About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Furniture

Update your bar or kitchen with a minimalist Winnie stool

With a simple, minimalist design and a contemporary feel, the Winnie modern barstool is made to withstand the rigours of everyday life and still offer you a lasting, beautiful stool.

Helping to create a functional kitchen, breakfast bar or island seating area, the Winnie modern kitchen stool is backless, elevating this barstool’s minimalist style and allowing these stools to tuck unobtrusively beneath counters when not in use. Due to its lightweight, functional design and clean modern form it can infuse any home with on-point contemporary styling.

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

The stool's solid steel rod comprises the sled style base and welcoming curved seat, while an integrated foot rest adds an extra level of comfort. The base also glides softly on surfaces to defend floors from scratches and scuffs.

The Winnie barstool collection is offered in multiple seat options such as leather, European oak, American ash and American walnut and three choices of bases, chrome, matte white or matte black.

The Winnie range of stools are available at Huset –

Huset huset.com.au

Interior Design by Sisalla Interior Design Photography by Amorfo Photography

Living

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WINNIE-STOOL-66---WHITE-FRAME---SOLID-OAK-STAINED-WHITE-SEAT

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

Winnie Stool - Furniture - Habitus Living

abc
Happenings
What's On

Artist Q+A: Mason Kimber

  - How would you describe your work? These are some keywords I would use: architecture, spatial perspective, fragmentation, subconscious, associations, memory and painterly abstraction.   Atrium Atrium, 2015, oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm   - Are there certain ideas or subjects you are most interested in? I’m interested in the idea of ‘architectural memory’. Built spaces, whether they are real or imagined, have the potential to hold certain memories. This idea can be traced back to ancient Greek times before the invention of text, where orators instructed their students to imagine objects within the spatial context of a room in order to help them recall information. Ruins and fragmented buildings in particular have this uncanny potential to create mnemonic associations.   Thinking-Slow,-Painting-Fast Thinking Slow, Paining Fast, 2015, oil on canvas, 84 x 71 cm   - Where do you find inspiration? These new works stem from a fascination with the various styles of spatial illusion found in Pompeian fresco painting during a recent studio residency at the British School at Rome. The many rich layers of history, architecture and painting that are visible in Rome and in its museums have given me a huge amount of material to work with. The experience of having a studio there for three months will continue to inspire me for years to come.   SurfaceFigure Surface/Figure, 2015, oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm   - How does the local landscape and environment feed into your work? Natural influences often appear unknowingly through the colour choices I make. No matter what subject matter, there always seems to be an element of aqua blue that is used subconsciously. I put this down to the environment where I grew up in Perth. Cottesloe is an area surrounded by water, situated between the Swan River and the Indian Ocean.   Frame-Villa Frame/Villa, 2015, oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm   - Can you talk about your style, what kind of process do you use and how has it developed over the years? I mainly work as a painter using oils on canvas, but these new works are the result of experimentation with traditional fresco techniques using high-calcium lime plaster, sand and pigments on plywood to form portable fresco panels. Painted ‘fresh’ into the plaster just before it completely dries, they are the products of a chemical reaction that forces the painting to become one with its architectural support. Fresco is known as one of the hardest mediums to work with, but I think the unique effects it produces are worth the effort.   Fresco-3 Fresco 3, 2015, pigment, sand & lime on plywood, 41 x 36 cm (framed)   - What do you enjoy most about being an artist? What are the challenges? I have a compulsive need to create and often feel guilty if I’m not making something or developing ideas. My favorite place to be is in the studio. That said, sometimes it’s really difficult to find motivation when things aren’t working. The key is to accept failure as part of the process to creating something unique. It’s often only through the process of doing that progress can be made. Fortunately, I enjoy the challenge.   fresco-m-kimber Fresco 1 and Fresco 2, 2015, pigment, sand & lime plaster on plywood, 41 x 26 cm (framed)   - Advice for aspiring artists? It’s simple - believe in yourself. Self-doubt is the creativity killer.   Untitled-1 Spazi Aperti, 2015, oil on canvas, 56 x 46 cm and Green Court, 2015, oil on canvas, 46 x 41 cm  
Photography: Courtesy the artist and Galerie pompom, Sydney.   Oltre la Vista opens this Wednesday April 1 at Galerie pompom, running through until April 26. Galerie pompom galeriepompom.com Mason Kimber masonkimber.com Tess Ritchie abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Can A Product’s Packaging Inform The Personality Of A Retail Space?

. The first overseas shop for BbyB – a chocolate shop by Antwerp-based, two-Michelin star chef Bart Desmidt – may look the same from the outside, but the richness of the product against the stark, minimalists (quintessentially nendo) aesthetic really sets this retail space apart. Available in 30 richly distinctive flavours; from strawberry, pepper and lemon to passionfruit and basil; the chocolates are all the same shape featuring modular packaging: five bars of chocolate slot neatly into each sliding box, and five boxes slot together into a cube. nendo2 nendo4 “The contents become apparent only gradually, as the boxes are opened and closed, offering surprises until the very last bite and turning the cube into a ‘magic chest of drawers’,” says nendo founder and designer, Oki Sato. Following this logic, Sato explains that he and the nendo team “turned the shop space into a three-dimensional version of the chocolate packaging. The chocolates seem to float in a transparent ‘chest of drawers’, placed at the center of the shop. When they purchase chocolates, customers slide the chest and remove them by themselves just like the chocolate packaging.” nendo8 nendo1 Towards the rear of the shop, the transparent chest becomes a showcase that displays chocolates individually, then turning into a counter for customers at the shop’s cafe. The shop is a long, narrow space, well suited to accommodate a 12.5m long piece of furniture. “We made the front of the shop entirely white and the cafe space at the rear entirely black – following the colour scheme of the packaging cube, and ‘tiled’ the white wall with chocolate packages so that the entire wall turns into another ‘drawer’,” says Sato. nendo6 nendo5 nendo7 The design creates a seamless transition between the shop space, the packaging and the act of eating the chocolates, offering an organic, compelling experience. And here, nendo again succeeds in one of the design industry’s most poignant challenges – creating more than a branded environment, but a branded experience for users, rewarding loyalty and encouraging repeat visits. This is the edict of the post-GFC consumer, and designers should look to nendo as a solid example. Words by Sophia Watson // Designed by Oki Sato for nendo // Project Assistant: Masumi Hotta (Nomura Kogei) // Photography by Daici Ano // nendo.jp abc
Architecture
Homes

The Dramatic extension of a traditional 1900’s cottage

  At first glance, the front elevation of architect Terry McQuillan’s Brisbane home bears no resemblance to the home’s dramatic extension. The front facade, historical in nature, is the result of McQuillan’s sensitive refurbishment to a traditional 1900’s cottage in the inner-north suburb of Wooloowin.   KentStreet_01   “The concept was to transform the simple cottage into a stylish modern home,” explains McQuillan. “However it was important that the character of the cottage was retained and that the extension utilised materials that were sympathetic to the original.”   KentStreet_66 KentStreet_55 McQuillan was also faced with resolving the spatial challenges inherent in the property’s poorly executed 1960’s extension. “The low skillion roof and the lack of windows made the house felt very detached from its surroundings,” the architect explains. “Another issue we had to resolve was the covered rear deck which led to a separate laundry at the bottom of the site.”   KentStreet_47 KentStreet_43   McQuillan and his wife were determined to create a new, strong connection with the outdoors and to maximise light, cross breezes and the available space underneath the house. The architect’s response is a weatherboard-clad, two storey extension separated from the original cottage by a louvered breezeway on the western side. Incorporated in the addition is a new kitchen, a master bedroom and outdoor living space at the upper level and a gymnasium and garage at the lower level. “The simplicity of the design, the louvres and the transition space between the original house and the extension highlights the character of the old cottage,” adds the architect.   KentStreet_61   The new addition also boasts a strong connection to the outside, drawing in a significant amount of natural light and ventilation, the latter having a dramatic cooling effect on the home’s internal temperature. McQuillan’s extension has has also been crafted in such a way that it achieves a high level of privacy, despite the largely open-space planning. “I designed sliding wall panels to create walls that close off sections of the house not being used, making rooms more private, as well as opening them up to the outside,” McQuillan explains.   KentStreet_24   The architect has also managed to achieve a particularly cost-effective build, by working closely with his contractor to limit off-site fabrication and a very hands-on approach to the construction. The home is also remarkably sustainable. Much of the existing timber from the 1960’s extension was retained, cleaned and reused for the structure with the remainder sourced from local, second hand timber suppliers. McQuillan’s level of restraint and minimalist preferences are also evident in the joinery design of and his selection of a simple, yet starkly contrasting material palette for the interiors.    abc
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Furniture

Sink into the Edra Standard sofa by Francesco Binfaré

The Edra Standard sofa, designed by Francesco Binfaré, is adaptable to the users’ desires with a malleable pillow-like embrace. The Edra Standard sofa's strength is in its movement. The key element to this sofa is a “smart pillow" that acts as a backrest and armrest, which is separately adjustable at will. It allows the sitter the freedom to customise the experience via a range of positions: symmetrical, asymmetrical, formal, informal, for reading or tablet consulting. The strong but supple back and the soft silhouette enhance the elegance of this upholstered sofa, which looks equally nice from the back as from the front. The sofa's metal frame supports the padding in polyurethane and synthetic wadding. Edra Standard Sofa - Furniture - Habitus Living Seats of different shapes and depths give rise to several solutions: linear, straight angular, open angular or free plan. The term “standard” comes from the old French estendart, which means flag, banner. Standard is an accepted rule, a model to repeat in the future. In fact, this project is the result of twenty years of typological and technological research that started with the couch L’Homme et la Femme, in 1993, that introduced variable configurations for the first time. Research then went on, exploring both new materials and opportunities of modifying arrangement and sitting through simple movements. New couches designed by Francesco Binfaré were born along this path, like the 2004 On the Rocks, a sectional that allows plenty of freedom in arranging modules. Standard is the synthesis of this research. Each pillow of the backrest and the armrests is individually adjustable and reclining in every direction, with fluid movements that allow the discovery of new thresholds of comfort. This possibility is made possible by the joints, which are a jewel of engineering and comfort. The various components of the system are fastened together by a moulded element of rigid polyurethane, which engages the pins of the different seats: an elementary joint that simplifies the operations of moving, cleaning, and changing position. The Edra Standard sofa is available at – Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.au Edra Standard Sofa - Furniture - Habitus Living Edra Standard Sofa - Furniture - Habitus Living Edra Standard Sofa - Furniture - Habitus Living Edra Standard Sofa - Furniture - Habitus Living Edra Standard Sofa - Furniture - Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

Mark Bickerstaffe on Bathroom Trends

  Mark Bickerstaffe: We see five leading trends which we call Wellbeing, Enhanced Everyday, Community, Engaging and Classic Tech. 1. Wellbeing is about finding your balance. We see 2 strands leading new architecture and design: - Contemplative wellbeing which prioritises emotional restoration and brings carefully curated natural material and structure into play to allow your body and kind to find calm. Mannered environments, careful selection of natural material texture colour arranged harmoniously. Expect natural finish, satin metals, linen, pale pastels and bleached naturals. - Pro active wellbeing is humankind grasping its own destiny and applying energy to be the best version of yourself you can be. Building confidence in yourself thru physical and mental fitness and working and applying the latest newest understanding and tech to achieve this. This is being expressed thru modern purposeful design, hybrid forms, multi material usage and bold expressions of efficiency and intent. Expect polycarbonate tints and tones, stoneware, technical fabrics and the avant garde. 2. The Enhanced Everyday is as its name suggests more pragmatic. Less about "me" and more about "we". It embraces new technology and solutions as ways to make life easier and better. It is the new mainstream and follows the same pattern in having 2 strands that align with the wellbeing trend. - Seamless integrates intelligence, welcomes the latest but insists that it is embedded in the environment. Architecture is tech smart but not expressively so. It feels airy, warm and real. Expect oaks, light brushed steel, white on white and black. - Overstated is conversely free of constraint and allows the intelligence to be visible and to become part of the identity. Proud of the new forms that technical innovation provides when designed to deliver its best. Expect walnut, raw concrete, tan leather, satin steel, biomimetic architecture and iridescence.   Rose-Gold-Purist   3. Our Community trend represents personal connection and is all about craft and its expression in the interiors we choose. - Local curates our environs into our living spaces and feels authentic to the place and time. In many ways this is a traditional lifestyle where what is available within local reach is your happy constraint. Choosing to only live and work with this creates its own unique connected solutions. Expect local ply, concrete, black, blown smokey glass and smokey iridescence. -DIY uses personal craft in the digital age. It is about modern making, using global know how to design and create efficient but local architecture. Resolutely modern and shamelessly, openly reprocessing, repurposing, redefining what living whilst respectful of local resource actually can be. Expect birch ply, paving, cork, terracotta, modularity and elevated mundane designs. 4. Engaging is new post-modernity. Boldly and confidently interpreting and expressing ones self thru your environment and consumption. This is the antidote to thoughtful, mindful living. It is not without respect, but it uses everything we have learnt, know how to do to enable personal gratification, individual expression. A worldly eclecticism. Expect warm wood grains, textured leathers, surrealism, pattern clashes and augmented 80's influence. 5. And finally, classicism endures. Luxury rooted in the traditions of exclusivity, rarity, gloss and glamour is evolving. Classic-tech embraces the modern crafts of technology and embeds them within to create richly enhanced experiences. Expect polished metals and metallics, oily finishes, ebony and crafted leather. Kohler kohler.comabc
Furniture
Design Products
Accessories

Habitus Loves… Elegance

  1 | Suzusan Lighting by Hiroyuki Murase 19159865_hokkaido70_1-(1) 19159870_kukuru_fl_3 Suzusan is a wonderful example of artisan meets modern technology. Hiroyuki Murase's parents' company in Japan are Shibori masters so he is steeped in the traditions of hand knotting and tying superb textiles and the vagaries of vegetable dyes. The Suzusan lights utilise these traditions and applies it to polyester fabric, which is then heated to permanently set the tie dye pleats into place. The result... a beautiful textured fabric lamp that gently glows within a room. Available from Spence & Lyda
  2 | The Hug Collection by Claesson Koivisto Rune for Arflex arflex-hug-love-seat_amb.07 arflex-Hug-armchair Part of the Hug Collection (speaking directly to the heart – the hug) is a small side chair (above) for dining or meeting, as well as dining and meeting tables and coffee tables and a high-back club chair with a more private repose than the armchair. All pieces are designed to give great flexibility to the customer as well as being beautiful to look at, the friendly and welcoming gesture, seen most clearly in the ‘open- armed’ position of the armrests, is meant as a universal invitation: “Come, sit with me a while and I’ll put you at ease”. Available from Poliform
  3 | Customised Towel Warmers by Hawthorn Hill 19159865_hawthorn-hill-satin-brass-towel-warmer-front-on Crafted in England, Hawthorn Hill's beautiful bespoke towel warmers are perfect for bespoke project requirements. Designers can specify the height, width and number of rails, in a range of finishes including Bare Brass. Elegant just the way you like it. Available from The English Tapware Company
  4 | Sub-Zero New Integrated Wine Preservation 19159867_sz_new_wine_4 The new integrated wine preservation is actually beautiful. It comes in four widths 46cm, 61cm, 67cm, 76cm and unit heights and handles match Sub-Zero’s integrated refrigeration range, ensuring a perfectly cohesive look throughout the kitchen. With no visible hinges or grilles they are designed to sit flush with adjacent cabinetry. Choose from classic stainless steel panels with either tubular or pro handles or opt for custom cabinetry for seemless integration. Sub-Zero wine storage combines high-quality materials, advanced technology and design, and a 70-year tradition of American craftsmanship to protect a cherished wine collection. Available from Sub-Zero Wolf Australia
  5 | Piper Pendant in Rose Piper-Pendant_Rose It is hard to fault the Piper Pendant in Rose, made from glass and brass it is exquisitely elegant, yet subtle and understated at the same time. Available from Jardan
  6 | Distinta Breakfast Collection in copper Distinta-Style-Copper[1] The Distinta Breakfast Collection is sure to create one good looking kitcehn. With its elegant lines and colour palette, the range embodies style, making it a unique statement for every kitchen. Available in Future Bronze, Style Copper, Elegance Black and Pure White, the Distinta Collection includes a two or four slice toaster, mechanical or digital Kettle and Manual Pump Coffee Machine. Available from De Longhi abc
Architecture
Design Hunters
NOT HOMES

5 Top New Designer Cafes

  FONDA HAWTHORN by Techné Architecture + Interior Design 1U5A3681-Edit 1U5A3819-Edit 1U5A3583-Edit 1U5A3636-Edit   1U5A3821-Edit   1U5A3872-Edit 1U5A3889-Edit 1U5A3914-Edit   1U5A3940-Edit 1U5A3949-Edit   1U5A7173-Edit 1U5A7176-Edit 1U5A7186-Edit 1U5A7201-Edit   It’s the third restaurant in the Fonda familia, but Melbourne-based firm Techné Architecture + Interior Design have still achieved a playful and original interior that references its popular predecessors. Echoing the fresh Mexican fare on offer, Techné have shaped their design though colour, texture and pattern, deriving inspiration from vernacular and contemporary Mexican culture.   1U5A7219-Edit 1U5A7222-Edit 1U5A7223-Edit 1U5A7233-Edit 1U5A7239-Edit   Against the heritage backdrop of the Hawthorn corner building, the signature Fonda colour palette of pastel pinks, yellows and blue and vibrant hues is offset against original timber trusses, exposed red brick walls and concrete flooring. Custom-fabricated steel screens and Besser Blocks break up the large space into more intimate dining spaces, defined by a range of bespoke furniture pieces and varied seating typologies which include intimate booths, small tables and bar seating. Photography by Tom Blachford techne.com.au fondamexican.com.au
  BONDI’S BEST by TomMarkHenry 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53014_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53018_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53037_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53060_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53068_LowRes Design studio TomMarkHenry have recently completed a sophisticated fitout for Bondi’s Best, appropriately representing the Sydney providore’s high quality produce. “Bondi’s Best is a tonal exploration of blues that emulate a sophisticated seafood restaurant with hints of shapes and textures that speak to the sea, without being your average seafood joint” explains Cushla McFadden, a partner of the practice.   150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53082_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53099_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53114_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53118_LowRes 150121_BONDI'S_BEST_53134-2_LowRes A ceiling defined by stretched ropes creates an intimate environment, further enhanced by travertine and tile-clad surfaces in blue and grey tones. The element of premium quality is underscored by use of brass accent lighting and edge trims which sit comfortably amongst the charcoal walls, bespoke glazed terracotta-tiled tables and a feature fish locker wall which houses and displays fresh fish. Photography by Damian Bennett tommarkhenry.com bondisbest.com.au
  GREENE ST JUICE CO by Travis Walton #3196_TWA_Juice53374H #3196_TWA_Juice53317 #3196_TWA_Juice53303H 7 6 Untitled-1 Strictly speaking it’s a store, but designer Travis Walton’s interior for Greene Street Juice Co in Prahran deserves special mention for its appropriately restrained and meticulous craftsmanship.   4 3 5 2   Inspired by its Manhattan origins (and organic products), the driving influences in designer Travis Walton’s interior include natural textures (like stone, walnut battens and planting) and a combination of geometric and directional forms in steel and timber which echo New York’s iconic bridges and fire escapes. Exposed services, a fully glazed shopfront and a concrete floor complete the urban aesthetic. Travis Walton Greene Street Juice
  YARDSTICK COFFEE by ACRE image_file_adqvmksism image_file_dxbqctxnoe image_file_e8zwssslen image_file_g2g4rm03vy image_file_h0flc9ouov image_file_httnqyivxu image_file_jdkh5y4sqj image_file_k2b887364n image_file_n1wowm4sz7 image_file_nk3qa8y3zy image_file_nkkw4h5vai image_file_oc0e5xgory image_file_pyllncpx5t image_file_qi52h6ebom image_file_vl6n0ken0u Yardstick is an “institution of coffee” located in Makati City, Philippines. Designed by self proclaimed “idea crafters”, Acre Studio, the space has been designed to increase the knowledge and spread of specialty coffee in the Philippines. The project is composed of three elements - a cafe, a coffee roastery and a coffee lab. Despite their sparing use of colour, the space has the feel of a fun workshop, accented by a playful use of colours and juxtaposed against the use of diffused lights which have eliminated shadows, thereby creating an evenly lit canvas to communicate the idea of a“clean and honest space.” Images via ACRE acre.sg Yardstick Coffee
  L’AMERICANO ESPRESSO BAR by Alexander & CO MHP-290 MHP-297 MHP-41 MHP-947 MHP-758 MHP-743 MHP-730 “An Italian American cafe meets Dicky Greenleaf from The Talented Mr Ripley,” says Jeremy Bull, principal of design studio Alexander & CO when describing furniture retailer Coco Republic’s brief for a new cafe located at the furniture retailer’s Sydney showroom. “Coco Republic desired a look that was nautical, atmospheric and genuine,” he continues. “But it also had to feel luxe enough to support the Coco Republic brand with sympathy, but be a brand in its own right.”     MHP-493 MHP-462   In response Bull has created an elegant interior that also integrates an element of the quirky. A green and white candy striped entrance canopy flanked by glossy green tiling opens up to the street via a European style hatch juxtaposed by raw brickwork, a vintage bicycle and gold leaf signage. Inside, the American-meets-Italian aesthetic is expressed through hardy leather furniture, metal and timber handing racks, nautical rope detailing, painted weatherboard and herringbone flooring and a sandblasted masonry backdrop, accented with glamorous lighting, marble counter-tops, brass detailing and a gallery wall of miniature leisure boats. Photography by Maree Homer alexanderand.co lamericano.com.au  abc
Architecture
Homes

Bringing the backyard back to Brisbane

  The house, in Brisbane’s New Farm suburb, has been built in a contemporary style with a focus on high quality craftsmanship and design, exemplified by the spacious semi-indoor entertaining area attached to the courtyard. MountfordRd_26   Plazibat principal Shane Plazibat say that the house “explores an alternative solution for the diminishing backyard spaces of inner city homes. By changing the built form into an ‘L’ shape plan arrangement we were able to create a one-room-deep plan for better natural lighting and ventilation. We also brought back the traditional ‘backyard space’ to play a more crucial role in forming a dialogue with the whole house.”   MountfordRd_25 MountfordRd_22   It is this attention to design that makes the house the stylish home it is. Flourishes like the two storey pizza oven chimney, the elevated entryway to the building and feature tiled wall showcase the warmth and modernity of the building’s design. MountfordRd_15   A special wall design, allowing for the flowthrough of filtered light, emphasises the variety of different materials Plazibat utilised in crafting the house. MountfordRd_18 MountfordRd_02   Yet it is the combined elements of both indoor and outdoor living, public and private that make this house special. The design encourages an active indoor and outdoor living meld, and still offers a series of different spaces and rooms that occupants can retreat to. MountfordRd_05   Plazibat Architects sparch.com.auabc
Architecture
Homes

Charming Melbourne Renovation: A Photo Essay

  With a strong and planned sense of design, this remodeled home retains a charming warmth without sacrificing modernity's neat aesthetic.  
Lounge and Hallway NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6285 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6284 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6299 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6302 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6310
From the designer: "We really wanted the extension to this very typical inner-urban house in Melbourne to be timeless. No tricks, no gimmicks, just a great renovation that will never grow old. As a result we used simple materials that never seem to go out of fashion, white painted bricks, timber floorboards and a beautiful timber lined ceiling.
Kitchen and Dining NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6322   NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6344 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6336   NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6370       NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6367 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6384 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6362 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6377 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6424 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6405 Lounge     NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6389 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6421 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6406   Outdoor NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6429 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6432 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6434 Bathroom NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6463 Bedroom and Office NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6264 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6251 NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6446   NestArchitects_MiddlePark_6483 Nest Architects nestarchitects.com.auabc
Design Products
Accessories

What makes Geberit different?

  Perhaps it is best to rewind, right back to the beginning when Caspar Melichior Gebert opened his plumbing company in 1874. It was here that the foundations as to what would make Geberit the success it is today were laid. Gebert was a true innovator, committed to quality and had a strong vision; it is this sense of integrity that has been carried through - keeping them leaders in their game and ever–expanding today.   1837651-copy   Everything comes back to one primary goal for Geberit: to make a sustainable improvement in the quality of life by innovative sanitary solutions. With a particular focus on technology, the company place major emphasis on innovation, durability and sustainability in order to achieve that. It is not that these three things are particularly unique to a brand, but that Geberit is resolute in sticking to them that makes the difference. From product design to company policy, Geberit stays focused on the goal at hand and ensures each step and facet is in line with those values. Rigorous in their commitment to innovation, the company has 500 technical advisors working the field in Europe alone; invest in nine technology areas including acoustics and hydraulics; and have 17 specialised production facilities worldwide. In the last five years alone, 103 new patents were registered.   Abwasserturm_Jona_2012-(2)-copy   In terms of sustainability, Geberit is equally paramount in their approach. They live up to their responsibilities, using modern vehicles that reduce emission, for example, continuously research ways to reduce environmental impact company wide, and get involved in social projects around the world.   Geberit_Sigma20_chrome   Geberit know what they stand for and stick to their values without question. With that in mind, it's not quite as surprising they've lasted so long and remained so strong – today continuing to lead in concealed cistern technology and drainage solutions and selling products in over 100 countries around the world. Precision, know-how and sheer joy in innovation characterise Geberit products and systems, successfully enhancing quality of life for generations. Geberit geberit.com.auabc
Design Products
Accessories

East Meets West: Kelly Hoppen for apaiser

. apaiser is thrilled to be collaborating with Kelly Hoppen MBE, in creating these exclusive designs. Kelly's unique range epitomises the apaiser focus on the creation of luxurious ambience in the bathroom. As an award winning bathware designer and manufacturer in hand finished stone composite bathware, apaiser has become synonymous with luxury and is renowned for its natural organic feel and sculptural lines. Inspired by Kelly's signature style of clean lines and sleek simplicity, we have together created a blend of distinctive curvaceous shapes and highly functional design. KH4 Kelly has always been so inspired by the traditional art of Origami and to be able to portray this gorgeous art form in such a strong fabric was a delight and filled her with inspiration. This range is the epitome of sophistication and discipline. With its minimalistic lines it creates a Zen-like feeling and mesmerising design, which is sure to bring any bathroom to life. As well as being a day to day product of function, it doubles as an art piece, which was the original idea behind the creation. Kelly loves that it is something different to look at. KH2 KH5 The layering of different textures is a key design aesthetic of Kelly's, so for the Harmony range, she gathered inspiration from lotus flowers, wooden and ceramic bowls to create this wonderful shape for a sensational piece. Kelly wanted this range to portray purity and strength, which it does with its soft lines and strong outer structure. In the East, bathing is a ceremony and Kelly wanted to ensure that this range was a celebration of the art of bathing. KH1 Bande was originally formed from Kelly's inspirations of the Obi, a sash used in traditional Japanese dress. Kelly uses this in a lot of her product designs and applied this style to the Bande bathware range to create something different and appealing to the eye. The range is both delicate and subtle, with a hint of her famous East meets West trend. For Kelly, the band completes the shape and adds contrast and dimension. This is truly a collection for the 21st century. apaiser.comabc