About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes

The Skewed House combats urban density and nature’s forces

  Designed by architects, Lijo Jos and Reny Lijo of LIJO.RENY.architects, Skewed House carries a well-defined aesthetic sensibility that weaves through spaces. Simple clean lines, volumetric variations, refined colour schemes and the considered integration of interiors and exteriors, all combine to create a joyous living space. The home of two doctors and their two kids, the Skewed House is set on a skewed plot in a tight residential fabric in Palakkad, India – which is known for the strong winds blowing across the opening in the Western Ghats and year-round blistering dry heat. The house is deliberately introverted as a response to the need for privacy in a dense neighbourhood fabric, and also to provide refuge from nature's elements. In order to ensure a constant movement of air through the home all year round, the house is split into three principal spaces or bays that are organised around a central open to sky court. Each private zones in the house opens out onto differently scaled internal courtyards. TheSkewedHouse26 The entry to the Skewed House is informal, and features a small court with a frangipani tree and a simplistic glass door enclosed foyer. Then you arrive at the formal living area, a semi-public zone. Natural light and leafy greenery cascades through a large window that contrasts against a stark white formal living space. This space features a split level ceiling with a large opening to the east, and is carefully enclosed with an aluminium screen that welcomes the morning light. Light is carefully orchestrated, creating spaces where at times the light filters in indirectly along a wall, or an explosion of natural light focuses directly onto a wall that forms a stage for a magnificent choreography of light and movement. The dining space defines the entry to the private zones of the Skewed House. A large window with a built-in window seat – a comfortably proportioned platform looking out onto the dense greenery outside – takes pride of place. The northern bay houses this space as well as the foyer, the formal living area, powder room, kitchen and related functional spaces. TheSkewedHouse22 One of the main features of the Skewed House is the staircase, an interplay between the solidity of the Kota stone on the lower portion of the stair and the lightness of the suspended stainless steel on the upper flight of stairs. The bedrooms and toilets on both the floors are located in the southern bay, buffered from the central zone by a layer of covered open space. The masterbed on the ground floor features a set of sliding doors that open out onto the central court through an intimate private patio. TheSkewedHouse20 Minimalistic colour palettes are interspersed with interesting design elements including the light fixtures, concealed linear LED strips inserted into the walls and the ceilings, and highlights of yellow. The spaces open out onto internal courtyards and allow a sense of continuity from the inside to the outside. These open spaces form the backdrop to the interior, with the landscaping connecting the space to nature and also aiding in the microclimatic control of the space. TheSkewedHouse17 TheSkewedHouse21 TheSkewedHouse23 TheSkewedHouse19 TheSkewedHouse16 TheSkewedHouse15 TheSkewedHouse14 TheSkewedHouse13 TheSkewedHouse12 TheSkewedHouse10 TheSkewedHouse9 TheSkewedHouse8 TheSkewedHouse7 TheSkewedHouse6 TheSkewedHouse5 TheSkewedHouse4 TheSkewedHouse3 TheSkewedHouse2 TheSkewedHouse1 TheSkewedHouse LIJO.RENY.architects lijoreny.wordpress.com Photographs: Praveen Mohandas, courtesy LIJO.RENY.architectsabc
Furniture
Design Products
Design Hunters
Conversations

How to properly achieve timeless design

The term is used correctly as much as it is abused. Why a design is truly timeless is difficult to say, but you know it when you see it. Certainly, classic materials have something to do with it – furniture must last physically before it lasts as a proud piece of design. Timeless may imply antique, yet this should not be the case. Take, for example, Catapult Design’s Coeval range. Whilst this Australian brand was established in 2013, the design of its items follows in the one hundred year history of its parent brand Dewhurst Furniture. Dewhurst directors Danny Koss and Andrew Dewhurst launched the brand as an avenue for exquisitely crafted furniture that references the strong history of Dewhurst, but with a modern beat. “Timeless design doesn’t have to be old-fashioned,” says Catapult co-Founder Aaron Zorzo. “Something can be modern looking, but still be ‘timeless.’ Coeval’s Ryba table combines classic materials and exquisite craftsmanship with the twist of a powdercoated metal beam running along the floor. It’s a twist on a traditional all-timber table, but that is what makes it unique and sets it apart.” Timeless in the modern age should be seen as exactly this; design that is proud of its roots, honest, yet brave enough to stand as a modern item. This is no doubt a difficult line to walk – striking a balance between the timelessness of age and making a bold new statement. Yet this ethos permeates across much of Catapult’s current collection, even outside of Coeval. Timeless design isn’t just a buzzword for modern hype; there is a benefit for both the environment and the consumer, “Timeless pieces reduce the need for replacement; they’ll live on for years to come, which is not only good in the long run for the budgets of our clients and customers, but also means that we can reduce the impact of furniture waste on our planet” says co-Founder Leigh Johnson. The true test of an item’s timelessness will only come in the future. If in twenty years, an object still functions as designed and looks great, then it is worthy of the moniker. And isn't that what design should be? Catapult Design catapultdesign.net.au Tevel-dining-chair---Coeval Dusan-dining-table-D2---Coeval Dusan-dining-table----Coeval 9-Dusan-lamp-table-2abc
Architecture
Homes

A window into architect Henri Sayes’ own home

  Unsurprisingly, the passion project Henri designed for himself and his wife is a charming and distinguished home. Notably, a cutaway in the cladding mirrors the double-height space of the house, while outdoors, a grassy berm, fashioned from excavated earth takes the form of a fence. This gives the home a unique positioning between nature and design. This positioning can be seen as a response to the rising cost of real estate in Auckland, where the house is located. For in spite of its striking appearance, the home is an unassuming and humble addition to the bungalow heavy area in which it is based. Sayes-Stock-House--04 The sharp, asymmetrical lines of the Onehunga House set it apart from its neighbours. This reflects the deliberately idiosyncratic style that Sayes has brings to many projects, though none could possibly be as person as this. Henri’s approach was as much a practical one as a stylistic one, “Our limited budget informed the form of the house more than anything else,” he says. “Our theory was that every junction would cost money and not necessarily add anything to the experience inside” In working on the project in his own time away from his day job at architecture firm Malcolm Walker Sayes is typical humble in describing the finished project as a very simple timber-framed rectangle with standard window details. In a basic way, the home is a good-looking barn that happens to contain some unique and complex spaces. These include a double-height open living and dining space with smaller subsidiary spaces. A more arresting feature of the home is Sayes’ use of exposed trusses, creating an illusion of varying ceiling heights throughout the dining and living room. These roof supports work together with the surplus soil of the outdoor area to define the space, inside and out. Sayes Studio sayes.co.nz Sayes-Stock-House--02 Sayes-Stock-House--03 Sayes-Stock-House--05 Sayes-Stock-House-06 Sayes-Stock-House-07 Sayes-Stock-House-08 Sayes-Stock-House-09 Sayes-Stock-House--01 Sayes-Stock-House-10  abc
Happenings
What's On

Artbank’s exhibition Visible Storage reveals extraordinary collection

  Visible Storage illustrates that Artbank’s collection is as diverse as it is surprising. Amassed over 30 years, all works within the Artbank collection can be leased for any period of time, and by any individual or corporation in Australia. The exhibition title – Visible Storage – plays on the simple premise of unveiling just some of this vast collection that is mostly being exhibited or out on lease arrangement, or held in specially designed facilities as part of the Artbank (Sydney) headquarters in Waterloo. Visible Storage brings together works drawn from the recesses of Artbank’s collection, and in many ways pays homage to the often applied strategy of various international collecting institutions in building glass walls around storage areas to create permanent ‘exhibitions’ of racks and vitrines that hold these artworks, and which would otherwise be publicly unavailable and unseen. Visible Storage includes works by John Olsen, Max Dupain, Brett Whiteley, Jon Cattapan, Ken Done and Ray Crooke. The works have been placed in an almost puzzle-like formation to consume the greater portion of blank surface. Extending the playful theme, the traditional white walls have been painted vivid yellow, growing all the more bright as works selected by visitors who commit to leasing for a period are immediately taken down from the exhibition. This will gradually see the dominant emergence of the yellow, while the exhibition itself shifts from the visible to increasingly invisible. “While most of Artbank’s storage is designed to be publically accessible at various times, ‘Visible Storage’ shines a light on works stored behind the scenes that are not easily viewed. Curated by the Artbank team, this exhibition features select works we felt deserved to be shared with the public and in so doing granted a new lease on life”, says Tony Stephens, Director of Artbank. The exhibition is now open and extends through to Saturday 29 August, 2015. A second version of Visible Storage will be mounted at Artbank’s Melbourne gallery space later this year. Artbank artbank.gov.au Artbank_HabitusLiving4 Artbank_HabitusLiving3 Artbank_HabitusLiving1 Artbank_HabitusLiving5abc
Design Products

Feel the wind through your hair on a Fonzarelli Moto Scooter

  Michelle Nazzari, founder of Fonzarelli Bikes, has created the Fonzarelli electric moto because she believes in 100% emission-free and eco-friendly personal transport. The Fonzarelli bike is easy to cruise around town, with superb engineering to ensure stability and balance for even the novice rider. A Fonzarelli is suitable for urban dwellers who want an alternative to traditional petrol options, with cutting edge technology and at the same time, protecting the environment. Complete with a compact removable lightweight battery, it can reach a full charge in 3-5 hours, or a fast charge up to 80% in just one hour. “Charging the bike is as simple as recharging your phone” says Nazzari. “You can even charge your phone while you ride with the under-seat USB charger.” Not only a high-powered and economical ride, the Fonzarelli also ramps up the style stakes to make quite a chic transport option around today. There is a choice between base colours of matte black, optic white or rocket red. Accessories can be customised to build individual unique and personal designs, and the intelligent Fonzarelli operating system can be customised to suit rider experience and city riding conditions. “Fonzarelli is as much about style as it is about providing an environmentally friendly transport solution. From accessory choices to performance adjustments, the Fonzarelli team will work with our customers to create the perfect ride”, Nazzari says. Fonzarelli fonzarelli.co Fonzarelli-bike4 Fonzarelli Fonzarelli1 Fonzarelli2abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Escape on the luxury yacht Polytropon II – Nautor’s Swan 82 Custom

  The world’s top naval architect has joined a creative architectural studio with a reputation for challenging the norm, along with the builder of highly regarded ocean-going sailing yachts. Polytropon II, the Nautor’s Swan 82 Custom was brought to fruition by naval architect, German Frers of Frers Naval Architecture & Engineering, design firm Lazzarini & Pickering Architetti, and shipyard Nautor’s Swan. They have brought their own skills, reputations and traditions, and each accommodated the influences of the others, but without compromising their own developed ideals. The yacht features high impact looks contrasted with a minimalist deck and interior layout. The exterior of the yacht contains a raised saloon deckhouse that blends effortlessly into the cockpit coaming as it stretches aft from the mast, and comfortable protected horseshoe seating areas are encompassed on either side of the yacht. The deckhouse is made of glass and features screen-printed laminate in the interior to give an opaque white finish that allows the occupants to look out. It privileges natural illumination and offers an uninterrupted view of the landscape from inside the boat, while blocking the view from the outside in. The glass opens with pistons allowing welcome ventilation from the deckhouse aft to the guest heads and cabins. The main deck is clad in teak, and this finish is weaved into  Nautor’s trademark interior. Hand-selected teak veneer finished in a custom stain and wax coating is used throughout, including the ceiling. In contrast to the teak, the finish to all bulkheads between the various cabins is high-gloss white, and mirrors on the sides of these panels provide a larger sense of space. There is no crew accommodation, a deliberate choice to allow maximum space for the owner and guest to liveaboard. Rather than place the crew into small quarters up in the bow, the owner has opted to accommodate them on a separate 47’ 30 Knot tender “Polytrofon II” that sleeps the 4 to 8 crew. The main cooking, laundry, wine and food storage facilities are also on the tender, referred to as “The Kitchen Boat”, reducing the space requirements for the galley and food storage. The accompanying boat offers all the pleasures of a large professional kitchen without sacrificing inhabitable space aboard the yacht. Polytropon II, the Nautor’s Swan 82 Custom is a yacht for sailing. It has clear concept design features that have not been allowed to compromise the seaworthiness or sea-kindliness of the design. The sailboat shows that the forces of nature can be sustained and optimised with the cooperation of artificial elements.   Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom3 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom1 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom2     Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom6 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom7 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom8 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom9 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom10 Polytropon_II_Nautors_Swan_82_Custom5 Naval Architect Frers Naval Architecture & Engineering Exterior Styling and Interior Design Lazzarini & Pickering Architetti Project Manager Vittorio Mariani Shipyard Nautor’s Swanabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Lighting

Boost your home efficiency with the Brightgreen Surface Series

 

The simple yet stylish set includes petite, surface, flexi, track and pendant fitting LEDs. Building on the efficiency of standard LEDs, Brightgreen’s Surface Series designs boost home energy ratings in more way than one way. By totally eliminating the cutouts and gaps in insulation required for recessed lighting, the surface-mounted LEDs reduce heating and cooling costs so much, that the savings actually cover the cost of lighting up an average-sized Australian home. 

Brightgreen has engineered the Surface Series to represent more colours on the visible spectrum in high levels, and has been designed to transform interiors through more than just flexibility and style. Each luminaire features the company’s trademark Tru-Colour technology, projecting light that improves the appearance of skin tones, interior colours and design details like wood grains, textiles and marble. “The company’s intention behind releasing the set was to encourage people to take a considered approach to lighting, allowing designers to achieve more creative and efficient results,” says Brightgreen Founder, CEO and Head of Product Design, David O’Driscoll. The timeless aesthetic, pared-back contours and flexibility of the Surface Series speaks to the commitment Brightgreen has to enduring design, with each model in the collection designed to last for up to 70,000 hours, or 30 years on average daily use. Each luminaire offers unique application benefits and comes in either low-sheen white or matte black finishes. Brightgreen brightgreen.com 18637029_t900 18637030_p900-cr_context1440x1080 18831640_d550 18637033_d900 18637032_d900abc
Design Products
Furniture

Chip off the old Block

Inspired by the design of classic tray tables, Danish designer Simon Legald has combined craftsmanship and industry in designing Block. Block is a mobile side table on wheels that has been designed with a light and airy feel. The table is of rectangular design and is easy to move around using one of its four handles, which are a natural extension of the table's legs. NC-Furniture-Catalogue-2014-(95) A simplified and updated version of the well-known tray table, Block’s hard steel is softened by its rounded shape and counterbalanced by the warmth of the wood. NC-Furniture-Catalogue-2014-(46) “Designing is a game between craftsmanship and industry, and both elements need to come together,” says Simon Legald “Block is a simplification and modernisation of the well-known tray table. It is a side table with wheels and an alternative to the traditional coffee table.” NC-Furniture-Catalogue-2014-(10) The Block table is a versatile piece of furniture with a wide range of applications. The feel of the table changes depending on its surroundings and it is easy personalised through styling. Normann Copenhagen normann-copenhagen.comabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Kengo Kuma Designs A Soy Sauce Shop

Kayanoya is an artisanal soy sauce manufacturer with a history that goes back more than 120 years. In designing the Kayanoya flagship store in Nihonbashi, Tokyo, Kengo Kuma has drawn inspiration from the company’s traditional warehouse in Kyushu, Southern Japan. Giant wooden barrels, which are used to make shoyu or soya sauce, hang from the ceiling, while Koji Buta, a special tray that is used in the making of koji (malt rice) has been turned into furniture. Underscoring the importance of community-oriented design, all the cedar materials have been sourced from Kyushu, and the barrels and trays have been produced by local craftspeople. Kengo Kuma kkaa.co.jp kk_030714_01-940x626 kk_030714_03-940x626 kk_030714_04-940x626 kk_030714_05-940x626 kk_030714_06-940x626abc
Design Hunters

Dion Horstmans forms unlikely collaboration for the 2015 Telstra Ballet Dancer Award

  One is a 6’6’’ guy who works with steel. The other is a delicate dancer from Japan. You wouldn’t think they have much in common, but you’d be wrong, according to them. “His pieces, I found, were like Japanese cranes, flying away,” says Ako Kondo of New Zealand artist, Dion Horstmans. “I had this connection to him because for me, with ballet, I always think of it like flying away.” Dion suggests further similarities between their practices. “For dancers, it’s about movement and being in this rhythm. In essence, my work is the same,” he says. “It’s just more elongated and stratified.” In this unique project for the Telstra Ballet Dancer Award 2015, six nominees from The Australian Ballet are paired up with six artists from different creative fields, who produce a work inspired by their respective dancer. Each duo came together for a day where both artist and dancer were ‘creating’, with a Telstra ‘prism’ adding a cohesive dimension across the six works. In Dion and Ako’s case, the geometry of both their forms of expression provided the basis for the sculpture and the dance. “Ballet is always about the line – the line of the body,” Ako explains. “This is quite similar to what Dion does”. Together, they envisioned one of Dion’s angular sculptures set on the floor, with low lighting casting directional shadows to provide a matrix for Ako to interact with and dance within. The result is both dynamic and intriguing. Their skills are quite different but there’s huge respect, from one artist to the other. “I love ballet dancers, aesthetically… they fly!” Dion marvels. “I can power through anything, but these guys are small and quick and lithe. I’m in awe of their physical abilities; also the time and discipline [they’ve put in] to get where they’re at.” This dedication is another point of similarity between the two contrasting figures. “Ako’s constantly trying to strive to be better and be more, and anyone who’s doing anything they’re passionate about is the same,” Dion points out. ‘You want to be able to do bigger things and push yourself further.” The Telstra Ballet Dancer Award, with a $20,000 cash prize, will be announced on 3 December. People’s Choice voting (with $5,000 prize) is open now, click here (telstra.com/ballet) to see the other artist/dancer collaborations and to vote. Telstra-IMG_5784-Lime Telstra-IMG_5800_Lime Telstra-IMG_6078_Lime Telstra-IMG_6136-Lime Telstra-IMG_6141_Lime Telstra-IMG_6255-Lime The Australian Ballet australianballet.com.au Dion Horstmans dionhorstmans.tumblr.com Telstra Ballet Dancer Award facebook.com/Telstra/app_734270776591021abc
Happenings
MAGAZINE
What's On

Habitus #28 Launch Party

  Thanks to both all of those who attended the Habitus launch party, and again to Stylecraft. We hope you enjoyed it. [gallery columns="4" ids="44559,44565,44564,44563,44562,44561,44560,44558,44557,44556,44555,44554,44553,44552,44551,44550,44549,44548,44547,44546,44545,44544,44543,44542,44541,44540,44539,44538,44537,44536,44535,44534,44533,44532,44531,44530,44529,44528,44527,44526,44525,44524,44523,44522,44521,44520,44519,44518,44517,44516,44515,44514,44513,44512,44511,44510,44509,44508,44507,44506,44505,44504,44503,44502"] Habitus issue #28 is on sale now. To see online related content, click here.abc
Architecture
Places

Potts Point denizens welcome wholefood store The Farm

  Bringing a dose of healthy eating to Macleay Street, The Farm owners, Josh and Lisa Thompson are firmly set on engaging the local community about how to eat in a healthy and sustainable manner. Through the supply of health foods, fresh produce and cafe that illustrates how to utilise them, The Farm offers a new way of food shopping and healthy eating. Sydney-based design studio, TomMarkHenry were tasked with bringing the space to life, and have designed the space around the familiar process of harvesting fresh fruit and vegetables from a farm setting. The Farm's cafe is set at the front of the space, which is framed by the silhouette of a triangular barn-shaped farmhouse. The cafe's furniture has been manufactured with sustainability in mind, and spans durable raw materials including recycled pallets, reclaimed timber and sustainable bamboo, all supported by recycled steel structures. Moving further into the back of the space, the whole-food store is stocked with a variety of dry foods, fresh produce and bulk food bins, and all carry clear and simple labels to make the process of shopping and eating healthy easy.   TomMarkHenry_TheFarm10 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm09 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm08 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm07 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm06 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm05 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm03 TomMarkHenry_TheFarm02   The Farm thefarmwholefoods.com  abc