About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
Conversations

What will our library look like in the future?

  Through the Future Libraries Report, Arup have released a series of predictions about what the library of tomorrow will look like. The findings of the report are the result of workshop events held in London, Melbourne, San Francisco and Sydney, attended by experts in the design and management of libraries. Libraries are currently encouraging people back into the physical space, through the integration of, cafes, free Wi-Fi, or child care programs. In addition, the “walls” of libraries continue to expand beyond the physical space, with online resources, social media, crowdsourcing and mobile services changing how collections and services are accessed and shared. The report found the role of libraries will significantly change in the coming years, driven by demographic changes, rising urban migration and technological advances. A few key findings about Future Libraries include integrating a wider range of public and commercial services in their offering will help libraries remain relevant to their communities. Physical interaction with a library will remain a key demand of users, despite the opportunity for constant information access offered by technology. The Future Libraries Report also found that libraries play a fundamental role in granting access to essential resources to those who do not have the means themselves. It is suggested community engagement will help in developing services specifically targeted to users’ needs. In the future, library spaces will need to be flexible and adaptable in order to stimulate collaboration and social interaction. As access to technology spreads and the quantity of information generated grows exponentially, the mentoring expertise of librarians will become more crucial in supporting education, research and well informed decision-making. The future is rich with opportunities for libraries and librarians in a world of rapid and continuous change. Adaptability and flexibility will be key to providing spaces and services that respond to user needs and expectations. Amsterdam-Public-Library_(c)-Arup-_-Michael-van-Oosten2 0995b0db349ba34882a09000a06444e2abc
Happenings
What's On

Parlour Inc presents Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture

  The Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning’s Tin Sheds Gallery will stage a photographic exhibition by Parlour Inc, which captures women architects and the architectural workplaces of three major Sydney practices over a single day alongside a second series of images challenging architect typecasts. For more than two decades, the proportion of female students graduating in architecture has been over 40 percent. Yet women represent only 21 percent of registered architects, suggesting that greater industry support for women architects is long overdue. “We see many talented female graduates coming out of our Faculty. While I also see many of our alumni enjoying continued success, career pathways for women architects could be substantially improved.  So this is an important initiative to support University of Sydney graduates and the industry for the long term,” says the University of Sydney’s Associate Professor, Lee Stickells. The photographic exhibition Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture features around 300 images of women in the Sydney offices of Bates Smart, BVN Architecture and PTW Architects. The exhibition also includes a second series of photographs that captured almost 100 delegates at the 2010 national conference of the Australian Institute of Architects,  playfully revealing the demographic makeup of the architectural community and challenges typecasts of an architect’s identity. The series shows that practitioners are more diverse than the popular perception of a male-dominated industry, challenging stereotypes and clichés about who can be an architect. “It creates an interesting picture of women at work in architecture, working to increase their visibility, celebrate their achievements, and shift industry thinking to greater support of career pathways for women in practice,” says Parlour co-founder and editor, Justine Clark. “It gives visitors, including future architects, a better sense of what architectural work entails and offers a more realistic portrait of everyday life in an architectural office. It also shows positive female role models in the industry today,” says University of Queensland’s Dr Naomi Stead. Parlour developed from the ARC-funded research project ‘Equity and Diversity in the Australian Architecture Profession: Women, Work and Leadership (2011–2014)’, led by University of Queensland’s Dr Naomi Stead, to investigate the low number of women progressing through the industry. “Following our research, we saw the need to provide a space for women to speak, network and celebrate their work in architecture. We need to encourage all those working in the profession to exchange experiences and share constructive ideas for best work practices. This will support women coming through the industry, as well as make it a better work experience for men in architecture,” says Dr Naomi Stead. Parlour co-founder and editor, Justine Clark, says that they have created strong online networks across Australia and internationally and are now delighted to be holding their first Sydney event. “There is a thriving, online community of activists who are working towards greater equity for women in the Australian architecture profession. The exhibition is an important contribution to this, and provides a different view of the research that will help develop networks in Sydney.” Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture opens at Tin Sheds Gallery at the University of Sydney on 10 July and runs until 11 September. A series of talks and forums will be held during the exhibition’s Sydney show. Portraits of Practice: At Work in Architecture July 10 to September 11 Tin Sheds Gallery, Wilkinson Building, The University of Sydney, Darlington Tuesday to Friday 11:00 am – 5:00 pm IMG_0928 IMG_0820 IMG_0806abc
Design Products
Lighting

Increase your thermal efficiency with Brightgreen’s Surface Series

  Sustainable architects, builders and homeowners alike are increasingly concerned with boosting home energy ratings by combating air leakage and maximising insulation R-values, especially when heating and cooling accounts for an average of 40 percent of Australian home energy usage. Lighting plays a key role in overall home efficiency, with the right lights standing to reduce both lighting and temperature control energy usage. Because warm air is more buoyant than cool air and will inevitably float upwards, having an airtight and well-insulated ceiling is important during cooler months. Brightgreen has released a comparative study on the effect recessed and surface-mounted LEDs have on home thermal efficiency, revealing important considerations when assessing the overall efficiency of a luminaire. Modelled on government and academic research, the study outlines how choosing surface-mounted LEDs instead of recessed equivalents can save homeowners so much in temperature control, that it covers the cost of lighting up an average-sized Australian home. The study outlines three factors as primary considerations when assessing the overall efficiency of a luminaire. The first is air leakage, which causes energy loss through conditioned air leaving the home through cracks and openings. For example, standard recessed downlights prevent homeowners from having a totally sealed ceiling because they require cutouts in the ceiling. Air leakage as a direct result of recessed lighting cutouts contributes to approximately 197.58kWhs per year of excess heating and cooling energy for an average-sized Australian home. Secondly, the study reveals that a well-insulated ceiling is one of the easiest and most effective ways to boost home thermal efficiency. Unlike surface-mounted lights, recessed downlights require a safe clearance around each installation to prevent fire hazards. This clearance reduces insulation R-values by up to 0.5, resulting in an increase of heat conduction. For an average-sized Australian home this amounts to approximately 194 kWh of additional temperature control energy usage per year. Lastly, energy usage and product lifetime of any lighting product are two elements of sustainability to consider. LEDs feature long product lifetimes and emit a higher amount of lumens per watt than other light sources. Brightgreen has made it their mission to create a range of surface-mounted LEDs to eliminate air leakage and gaps in insulation, and halve the total energy used by recessed equivalents. Brightgreen brightgreen.com 18831640_d550 18637032_d900 18637030_p900-cr_context1440x1080 18637029_t900 18637005_surface_sriesabc
Design Hunters

The world’s top design brands and best international products launching in Sydney

  We're just two weeks out from Sydney's biggest commercial design event of the year, and our Exhibitors are gearing up to reveal their latest releases fresh off the shipping containers. Pre-register now! Great taste - great sense of humour: Blu Dot is set to reveal the thinking behind its much-loved designs, and share the story behind its international success with two timed talks, in-showroom with Blu Dot co-founder, John Christakos. From their brand new showroom in Devonshire Street, Surry Hills, SeehoSuinvites you to explore beautiful craftsmanship and contemporary design from Japanese brand Maruni, Danish new-comers New Works, Mud Australia, molo design studio and more. Pure Concept transports you into a luxury world of indoor-outdoor living with a full-working kitchen, and a premium range of contemporary Italian collections including new pieces from Antonio Lupi. Spence & Lyda welcomes DCW Editions' Fred Winkler in Australia to launch new furniture and lighting editions fresh from the Salone in Milan. Also making a star appearance in Sydney is Alvaro De Catalan de Ocon, designer and creator of the PET phenomenon, launching the African collection, ABYSSINIA. Coco Republic presents the founder and namesake behind Timothy Oulton - Timothy Oulton himself! Timothy's pieces combine the best of traditional authenticity with daring amounts of innovation in design - it's a meeting not to be missed! Also joining Coco Republic is Benjamin Brougham, Director of Interior Design at Jonathan Adler. Benjamin has a talent for tapping in to current trends and translating these to suit your clients' needs and tastes. Zenith presents Belgium company BuzziSpace. Since its inception in 2007 with fresh and stylish solutions for silence in the office, BuzziSpace has become a world-wide hit. Explore the true beauty of silence with this designer brand. Cafe Culture + Insitu take design to the next level with Zeitraum. The interactive and engaging display at Galleria invites you to engage with new Zeitraum collections including M11, Morph, Side Comfort - to name a few. ECC Lighting + Furniturelaunches USM Modular Furniture, the Swiss furniture producer whose products are associated with long life-cycles, unlimited reconfigurations and sustainable design. Discover NEOLITH, the new sintered compact surface that, thanks to its super-strength properties, is perfect for wet and hot areas, interiors and exteriors. Explore NEOLITH's extensive range of colours and thickness options for work and leisure surfaces. Sydney Indesign runs from August 13-16. Pre-register now!abc
Design Hunters
Conversations

Five minutes with Stephen Burton, Creative Director of POMO

  The studio was the brain-child of POMO’s Creative Director Stephen Burton, who collaborated with builders Tim Coates and Callum Fraser. Based in Rosemount in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, the open plan 42 sqm creative studio workspace was completed in November 2013. What was the brief for this project? To create a sustainable, inspirational, creative workspace that would be complementary to the old growth trees and forest in which it would be built. How did the local climate, building vernacular or local landscape influence your design? The studio sits on the side of a very steep hill, it also sits in a corridor of old-growth trees. It was important that none of these old growth trees were removed, it was also important to conduct minimal ground works in order to preserve the natural contours of the land. The bush influenced the design by inspiring us to want to bring the beauty outside into the experience of the interior. This was achieved through the use of glass with expansive floor to ceiling glass corners and custom made sliding doors which open to a viewing deck that stands over 6m high from the bush floor and quite literally in some of the tree tops. Being located at the top of a valley on the Sunshine Coast, we attract the afternoon sea breeze with cross-flow ventilation. The natural canopy of the close trees prevent direct summer sun and therefore help lower our cooling bills while heating in winter is virtually unnecessary as the aspect of the building allows the sun to stretch into our studio space in the cooler months. Please comment on your experience of the space. Has it met your goals? Would you change anything? It has met our goals, most definitely. We would not change anything. It is serene and sitting amongst the trees in our tree-house inspires creative thinking and design amongst the staff. How does it affect your work? Creatively, the space is very conducive to open communication and collaboration, this is featured in the furniture design with a custom-made park bench style meeting table and free flowing fully connected plywood workspaces. The central light fitting was also made out of timber and sits above the central conference area. The meeting table is designed to emulate a relaxed atmosphere with people sitting together to share and exchange ideas. For a creative business the sharing of ideas and inspiration has improved our collective output and our focus. POMO2 Please discuss the sustainable features, and why this is so important to you. It was important to create something that was respectful of and appropriate for the space in which it was located. All design, above everything, must be appropriate. With this in mind we created something respectful of the natural environment in which it was situated and referenced that environment through the use of materials, most of which were sourced locally. The studio has a number of sustainability features. The floor exclusively uses manufactured timber support beams rather than hardwood. The manufactured beams are made from sustainable plantation timber. The floor is exposed yellow tongue flooring which is made from a high recycled material component. There is no carpet inside the studio. All furniture – excluding the office chairs – is made from pine or plywood sourced from sustainable plantations. For the roof, timber beams have been made from sustainable pine plantations that are grown locally. The roof and walls are lined with plywood, also made from sustainable pine plantations. No paint was used inside the building. The roof has no gutters and instead all water empties from above the front deck area creating a waterfall that falls six metres down past the deck and to the forest floor returning the rainfall to the nearby trees. Exclusive use of LED lighting has reduced power consumption by over 80% compared to our previous working location. The expansive use of glass means minimal lights are required to work during the day. The building is fully insulated and with the advantage of a north aspect to use winter sun to heat the building but excluding summer sun. A natural canopy of old grown trees prevents most direct sun on the roof keeping it cooler thus reducing reliance on electricity. POMO3 IMG_0092u Photography: Lucas Muro  abc
Happenings
What's On

Women architects debate on changes needed in architecture

  The panel will be facilitated by Parlour editor and co-founder, Justine Clark at University of Sydney’s Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, on Wednesday 5 August, and features Sydney architects Stephanie Smith (Lend Lease), Rachel Neeson (Neeson Murcutt Architects), Camilla Block (Durbach Block Jaggers) and Imogen Howe (Allen Jack+Cottier). “The architecture industry finds itself beleaguered in the current market – disempowered, marginalised, and subject to pressures that make it difficult for architects to stay afloat,” says Dr Naomi Stead, Parlour co-founder. “In this context, gender equity might seem like a minor concern. But we would argue the opposite. Making sure you have the best and brightest people in your workforce, fulfilling their full potential, is absolutely central to the sustainability and viability of the profession. More than this, a more diverse concept of who can be an architect and how they might practise is also key – demographic diversity is linked to diverse ways of practising, and that is crucial in the present, highly-stressed environment.” All architecture graduates of the University of Sydney, the panel of speakers collectively has extensive experience working for large Australian and international architects, infrastructure companies and running their own practices over the last three decades. The panel will speculate on different roles women might play moving towards a more equitable and robust profession. If the survival of the profession long-term depends on diversity, how might this be reflected in architecture’s demographics, ways of working, and modes of practice? How should a practice be redesigned to support diversity? How does gender equity expand the definition of architectural practice and engagement, and what does this offer the discipline and community? These are just a few of the questions that the panel will tackle. The panel is presented by the Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning Alumni Association and coincides with Parlour’s current exhibition Portraits of Practice on display in Tin Sheds Gallery at the University of Sydney. Women in Architecture: the Future of Practice 5 August, 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm Wilkinson Building, Faculty of Architecture, Design and Planning, 148 City Road, University of Sydney Register your free ticket via Eventbrite.abc
Happenings
What's On

Everything you need to know about Sydney Indesign!

  This is your comprehensive guide to the entire event, so read on for locations, exhibitors & showrooms. We know you don’t want to miss a thing. @Galleria Located at 2 Locomotive St, Eveleigh, Galleria is jam-packed full with exciting collaborations and products, all in one convenient space. The organic design of Galleria and the open-plan layout allows visitors to enjoy the complementary and contrasting designs of international and local designers and studios. @Showrooms Sydney Indesign takes to the streets, with showrooms and studios putting on exciting events and talks, as well as changing up their spaces, in 5 different precincts. Those precincts are Alexandria, Chippendale, Darlinghurst, Redfern/Waterloo and Surry Hills. The Map Check out this great map to see all you need to know about Sydney Indesign in a glance. Explore our precincts and participating showrooms, as well as the detailed bus routes to help you get the most out of event day. This is design in Sydney at its finest. Bus hop-on/hop-off schedule Thanks to our partners at iGuzzini, your day will be made easy with complimentary, hop on/hop off buses that will take you between precincts and of course back to Galleria. At 10am on both Friday and Saturday the first buses will depart from any participating location, so use the map above and start your adventure at a destination of your choice and head off from there! Don’t miss our last buses, departing at 6pm from each precinct, and of course, Galleria. How often will the buses come? On Friday you can hop on a bus every 45 minutes, whilst on Saturday that time dwindles to just 15 -20 minutes! We hope you have a wonderful 3 days at Sydney Indesign. Don’t forget, if you haven’t done so already register now to avoid unnecessary queues on event day!  abc
Happenings
What's On

The Design Files Inaugural Annual Fundraiser raises funds for Melbourne’s Asylum Seeker Resource Centre

  Each artist has donated their work, with all proceeds going to Melbourne’s Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC), which provides much needed support and services to refugees and asylum seekers in the local community. Greer Allen, the Key Support Coordinator of ASR says the money will support and strengthen many of their vital programs. “Because of our incredible team of over 1100 volunteers, the ASRC delivers $20 worth of life‐saving and empowering services for every $1 donated,” says Greer. The Design Files aim to raise $50,000 for the ASRC. This donation has the potential to: – Provide 100,000 hot lunches to asylum seekers. – Stock groceries in the ASRC Foodbank with for 6 months, feeding 200 families per week. – Supply medication for the ASRC Health Program for the entire year, supporting over 3000 medical appointments to asylum seekers without income or access to Medicare. – Fund the position of the ASRC’s Legal Coordinator for 1 year, who manages the advice and representation to over 550 asylum seekers. The Design Files’ editor, Lucy Feagins feels strongly connected to the ASRC. “The Aslyum Seeker Resource Centre create a welcoming environment and incredible support network for so many people working hard to make a second home for their families in Australia,” says Lucy. “With our focus on the importance of a sense of ‘home’, we are in awe of the incredible work the ASRC do to make those less fortunate feel welcome, supported and at home in Melbourne.” Participating Artists include: Kirra Jamison  (VIC), Leah Fraser (NSW), Yvette Coppersmith (VIC), Julian Meagher (NSW), Miranda Skoczek  (VIC), Laura Jones (NSW), Laura Skerlj (VIC), Belynda Henry (NSW), Fred Fowler (VIC), Barbara Kitallides (VIC), Elizabeth Barnett (VIC), Emma Lipscombe (WA), Liam Snootle (VIC), Sandra Eterovic (VIC), Sarah Kelk (VIC), Sean Fennessy (VIC), Rachel Castle (NSW), Stephen Baker (VIC), Billie Justice Thomson (VIC), Leila Jeffreys (NSW), Emily Ferretti (VIC), Skye Jefferys (VIC), Lucas Grogan (VIC), Evi O (NSW), Jennifer Tyers (NSW), Madeline Kidd (VIC), Minna Gilligan (VIC), Anna Varendorff (VIC), Louise De Weger (QLD). The Design Files Inaugural Annual Fundraiser is running from July 25 – 31. Sunday 26 July, 11.00am to 3.00pm Monday 27 July, closed Tuesday 28 to Friday 31 July, 10.00am to 4.00pm 114 Little Oxford Street, Collingwood, Victoria Artist Portrait by Annette O’Brien RACHEL-CASTLE_Little-Garden-3 LAURA-JONES_Scarlet-Banksia-2015,-oil-on-linen,-41-x-41-cm-WEB EMILY-FERRETTI_Gesture-18-(through) BELYNDA-HENRY_my-heart-skipped-a-beat  abc
Design Hunters
People

DESIGN HUNTER® Q&A: Liz Watson

  Drawing on her background in visual arts and graphic design, Liz applies her sharp design eye to create the brand's popular prints that adorn their own range of tea towels, cushions and other hand-crafted products. Before Everingham + Watson launches their Girt By Sea range at Life Instyle this month, we sit down to chat with Liz Watson about her latest project, passions and source of inspiration. Where you are from?  Brisbane, Queensland What you do?  I run a design and manufacturing business with Susie Everingham, Everingham + Watson. When did you first know you wanted to do something creative?  I went to art college straight after school, but quickly decided that design was my thing. Your latest project?  Our latest range for Everingham + Watson, Girt By Sea. Please tell a bit about this, what were the highs and what were the challenges? Product development is the biggest challenge. For our new body range, we worked alongside scent experts and chemists to achieve the fragrance we were chasing. We had very clear ideas about the memories of beach holidays we wanted to evoke. We got there after several attempts and months of ebbing and flowing, and we are really happy with the outcome. How did you overcome these? Wine! Where you find inspiration? So many places. I find the visual overload of online content overwhelming, so I’m finding I refer back to books, libraries and stillness more and more now. Who are three people that inspire/excite you? The amazing ladies behind Easton Pearson - Pam Easton and Lydia Pearson. My uncle Dr Don Watson who is an architect and historian. He has an amazing thirst for knowledge and an excellent sense of humour! Chris McKimmie, my old lecturer at art college, he has written and written and illustrated nine children’s books and they are hysterical! My favourite being Special Kev, its all about red heads. What is your favourite… Car/bike/plane/boat model: Mum's old Citroen DS. Chair model: Spanish Chair, Børge Mogensen. Residential space: Anything by Vokes + Peters. Commercial space: Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA). Decorative product: Contemporary Australian art, my recent Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda (Mrs Gabori) purchase makes me very happy! Functional product: Any of our tea towels. Handmade good: A beautiful piece of Japanese stoneware Susie recently brought back from Japan for me. Mass-produced good: Our anti bacterial hand wash with lemon myrtle, rosemary, orange peel and wattle seed extract. It smells and feels amazing. Item in your studio: A big cork board, covered in memories, inspiration and photos of family and friends. Time of day to work/play: Mornings are my time to shine, and late at night. Meal: Bacon! Restaurant: Pearl at Woolloongabba, Brisbane for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Drink: English Breakfast tea. Bar: The Servery upstairs at Pearl. Piece of technology: iPhone. Historical figure: Sunday Reed. Fictional character: The tree in the Folk of the Faraway Tree. Vice: Pinot Noir. Virtue: Ask Susie! What does the term ‘Design Hunter’ mean to you? Being inquisitive through travel, learning and experimentation.abc
Design Products
Furniture

XO Chair by Workshopped combines classic proportions and contemporary lines

  The XO Chair by Workshopped is refined to a minimum of components, materials and elements. The design was originally developed through extensive research and community focus group sessions for a new cancer support centre in Northern Tasmania. The focus sessions outlined a number of requirements – stability, access, weight, support and comfort, which combined informs the structural and aesthetic qualities. The XO Chair gains its name from the timber frame that extends vertically beyond the seating plane, creating an ‘exoskeleton’. Materials were selected for their availability and suitability. The frame and structure make use of standard Tasmanian-Oak timber sections, maximising the material recovery, while forming a strong, lightweight and elegant structure. With the upholstery in a full aniline leather, the materials will age with a graceful patina, to create an object with history and inherent beauty. Workshopped workshopped.com.auabc
MAGAZINE

Habitus 28: Behind The Scenes

  Each issue when we put together out 8-page shoot, stylist Amanda Talbot dreams up an out-of-the-box concept. This issue, she had our dancer Rosslyn Wythes jumping and twirling against a white wall, to be placed into the product shots in post production. Her brief was to (pretend to) interact with the products as if they were characters – depending on the set up, they were menacing, soldierly, astral or floral. Habitus #28 is out now, grab a copy to see the full feature.abc
Happenings
What's On

Hear Julie Paterson in conversation at ClothBound & Beyond

Bringing to life the vivid fabrics on display at Australian Design Centre’s latest exhibition Cloth: Seeds to Bloom, Australian Design Centre’s Director Steven Pozel will host an intimate one-on-one conversation with Julie Paterson. During this intimate conversation, Julie will share some of the stories contained in her new book ClothBound. Julie will explain how the flora of her Blue Mountains home has infused and inspired her work, and discuss the ways in which her studio practice has grown and developed over the past 20 years. Julie’s latest book, ClothBound documents her creative process and practice. It traces the development of nine collections from the first inklings of an idea, to exploratory artworks made in her Blue Mountains studio, all the way through to the finished fabric designs and products. While you’re there be sure to browse Australian Design Centre’s latest exhibition Cloth: Seeds to Bloom running July 17 to August 15. It traces 20 years of Julie Paterson’s designs. Drawing inspiration from the Australian bush, Julie’s stunning fabrics are a riot of colour and floral forms, bursting across lengths of natural linen fabric. Be sure to register to ClothBound & Beyond - Julie Paterson in conversation, and visit Cloth: Seeds to Bloom before it closes, August 15.abc