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What is a Smart Home?

Above: Sven Ehmann. Photo by Alex Kroke / Stacking Green house by Vo Trong Nghia Architects . Photo by Hiroyuki Okiand Habitus: What is a Smart Home? Sven Ehmann: Following the media these days, it seems as if a smart home is essentially a home full of sensors, controllers, and networked technology. A place that knows us, supports our living, and fixes our misbehaviours occasionally. To some, this sounds like paradise; to others, it probably sounds like hell and total control. Before combining the two words, I would suggest widening the conversation about “smart homes” in order to better understand what “smart” means and what “home” means today. To me, smart living very much includes a sustainable home. Sustainability is not only influenced by technology but also location, floor plans, building materials used.   Building-Better   In our book Building Better, we document how architects and homeowners work together today to find unique and aesthetically solutions while building environmentally friendly houses. A vivid example is a four-story layered townhouse in Ho Chi Minh City disguises itself behind 12 levels of greenery. A façade composed of planters filled lush vegetation not only serves as horizontal louvers directing light and air into the house, but also a passive cooling strategy upgrading the indoor thermal environment. buildingbetter_press_p246-247-2 buildingbetter_press_p250-251 Stacking Green from Building Better copyright Gestalten 2015 On the other hand, the word “home” means more than being environmentally friendly or maintainable. Instead, the urban nomads—people among us who move from one place to another—might have several homes where they are emotionally attached to when they travel, work abroad, or visit friends and families. These places have much more to serve than merely high technology. Our recent book The New Nomads features a caravan of trailers and tents who temporarily repurposed the private gardens of Musée du Quai Branly in Paris for a series of public events and programs. Together they transformed the outdoors into a shared living room for impromptu gatherings. This was where they called home.   Untitled-1 thenewnomads_press_p032-033 Nomad by Bureau A from The New Nomads, Copyright Gestalten 2015. Photo: Jack Halloway & Jay Nelson   Habitus: What features are prominent in Smart Homes today? How has this changed over the past 5-10 years? Sven Ehmann: The most relevant change over the last decade is the digitalization with all its innovations and consequences, but what’s even more important is the transformation in the minds and the awareness of people. Architects, engineers, developers, and homeowners design, build and desire to live in smarter homes. Habitus: Why is it more important than ever to have consciously designed homes? Sven Ehmann: We are simply responsible for everything we build and produce, and this has become more obvious and more transparent than before. It is a matter of taste, attitude and survival. Habitus: Where is the trend towards Smart Homes strongest? A. There are different levels of innovation around smart living. I would say that the U.S. is strong in developing and marketing the latest high-tech consumer goods, while over here in Germany we have a major focus on sustainable renovation and improved insulation of existing buildings as well as security. Japan seems to be the country that reinvents the bathroom. It’s a global challenge, and there are solutions around the globe as well.   building_better_page02 building_better_page01 From Building Better, copyright Gestalten 2015 Habitus: What can Australia learn from other countries, and vice versa? Sven Ehmann: I think each country has its uniqueness as well as universal challenges. Identify the unique ones and share your results while acknowledging the global challenges and collaborating with partners around the world for better solutions. Habitus: How can we make our homes smarter? Sven Ehmann: If house owners or inhabitants are smart, interested, open-minded, and are able to criticize, everything else will follow soon.   Gestalten gestalten.com Sven Ehmann is a creative director from Berlin. He spends most of his time working with publishing company Gestalten where he edited over 70 books on contemporary visual culture with subjects ranging from information graphics and editorial design, to architecture, interior design, interactive environments, 3D printing, bicycles and food. Sven is most curious about radically new forms of creative expression and currently explores the intersection between design, technology and journalism. Besides that he also works as a curator, lecturer and consultant on aspects of design and innovation.  abc
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Fixed & Fitted

Zucchetti makes an eclectic and strong statement for modern showers

Zucchetti designer Diego Grandi’s started with the goal of bringing the normally static bathroom space to life. To do this, he designed an object with strong expressive potential and plenty of scope for dynamism. “The concept is simple: the name comes both from your movement towards the water, and from the water that follows you”, says Diego. Zucchetti Closer In regards to form, the Closer more resembles a lamp than a traditional showerhead. With three moveable joints and extendable features the showerhead is not simply an aesthetic choice for consumers; the Closer is designed to be enjoyed. The adjustable arm allows for different spatial configurations, which in turn translates into equally wide ranges of methods for the user to control and direct the jet of water. Zucchetti Closer As per all of Candana’s stocked products, Closer by Zucchetti keeps in line with the needs of modern life, combining inspirational design with practical functionality, with the result being an exhilarating showering experience. Candana candana.com.auabc
Architecture
Uncategorized

What Makes The Perfect Kitchen Layout?

As the heart of the home, the role of the kitchen is pivotal to our daily lives as it provides an area to socialise, revitalise and constantly be inspired. It is crucial that the design of the kitchen, whether big or small; in a studio-size city apartment or an extravagant house; ultimately supports your living and cooking style in the best, most functional way possible. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1170"]Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecure Clovelly Apartment by James Garvan Architecture.[/caption] When it comes to re-designing the kitchen, it all comes down to organisation, layout, the consideration of where existing fittings and fixtures are, additional appliances, space for activity and how many people you’re cooking for and with. We sometimes turn towards IKEA inspiration for their various styles of modern and industrial kitchen layouts, paired with a grand butlers pantry layout or long configurations of storage solutions. Or if you want to renovate and re-design your own kitchen, some of us have turned to the masters of home renovations: Bunnings and their beloved custom kitchen design planner, Kaboodle – the ultimate planner to make the process of renovating and achieving a classic kitchen straightforward and easy. Every kitchen style is different, refined and configured to accommodate your lifestyle. And with so much time at home, what better way to spend it than to a complete kitchen overhaul? These are some standard kitchen styles, configurations and floor plans to deliver inspiration and kick-start your new, revitalised cooking haven. U-Shaped Kitchen Layout For those who have the luxury of space, the U-shape kitchen layout is the perfect choice. Designed for a large open plan area, the U-Shape is suited to households that spend a lot of time in the kitchen. [caption id="attachment_101366" align="alignleft" width="1170"] Olinda House by BENT Architecture. Photography by Tatjana Plitt.[/caption] Pros: There will never be a storage or workspace shortage, with the countertops and cabinets are spread across three walls, with an option of adding an island bench in the middle. It can be a highly effective kitchen layout that supports the standard dimensions of the working triangle with ample amounts of space of 1200mm between each of the working zones of preparation, cooking and storage. Cons: The kitchen layout lends itself to a large floor plan and is usually fitted with maximum amount of storage options, which could make it look quite intense and out of character for a contemporary home. [caption id="attachment_101369" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Olinda House by BENT Architecture. Photography by Tatjana Plitt.[/caption] With the U-shape design, the kitchen can be used to its maximum potential as a gathering area and a home chef’s dream kitchen. L-Shaped Kitchen Layout The L-shaped kitchen is suitable for a medium-sized space, as it loses one of the three walls that we’ve previously seen in the U-shaped floor plan. On one wall, you would find the cooking essentials such as the stove, oven and washing area with the kitchen pantry, storage and fridge on the other. [caption id="attachment_79272" align="alignleft" width="1170"]Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell kitchen North Fitzroy House by Kennedy Nolan. Photography by Derek Swalwell.[/caption] Pros: This is perfect for residences housing one individual, a couple or a small family of four as it maximizes the space of a smaller floor plan with efficient storage solutions and flexible and efficient working areas. Cons: However with the lack of space, the layout tends to create storage solutions vertically which could be difficult for ease accessibility in some residences. [caption id="attachment_79266" align="alignleft" width="1170"]Liverpool House Kennedy Nolan cc Derek Swalwell Brooklyn dining chairs Jardan North Fitzroy House by Kennedy Nolan. Photography by Derek Swalwell.[/caption] The L-shaped configuration also offers ideal balance of privacy and open-plan cooking for the household. G-Shaped Kitchen Layout The G-shaped approach is designed for homes that have the minimum space required for a functioning kitchen layout, but with maximum functionality. It allows activity to take place across three sides, with the fridge, stovetop, oven and cabinets/storage covering two walls and a kitchen bench unit as the third to complete the G-shape. [caption id="attachment_99014" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Chef, André Chiang's Residence by Lee Design Studio.[/caption] Pros: This kitchen layout is designed for small spaces and therefore is efficiently crafted to enhance the cooking experience. Storage solutions are compact and concealed throughout the G-shape, without compromising on the ample amounts of benchtop space needed for cooking. Similar to the L-shaped kitchen layout, this design allows the individual to cook in a semi-private level, with a slight pathway to enter in and out of the kitchen and an open view of the living areas across the extra island unit. Cons: It introduces a lot of corner base cabinets, which don’t offer the most efficient storage options. Although there’s a lot of deep, internal storage in these corner kitchen areas, it can be quite difficult to reach to the back areas of the cabinet and retrieve small items. [caption id="attachment_98573" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Chef, André Chiang's Residence by Lee Design Studio.[/caption] The star of this kitchen layout is the additional kitchen unit. This island ‘breakfast bar’ offers the perfect amount of space for a quick snack, a cup of coffee to start your day or can even be used as a display bench for your charming cocktail shaker and bartending essentials. The bench height is usually designed for a pair of high bar stools, where one can also sit, converse with the cook and watch the magic in the kitchen. Galley Kitchen Layout [caption id="attachment_79171" align="alignleft" width="1170"]Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly kitchen Tiny Apartment By Tsai Design. Photography by Tess Kelly.[/caption] More common in older-style residences, the Galley kitchen layout is designed for a small to medium size space. This style is ideal for long corridor kitchens for a chef that loves to cook in private and situated away from the other living areas. Pros: The design is extremely functional with storage available across two walls in a compact floor plan, without compromising on the required dimensions for the standard cooktop and fridge appliances. It gives the cook a simple and streamlined way of working with one entry and exit point or one on either side of the narrow space, making their time in the kitchen productive and organized in the way they operate. Cons: It can make the individual feel excluded, where most of the kitchen layout is closed off to the rest of the house and doesn’t suit an open plan lifestyle. With most of the space taken up by storage and kitchen appliances, that leaves very little breathing space and avenues where windows and light can brighten up the space. Bringing pops of colour, beautiful finishes and impressive organisation however can bring a lot of soul into the petite kitchen layout. [caption id="attachment_79168" align="alignleft" width="1170"]Type Street Apartment Tsai Design cc Tess Kelly dining Tiny Apartment By Tsai Design. Photography by Tess Kelly.[/caption]

These classic kitchen layouts and styles can be a great starting point to reshaping your ideal cooking space. Make sure to consider your lifestyle, how many people you’re accommodating and ultimately, the food you love to cook and what that requires when dreaming of your new kitchen and creating a sanctuary that is specially made for you. [caption id="attachment_98556" align="alignnone" width="1170"] Wellington Hillside House by Patchwork Architecture.[/caption]
Header Image: Francis Apartment by Studio Weave Architects. Photography by Tom Ferguson. 
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Architecture
Design Hunters

Does House Orientation Really Matter?

Whether you’re building, buying, renovating, or simply a fiend for residential property insights/eye-candy, you will have heard through the grapevine about the enigmatic north facing house. Architects and real estate agents speak of it as if it is the holy grail of residential design. Whenever a project or property, even slightly blessed with a northerly aspect, happens across either’s desk, it becomes their personal quest to maximise the auspiciousness of said orientation so that, when the their job is done, residents may bask in all the glory of having a north facing house. … But what exactly is all the fuss about a north facing house? Studio Takt added a north facing living pavilion to a dark, cramped 1950s brick bungalow in Illawarra, NSW, to open Exoskeleton House up to the northerly aspect and connect it to its landscape.
Studio Takt added a north facing living pavilion to a dark, cramped 1950s brick bungalow in Illawarra, NSW, to open Exoskeleton House up to the northerly aspect and connect it to its landscape.Studio Takt added a north facing living pavilion to a dark, cramped 1950s brick bungalow in Illawarra, NSW, to open Exoskeleton House up to the northerly aspect and connect it to its landscape.
Like any other buzzword in the books, house orientation and all its north, east, south and west derivatives were, once upon a time, professional jargon used only by those well-versed in the built environment. Today, thanks to its spread through word of mouth, the fact that house orientation means something important to us all is obvious. What it means and why it matters, however, is not so conspicuous. At least, until now; here’s what you need to know about house orientation and what all the fuss is about having a north facing house.

Why House Orientation Matters

Fundamentally, the orientation of a house determines its relationship with the sun. Also known as the centre of our universe, the sun – and our position in relation to it – has an enormous influence on the liveability of a house. That goes for liveability in the sense of comfort as well as health and wellbeing, with the sun being not only an abundant, natural source of light, warmth and solar energy, but also of the ever-precious disease-fighting, mood-boosting Vitamin D. In a nutshell: our world, quite literally, revolves around the sun. Light House, designed by LAYAN, is an Alts & Ads a Victorian worker’s cottage in Melbourne that has a façade screen that enables the occupants to closely observe and live in harmony the rhythms of nature.
Light House, designed by LAYAN, is an Alts & Ads a Victorian worker’s cottage in Melbourne that has a façade screen that enables the occupants to closely observe and live in harmony the rhythms of nature.Light House, designed by LAYAN, is an Alts & Ads a Victorian worker’s cottage in Melbourne that has a façade screen that enables the occupants to closely observe and live in harmony the rhythms of nature.
With the habitability of our environment – built and natural – irrevocably at the whim of solar conditions, considering the house position in relation to the sun is of utmost importance when designing or buying a home. When house orientation is duly considered in residential design, the resulting home is specifically designed to provide the most comfortable living environment, year-round, while cultivating the positive wellbeing of inhabitants.

Benefits: House Orientation And Passive Solar Design

The benefits of living in a well-orientated house or apartment are endless, for two keys reasons: temperature/climate management and energy efficiency. A core principle of passive solar design, a well-orientated house is essentially optimised to harness all of the sun’s bright, warm glory where and when its most valued – when it’s not too hot nor too bright, but just right – and shut it out when it’s not. Cumulus Studio's brief for Midway Point House, in Tasmania, requested privacy from the street while also capturing northern sun, and to make the most of western views but minimise glare and heat gains / loss.
Cumulus Studio's brief for Midway Point House, in Tasmania, requested privacy from the street while also capturing northern sun, and to make the most of western views but minimise glare and heat gains / loss.Cumulus Studio's brief for Midway Point House, in Tasmania, requested privacy from the street while also capturing northern sun, and to make the most of western views but minimise glare and heat gains / loss.

Solar Syncing: Sun Path Is Relative To Time And Place

Determined by earth’s dance around the solar system, time has an intrinsic correlation to the sun’s path in both the daily and seasonal sense. As such, sun’s path defines the length of daytime and the amount of daylight received along a certain latitude during a given season. When it comes to place, solar syncing is relative to climate, hemisphere and site topology. Just as with the seasons, the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere have yin and yang experiences of the sun path. For instance, a winter’s day in the Northern Hemisphere begins with the sun rising in the south east before travelling over the equator, in the southern horizon, and setting in the south west. On the flip side, in the Southern Hemisphere, the winter sun rises in the north east, journeys over the equator (in the northern horizon), before setting in the north west. Come summertime, the sunrise direction and sun path in each hemisphere is the same as the other's winter solar path.

What House Orientation Is Best?

Taking all this into account, it’s safe to say that there is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ when it comes to the best house orientation. The yin and yang nature of the Earth’s Hemispheres alone tells us that whatever is deemed the best orientation in the North will be unfavourable for the antipodes of the South. And that’s not to mention the disparate demands of differing geographies and where they sit on the spectrum of polar to tropical climes. Daniel Hudson of Jackson Teece drastically reconfigured the plans of his own inner-city Brisbane home in order to create the considered and site-responsive north facing house it is today.
Daniel Hudson of Jackson Teece drastically reconfigured the plans of his own inner-city Brisbane home in order to create the considered and site-responsive north facing house it is today.Architect Daniel Hudson of Jackson Teece drastically reconfigured the plans of his own inner-city Brisbane home in order to create the considered and site-responsive north facing house it is today.
  Northerly Aspect In antipodean countries such as Australia and New Zealand, a north facing house is widely considered the most desirable, due to their fortuitous aspect in relation to the sun path. When the windows, main living areas and/or backyard of a home are north facing, these spaces will maximise natural light as the sun moves from east-to-west each day, all year round. This can make a huge difference during winter and in urban areas. In order to make the most of this Melbourne residence’s blessed northerly aspect, Taylor Knights literally flipped the traditional layout of Fitzroy Terrace on its head.
In order to make the most of this Melbourne residence’s blessed northerly aspect, Taylor Knights literally flipped the traditional layout of Fitzroy Terrace on its head.In order to make the most of this Melbourne residence’s blessed northerly aspect, Taylor Knights literally flipped the traditional layout of Fitzroy Terrace on its head.
Eastern Aspect While east facing houses and apartments get to enjoy beautiful sunrises and full morning sun, it will all be over by noon. Summer mornings can be uncomfortably hot while winter evenings will call for heating early on, in lieu of receiving warmth from the afternoon sun. Southern Aspect In the Southern Hemisphere, south facing homes are notoriously deprived of sunlight –  particularly in the winter, when the sun direction is coming from the north. Due to their lack of sunlight, south facing houses and apartments can be prone to condensation, mould and mildew. Western Aspect With the sun setting in the west, west facing houses and apartments can get glaring afternoon sun – most especially if reflected off of nearby water. Sun from a low angle (during rising and setting rather than at the peak of midday) can be especially hard to manage as most awnings/shade devices are designed to shade from above. Architect Peter Besley gave Couldrey House, in Brisbane, a windowless west-facing street entry elevation built from off-white bricks to protect the house from the sun.
Architect Peter Besley gave Couldrey House, in Brisbane, a windowless west-facing street entry elevation built from off-white bricks to protect the house from the sun.Architect Peter Besley gave Couldrey House, in Brisbane, a windowless west-facing street entry elevation built from off-white bricks to protect the house from the sun.
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Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

The YO! Home of the Future

Simon Woodroffe’s ingenious design turns a one-room apartment into four different spaces. At the press of a button, the living space transforms into a bedroom with a bed lowered from the ceiling, or into a dining area with a sunken table being revealed in the floor. 100_Design2955100_Design2968 Pull a wall form a hidden recess to offer privacy to a guest, turn a desk around into a second bed or reveal a range of furniture completely hidden from view. Through a series of intelligently designed systems, an eighty square metre space is turned into a moveable, comfortable home. 100_Design2963 100_Design2991_2 The YO! Home was designed by a carefully compiled team combining interior designers, yacht designers and engineers normally employed in the mechanics of stage scenery. The design draws on Woodroffe’s previous career in rock concert show stage design, his fondness for living in houseboats, as well his previous work on the compact YOTEL chain of hotels. 100_Design3036_2 100_Design3062_2 Driven by a sense of invention and change, the YO! Home epitomises smart and daring design. Simon Woodroffe comments “The traditional city centre apartment has not been reinvented since its early format in the 18th Century” 100_Design3177_RETOUCHED_Closed 100_Design3180 There would be little argument against the idea that the YO! Home concept is a huge reinvention. Offering what is essentially four times the space for the same cost as a one room apartment, the YO! Home concept is smart design at the forefront of its field. YO! Home yo.co.ukabc
Design Hunters

Launch Pad 2015 Shortlist Announced!

The judges who selected the shortlist, and will now be deciding the finalists, are: Adam Price, Director of JP Finsbury Bespoke Joiners; Aidan Mawhinney, CEO of Living Edge; Fiona Lyda of Spence & Lyda; Gavin Harris, Senior Associate + Design Director of futurespace; Michael Alvisse, Co-Director and Designer of Schamburg + Alvisse; Terri Winter of Top3 By Design; Richard Munao, Managing Director of Cult; Raymond Scott, Managing Director of Workshopped; and our international judges John Christakos, Co-founder & CEO of Blu Dot, and Maurice Blanks, Co-founder and Chief Operating Office, Blu Dot. Below are the shortlisted entries in alphabetical order. The Finalists will be announced at the end of June. Be sure to visit the Launch Pad Finalists Exhibition at Sydney Indesign, 13 – 15 August! Register here to attend, which will give you free entry to the exhibition Alana Birch, BB-liney Coat Racks Alex Fitzpatrick, Eon Alex Cummins & Remy Cerritelli, Pilloe chair Alexandra Tyquin, Hilda Anita Whitbourn, I'm Yours Ash Allen, Taut Ben Nicholson, Plylight and Wishbone Brad Wray, Magazine Stable Carly Lay, Raw Bottle and Cup Set Dale Hardiman, Swing Stool Daniel Tucker, Hung Ebony Gamble, Interactive sculptural homeware #2: An accessory for creative life Elliot Gorham, Spot Stool Franco Crea, Unito Gary Pennington, Stand & Deliver James Walsh, Diamond chair Josh Carmody, Legless Bar Stool Jye Edwards, Florence Linda Huynh, Nucleus Marinos Drakopoulos, Stack Pendant Mark Sandstrom, Hërkan Matty & JoJo Smith, Off The Shelf [OTS] Max Harper, Corker Series of Pendant Lights Melanie Lockhart and Adrian Pjanic, Geometric Tableware Collection Monique Taylor, Canopy Naomi Taplin, Dusked Pendants Patty Hava, Invisible Cities Candleholders Peter Milligan, Colour Wheel and Counterpoint Light Rene Linssen, Pod Rhys Cooper, Cusp Dining Chair and Split Richard Greenacre, Agave Credenza Samuel Chan, Pleat Lounge Sandra Elliott, Angel Light Simon Colabufalo, Pinguino and Spade Siobhan Glass, Airer #2 Stephen Roy & Drew Spangenberg, Calisto Lamp Sunny Wilder, 4 Seven's Table and Series Couch Susan Chen, Fold Series Thomas Hastings, Warmas YOU Tom Skeehan, HENKO Light and SETTO Low Chair Torin O'Connell, Ark and Tradux Troy Backhouse, Islero Valissa Butterworth, The Hide Pendant Zev Bianchi, Bcompact stairs With thanks to our sponsors: Major Sponsor, Cult Founding Partner, Living Edge Production Partner, Workshopped Program Partner, JP Finsbury Education Partner, General Assembly Launch Pad launch-pad.com.auabc
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The importance of supporting Australian design

Historically, we have had to look to Europe for quality design, yet this is no longer the case; great design is available here and now, and internationally, people are noticing. Ross Didier's Obelisk SofasRoss Didier's Obelisk Sofa “The success of Australian designers overseas has shown the local industry that we are a talented group of people,” says Catapult Design director Aaron Zorzo. “When someone like Alessi or Cappellini picks up an Australian-designed product it makes you realise that our work is good, and that we can reach the pinnacle without having to give up our homes and lives in Australia” Ross Didier's Congo Table One of the reasons why the story of Australian design is such a successful one is due to the weakening of global boundaries. This has opened consumer awareness and built global competition like never seen before. Our isolated location is no longer a burden – it many ways it adds an element of exclusivity and charm to the branding of Australian Design. Ross Didier's Congo StoolsRoss Congo's Congo Table and Chair Whilst this competition has kept Australian design on its toes, it’s also encouraged some of the more exceptional work from our shores. Catapult director Leigh Johnson says “this means that talented Australian designers like Ross Didier can remain in Australia, despite international success, and export to the world. The days of Marc Newson having to leave to forge a career are long gone. Now you can be a success without having to pack up your home, and whilst supporting the local industry at the same time.” _Didier_Congo306 Going forward, companies like Catapult who continue to show support to the emerging design scene will be even more important. The addition of Ross Didier’s Obelisk range of lounging to their collection last year is a perfect example of great local design and the championing of it. _Didier_Congo298 “The interest from media, stylists, and clients in both commercial and residential has been incredibly rewarding” says Leigh, and it goes to show that Australian design can persist and maintain longevity, considering the range made its initial splash on the international scene in 2005.

Ten years and many designs later, Ross Didier has continued with his commitment to authentic Australian design, with his latest release the Congo range of seating and tables, which you've no doubt been admiring throughout this piece. Designed within Australia, the charming range has kept local needs forefront, something international design often fails to do. Not only do individual Australian designs have the ability to persist, the support of local design ensures new and exciting options continue to flourish. And what could be better than that?

Catapult Design catapultdesign.net.auabc
Architecture
MAGAZINE

How to live smart in harsh climates

Designed by Hugh Broughton Architects with AECOM and constructed by Galliford Try for British Antarctic Survey, BAS, the project demonstrates an ability to create groundbreaking architecture combined with high concept technological prowess. halley-vi_-©jmorris-124 Antony-Dubber_Halley-VI Characterised by a compelling concept and executed with fastidious attention to detail, the Halley VI Antarctic Research Station is the product of an extraordinary and intense 8-year collaboration with BAS and is the first fully re-locatable research station in the world. Sam-Burrell_Halley-VI_winter-view The vast unspoilt landscape of Antarctica provides unique opportunities for earth science study. To carry out this vital research, scientists endure some of the harshest living conditions on our planet, living for prolonged periods in isolated, self-sufficient research stations subjected to extreme weather. halley-vi_-©jmorris-169b Pushing the boundaries of smart design in a life critical environment, the Halley VI research station creates a beacon for sustainable, smart living in Polar Regions, and also serves to draw attention to some of the most significant science conducted on our planet. Hugh Broughton Architects hbarchitects.co.ukabc
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A smart way to warm up in winter

With the winter months upon us, choosing the right heater for your home can be a daunting task. From new and high tech safety features and energy saving features to heating size and aesthetics, selecting right appliance can be a challenge. With this in mind, Delonghi has designed its range of heaters and dehumidifiers to include features and functions for every need, room size and décor. DDS_AMB_1 The Delonghi range features energy efficient design and modern safety features, along with sleek style and reliable performance. Built on the foundations of Delonghi strong Italian design heritage, the heating collection offers options for the space and money conscious. The slim line panel heater range blends effortlessly into any living environment and makes best use of your floor area. While everyone can appreciate Delonghi’s Eco Plus technology in its heaters; optimising energy use and regulating power flow to ensure a lower power bill. DeLonghi-Ceramic-HeaterDCH7092ER Delonghi’s dehumidifier range focuses on comfort and convenience, offering four distinct products to prevent the growth of mould and bacteria in environments including the bedroom, living room, basement and laundry. The Delonghi heating and dehumidifying ranges are available in leading appliance retailers, and are a smart addition to any smart home. Delonghi delonghi.comabc
Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

Smart design hidden in the woods

Basically consisting of a floor covered by a lead roof, balanced on a column held in place by a ground anchor, the Forest Pavilion is as unassuming as it it is charming.

Lövkojan3

Jägnefält Milton and Arup Berlin were able to create the Forest Pavilion due to newly instituted Swedish building regulations that allow structures smaller than 25 square metres to be built on one's own land with no government approval.

Lövkojan2

A polyurethane duvet gives shelter from the elements without entirely removing the natural connection the structure's design enables.

The lead roof will age together with the exposed wooden structure and flooring, so to to provide adequate cover while not removing the organic link to nature. The ground anchor does not only make it possible to have a single column, it also channels the rainwater over the chain and over the stone which binds the otherwise harmful lead particles.

model1

This is smart design at its best. Wonderfully free flowing design and a connection with the natural world fuse together to create a work of design that is as unique as it is enticing.

The open floor plan and the absence of permanent walls make this design ideal for anything but the specific.

model2

Jägnefält Milton jagnefaltmilton.se

Arup Berlin arup.com

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Cult’s revamped LC50 Collection celebrates Le Corbusier

To mark the anniversary Cassina launches the LC50 collection featuring sustainable materials and novel colour schemes. CASSINA_LC2_Le-Corbusier-Pierre-Jeanneret-Charlotte-Perriand_Vitruvian_group_1 Together with the Corbusier Foundation in Paris, Cassina has dug down and researched old archives, memoirs and sketches dating back to 1920s of Le Corbusier and his co-designers Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand - the golden trio behind the iconic LC collection that Cassina has the sole authority to produce and distribute today. LC lc2_gallery_01_0 This research led to a series of innovative product upgrades for the LC50 Collection, available in Australia through Cult, that still retains the elegance and authentic spirit of the original collection. lc3_gallery_01 Nature was often a central theme in design work of Le Corbusier, Jeanneret and Perriand, and their original design process had the trio particularly conscious about the environment. In tribute to this philosophy, Cassina has employed more sustainable materials for the frames in the LC50 collection; a trivalent chromium plating process that is a safe and eco-friendly alternative to hexavalent chromium. lc4_gallery_01lc1_gallery_01 The LC50 collection’s leathers are also totally organic, and Cassina also introduces a new microfiber fabric produced without solvent or metal-based dyes. The new fabric uses 70% less water and generates 35% less CO2 in the production process, considerably reducing the negative impact on the environment. lc9_gallery_01 lc11p_gallery01 In addition to new material upgrades, Cassina presents a revised colour palette for the LC collection’s frames. The burgundy and ochre frames are replaced by sophisticated brown, ivory and mud tones; the light blue and green shades are modified slightly, while the classic grey remains the same. lc12_gallery01 A final addition to the collection is the elegantly crafted headrest strap for the range’s chaise longue. Cult celebrates the 50th anniversary together with Cassina throughout Australia and New Zealand withabc
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Chrominance: a visual exhibit

Saturated hues dominate the space where Coulter has created an altered experience for the viewer, challenging spatial relationships. The concept of the threshold, a space of transition, infuses itself into Coulter’s work. Her paintings leap from the wall into the physical plane and contrasting colours communicate with each other forming a metaphysical element. The colours play off relationships based on placement, proportion and adjacency in response to space to construct prismatic realms where the imagination can take hold. 03_spatial deconstruction 12 and adaptable construction no3_emmacoulter_2015 Chrominance as an approach to painting unites site, colour and space, while also alluding to colour itself being dominant, rather than a secondary or expected element to the work. Relying on the way we view colours in relation to each other, Coulter creates an image based on shifting perceptions. The site‐specific works will expand on this theme, physically involving the viewer, as it is how we perceive them that determines their existence. Through her approach to colour and painting, Coulter deliberately controls our experience in Chrominance – spatial elements will be revealed, destroyed and reinvented, defined by the site and situation, creating an interstitial space that exists between place and painting. 02_front window installation shot_chrominance_emmacoulter_2014_APG Coulter is currently undertaking her Master of Contemporary Art at the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne and also holds a bachelor of Visual Art from the Queensland University of Technology. Emma Coulter emmacoulter.com.au Anna Pappas Gallery annapappasgallery.comabc