney with a brand new look and an evolved event format that puts the focus on connectivity, engagement and best-in-class Australian and international design. “Indesign: The Event continues to be the region’s single most powerful platform for connecting designers, specifiers, suppliers, manufacturers and developers, through a highly interactive, commercially-focused program of events. Our new-look brand is a close reflection of our commitment to continuing to facilitate new business opportunity and growth – especially within Australian and our surrounding region,” says Indesign Media CEO, Raj Nandan. ArticleHeroImage[1] The new look is characterised by a strong graphic campaign, produced by Art Director Christopher Holt in collaboration with Mr. Nandan. Celebrating the concept of connection and engagement among design professionals are the interconnecting angles of geometric shapes and layering of colour in subtly varied tones. GroupMeeting2 Above: Raj Nandan opens the Sydney Indesign Group Meeeting, February 2015 Taking place over three days, the Sydney Indesign program offers members of the design community a chance to connect and interact through numerous touch points. Spread across four major design precincts, 40+ showroom destinations allow visitors to engage with the brands they love and be the first to see latest product and furniture releases. GroupMeeting55 Above: Sydney Indesign Group Meeeting, February 2015 Sydney Indesign presents its third edition of Galleria at the Australian Technology Park. This immersive open plan design experience offers up a lively mix of brands – both Australian and international, and an exciting line-up of local and global product launches. Heating up conversation will be Sydney Indesign’s WorkLife, Habitus' Livelife and DQ Round Table seminar series, which invite local and global thought leaders to nut out key issues surrounding the disciplines and industry of architecture and design. GroupMeeting4 In 2015 The Project tackles the theme of Ritual, inviting suppliers and retailers to team up with designers to interpret and tease out the ‘rituals and traditions’ that are inherent within their brand culture and creative practice. Visitors will be wowed by The Project’s powerful creative pull, with designers and suppliers working together to transform space and product into a truly memorable experience. The DQ Design Trail is a self-guided tour that enables design lovers to tailor their Sydney Indesign experience so that Australian made and designed products stay top of the day’s agenda. DQ_Roundtable2 Above: DQ Round table discussion, Melbourne Continuing in its support and facilitation of emerging Australian design is Launch Pad, which runs in conjunction with Indesign: The Event. In 2015 the Launch Pad competition and mentorship program calls on emerging Australian designers to submit their design prototypes and go in the running to win a career launching package.   FAST FACTS When Thursday 13 – Saturday 15 August 2015 Where Multiple venues along design trails in Surry Hills, Chippendale, Alexandria, Darlinghurst How much Free to register and attend Getting Around: Registration gives you free all-day travel on our shuttle buses, traveling between each location on the design trails. Web + Social sydneyindesign.com.au facebook.com/indesigntheevent instagram.com/indesigntheevent twitter.com/indesign_event  abc
Design Products
Accessories

Have you ever seen such luxury cutlery?

  cutlery_3 cutlery_7   Edged Cutlery, by Maximilian Löw, is certainly luxury. The choice of material is a controversial one, making manufacturing very different from regular cutlery. Due to this confrontation a conventional object of daily use gets its own individual character and gives awareness for daily objects. Is there a possibility to combine soft curves of classic cutlery with sharp, rigorous edges?   cutlery_4 cutlery_6 cutlery_5   As the eating comfort should not suffer under this arrangement, the challenge was to combine the aesthetics with a pleasant usability. This required a large amount of ergonomic models and self - experiments. After evaluation and adjustment of the models the pieces were cast in bronze. Of course, different manufacturing methods and materials are conceivable for the real production and commercial viability. Maximilian Löw maxloew.comabc
Architecture
Homes

What makes a Family-friendly Kitchen?

  The latest award-winning kitchen from the Art of Kitchens team is no exception to their rule of excellence. When they were asked to design a kitchen for this Northbridge home, they immediately recognised the potential to create an amazing space that would be both aesthetically pleasing and an incredibly functional family kitchen. The brief was simple – an accessible family-friendly room with a view, and seating for at least five people – but the site presented plenty of challenges that had to be overcome. It was important to maintain the view as a feature, minimise the imposition of the staircase, work around the existing angled walls, and complement the stained American Oak flooring. The result is a 2014 KBDi NSW Kitchen Designer award for Large Kitchens: a seamless design that achieves the perfect balance between the backdrop of stunning views and the pared-back mimimalism of the kitchen.   19159866_2792-northbridge-002   An island bench was used to create an accessible working space and open the room toward the backyard and front balcony. The New Age Veneer, ‘Grenada’ was used on the island cabinetry to add contrast to the custom-fabricated stainless steel bench and integrated sink. The moulded bench and integrated sink means food preparation and clean-up is a breeze, and the inclusion of the Calcutta Marble-topped dining table at the end of the island gives the family a beautiful space in the heart of the home to share their meals, or relax after a hard day at work and enjoy the spectacular views.   19159868_2792-northbridge-004   One of the major strengths of The Art of Kitchens is the fact that the team does not use pre-built modular cabinets. Every design is original and the joinery bespoke. This approach offers a great deal of freedom to the client, and it is also a positive in difficult spaces like the angled walls in this kitchen. The floor to ceiling cabinets behind the island were built around the angled walls, and covered in a lighter-toned New Age Veneer ‘Santorini’. Bench-height draws, storage cabinets – even the fridge – are tucked behind the smooth exterior of the cabinets in a kitchen that exudes cool, balanced sophistication. The heady mix of contrasting veneer tones, stainless steel and marble add textural interest, and reduce the risk of any one element becoming a dominant feature. The substantial natural light enjoyed in the kitchen meant David Bartlett could concentrate on creating an innovative and exciting lighting feature that would also perform the functional work required. It is a bold design that once again manages to beautifully balance some of the more austere elements of the kitchen. The custom-made light plane of moulded stainless steel with inbuilt LED down lights is suspended on stainless wires, and despite the industrial muscularity of the cylindrical integrated Qasair Range-hood above the Siemanns cooktop, gives the impression it is floating above the island.   19159867_2792-northbridge-003   With such a carefully-considered balance between form and function, it’s no surprise this kitchen is an award winner. When we asked David for his thoughts on winning the 2014 KBDi NSW Kitchen Designer award for Large Kitchens, he said “Awards are always fantastic because they are a benchmark for excellence, but client satisfaction is paramount. The owner of this kitchen told us it has become the heart of the home. That makes us very happy indeed.” There’s no doubt David and The Art of Kitchens team will continue to make their clients ecstatically happy. The 2014 KBDi award is their 21st industry award since 2008, proving that David’s investment in “attention to detail, sympathetic design and a highly-skilled, cohesive team at Art of Kitchens” is paying dividends for this award-winning kitchen designer, and for his clients. LOCATION: Northbridge YEAR COMPLETED: 2014 Art of Kitchens artofkitchens.com.auabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

Mindful Design with Nicky Lobo: Kitchen & Bathroom Special

Otopare House, New Zealand, by Mitchell & Stout Architects / Photo by Simon Devitt   The Slow Food movement has been around for some time now. For many (most of the Italian population no doubt), it never went away. Slow Food is not so much a movement as a way of life. This is one ideal that we've explored in relation to the kitchen & bathroom in our very first Habitus special issue. These are spaces that are not just functional, but spaces in which we spend quality time. Where we nourish our physical bodies, and hopefully, our psyche and souls too. In this mode of thought. Slow Food extends to Slow Bathing. It's often said that the bathroom is the only place we can truly switch off and unplug. And, according to this article, this is precisely why people say they have their best ideas while taking a shower.   IMG_0023 Puri Angsa House, Bali, by Weir + Phillips Architects / Photo by Carby Tuckwell   Basically, bathing (and food preparation… maybe even cleaning? Hmmm.) encourages a semi-meditative state where your mind is free to wander while your body goes through a routine – scrubbing or chopping for example. This mild activity provides the perfect balance of relaxation and stimulation that allows neurones to fire up new pathways. For anyone who wants to think creatively – hopefully that's everyone – creating spaces that encourage this state of being is of utmost importance. If your kitchen & bathroom is designed in a way that responds intuitively, you don't need to be worrying about the cost of your water bill or wondering where to hang that wet washcloth. Enter relaxed state of mind, enter creative thinking. It's not just about what these spaces look like, but how they can enrich our experience and even influence our mental state.   HYLA-054185 Bukit Tunggal House, Singapore, by Hyla Architects / Photo by Derek Swalwell   Habitus special issue – kitchen & bathroom is out 5 March. Available from selected newsagents and book stores.   abc
Architecture
Homes

Habitus Loves: Plywood Kitchens

Above: Hello House by OOF! Architecture   1 | Chicory Kiln Renovation, Phillip Island Victoria House-For-Hermes-Andrew-Simpson-Architects-Habitus-Living-10 House-For-Hermes-Andrew-Simpson-Architects-Habitus-Living-08 Andrew Simpson Architects in collaboration with Charles Anderson / Photography by Peter Bennetts Full story here
  2 | Hello House, Melbourne IMG_2299-Edit-Lowres-Hello-House IMG_2349-Lowres-Hello-House OOF! Architecture / Photography by Nic Granleese Full story here
  3 | Flinders Lane Apartment, Melbourne ClareCousins_FlindersLaneApt_LisbethGrosmann_09   Clare Cousins / Photography by Lisbeth Grosmann
  4 | Beach House, Great Ocean Road, VIC great_ocean_road_3 ITN Architects / Photography by Aidan Halloran Full story hereabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A: Emilio Fuscaldo

  Name: Emilio Fuscaldo Where you are from/live: Nest Architects What you do: Architect Your latest project: Harold St and the Ormond College Masters office   NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6362 Harold St   Where do you find inspiration? My colleagues (other architects) who are always pushing the boundaries of design and interior decoration. My friends who all have great taste in design and decoration. Nu,merous magazines and blogs always help to give a few new ideas. Which room do you spend more time in, kitchen or bathroom? Kitchen definitely. It’s the heart of our home and the place where my family and me gathers. With 2 very little kids we find ourselves perched around the kitchen island bench either watching them play or trying to find a place not consumed with wooden train sets.  
"Your pots, pans, glasses and vases are a reflection of your personality."
  What would your dream kitchen look like? I hate to say it but I love the kitchen we have designed for our home. It’s really just a few different pieces of furniture; a workbench with a sink, a cobblers rack for storage and a locker for a pantry. I really love open shelving so that you can show off your wares as they are so much a part of your personality. What do you think every kitchen should not be without? Open shelving. We shouldn’t hide our lives behind cupboard doors. Your pots, pans, glasses and vases are a reflection of your personality and they should be allowed to add to the character of the house as a whole.   NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6367 Harold St   What does the kitchen represent for you? A place where everyone is invited to participate in the goings on of daily life. Food should be fun and the preparation of meals should be a really enjoyable part of daily life. It’s not always that way, but it should be something we aspire to. Describe your dream bathroom? Dark, like a nightclub. What does this room mean to you? It’s a highly personal room where you spend time reflecting on your body. The room should be a place where you feel safe but at the same time be detailed in such a way that you feel glamorous. Hence the nightclub analogy.   NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6463 Harold St   What is your favourite… Kitchen appliance: Kenwood mix master Recipe book: Stephanie Alexander’s Cook’s Companion. Meal to cook: homemade pizza or fish and chips. Place to eat out: with 2 kids this is somewhat impossible, but if I had a chance I would grab fish and chips from the Queenscliff take away and eat them on the beach. Drink: Rusty nails Bar: Myers place in Melbourne. Cleaning product: Howards orange oil Skin/hair care range: Whatever is on the shelf Functional bathroom product: Toothbrush holder shaped as a gold tooth. Decorative bathroom product: Our fern which seems to always come back to life. What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? The ability to seek out inspiring places and people who/which are set apart from the standard design foils.   Nest Architects nestarchitects.com.au Look out for a full feature on Harold Street soon... abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

The bleeding edge of design

Good retail is so much more than nice product – it’s about your experience of purchasing that product – the look and feel of the store or shop, and the personal service too. While Melbourne-based hairdresser Herr Blick isn’t exactly retail, a visit to one of their hairdressing studios in the CBD or Northcote has all the ingredients of a great retail experience. Personalised one-on-one service from staff and a thoughtfully designed and furnished fit-out that makes you ‘really feel’ the brand. Northcote-7 Owner, founder and seasoned hairdresser, Steven Blick, has infused his salons with a unique and character-filled combination of 20th Century taste and a focus on the craft of hairdressing. Where a majority of hair salons embrace their inner glamour-puss, Herr Blick keeps it simple and focused. “No one wants to be in a busy, banging salon, those days are over,” says Steven who has cultivated this sense of craft over almost three decades of hairdressing. Northcote-70 Step into Herr Blick’s Northcote salon (opened just last year), and you’re greeted by the strains of Classic FM. Subtle notes of 20th Century style float out from carefully selected furniture pieces, sourced from Danish vintage connoisseurs, Grandfather’s Axe. “Getting your hair cut is a very private thing. It’s about getting back to the craft, rather than passing your client through a stream of people – apprentice to stylist, colourist, blow dryer and front desk. Here it’s intimate and focused.” Northcote-36 Steven talks about the hairdressers of old, who worked as barber surgeons – an intimate and invasive job involving the common use of a sharp-bladed razor. (It should be clarified here that the crossover from barber to surgeon involved very minor procedures only!) “It was right up until the early 1900s in the UK that surgeons had to go to the head of the barber-surgeon’s guild to have their qualifications approved,” Steve elaborates. Northcote-40 In an almost humorous twist, Herr Blick’s Northcote space is a subtle nod towards that history. Haircuts are conducted in spacious timber-clad booths where you can enjoy some quality time with your hairdresser, uninterrupted by blasting music, blazing hairdryers and loud, chatty neighbours. The hairdressing chairs are body-length seats salvaged from a local dentist surgery. But in this setting, the seats seem strangely enticing, the unsettling implications of the dentist’s chair fading before the welcoming salute of the hairdresser. Steve also points out the wash stations, which happen to be produced by the same Japanese manufacturer, a specialist of medical and hairdressing seating. Northcote-111 When fitting out the space, Steven researched Scandinavian design – the pared back clarity of materials reflecting this line of investigation. Tenets of traditional Japanese interior design also come into play, where a custom-designed screen, by Chantal Kirby, featuring a hand-punctured pattern secludes the cutting booth from the reception area. This “lay of the hand” is a common thread throughout, and makes for a holistic experience of space, brand and service. It’s a timely reminder that purchasing a product or service is as much about the experience as it is about the sell.   Follow Steven’s documentary Outback & Sides, as he cuts his way around Australia, sharing the stories of everyday Australians through the medium of the cut.   Photography by Samara Clifford Herr Blick herrblick.com.au    abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

A Dark prison becomes light Cafe

  From the designer: Jury Cafe is located within the bluestone walls of a Melbourne historical site: Pentridge Village – formerly Pentridge Prison. The prison was decommissioned in 1997. As an interior design project, Jury presented several unique challenges to our studio: we wanted to respect its dark past as a prison, and we also wanted to breathe new life into the cafe for its patrons to enjoy.   JuryCafe_MG_2480 JuryCafe_MG_2418   The theme of irreverence led us to play with ideas – ideas that created a contrast between dark bluestone walls and a palette of bright colours and blond timbers. Along with these ideas of colour, we used a mix of raw materials, plywood, structural timbers and concrete that allowed us to form a geometric colour pattern within the feature wall of Jury.   JuryCafe_MG_2423 JuryCafe_MG_2496   This structure created a playful effect, one that brought the site to life and allowed it to move on from its dark past, as well as embrace a sense of fun for the future. We softened the space further by adding greenery from Pop Plant; we also designed bespoke tables and stools that are, again, all made from natural materials. The result is a cafe that even Chopper Read would have frequented during his time in 'H' division.   JuryCafe_MG_2476 JuryCafe_MG_2410   Photography by Martina Gemmola DROPBOX
Name of designer or designer office: Biasol: Design Studio Location of the project (city/country): Melbourne, Australia Completion: March 2014 Area: 47sqm Furniture & Lighting: Tables and Stools – Custom crafted. Pendants from Nud Collection Bulbs from Plumen Biasol biasol.com.au abc
Architecture
Homes

An Extension Inspired by Location

  Langdons-Hill-04 Langdons-Hill-14 Langdons-Hill-05 What was the brief for this project? Extend the open plan living and dining area to create space for a new kitchen with island bench, and providing better access to the views and deck. The bathroom and bedrooms were also to be refurbished and the existing shed and carport needed replacing.   Langdons-Hill-08 Langdons-Hill-07 Langdons-Hill-06   How did the local climate, building vernacular or local landscape influence your design? Due to its rural location, any changes to the house had to strike a balance between the desire to maximise views and need for protection from the elements. Window and door openings were positioned to frame commanding views of the property, while being protected from the rain and harsh summer sun. A combination of materials was selected to enhance the original character of the property and reference the texture and colours of the surrounding environment.   Langdons-Hill-10 Langdons-Hill-09   The star of Plinth House is a series of timber blades. Can you tell us about the use of plinths? The existing house was surrounded by a stone and concrete plinth that anchored it to the site and provided a strong sense of texture and materiality. This plinth is referenced by a new concrete hearth in the living area and remains a feature of the house.   Langdons-Hill-13 Langdons-Hill-12 Langdons-Hill-11   How do the clients enjoy the space? The renovation and extension has allowed the clients to take full advantage of the picturesque views while being protected from the elements throughout the year. What about this space makes it a special and personal project for you or the lead architect/designer? This project was the result of a great builder, fantastic clients and an amazing site. It is a good example of doing more with less. It is only a small extension, but has made a dramatic difference to the quality and function of the house.   Langdons-Hill-02 Langdons-Hill-01 Langdons-Hill-15 Langdons-Hill-16 Plans-&-Elevations-1  
Photography by Hilary Bradford Photography DROPBOX Architect: Luke Stanley Architects Principle Architect & Project Architect: Luke Stanley Kind of project: Renovation & extension to an existing weekender house. Location: Langdons Hill, Victoria 3363 Australia Parameters of project: 2 Beds, 1 Bathroom, Open plan Living/Dining/Kitchen, Plus a Shed & Carport Areas: Existing House - 103m2. Extension to House - 8m2. Shed & Carport - 140m2 Date of project completion: October 2014 Luke Stanley Architects lukestanleyarchitects.com abc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter Q+A Kitchen and Bathroom Special: Tony Owen

  Name: Tony Owen Where you are from/live: Sydney What you do: Architect Your latest project: Eliza Sydney   td1   Where do you find inspiration: Sneakers, Graffiti, Headlights, chocolate Which room do you spend more time in, kitchen or bathroom: Kitchen What would your dream kitchen look like: Balducci’s on West Broadway What do you think every kitchen should not be without: A large red iron soup pot What does the kitchen represent for you: Family Describe your dream bathroom: Like a Trinity super yacht What does this room mean to you: Clean   td3 td2   What is your favourite… Kitchen appliance: Miele Recipe book: Monday Morning Cooking Club Meal to cook: Schnitzel Place to eat out: Anywhere in Bondi Drink: Girly Cocktails Bar: Saigon Rooftop Bars Cleaning product: Water Skin/hair care range: Water Functional bathroom product: Scales Decorative bathroom product: Scales td4   What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you: Inspiration
TONY OWEN PARTNERS tonyowen.com.au All images featured are of the Eliza Penthouse, Sydney   abc
Design Hunters
People

BEI NA WEI – THE FIRST FASHION ENGINEER

How has your background in electrical engineering influenced your fashion design, if at all? What else has influenced your aesthetic? My engineering background manifests itself in a technical and practical approach to design. I need to experiment structurally with materials and then physically see what silhouettes and ideas emerge from these experiments. I am also always thinking practically about the final functionality, which means comfort, ease of wear and flattering the female form are always integral to my design process. bnw2 How is the illustrative process important to you? Illustration and sketching have never been my strengths - I had to learn how to draw to apply for design school! - and I’m always trying to find other methods to convey my ideas. I drape on the mannequin, draw directly onto photos or use photoshop to splice ideas together. For me, the illustration is just the final step of communicating a resolved idea. bnw1 Describe your design process. What components do you find challenging and which are comparatively easy? I approach design as a creative and reiterative problem solving process. My inspiration will come from researching interesting materials and fabrication techniques and experimenting with these until I find shapes and concepts that I want to pursue further. These will then be turned into ‘wearable objects’ to experiment with on the body before refining all of my ideas together into a cohesive narrative for the final collection. I always find that sourcing that initial spark of an idea to pursue the hardest part of the design process, but once the concept is locked in, I absolutely relish the physical process of realising ideas into garments. bnw4 How do you approach texture, colour and form in unique ways? Constant research, materials sourcing and experimentation are always key to my design process. I’m always mixing up different bits and pieces just to see what works. bnw5 bnw6 What distinguishes your fashion design? Sculptural minimalism mixed with powerful femininity - pieces for the beautifully complex modern woman. bnw9 bnw8 How will you or have you set up business strategies that are tailored to suit the design industry? I’m planning to start small through developing custom pieces and then sustainably scale the business with market demand. I want to create a label with a long term vision, so that we can still be talking about the Bei Na Wei brand long into the future. bnw10 Read the full editorial on Bei in issue #57 of DQ Magazine. BEI NA WEI beinawei.com abc
Architecture
Places

Chiara, by loopcreative

From the architect: Chiara is a 150 seat Italian restaurant and bar with separate wine cellar private dining room for 16. It is contained within the ground floor of the Lantern Building, which is part of the heritage listed Goods Shed North redevelopment at Collins Square in Docklands Melbourne. The client, Walker Evans Baker Restaurant Group led by partners Lang Walker (Walker Corporation) Pete Evans (My Kitchen Rules) and Gavin Baker (ex Fat Duck Jnr Sous Chef) approached loopcreative in late 2013 to design the 2 level 750sqm ground floor restaurant and first floor production and catering kitchen. The client wanted a high quality restaurant design with a sophisticated corporate ambience. They also wanted a state-of-the-art production and catering kitchen that catered to Collins Square blue chip clients and the greater Melbourne community. LOOP_CHIARA_4 When we first spoke to the client, we talked about Chiara being a space that felt like it had always been part of the Melbourne fabric. It was important for it to not feel too themed, but feel sophisticated and be a natural gateway to the Collins Square development. The restaurant is a commercial space with spectacular elevated views through the Goods Shed South heritage building roofline structure. The restaurant is made up of an aged bronze bar with seating for 20, the main restaurant seating 120 on custom built leather banquettes, and a dedicated private room wine cellar for 16. Upstairs is the chef’s table for 12 and the 400sqm production and catering kitchen for BAKER & EVANS. The kitchen is visible from Collins St through a series of steel windows, with a dedicated ageing room, butchery and pastry kitchen. There is also main cook line where Gavin Baker and Pete Evans can conduct demonstration classes. LOOP_CHIARA_2 The furniture is classic Thonet Bentwood chairs with Italian marble tabletops and the remaining chairs were imported leather Space Furniture chairs. The banquette styling is based on an old car seat with similar stitching and proportions. For the lighting we have used the UK firm Established & Sons for the suspended saucer bar lights and the NY based company Workstead for the perimeter pendants. We wanted the materials to be honest and true to their use, with oak parquetry flooring, inset carpets by Designer rugs and a Catherine Martin designed feature wallpapered wall. We wanted the materials to be honest to their surface without the need for too much adorned decoration. If it didn't look like it shouldn't be there, then it didn't stay. In terms of colours, we went for a warm sophisticated palette with tones of timber flooring, bronze for the bar and micaceous paint (the Harbour Bridge paint) for all of the steelwork. During the day there is beautiful shadow-cast filtered light from behind the full height louvered blinds as the sun sets behind the building. By night the space becomes a darker more luxuriously environment with views through the skeleton which is the roof structure of the heritage listed goods shed south. LOOP_CHIARA_3 There is an obvious corporate overtone to this space and it's no hipster kool-aid fit out. There is no 'vintage found design' like the majority of other new fit-outs being carried out, we wanted something sophisticated and approachable like the people that inhabit Collins Square. From a layout perspective there was a natural order to the planning and we incorporated a new entrance steel vestibule, bar area and restaurant. The ceiling and floor levels did pose some design issues which led us down the path of incorporating an aged mirror ceiling to the majority of the space, thus providing the patrons with the perception of a 6m high ceiling space, the effect being quite dramatic. This was the first project for loopcreative for the Walker Evans Baker Restaurant Group. Since its opening we have been appointed to design a new 500sqm bar and a new 350sqm fine dining restaurant which are currently in concept design stage. Chiara chiara.net.au/about loopcreative loopcreative.com.auabc