About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
Parties

Pittella’s new showroom party

The new showroom aligns aesthetic style with company's core value of offering top-quality, timeless and elegant Italian designed products. Broken into a series of rooms, the showroom allows customer's to journey naturally through the space, with each room taking on a unique function for showcasing products.

A lively event saw the company celebrating the new showroom's opening. [gallery ids="44247,44248,44249,44250,44251,44252,44269,44267,44266,44270,44268,44271,44272,44253,44273,44274,44276,44275,44277,44279,44280,44281,44282,44283,44285,44286,44287,44284,44254,44255,44256,44257,44258,44259,44260,44261,44262,44263,44264,44265,44278"] Pittella pittella.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunter® Q&A: Henri Sayes

Name: Henri Sayes Position: Architect at Sayes Studio Location: Auckland, New Zealand Parameters of project: 115m2 / 2 bedrooms + study, 1 bathroom, 1 powder room What was the brief for this project, and who was it designed for? The house was designed for myself and my wife Nicole. Being our own client allowed the brief to be quite flexible: other than practical requirements like having 3 bedrooms, we started with very few preconceived ideas.   . We wanted a house which felt generous despite its modest size, a social house where the occupants were always connected. It also had to be good for large dinner parties. The design process became a way of exploring different ways to live and informed the brief as much as the brief informed the design process – it became quite a cyclical process Sayes-Stock-House-10 What did you enjoy most about the process of creating this space and why? I worked on this project outside my day job at Malcolm Walker Architects. It was refreshing to be able to explore design ideas without time pressures and client expectations. The project was designed and documented over about 2 years, we had a limited budget, but a lot of time to refine ideas to logical end point. I worked primarily through physical models (about 10) and hand drawings (mainly plans and sections). Sayes-Stock-House--01 What was the most challenging aspect, and how did you overcome that? The budget. It meant reevaluating what good architecture was, to explore what was good value, rather than just being good. The priority was to design the house to have good space and spatial contrast, rather than gratuitous architectural gesturers. The form and elevation were important, but designed as an expression of the space rather than the driver. Sayes-Stock-House--02 How did the original site affect the design? Were there any noteworthy historical qualities about it? The site is overwhelming suburban, and is a rear section with no road frontage. The surrounding properties are quite modest 1950s cottages which informed the scale and simple form of the house. Not having a street frontage allowed for a more casual entry Sayes-Stock-House--03 Sayes-Stock-House--04 Is the local climate or landscape reflected in the space, how important was this to the final design? Auckland ha quite fickle weather, so we designed the house with deep eaves so doors can be left open when a sunny morning turns to a showery afternoon. What sort of materials did you use, do they have any connection to the area? The material palate is... External: cedar weatherboards left to weather, bandsawn plywood (painted), alumiuium joinery, Internal: concrete slab, exposed timber trusses (painted), grooved plywood ceiling (painted) American oak flooring (we also made the door stops and towel/ shower curtain rail, and handrail from oak dowel) and plasterboard wall linings (painted). We also used simple motifs that repeat throughout the house, penny tiles, peg board and circular mirrors etc. Sayes-Stock-House--05 Sayes-Stock-House-06 Are there any sustainable qualities to the design? Good design is inherently sustainable. The main strategy we employed was to build as small as practically possible and to use renewable materials. Further to this the living spaces are orientated for good solar gain in the winter, but the deep eaves regulates solar gain in the summer. The concrete slab provides thermal mass to regulate the temperature throughout the year. What about this space makes it a special and personal project for you? It was the first house which I’d completed under my own name, which was made more special for the fact that I also got to live it. I’d spend so much time imagining how things are going to be, that you already know what you’re going to get before you start building. But it turned out there are so many great little moments which I wasn't expecting – moments which I don’t think you grasp or appreciate without inhabiting a house for a period of time. Sayes-Stock-House-07 Sayes-Stock-House-09 What are some of the owner’s favourite aspects of this space? The light and the warmth. This house captures sun throughout the day making the simple spaces feel ever-changing as the sun moves through the trusses or the down the stairs. And how warm it is! Double glazing, insulation everywhere and the small size make this house so cosy in winter (and cool in summer). Photography: Patrick Reynolds patrickreynolds.co.nz Sayes Studio sayes.co.nzabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Designing for an Aesop Aesthetic

The original store, opened in 2007, had Melbourne architect Rodney Eggleston quickly constructing its façade over a mere five days; born more of necessity than design desire. Originally intended as a temporary installation, the cardboard clad interior was so well received that Aesop let it stand. After seven years though, refurbishment became inevitable. AESOP-AU-STORE-FLINDERS-LANE-01 In a move that gives a fresh interpretation to the space yet acknowledges its history, the design features prominent use of industrial cardboard, including a bold feature wall created from 1550 cardboard sheets. The feature wall envelops the right-hand side of the store, its curvature guiding visitors through the space, encouraging exploration. AESOP-AU-STORE-FLINDERS-LANE-02 AESOP-AU-STORE-FLINDERS-LANE-03 Intended to soften, wear and evolve with age, the structure reflects the connection between built forms and their occupants. A dark, restrained palette is seen throughout the rest of the interior, with a careful balance of concrete, lacquered oak and blackened steel. AESOP-AU-STORE-FLINDERS-LANE-05 Customers can explore and select from Aesop’s complete range of skin, hair and body care products, distinguished by botanical and laboratory-generated ingredients of the highest quality. AESOP-AU-STORE-FLINDERS-LANE-07 Founded in Melbourne in 1987, Aesop today offers its renowned range of skin, hair, and body care products in signature stores around the world. As the company evolves, meticulously considered design remains paramount to the creation of each space. Aesop aesop.comabc
Happenings
What's On

Marina Ambramovic: In Residence

  We talk a lot about Slow Food, Slow Design and Slow Architecture. But what about Slow Life? Serbian artist Marina Ambramovic, hailed as one of the most important performance artists of our time, compels us to try it out at Marina Abramovic: In Residence, presented by Kaldor Public Art Projects, open to the public until 5 July.   marina-abramovic-in-residence   Stripped of time – watches and mobile phones are placed into lockers before entering – visitors engage in various activities that encourage a kind of meditation. This is the next phase in Abramovic's artistic development – as she moves from performer to conductor. The stations are a sample of the Ambramovic Method, a series of exercises designed by the artist over the course of 40 years to explore boundaries of body and mind.   marina-abramovic-in-residence-5   Whether it's following an exercise video, counting grains of rice or staring at a coloured square, the viewer becomes performer, both observer and observed simultaneously. We experience the effects of the exercises, form impressions and observe our thought patterns, as Facilitators – who have been trained by Abramovic on the art of presence – guide us through the stations.   marina-abramovic-in-residence-3   Upstairs at Pier 2/3, there are 12 young artists sleeping in 'cells' for the duration of the 12-day exhibition. They are the handpicked Residency Artists who have been spending time with Abramovic to develop their practice, while also interacting with members of the public who are encouraged to visit.   marina-abramovic-in-residence-6     The impact of the exercises are best felt. If you are not able to visit the exhibition, try this: Kaldor Public Art Projects Marina Abramovic Instituteabc
Design Hunters

We’re loving local design!

Art in above image is Mark Hislop's Brodee (2010) and Henry (2010) © Mark Hislop/Licensed by Viscopy 2016. This August we’re going to be putting the spotlight on design that’s uniquely MIA – ie. Made In Australia! We’re just under 7 weeks out from Sydney Indesign 2015 and we’re already seeing local designers and brands planting the seeds for a series of collaborative engagements that will make your Sydney Indesign experience truly memorable. ArthurG_Campaign2015_MorrisChair_Low02 Sydney brands you know and love – at Hill Street Precinct Head for the hills – literally! – at Hill Street Precinct in Surry Hills where Arthur G, Luxmy, Workshopped and Euroluce are teaming up with Design by Toko for The Project. It promises to be a three-way Australian design collaboration that will be sure to wow. Have those phone cameras ready! ArthurG_Campaign2015_Curtis_Low All Aussie furniture on show at Galleria Galleria is shaping up to be a very lively mix of designer furniture brands with plenty of locally designed and manufactured products on show – and even a few first-time exhibitors! Be the first to discover fresh home-made talent – all ready to do design business. Adaptive Interiors, Anaesthetic.Inde.Skeehan, Cafe Culture + Insitu, Catapult, ECC + USM, Folioworks, Gibbon Group, ISM Objects, Luxxbox, Savage Design Jardan Jardan_Image-1 First time Exhibitors at Sydney Indesign! See them at Galleria Bcompact Dezion Studio Exit Eighty Six Oxley Butterworth Pop Concrete DESIGNBYTHEM_DOMESTEMBUTTER-#5 Save yourself a seat at Design By Them Sydney darlings, Design By Them, are hard at work refreshing their Chippendale showroom in time for Sydney Indesign this August. Even more exciting is the news that they’ll be hosting a DQ Round Table talk at their showroom on Saturday 15th August. Contact info@indesigntheevent.com to save your seat at DQ’s round table discussion on Cross-Industry Practice. Brenton Smith, Bates Smart Joe Farage, Farage Nick Karlovasitis, Design ByThem Rachel Oakley, Dulux Richard Weinman, Woods Bagot Sarah Gibson, DesignByThem CM-Studio_CrossSt_Hi-57 All-Australian favourites team up for The Project Staple & Co x C+M Studio Making their debut at Sydney Indesign is Staple & Co. Specialising in beautiful sofas and beds, Staple & Co have plenty of design stories to share. At Sydney Indesign they team up with fellow Sydney-siders C+M Studio to launch a brand new sofa. Collaborating with C+M Studio, Staple & Co will also stage The Project from an exciting pop-up space in Surry Hills. Jardan x Hannah Tribe Upping the ante on The Project in 2015 is Australian design brand Jardan with architect Hannah Tribe. They’re teaming up to give us an extra special surprise… we’re not allowed to say too much, but from what we’ve seen… it’s going to be hot! Sydney Indesign sydneyindesign.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

Towers of Tomorrow with LEGO

  Did you know there was such a thing as a certified LEGO® professional? Well, there is, and there's only 12 in the world. One of them is Australian Ryan Mcnaught, whose recent project is now on exhibition at the Museum of Sydney. Part of Sydney Living Museum's program, the Towers of Tomorrow recreates 18 tall and extraordinary buildings from Australia and Asia. Some are engineering head-turners while others are technical marvels.   slm_towers-of-tomorrow-3 LEGO master Ryan Mcnaught working on Marina Bay Sands model   Some of these eye-popping giants, like the Shanghai Tower, pioneer new ways of living, while others like Singapore's Marina Bay Sands are instant global landmarks. Some are green, others lean. Some are strange and other-worldly, others are breathtakingly beautiful.   slm_towers-of-tomorrow-4 Sydney Tower, sky-high and up close   This is a study in architectural construction, with some models standing over 3 metres high, in stunning architectural detail and playful use of colours and textures. They will inspire kids and big kids alike to create their own ‘towers of tomorrow’, with over 200,000 loose LEGO® bricks on hand. You can build your own towering creation and add it to the colourful futuristic metropolis rising in the heart of the exhibition.   slm_towers-of-tomorrow-5 Eureka Tower and Central Park Tower, up close   Towers of Tomorrow runs until 12 July Photo © James Horan for Sydney Living Museumsabc
Architecture
Homes

Framing nature in architecture

Positioned at the crest of a hill the Whitehall Road Residence in Flinders takes advantage of sweeping views of the surrounding landscape, with a grove of mature gum trees informing the location of the house. Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0410 An impressive drystone wall that runs the full length of the house frames the residence. Melbourne design studio B.E. Architecture has designed this set piece of the residence as being cut into the earth, at once anchoring the house and countering the exposure of the site. Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0324 Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0276 Following the length of the drystone wall, the house is built in a series of straight-lined pavilions. In a design that downplays the scale of the five-bedroom house, the pavilion aesthetic allows for a variety of outdoor, indoor and interstitial spaces. Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0246 Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0174 The character of house’s interstitial spaces is further emphasised through B.E. Architecture’s employment of fully retractable glazing and delicate cane screening. Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0178 Stone, timber, glass and render serve as the dominant materials in the house’s construction. The weight and strength felt through the presence of stone, and the scale of the timber provide are offset through the juxtaposition of large expanses of glass featured throughout, and the natural grassy landscape the house finds itself in. Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0135 Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0057 This landscape can be fully enjoyed from the site, with sight lines being carefully coordinated with the glazing to properly reveal the vast beauty of the natural environment. Whitehall-Rd-Nov-2014_0004 B.E. Architecture bearchitecture.com  abc
Architecture
Homes

Creating a point of serenity

  For a busy couple with hectic trans-Tasman lives, their home base of South Yarra in Melbourne needed to serve a calming point of stability, not merely a stopping point. 157599 Pre-renovation, the 1990’s loft style apartment was unusually divided. Despite occupying a full floor of a large building, its spaciousness and flow were hindered by labyrinthine hallways, awkward layout and unwieldy connections between spaces. 157582 157500 The renovation, carried out by Melbourne’s Molecule, sought to maximize the size and useability of the space, emphasising a spatial looseness that epitomises the loft typology, making for more languid time at home. 157617 157470 Walls between the former lounge and main bedroom were removed to create a contiguous pair of living spaces that operate broadly as sitting room and den, but become two halves of a vast party room when the apartment switches into entertaining mode. 157408 157392 Borrowing ideas from hospitality, Molecule created a break between the former bedroom’s wardrobe and ensuite to house a fabulous wet bar and powder room. The previous dance studio in the apartment, complete with mirrored walls and sprung floor, has been repurposed to serve as the main bedroom. A large island of joinery provides a sleeping nook, display shelves for glassworks, an expansive wardrobe and a dressing station. 157268 Continuing Molecule’s signature interest in contextual sympathy, material selections and construction sought to achieve an invisible touch. A Japanese style of serenity has visible detail minimised, with white walls sitting a shadow line above light timber and stone floors. 157120 This soft touch of minimalist style emphasizes the design choices of this home. Not in its strict adherence to minimal aesthetic, but in Molecule’s invisible approach to design. Through seamlessly integrating new elements, the apartment removes any discernible line between what was and what is. Photography by Shannon McGrath Molecule moleculeweb.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

A Hotel For Dogs

Located some 45 minutes from Kuala Lumpur, the Negeri Sembilan based pet hotel allows owners to board their dogs when they have to be away. IMG_8136 IMG_8129 The form of the actual doghouse is inspired by classic graphical representations of doghouses. The houses and perimeter walls are made of concrete and stone so that the walls can weather naturally in a jungle setting. IMG_1287 IMG_1316 The houses themselves are made out of concrete and feature steel doors and openable steel platforms, which form balconies for dogs to lie about in the day. IMG_8198 The doghouses are naturally lit and ventilated with ceiling fans and perforated doors that made out of mosquitoes netting. Designed by WHBC Architects, the houses have been built with a natural aesthetic, focusing around trees, boulders and contour of the land. DSC_0058 Ultimately though, it’s the care of the owners, dog lovers themselves, that shape this project and define its charm. WHBC Architects whbca.comabc
Design Products
Finishes
MAGAZINE

Surfaces that are sustainable and smart

As part of their quest for sustainability, ECO by Cosentino gathers the waste materials we are all surrounded by, to create a product with a composition of 75% recycled materials. Glass, porcelain, vitrified ashes and even water are reused to breathe new life into something that had previously expired. KERANIUM-Encimera The remaining 25% is made up from a blend of quartz, natural stone, pigments and exclusive partially vegetable resin. DEKTON-ZENITH-Rest-Dani-García-1 DEKTON-Restaurante-Dani-Garcia-Marbella-01 ECO by Cosentino was created through comprehensive research and development, with all the manufacturing processes complying with high environmental standards. This makes ECO by Cosentino a highly sustainable and unique product for the modern smart home. Cosentino cosentino.comabc
Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

The smart home boom

Rising in the desert surrounding Palm Springs in California, BOOM is the brainchild of ten international architects, and was conceived for the gay community but extends its embrace to all. Arakawa-Gins_Image-Courtesy-HWKN DillerScofidioRenfro_Image-Courtesy-HWKN Pedestrian oriented and culture-driven, BOOM is designed to inspire its residents to better themselves and others. Totally rethinking the idea of how to create homes for the elderly, BOOM will be built in eight unique neighborhoods, each designed by a different architect. HWKN_Image-Courtesy-HWKN JMayerH_Image-Courtesy-HWKN Pathways and plazas set in a landscaped desert environment connect to the social and geographic heart of BOOM, which features an entertainment complex, boutique hotel, gym, spa, and wellness center. The health and wellness services cater to the health needs not just of retirees, but of all generations. Joel-Sanders-Architect_Image-Courtesy-HWKN L2-Tsionov-Vitkon_Image-Courtesy-HWKN BOOM is supplemented by the boomforlife website and a social media movement designed to move participants from a virtual community to one constructed out of bricks and mortar. This groundbreaking meld of online media and practical architectural work exemplifies the changing nature of what we define as a smart home. LOT-EK_Image-Courtesy-HWKN Rudin-Donner_Image-Courtesy-HWKN The website allows BOOM’s design team to collaborate with prospective residents, incorporating their ideas into the design of the boom community. These crowd-sourcing efforts also encourage boom members to shape the social programs and lifestyle for boom. Surfacedesign_Image-Courtesy-HWKN Aerial5_Image-Courtesy-HWKN The demands of the gay community are often seen as being more ambitious than traditional retirees. Gay Americans have a history of pioneering new ways of living; with BOOM there is a community that is multi-generational, smart and socially diverse. BOOM is a community open to everyone, young and old, gay and straight, exemplified by their philosophy that BOOM be about "inclusion, not seclusion; about living, not retiring" Boom boomforlife.tumblr.comabc
Design Products
Furniture

Twisting the classics

  The company creates bespoke, contemporary designed furniture with a classic twist. Entirely handcrafted with careful consideration of the finest details, White Furniture specialises in the art of traditional deep diamond buttoning. Harrison-Armchair Georgina-Armchair All of White Furniture’s designs are made to order, which ensures that the final pieces will suit exact needs for the home. The craftsmen who make the actual pieces have decades of experience behind them. The pride White has for its attention to detail is clear in the meticulously neat design every piece in their collection displays. Louis-Bar-Stool Palm-Carver-Dining-Chair Gold Coast’s Jupiters Hotel & Casino and Brisbane’s Treasury Casino have already seen a collection of White’s furniture placed throughout their spaces. Yet it is the home where these pieces Tiffany-Dining-Chair Truman-Dining-Chair---Leatherreally have the potential to shine.   White Furniture Design was created by Shelley Boyd, founding director of Australia’s leading interiors wholesaler, Boyd Blue, and was inspired by Shelley’s passion for traditional quality craftsmanship and globally inspired designs. Sarah-Ottoman Wellington-Sofa Boyd Blue is the national distributor for White Furniture Design throughout Australia. White Furniture Design whitefurnituredesign.comabc