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Architecture
Homes

How to design your home around water

History is a great teacher and there’s a lot to learn from the past when designing spaces. For one of RT+Q Architects’ recently completed homes – the House with an Impluvium – they looked to the impluvium, the sunken part of the atrium in a Greek or Roman house that is created to carry away rainwater coming from the roof. The impluvium takes the function of a water feature cum swimming pool. It sits in the middle of the house, separating two linear blocks, joined by the main dining room that floats gracefully above the pool like a glass lantern. At night, the shimmering of the pool’s mosaic tiles creates a mesmerising blue and silver underwater ‘carpet’, making this an ideal space for entertaining. ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_09 This impluvium – or courtyard space – is the key datum of the house, says Rene Tan, the principal architect, who founded the award-winning firm together with architect TK Quek. “The central impluvium has a double function: first, it provides for an aesthetically pleasing space, an oasis with light, air, natural ventilation and views; second, it also functions as the symbolic centre of the house,” he says. In other words, it is the heart of the home, where the older and younger generation can retire to their respective blocks containing self-sufficient bedrooms and living spaces, but also come together at meal times for fellowship. Furthermore, it allows more natural light to illuminate the home’s internal spaces. ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_14-915x587 In land-scarce Singapore where many homeowners are wont to build up as much as possible to take advantage of the expensive land, an insertion of a courtyard as large as the one here goes against the norm. But Tan explains that this has always been part of the firm’s ‘counter-intuitive’ approach that lends to a more inspired and emotional type of living. Additionally, for RT+Q Architects, the devil is always in the details. So for instance, they have allowed for slits at the pool area so that water can cascade down into the basement. This results not only in refreshing water features at the basement corridors but also introduces natural light and ventilation into the space, thus reducing the perception that basements are dark and uninviting, explains Allan Tongol, the architectural assistant in charge of the project. ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_06 The architecture also considers the comforts of daily living for the inhabitants. As Tongol shares, the land is higher behind, so he conceived of a layered progression of steps leading from the car porch to the grandparents’ living room and on to their bedroom so that moving about the space will not be so strenuous. In terms of materials, the palette of plaster-and-paint, glass panels, aluminium profiles and stone cladding are put together in an elegant manner that complement the streamlined volumes of the architecture. In other words, this is a trademark RT+Q Architect house with plenty of class and strong architectonic expressions, as well as a good balance of texture and warmth. RT+Q Architects rtnq.com ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_05 ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_10 ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_07 ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_08 ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_01big ed_HOUSE-WITH-IMPLUVIUM-_02  abc
Design Products
Accessories

Anekka, the abstract made real

Acclaimed for her work on high-end illustrated books and paintings, Evi O’s debut Anekka collection comprises four contemporary tableware pieces. Neat and understated, the collection is perfectly in line with Evi’s style, “Our products have clean lines and are produced to last. Each piece combines modern form and minimalist design to add a contemporary element to your home” she says. Based in Sydney, Evi drew on her Indonesian roots and connections for Anekka, collaborating with a range of Indonesian artisans using traditional techniques for each piece. A star of the collection is the Melk vase, which is inspired by traditional milk jugs and comes in five shades. Equally useful for both drinking or display purposes the jug is well paired well with the Tulip cups. Rounding out the collection are two bowls, the Maan and the Hoed. The Maan, is a stackable item, suitable for everyday meals, while the Hoed is designed for entrées and desserts. Anekka anekka.com anekka-set-nest  abc
Architecture
Around The World

Imaginative Social Spaces in Singapore’s latest hotel: The South Beach

The first thing we saw at The South Beach was a Lee Lee Nam video art wall. Installed front and centre (and mere steps) of the entrance, the South Korean artist’s six-metre-tall and seven-metre-wide digital canvas loomed extra large. We were told the piece was conceptualised as a ‘moving picture’ to convey a sense of ‘transformation and energies’, inviting guests to explore their imaginations and leave the ordinary behind. Having a video wall at the entrance struck us as playful, too – it also functioned as a partition that screened (what was to come), heightening the sense of anticipation in the arrival experience. The Global Village which is the hotel lobby ensues after the video wall. To our left, we caught a glimpse of a communal table set up over which a huge cocoon sculpture hung. We took the right and the lobby, which serves as one of the hotel’s many imaginative social spaces, unfolded in a long, linear stretch – a remarkable contrast to the verticality of space experienced just before the art wall. TheSouthBeach_Global-Village-Video-Wall-Highres Seven individual check-in desks lined the linear lobby. Each of these desks depicts seven different societies from around the world, including that of the Europeans, the Peranakans, the North Americans, the South Americans, the Indians, the Chinese and the Moorish. Opposite the desks, shining in pink neon (discreetly, ironically) from under an elongated lampshade a string of words reads ‘On the road of ways there was A after B’. Indeed, many features in this hotel seemed to defy easy, straightforward reading, as is typical of Starck’s work. There were trick-of-eye objects (a trompe l’oeil ‘chair back bench’ and a 160 ‘floating’ candles centrepiece, for instance), and ‘out-of-place’ fixtures (PREFIX, the lobby bar is perhaps the only bar in Singapore that has a fireplace). These whimsical, sometimes offbeat features provided plenty to wonder at, and to ponder over. TheSouthBeach_Global-Village-1-Highres The elevator ride was another surprise. As the doors shut, the RGB lights came on, and images of sea creatures showed up in flashes of red, green, or blue on the walls. It was amusing to think that Starck had chosen to depict the depths of the ocean as we shot up the skyscraper. The lift ride was transporting, if not disorientating, but that was the point: all of this – the eclecticism, the play – was part of a design intention to ‘create infinite experiences’; to send you to another space and time. On the guest room floors, we were cast into yet another world. All along the walls, floors and doors of the corridors were depictions of a child’s drawings – although the scent in the air and the muted colour tone reminded us of a bamboo forest. There was a softening in mood, and we naturally fell to speaking in hushed tones. TheSouthBeach_LAUGH-Bar-Kitchen-Highres The guest rooms are called ‘Showcase Rooms and Suites’. There’s ‘Showcase Me’ (Deluxe Room), ‘Showcase You’ (Premier Rooms), ‘Showcase Us’ (Deluxe Club Room), and ‘Showcase Us Plus’ (Premier Club Room). Appropriate to the idea of ‘showcasing’ (oneself), mirrors and mirrored surfaces were everywhere. There was a sense of quietness and privacy in these cool toned, white on white rooms. In the ladies rooms, (there are 80 of such rooms, spread over three strictly ladies only floors featuring additional amenities and security), bed linen had been given pink piping, as were many other custom amenities and accessories. Up at Flow18, a sky garden wrapped around the building presented a rewarding panorama of the city. Open to the outside all around, this floor offered a sense of the city, the weather and locality. Set up as a mixture of seating clusters, and game and leisure areas with a foosball and ping pong table, this was designed as an Imaginative Social Space where guests (who are strangers) could be ‘alone together’ in the property. TheSouthBeach_Presidential-Suite-Living-Room-Highres Back in ‘Global Village’, we took a seat on the chair bench and the intention of the placement became clear: you sit here to watch the scene. Richard Rogers has said that one of life’s greatest pleasures is in watching people. The South Beach hotel’s imaginative social spaces are just opportunities set up for such enjoyment. The South Beach thesouthbeach.com.sg TheSouthBeach_PREFIX-1-Highres TheSouthBeach_LAUGH-Restaurant-Highres TheSouthBeach_LAUGH-Long-Table-Highres TheSouthBeach_Room TheSouthBeach_Showcase-You-Bathroom-Highres TheSouthBeach_Ebb6-Highresabc
Design Products
Furniture

Overgaard & Dyrman: A Young Danish Brand Builds Upon Heritage

Despite having launched just one collection, Overgaard & Dyrman have already set a clear – and bold – direction for its brand of furniture. Wire, its debut collection consisting of a bar stool, chair, coffee table, dining chair, lounge chair and sofa, is produced using both traditional saddlery craft and advanced metalworking. Without forgetting its Danish design heritage, Overgaard & Dyrman believes in innovating. The furniture company founded in 2013 by Christian Dyrman (technical director) and Jasper Overgaard (creative director) strives to blend contemporary construction with age-old techniques, and running their own workshop allows them to do just that. OvergaardDyrman_BritishRacingGreenLeather While dictating their production processes, the duo made tools and fixtures to achieve the complexity of Wire. For example, a custom fixture allows a highly skilled welder to weld by hand. Says Christian Dyrman, “The use of modern machinery gives us the opportunity to preserve the fantastic craft skills that are still among us, and to combine these with complex forms and manufacturing methods.” The ‘saddles’ that inform the seating are made by combining thick full-grain tooling leather with a layer of foam and soft leather. This traditional technique, which has been used for generations of saddle-making, was slightly tweaked. “Saddle makers have a horse-shaped mould to make the saddle from. We have made a similar mould for our saddles – except that our mould has the shape of a chair,” says the duo. The completed saddle is then mounted to a bearing structure by interweaving the leather straps with steel wires. OvergaardDyrman_WireLoungeChair_WhiskeyLeather Each piece in the Wire collection was designed to be spectacular no matter which angle it is viewed from. This is a nod to late Danish legend, Hans J. Wegner who once said, “A chair is to have no backside. It should be beautiful from all sides and angles.” Christian and Jasper believe that the longevity of furniture does not simply lie in high quality materials and durable construction, but is completed by the beauty of design detailing and its making process. Overgaard & Dyrman oandd.dk DREAM dream.com.sg Watch the crafting of the Wire collection here: [embed]https://youtu.be/Kh990wwFgVs[/embed] Wire-Dining-Chair-Back_Yellowstone-Whiskey-leather making-of Makingof-2abc
Architecture
Homes

How Mim Design brought symmetry and subtlety to the beach

In designing the gallery-esque pavilion house, Mim Design had symmetry and aspect at the fore of the interior planning process. Intended as a coastal hideout for a large family, the four-bedroom home displays a sense of the natural and handmade, tying it to its coastal situation, in spite of its sleek modern appearance. According to Mim Design Director Miriam Fanning, the owners of the newly built beach house wanted to walk in and immediately relax. “The brief was to achieve a simplified sense of calm, rather than having something that feels cluttered,” Fanning says, “The interiors needed to suit short- and long-term stays, and encourage a sense of closeknit family living, despite the large scale of the home. A further requirement was that every room had its own aspect, whether that be of the garden, outdoor entertainment and pool area, artwork, or of the custom joinery on show in every room.” A reconfiguration of the floor plan was required in order to achieve this design goal, with the L-shaped building now divided into separate wings for adults and children. The adults’ wing comprises a main bedroom with a bench nook, custom robes, built-in dresser and an extensive marble ensuite. While the children’s zone features a separate living area with two bedrooms and access to a two-way ensuite that overlooks a courtyard garden. “To balance the building’s existing black cladding and window frames, we selected textural finishes such as super soft knotted wool carpets, slatted timber wall panels, timber veneer shelving, powder coated door handles and natural stone benches, all in a soft palette of grey, pebble, white ivory, pumice and black,” says Kristiina Morgan, who led the project alongside Ms Fanning. “From the homemade bathroom tiles, to the custom vanities, mirrors and joinery, everything is refined but with an artisan sensibility. “We wanted to create a relaxing home, where a family could spend quality time together in a picturesque coastal environment that feels both sleek and soothing, and we believe we’ve managed to strike that balance.” Mim Design mimdesign.com.au MimRelphAve-01 MimRelphAve-13 MimRelphAve-12 MimRelphAve-11 MimRelphAve-10 MimRelphAve-09 MimRelphAve-06 MimRelphAve-05   MimRelphAve-04 MimRelphAve-03 MimRelphAve-02   MimRelphAve-14  abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Pedder on Scotts: Infusing Creativity into Retail

It seems that not a week goes by without another shopping destination opening its doors to insatiable Singaporean shoppers, yet the recently launched retail concept Pedder on Scotts stands out from the rest of its cookie-cutter competitors. Pedder on Scotts brings together fashion, art, entrepreneurship and opportunities for homegrown creative talents to be showcased in a new way. With its unique vision spearheaded by the Pedder Group – a fashion footwear and accessories specialist with a sprawling outreach in Asia – Pedder on Scotts is anything but a stoic display of shoes and bags. 1110 The store’s unique layout and design, carefully crafted by the Toronto-based architect Abraham Chan of Abraham Chan Design Office and Hong Kong-based PLY Union‘s Raymond Chan, presents a dynamic shopping experience that mixes latest must-haves and special collaborations between emerging and established designers in an environment that invites visitors to explore, discover and be inspired along the way. Located at the heart of Singapore’s most visited shopping district, Orchard Road, Pedder on Scotts is a conglomeration of more than 100 international footwear, handbag and accessories brands (with many exclusive to the Singaporean market) in a space that is mindfully subdivided into several distinct zones, each with a unique sentiment and style. 03a This subdivision was a deliberate design decision by Abraham Chan and Raymond Chan to create a sense of order in an otherwise free-to-explore environment. As a result, the core brand mix fits neatly into five curated sections: On Pedder, On Pedder Men, New Generation, Weekend & Sports and Cool Kids, with a rotating selection of pop-up kiosks showcasing new collaborations and labels. “This is the largest range of designers under one roof for women, men and children in an environment that mixes creativity and fun, allowing individuals to explore fashion and meet the creators, in a truly unique way,” says Peter Harris, President of Pedder Group, on the unique retail space. 12b With sections of the store visually and spatially interconnected around an atrium, the overall design of Pedder on Scotts allows visitors to explore and discover the individual retail sections on a rotary path. Curating an experience that feels “like a nice day in a modern gallery”, instead of a regimented sequential flow often associated with many traditional department stores, the architects were able to create stylistically distinct areas that bring out the unifying characteristics of the brands showcased in each section, while maintaining a subtle and muted backdrop for the various sections and installations. 063 Through each zone, the architects utilised unique design features to complement the curated brands on display and emphasise the collective spirit that unifies different brands through a series of deliberate spatial and stylistic design gestures. For On Pedder for Men, which features established and definitively masculine brands, the duo drew inspiration from American period drama television series Mad Men, set in the 60s. Muted pastels and raw finishes were used for furnishings and displays to evoke classic masculinity. 073 For Weekend & Sports section, the architects went with a bold and dynamic design, utilising gym inspired fixtures and installations composed of featured footwear, while for the most whimsical area, the Cool Kids zone, the architects let their imagination run wild, creating a giant rope monster in an enchanted forest setting to foster the sense of wonder and fun. With each space exuding a different aesthetic and catering to different audiences, the overarching emphasis on art, design and creativity breathes inspiration into the vibrant retail space. With plans to host exciting new collaborations and designers, including the retail store’s first exhibition of established Singaporean talent Theseus Chan’s latest publication entitled STEIDL-WERK No. 23: Masaho Anotani “DEFORMED”, and to introduce new brands every few months, Pedder on Scotts solidifies its ongoing commitment to infuse creativity into a new kind of retail experience that brings joy back to shopping. Abraham Chan Design Office abraham-chan.com Ply Union plyunion.hk 093 124 01b 023-915x587abc
Design Products
Accessories

The Skeehan Brothers Cookbook

The Skeehan Brothers Cookbookbook celebrates the love of food that they grew up with during their time in the South Coast, NSW and Denver, Colorado. The brothers honed their cooking on the road, in the homes of their friends and family, and most tellingly, in the great outdoors.

“We both have travelled extensively – particularly visiting family in USA. These experiences, exploring other cultures food and cooking for large family dinners, inspired us to begin to catalogue our own recipes so we could bring them home to share with friends,” says Dan Skeehan.

Tom Skeehan says they were lucky enough to grow up in a family that took pride in cooking and sharing recipes. "Our family meals were not fancy or elaborate, although ingredients were always good, often locally sourced – no frills, honest home cooking. Yet, they were always delicious, because of the love and pleasure that was taken when preparing them for each other,” explains Tom.

For more information, contact info@skeehan.com.au Skeenhan skeehan.com.au SKEEHAN_BROS_Promo_tostadas SKEEHAN_BROS_Promo_lambabc
Design Products
Furniture

Something Beginning With 3

The Maiko Coffee Table, Side Table and Charlie Desk Chair have been added to the Something Beginning With range as the brand continues to grow. Originally Founded in 2011 by industrial designer Lisa Vincitorio and celebrated visual artist Laelie Berzon, these three new designs complement the entire SBW range of elegant, functional furniture. Maiko Coffee Table: Something Beginning With approaches all their design with curiosity and playfulness; the Maiko Coffee Table results from these elements. The powder coated mild steel rods of the Maiko table meet to form a structural and sturdy, yet dynamic table base. The Maiko Side Table is the little cousin to the coffee table, and makes an equally striking impact in home and hospitality environments. Solid yet visually light, the balanced design has an emphasis on spaciousness and continuity. The Charlie Desk Chair: The Charlie stands tall and proud on an aluminium, black powdercoat base with four castors. The chair is lightweight and features a polypropylene shell and beautiful upholstery. These new designs from Something Beginning With exude the timelessness that the brand is known for; yet show a new playfulness for the company. Like all SBW designs though, they manage to enhance the style and comfort of any residential, commercial and hospitality environment. Something Beginning With somethingbeginningwith.com.au Something-Beginning-With_Charlie-Desk-Chair_05Something-Beginning-With_Maiko-Coffee-&-Side-Table_02 Something-Beginning-With_Maiko-Side-Table_01abc
Happenings
What's On

Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei together at the NGV

The Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei exhibition has been developed in joint collaboration between the National Gallery of Victoria, The Andy Warhol Museum and Ai Weiwei himself. The exhibit, which runs until late April, explores the influence of these two iconic modern artists on contemporary art and life. The exhibition focuses on the parallels, intersections and points of difference between Andy Warhol and Ai Weiwei. Surveying the breadth of both artists’ careers, the exhibition at is presenting over 300 works, including a selection of major new commissions, immersive installations and a wide representation of paintings, sculpture, film, photography, publishing and social media. Presenting the work of both artists side by side, the exhibition explores modern life and cultural politics through the lenses of two unique figures; one representing the twentieth century’s modernity and the American century; the other contemporary life and what has been heralded as the ‘Chinese century’ to come. Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei premieres a collection of major new commissions from Weiwei, including an installation from his Forever Bicycles series, composed from almost 1500 bicycles and a major five-metre-tall work from Ai’s Chandelier series of crystal and light. Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei runs from December 11, 2015 to April 24, 2016. National Gallery of Victoria ngv.vic.gov.au 4972338_orig 91a39b34f1a145a588c37c4c11afcc7b 6590602-3x2-940x627 Warhol-2-1011x1024  abc
Architecture
Places

Code Black opens in North Melbourne

Zwei’s latest fit-out for Code Black continues the brand’s distinctly laidback approach to hospitality with a scheme that is as inviting as it is modern. Co-directors Katherine Kemp and Hannah Richardson didn’t necessarily set out to be innovative, but they did want to design an interior with the feeling of home. “We wanted people to be able to walk into somewhere they felt immediately comfortable and relaxed, so we created a soft, gentle environment that’s really light, bright and warm,” says Kemp. This was no simple feat, considering the North Melbourne café is located in a former mechanic’s warehouse. The Zwei co-directors worked with the building’s existing shell by treating the brickwork in a manner that was both playful and unexpected. By applying pastel hued geometric patterning to the white-washed walls, they achieved a sense of lightness, softening the interior’s industrial aesthetic. And along with the new terrazzo floor, the painted walls function as a neutral backdrop for the scheme’s boldest design expression. The ground level kitchen and service counter are centrally located, placing the food front and centre and putting the chef on display. Directly above is a mezzanine insertion, bold in form and with a cantilever that extends above the coffee station. Both levels are connected by a steel support structure finished in deep green that highlights the interplay between various material elements. To add further visual interest, Kemp and Richardson extended the mezzanine’s timber slats to the plywood-lined ceiling. It effectively contrasts with the existing timber beams, which were stripped back to their original state. As Kemp explains, “We knew what we wanted to achieve in terms of environment, but we didn’t start out with a rigid palette. There was a bit of trial and error involved.” This flexible approach informed the generous circulation path that zones the dining area in three distinct sections; at the front of the café, along the sides and towards the back. Stools and high tables are custom made, with the banquette’s round tables mounted from the wall in a thoughtful detail highlighting Kemp and Richardson’s pared-back, slick aesthetic. Light fittings are also elegantly minimalistic in appearance and reiterate the space’s angles and lines. Interestingly, the project took four years to complete because of an extended approval process, although construction was undertaken in six months. For Kemp however, it was important not to lose sight of the driving design concept. “Four years is a long time, so the real challenge was maintaining our original vision,” she reflects. “And making sure it was still very contemporary and fresh.” Photography: Michael Kai Zwei zwei.com.au 141219_Zwei_Projects-0620 141219_Zwei_Projects-1125 141219_Zwei_Projects-1039 141219_Zwei_Projects-1015 141219_Zwei_Projects-1013 141219_Zwei_Projects-1002 141219_Zwei_Projects-0967 141219_Zwei_Projects-0942 141219_Zwei_Projects-0919 141219_Zwei_Projects-0889 141219_Zwei_Projects-0836 141219_Zwei_Projects-0803 141219_Zwei_Projects-0779 141219_Zwei_Projects-0757 141219_Zwei_Projects-0709 141219_Zwei_Projects-0697 141219_Zwei_Projects-0669  abc
Happenings
What's On

Looking back on five decades of El Anatsui

His first major exhibition in Australia, El Anatsui: Five Decades, will showcase a history of the man’s work, from his earliest pieces to today. Presented as a part of the Sydney Festival, the festival will run from 7 January until 6 March 2016. Carriageworks will present over than 30 works from the 1970s to the current day, including ceramics, drawings, sculptures and woodcarvings, alongside the intricate and expansive, large-scale installations for which Anatsui is best known. Born in 1944 in Anyako, Ghana, Anatsui has spent much of his life working and living in Nsukka, Nigeria and has long been recognised as one of the world’s leading contemporary artists. Lisa Havilah, Director of Carriageworks, said “El Anatsui: Five Decades is an ambitious project and reflects Carriageworks commitment to presenting the most ambitious contemporary art from around the world in Australia. This major exhibition continues our annual series presenting the major installations by the most exciting international visual artists working today. “El Anatsui is one of the world’s great artists and it is an honour to be presenting these remarkable works in Carriageworks’ unique spaces. We hope the audiences of Sydney and beyond relish this very special experience,” continues Beatrice Gralton, Visual Arts Curator, Carriageworks. Five Decades demonstrates Anatsui’s inspired approach to repurposed materials. Old wood, aluminium printing plates, tin boxes and liquor bottle tops become ingenious works of unique art. Many of Anatsui’s early ceramic works, prints and sculptures incorporate a contemporary appropriation of the West African adinkra symbols, reaffirm local nature of his work. Five Decades examines the histories of colonial and post-colonial Africa alongside ideas of consumption, exchange and renewal. El Anatsui: Five Decades will be presented at Carriageworks from 7 January until 6 March 2016. Carriageworks carriageworks.com.au EA04 EA11 EA79 EA14 EA80 EA87 EA95 El-Anatsui-Adinkra-Sasa-2003  abc
Architecture
Homes

The Naremburn House: fusing heritage with the modern

Dealing with tricky site size and heritage certification is never easy, but through playing with geometry, light and materials, Bijl Architecture has created a house that is unique, charming and remarkable in turns. The Naremburn House questions traditional design clichés, and provides a site-specific response to client needs and practical requirements. A notable emphasis has been placed on spatial planning throughout the design process, as well as a robust materiality in response to the client’s brief to ‘live long’. A re-interpretation of traditional roof forms allows a compact street front view to matches the scale of neighbouring homes, while the roof form’s exploits design volume to offer useful and spacious floor plans. Bijl Architecture employed a clever use of asymmetrical design and subtle spatial manipulations throughout the house as a means of ensuring scale and proportion are playfully used, but not disorienting. The centrepiece of the Naremburn House design is a sculptural wall installation dubbed the “De-Form Wall”. Bijl co-designed the wall with AR-MA in an exploration of parametric drawing and scripting. The De-Form Wall investigates pattern and form through a usage of digital fabrication. For the proud owners of the home, the space serves as a multitude of specifically constructed spaces, forming an attractive and unique home. Bijl Architecture bijlarchitecture.com.au _MG_6358 _MG_6688 _MG_6544 _MG_6519 _MG_6490 _MG_6468 _MG_6438 _MG_6427 _MG_6398 _MG_6907 _MG_6840 _MG_6828 _MG_6821  abc