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From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters

Dinosaur Designs and Romance Was Born collaborate

  The jewellery collection was first previewed at Romance Was Born’s presentation of Cooee Couture during Mercedes Benz Fashion Week earlier this year. This month will see a range of brightly coloured gum leaves and gum nut pendants, necklaces and earrings from the runway collection transformed into ready to wear pieces for the Dinosaur Designs for Romance Was Born collaboration. “It’s exciting to finally launch this wonderful collaborative collection in store. Working with Luke Sales, Anna Plunkett and Linda Jackson was a joy. We were able to share our love for the Australian landscape and explore and celebrate its beauty with these bold, creative pieces,” says Dinosaur Designs’ Louise Olsen. “We have wanted to collaborate with Dinosaur Designs for ages, and we’ve been thinking, what would it be when we did? Dinosaur Designs is an Australian icon so they were perfect for this project that celebrates so many icons of the country we live in,” says Luke Sales of Romance Was Born. “Casting the gum nuts and leaves was great fun, and we’ve used a colour palette that reflects Romance Was Born, Linda Jackson, opals, the red centre, our oceans and the tropics…and of course rainbows and tropical birds.” The collaboration will be available from Dinosaur Designs, September 4 in store and online. dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_014 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_013 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_012 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_011 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_010 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_009 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_008 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_007 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_006 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_004 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_003 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_002 dinosaur_designs_romance_was_born_jewellery_11_august_2015_001abc
Happenings
What's On

The Gold Club: Bringing Back Style

Bringing Back Style will address the working concerns of today’s interior design community – covering aspects from styling, to product design and sustainability concerns. Hosted by the Australian Design Centre, Australia’s leading centre for craft and design, and chaired by The Snap Assembly's Anne-Maree Sargeant, this panel discussion will feature a line-up of Australian design luminaries including; “Australia’s first stylist” Babette Hayes OAM; artist, designer, and educator Jacquie Clayton; Liane Rossler, curator and creative advisor on issues relating to art, design and the environment; and Robyn Holt, former CEO of Condé Nast, publisher of Vogue and GQ, and co-founder of the Monocle Magazine empire. Bringing Back Style is the second in the Australian Design Centre’s Gold Club events, a conversation series that shines a spotlight on how influential women have contributed to the Australian art, craft, and design landscape. Date: 8 September, 6-8pm Address: 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst Register: Eventbrite Photographed: Robyn Holt abc
Design Products
Furniture

Tom Skeehan explores contrasting materials in Setto

  Tom Skeehan’s Setto Chair draws reference from traditional Japanese chair design, bringing together the simplicity of materials and purity of form with a commercial manufacturing process. The Setto Chair’s minimal form is expressed through the obvious use of two materials; a powder coated steel frame and American oak. The Setto Low Chair utilises a similar minimal steel frame to cradle the large upholstered element, allowing the chosen fabric – available in wool or felt – to respond to its constraints and provide a comfortable seat with generous proportions. Subtle details are achieved through precise upholstery techniques, allowing the material and process to inform the final design. Tom Skeehan’s Henko Light takes inspiration from the theatrical interaction a user experiences when operating and adjusting a light. The light pole can easily be adjusted and rotated 360 degrees, and the opposite end of the light can be placed in the base to create a varied angle of light. This tactile interaction defines the position and orientation the light, encouraging the user to further interact with the light and its environment. The Henko Light spans three different materials; a powder coated aluminum pole available in black or white, concrete and wood. Tom Skeenhan skeehan.com.au Unknown Unknown-3 Unknown-5 Unknown-2 Unknown-4  abc
Design Products
Furniture

Nendo releases Twig chair for Alias

  Nendo designer, Sayaka Ito set out to create a chair made of four aluminium “twigs” and a seat. While the aluminium structure of all of the chairs remain the same, five upper portion unit variations feature differing shapes, colours, and materials. A number of different shapes and sitting experiences are achieved by fitting these units onto the four legs to create a T-shape on the tops of the legs, connect sections, or add a high or low backrest. Choices for seat material include wood, plastic, and fabric. When the seat and upper portion is removed, the aluminium frames of multiple seats can be stacked, making storage convenient and reducing potential transportation costs. Nendo nendo.jp twig17_akihiro_yoshida twig16_akihiro_yoshida twig15_akihiro_yoshida twig14_akihiro_yoshida twig13_akihiro_yoshida twig12_akihiro_yoshida twig11_akihiro_yoshida twig09_akihiro_yoshida twig08_akihiro_yoshida twig06_akihiro_yoshida twig05_akihiro_yoshida   twig04_akihiro_yoshida twig03_akihiro_yoshida twig02_akihiro_yoshida twig01_akihiro_yoshida twig_sketch02 twig_sketch01abc
Design Products
Furniture

Find handcrafted beauty in Synthesis by Nick Randall

  Tasmanian craftsman, Nick Randall embraces complex curvilinear forms and sinuous lines in his Synthesis collection, pairing traditional furniture making methods with wooden boat boatbuilding techniques. Inspired by his time building a timber rowing dinghy from King Billy Pine and Blackwood, Nick began incorporating his newly honed techniques into his furniture range. “I have a passion for boats and have always admired classic timber yachts with their elegant and graceful lines,” says Nick. “As a furniture maker I am also fascinated with how yachts are designed and built and saw the potential of utilising these techniques in my work.” Each piece involves the laying of a series of delicate strips around a set of forms, where carbon fibre is then laminated to the interior of the form to provide a rigid structure. The forms are produced using digital methods with the final shaping completed by hand, ensuring the desired shape is achieved and adding a tactile nature to the work. Nick Randall nickrandalldesign.com Photography by Peter Whyte randall_1309_008 randall_1410_009 randall_1410_015 randall_1410_018abc
Architecture
Homes

Pickles & Rouse House

  The Pickles & Round House was the first project that Jo and Harry worked on together, and resulted in the formulation of their architecture studio Pickles & Rouse Architects. “We bought this house in 2010 and it has been evolving ever since. This was our first house and design project together, hence the name and establishment of our Architectural firm Pickles & Rouse,” says Jo Lambis. “The house has recently been sold as our family is becoming larger, however the buyers would like to evolve the house further so we will be helping them to achieve this.” Located on the Corner of Pickles and Rouse Street in Port Melbourne, the house has been renovated to become a two bedroom, one bathroom home that circulates around a central courtyard, enabling the user to open up the living and kitchen areas to create one fluid space. “The highly conceptual design tests the boundaries of inner city living,” expalins Jo. “Many designs we see today are quite introverted, however Pickles & Rouse house explores the use of integration with the street. It is a design that we find passersby always peeking in to see how the design is evolving.” Pickles_15 Pickles_8 The original part of the house is a 100-year-old single fronted Victorian, where sympathy was given to the existing facade and two front rooms. The rear of the house was opened up to maximise the north facing corner aspect, allowing light to cascade into the living and kitchen areas. The main focus of the design is the central courtyard that links the living, study and kitchen area, and allows the spaces to open up to the street via a three metre wide sliding garden wall. Jo explains that this design enables them to change the size of the space when guests visit, allowing for spaces to fold inwards and outwards. “The courtyard in summer is the main space we resided in and the connection between the kitchen and living room is quite strong, so much so that during summer we would tend to walk through the courtyard to each space rather than down the hallway,” says Jo. “It really captivates urban summer living, rather than hiding behind walls. So the user is really able to integrate with inner city living.” The detail of the joinery in the kitchen is also highly conceptual. Due to limited space restrictions, the pantry is designed with a minimal depth using a bi-fold system. “When we are cooking, the bi-folds would open up to provide shallow shelves for food storage, an appliance area and hanging section for pots and pans. It creates a highly functional space with everything at your fingertips when required,” explains Jo. Once cooking is finished the bi-fold is shut to create clean lines and an uncluttered space. Pickles & Rouse picklesandrouse.com.au Pickles_9 Pickles_7 Pickles_5 Pickles_3 Pickles_6 Pickles_1 Pickles_14 Pickles_13 Pickles_12abc
Architecture
Homes

The Hampton Road addition

  The original house sits at the front of the block, and the addition at the rear, which draws heavily on the physical and material character of the existing house. The brief requested a simple replacement of the existing fibro lean-to at the rear that contained the kitchen, dining, bathroom and laundry. The only additional request was for a separate ensuite off the main bedroom. Formally the original house is a corrugated iron roof over rough heavy walls with dark interiors and no connection to the external environment. The limestone rubble walls created a striking roughness and texture to the exterior while internally creating deep thresholds between spaces. The new addition takes these qualities of material, light and tactility and reinterprets them to create a series of spaces that are designed to elevate the experience of living. Fremantle-Adds-Ext-2 Fremantle-Adds-Ext-3 Rammed limestone walls were created to continue the weightiness of the existing but to introduce a more tactile surface. Over the walls a metal clad roof structure has been carefully placed. The profile of the roof reflects its role in opening up the interior to draw in light and ventilation. The texture of the cladding gives the roof a visual tactility through the play of light and shadow over its surface. While a significant problem in additions and alterations is how to connect the new and old together, this project embraces both. Because of the strength of character of the existing the new roof, the walls have been pulled away from the existing house in order to emphasize the qualities of each. Where the two forms touch, the materials have been reduced to almost nothing. The roof has been flattened to tuck underneath the existing and the walls stop short and glass has been introduced. This project is a careful exploration of materials and restraint in order to create a generous living environment. The new internal living spaces have been augmented by the introduction of external deck and garden spaces, and cavity sliding doors open up to allow for the boundary between these two spaces to be erased. Photography by Robert Frith Fremantle-Adds-Int-3 Fremantle-Adds-Int-4 Fremantle-Adds-Int-5 Fremantle-Adds-Int-2 Fremantle-Adds-Int-1 Fremantle-Adds-Int-10 Fremantle-Adds-Int-9 Fremantle-Adds-Int-8   Fremantle-Adds-Int-6 Fremantle-Adds-Int-7 Fremantle-Adds-Ext-6 Fremantle-Adds-Ext-8 Fremantle-Adds-Ext-7abc
Happenings
What's On

Superhouse Talk Series at Museum of Sydney

  Featuring some of Australia’s leading architectural minds and insightful social commentators, the series will delve deeper into the stories and themes behind Superhouse and answer the question: ‘what makes a house super?’. The series will reveal how some of our most influential architects, including some whose projects are featured in the exhibition, think about place, materials, size, heritage and so much more when designing spaces for living. Each talk will include illustrated presentations from the speakers, followed by a conversation hosted by Karen McCartney. Does Size Matter? Friday 11 September, 6.30-8pm A tiny footprint can still have a powerful architectural impact. The Superhouse exhibition showcases several houses where lack of dimension does not diminish their architectural impact. In an era of ever-expanding floor plans, and pressure on resources, the panel will discuss the issue of size through the lens of architects Paul Morgan (Trunk House, 2011) and Alec Tzannes, and researcher and author Dr Rebecca Huntley. LON15_SUP_007 Re Imagining the House Friday 9 October, 6.30-8pm As the repurposing of buildings becomes a strong architectural focus, the panel will discuss how this is achieved for residential spaces and some of the challenges and benefits that it presents. The discussion will broaden to the impact on urban environments and how large-scale developments can take a more sustainable approach to the reinvigoration of buildings. Speakers include Dom Alvaro, Woods Bagot (Small House, 2010), William Smart, Smart Design Studio and Ian Innes, Director Heritage, Sydney Living Museums. LON15_SUP_059-sml Designing for Place Friday 13 November, 6.30-8pm    Whether it is the direct relationship with the land, and the climate, and how it informs the siting, form and materials or, in an urban context, the history and constraints of a site, designing for place is one of the foremost considerations for an architect. The panel will discuss how both situations inform the outcome and the processes they explore along the way. Speakers include Hannah Tribe,  Tribe Studios, James Stockwell, Stockwell Design (Croft House, 2013) and Virginia Kerridge, Virginia Kerridge Architects (House in Country NSW, 2010). SuperHouse1 Individual talk: $40 adult, $35 conc/member Series ticket: $80 adult, $70 conc/member Location: Museum of Sydney, cnr Phillip and Bridge Streets, Sydney. All talks are held at the Museum of Sydney and include entry to the Superhouse exhibition. Book: slm.is/superhouse or 1300 448 849 LON15_SUP_002-smlabc
Happenings
What's On

The Other Art Fair launches in Sydney this September

  The selected artists will showcase their work across four days, with mediums spanning  installation, sculpture,  mixed  media, printmaking, painting, video works and photography. The Other Art Fair will be presented during the same period as the international art fair Sydney Contemporary, which will take over the Carriageworks precinct. “Sydney’s first edition of The Other Art Fair offers visitors the opportunity to buy directly from the best emerging and undiscovered artists from around Australia and beyond,” says Emilya Colliver, Sydney Fair Director of The Other Art Fair. “The Other Art Fair provides a platform for new and experienced collectors alike to meet and engage with artists directly, ask questions and understand the artist’s story and creative process,” she says. “It is an exciting chance to meet and invest in an artist who might just be the ‘next big thing’ in the arts world. We are offering the full spectrum – some of our artists are new ‘break-­ut’  artists whilst others are quite accomplished in their field.” Artists presenting work at The Other Art Fair include emerging Korean artist collective Reissue Korea who will be creating sculptures and installation, Sydney-­based artist collective Black Parrot, which includes 2014 Sulman Prize winning artist Andrew Sullivan and 2015 Archibald finalist, American-­born, Sydney-based painter Kim Leutwyler. The Other Art Fair was inaugurated in London in November 2011 and has since presented eight  successful  editions  in  the  United Kingdom,  firmly  establishing  itself  as  London’s favourite alternative art event.   Tickets for The Other Art Fair are now available online from www.theotherartfair.com.au Date: Thursday 10 September to Sunday 13 September Location: The aMBUSH  Project  Space, Level 3, Central Park, 28 Broadway,  Chippendale,  Sydney Image by Anya Brock. abc
Architecture
Homes

Medium Density with Australian Characteristics

The six apartments over three floors each extend the full width of the building. Windows and balcony access on both north and south sides providing cross ventilation and abundant natural light. The combination of glass and natural heating and cooling, with the outer gossamer screens made from recycled materials, were paramount to the sustainable design and thermal performance of the project. The screens, extending over the balconies, provide both privacy and weather protection and emphasise the strong form of the building.

The principles of passive environmental design for the six apartments also focuses on external space, with each apartment having more outdoor space than would be expected on such a tight site. Integral to the design is also a brown roof, providing gardens for wildlife habitat and solar panels to contribute to the apartment’s energy consumption.

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The contemporary interior design for the apartments complements the design of the exterior - simple in expression with warm materials, maintaining a neutral yet light feel. The aesthetic of the gossamer screens extends to the tiling in the bathroom, shared spaces and entrance foyer, maintaining maintaining a development is cool and contemporary.

Prominently at the apex of the building and pointing proudly to the Hall Street, a public sculpture has been installed, wrapping the powerful column outside the St George Bank tenancy. This sculpture, ‘The Flume’ by Organism Design, was commissioned by the client through the Waverley Council Public Art Program.

This project is a successful and considered example of contemporary architectural design. Undertaken with town planner guidance and council support, this project is now an iconic development in the local precinct.

Tanner Kibble Denton Architects tkda.com.au

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Design Hunters
Conversations

Project Profile: Washington Street, Orchard Piper

Name: Luke McKie, Director, Orchard Piper Architect/design firm including head and participating architects/designers: Jolson Primary Architect, Stephen Jolson and Project Architect, Matt Wright Other help – designers/ decorators / landscape gardeners/ stylists?   Rick Eckersley – Eckersley Garden Architecture Lindsey Adelman – Lindsey Adelman Lighting and Objects Venini – Owner Giancarlo Chimento 140908---Washington---R004---Living-2000 Kind of project: Residential development inclusive of garden residences, terraces and a penthouse. Location: 27 – 31 Washington Street, Toorak Parameters of project: 6 residences including one large super penthouse. Washington Street is inclusive of private pools, private lifts, grand gallery entrances, wine cellars, multiple dining and living rooms, home offices, landscaped gardens and unobstructed Melbourne city views. Final cost of the project: $30+million Date of project completion: Summer 2016 (ready for occupancy) 140908---Washington---R003---Kitchen-2000 What was the brief for this project? We were after a pure expression of creativity from Jolson with no compromise. Our overall aim was to create house size apartments as a luxury living alternative, situated close to amenities on a unique and distinctive site. We were very much after an international level of luxury and wanted to provide the same levels of luxury you would find in the great urban cities of the world such as Paris, London, New York, Berlin and Milan. The design is classy and timeless – pushing the boundaries of what apartment living can be, as a proper alternative to a house. ‘Timeless’ and ‘incomparable’ were touchstone words for the brief. How did the local climate, building vernacular or local landscape influence your design? All buildings will be built to blend into their context and not to dominate their surrounds. We have designed the location of the eating, entertainment and living areas to maximise the rising and setting sun (sunrise and sunsets) also to maximise the benefits of the intangibles, such as solar heat (to make the most of the elements). The experience of a luxurious space that we are trying to achieve is found in outlooks and controlling view lines. 140908---Washington---R007---Living-2000 Can you tell us about the high internal volumes used? Why they were chosen for this building? We were very conscious about retaining the domestic scale of the building and making sure that it did not feel like a commercial experience. It needed to feel calm and nurturing. You can often find spaces are too big. We ensured that Washington Street’s building materials, workmanship and quality is of the highest specification available in Australia, and were conscious of a ‘taste versus value’ equation. That is to say, we did not specify the most expensive fittings and fixtures, but a profoundly considered and balanced selection of materials, and palette that best represents a level of luxury that we aspire to. Three metre ceilings are a real luxury as they provide both space and proportion.It is very easy to just buy the most expensive fittings, but to really heighten the human experience it is all about space and volume. The height and volume was also maximise the northern orientation of the building and the views to the city. What about this space makes it a special and personal project for you or the lead architect/designer? This is the first time I have ever done a project where we started with very little idea where we would end up … it has been an exciting process from day one. I gave a very loose brief so we could all jump aboard the creative bandwagon. I still find finessed and thoughtful details in this project, which is really exciting. I won’t fully appreciate the profound level of detail until it’s built, so it is pleasing to see these things materialise. There is nothing more special than seeing concepts come to life, especially after all the meticulous analysis and scrutiny – everything in Washington Street is so considered – it just has to be right. Washington Street is a project in which we have really listened to our market and how they want to live to their lives. Orchard Piper orchardpiper.com 140908---Washington---R016---Bar-2000 140908---Washington---R015---Lobby-2000 140908---Washington---R014---Study-2000 140908---Washington---R012---Ensuite-2000 140908---Washington---R011---Penthouse-Living-2000 140908---Washington---R010---Study-2000 140908---Washington---R008---Living-2000 140908---Washington---R006---Ensuite-2000 140908 - Washington - R009 copy 140908---Washington---R005---Study-2000 140908---Washington---R002---Street-2000 140908---Washington-street---R001---Elevation-2000abc
Happenings
What's On

Cutler & Co. and The Robin Boyd Foundation combine Architecture and Food

The house provides a unique insight into Melbourne’s design leaders of the 50s and 60s. Designed by Robin Boyd for himself and his family in 1958, the house is widely recognised as one of Australia’s architectural icons of the 20th century. It remains largely unchanged from the time it was first occupied, furnished with pieces designed by Boyd’s associates Grant Featherston, Clement Meadmore and others. The house is now home to The Robin Boyd Foundation who hosts private events, celebrations and seminars designed to preserve Boyd’s legacy. By providing a forum to share knowledge and inform and inspire discussion, it is hoped the space will raise awareness of the importance of design. WalshStHouse WalshStHouse1 WalshStHouse2 WalshStHouse4  abc