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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Places

New York, Hip Hop and Kebabs with Biggie Smalls

Biggie Smalls is the second restaurant Melbourne chef Shane Delia has opened, following the highly acclaimed Maha. Rather than replicating the style or aesthetic of that middle-eastern inspired establishment though, Biggie Smalls channels a New York hip-hop style for its kebabs. Located on Smith Street, Biggie Smalls, named after legendary Brooklyn rapper Christopher Wallace aka The Notorious B.I.G., combines two of Delia’s personal passions: kebabs and hip-hop. Technē’s design for the space reflects the streets of Brooklyn where Biggie himself grew up, and the aesthetic complements the laidback approach to the food, compared to the more traditional Maha. “We wanted to create a space that captured the spirit of 80s and 90s NYC and would become a relevant part of the local social fabric,” Technē Lead Interior Designer, Kate Archibald. Biggie Smalls - Habitus Living Referencing the iconic design of so many New York diners, Technē worked with a material palette of stainless steel, vinyl, coloured tiles and timber laminate. “We wanted to create a New York diner meets locals-only neighbourhood bar,” Archibald says, with booths upholstered in yellow with black and white-chequered trim, recalling visions of New York taxis. In a fun twist, chrome luggage racks, as known in New York subway cars, appear overhead. Whilst the design of the space, and accompanying hip-hop heavy soundtrack, is pure New York, the menu brings influences of Delia’s Middle Eastern heritage. “The world doesn’t really need another traditional kebab joint, but there’s nothing traditional about Biggie Smalls,” Delia says, “I wanted somewhere with a something better than Carlton Draught on tap, no cheesy hip hop paraphernalia and a menu that’s in keeping with Melbourne’s world-class dining scene.” Technē Architecture + Interior Design techne.com.au Biggie Smalls Kbabs biggiesmalls.com.au Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living Biggie - Habitus Living  abc
Architecture
Homes

The Tranquility Beach House fosters a natural connection with the outdoors

Designed by Wolveridge Architects in collaboration with a couple who have been building domestically and commercially for over 30 years, the home is a reflection of both parties passion for creating beautiful spaces. The brief was for a 4 bedroom family home with a strong connection to the outdoor living spaces, including a pool, tennis court and outdoor kitchen/dining area. The garden suite provides a space for kid’s activities, large family functions and doubles as a guest suite, while living spaces are generous in order to encourage a communal approach to living rather than a multitude of individual spaces. Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living The arbour also provides the guest with their own sense of seclusion and will eventually provide shelter when the planted vegetation matures. The connection to the garden was an important part of the design, which sees both large and more intimate green spaces throughout the property. "We lived in our family home for 18 years and loved the way our living areas flowed out into the garden," explain the residents. "We have lived in two storey homes with the living areas on the upper level to take in views over the bay but we did not like the feeling of being disconnected from the garden. It was extremely important for us to be connected to the garden from inside the house." "Both living areas open up into the garden via large stackable glazed doors that hide away within a wall space. When the doors are open the indoor and outdoor space becomes one. The main living space looks over the garden, pool and tennis court to the valley and hills beyond. The feeling of space created by siting the house in this way is phenomenal." Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living The arrival to a beach house is often met with great excitement for the weekend-visitor and it was the intention to provide this anticipation for the client who uses the home as their primary dwelling. To achieve this, the long driveway that was the result of the subdivision was leveraged with a bold entryway at the end that divides the building into two main forms. A long rammed-earth wall separates the building into two forms each side of the entry and creates a sense of arrival whether by car or by foot. Formally, the single story box forms the master-wing with the cladding reflecting its horizontality, whilst the large two-story box hosts the living spaces and bedrooms above and is clad vertically. The cantilevered balcony provides weather protection for a range of outdoor activities below and a generous space to enjoy views from the bedrooms above. Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living The robust exterior continues indoors with a highly textured and earthy palette that resonates with the costal location and the extensive indigenous costal vegetation. "In collaboration with Wolveridge we have created a home which not only ticks all the boxes of the design brief but also creates indoor and outdoor living spaces which flow seamlessly together in beautiful and stunning form," enthuse the homeowners. "People often ask us if we could alter anything about the house, what we would alter. Our answer is nothing!" Wolveridge Architects wolveridge.com.au Practice Team: Jeremy Wolveridge, Nick Wheeler, Sina Petzold Builder and Construction Manager: S Smith Builders Structural/Civil Engineer: Don Moore and Associates Landscape Architect: Fiona Brockhoff Building Surveyor: Nepean Building Permits Photographer: Derek Swalwell Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living0 Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Living Wolveridge Architects - Interiors - Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters

Enter Contemporary’s Live in Design Competition

Kicking things off with their Live in Design competition, Contemporary has teamed up with highly esteemed Perth artist Genevieve Montgomerie, whose captivating portrayals of Western Australia’s coast have won hearts locally, nationally and abroad. The image above is Western Australia’s iconic coastline, worth $4800. Her paintings will have you doing a double take to ensure they’re not photographs, while her easy going nature makes you want to instantly sign up for one of her classes. One thing is for certain; artist Genevieve Montgomerie’s flawless depiction of the magic of Western Australia’s coastline will leave you captivated. CLICK HERE TO ENTER ON DESKTOP CLICK HERE TO ENTER ON MOBILE DEVICE At age 11, Genevieve’s parents were planning a holiday to see relatives in Ireland and England when her mum suggested to her and her sisters that if they all took on a pamphlet delivery round for six months, they would be able to afford a visit to Italy and all the galleries, museums and architecture that went with it. Genevieve recalls the memory fondly, as it was her mother’s way of exposing their hearts to artistic beauty on the grandest of scales at an early age. Looking at her now and what she has accomplished, it’s hard to believe that for years Genevieve was selling her pieces off the beach, before moving to the walls of the Cottesloe Beach Hotel restaurant and a number of joint exhibitions. Years of non-artistic career moves and raising a young family followed, and it wasn’t until a spiritual healer friend of Genevieve’s stopped her in her tracks and encouraged her to see a future in art. “As though the voice of our creator was speaking through him, he said to me: ‘Stop wading in the water, sister. Come swim with me.’ From that point on I have worried less about my weekly blow-dries and more about my need to watch and to capture, to dive in and reinvigorate by breathing in all that is mesmerising about the waters that surround us and translating that through paint.” Once described as ‘technically traditional with a refreshing twist on the realist’, Genevieve has carved a career out of capturing the beauty and essence of the iconic West Australian coastline. We caught up with the down-to-earth artist, and upon seeing her collection of paintings it is impossible to not feel a huge sense of WA pride. When did you know you wanted to be an artist? I am not sure I ever knew I wanted to be an artist, as we always seem to be pushed away from such financially temperamental callings. My eye for realism and my passion for colour and how uniquely stunning our environment is – where water meets land – lured me in to a place where I found myself unwinding and yet working at the same time. I realised that what I was doing had purpose for not only myself but also for others by enabling people to feel pride about their surrounds and their way of embracing life at the water’s edge. What interests you most about your particular area of expertise? I am told that my technical ability – which I guess stems from breaking down what I can see into shape, form and color and translating that to a canvas – is rarely seen in an age where less traditional painting practice is popular to execute and to collect. My work seems to weave between environmental realism and a contemporary take on the techniques of the Old Masters. Painterly yet rendered, inviting yet intimately personal reflections, my work is a testament to the depth and mood of the cleansing water of life I find myself immersed in. What is unique about the way you work? I was once told by a lecturer at Melbourne University that my work was “technically traditional yet refreshingly contemporary”. At the time I was desperately trying to loosen up my very ‘tight’ and detailed style, so I wasn’t convinced that this was a compliment! After all of these years, however, I believe I have embraced it by combining both traditional techniques with contemporary framing of my subject. My sub-major was photography, so in using (mostly) my own photos I can crop images to create frameless works which serve as an open window to the mesmerising water worlds – an illusionary space that leaves the four walls of a gallery in a distant past. Eighteen years into my Western Australian artistic career, I feel it is my technical refinement, use of pure luminous colour and ever changing vaporous atmosphere – all flooded in golden light that could only ever be Western Australia – that makes my work unique. Apart from creating your own pieces, what else are you involved in? After years of raising children and following different career paths, I am finally back teaching students – both adults and children in a beautiful creative hub called ‘Studio 124’ in Mosman Park. The studio brings together art classes, framing, antiques, interior design and a gallery, all connected by a leafy central courtyard, which is the perfect spot to unwind, reflect and be inspired. Teaching with the creator of this collective and fellow artist Cher Van Schouwen is a wonderful way to balance my own practice by inspiring others to get in touch with their creative souls. Is there an artwork you’re most proud of? I am most proud of a large piece – ‘One Incredible Morning – South Fremantle’ – which can be seen on my website. It was a balancing act of light and dark, perspective and that perfect aqua/primary blue that is so uniquely Western Australia! It also brings back vivid memories of the day I shot the photos that inspired the work, when my then 18 month old daughter Grace (by far my biggest water baby of all three children) was shrieking with sheer glee in the water, naked other than a hat. She was mesmerised by the wash of water on the sand, and had Grandma Margie hot on her heels so that I could lose myself in hundreds of snaps. How do you know when a work is finished? I wish I did! I have been known to overdo a piece, however I am getting better in my process of observation and painting so that when it looks as perfect as I feel I can make it, I try to step back and observe it as though I am looking at it critically for the first time. My husband plays an integral role in this process. While he may not be an artist, he definitely has an eye for what looks ‘right’ and isn’t afraid to break it to me when something deviates from perfect! Your biggest career moment? I guess my biggest career moment has been my last solo exhibition when I had the opportunity to accumulate work over three years. As an artist who survives on the sale of work, making a commitment to accumulate pieces and not sell them is an emotional and financial risk, particularly when pieces take so long to execute. At my solo exhibition I had the opportunity to speak about a wonderful Aboriginal Spiritual Healer that I had met in the months leading up to my show who really got my attention. While pushing our toddlers on a swing down in Denmark, he commented about the significance of the growing baby I had within. This was a pregnancy that only my husband and I knew about and one that definitely did not show to the outside world for another 12 weeks. Feeling swamped at the time with early pregnancy fatigue and balancing life with two other little ones, I was wondering how I would survive the few months of painting ahead leading up to my exhibition. I certainly felt that I met Joe at the right time, and that in itself was a pivotal career and spiritual moment. Who/what are your top influencers? The Australian Heidelberg School (sometimes referred to as the Australian Impressionists) would have to be my top influencers. Artists from 1885 onwards including Streeton, McCubbin and Roberts were applying the ‘plein air’ impressionistic theories to painting the Australian landscape, which is flooded with light and colour. More recently, Western Australian artists Larry Mitchell and Leigh Hewson-Bower blow me away with their detail, their depth of field and their light on water. I can’t not mention the role my children have played in shaping what I do and what I see. On our walks in the early days with the double pusher complete with scooter, books, a plethora of food, camera, buckets, spades, trucks, bottle, sketchbook and dare I forget Mollie the kelpie (RIP), their journey of “exploring” with mum – another river bank, bit of scrubland or virgin beach – so that I could snap away with my camera and sketch inspired me greatly. They have opened my eyes to the smallest details, otherwise missed with a quick squiz or hectic schedule. Professionally, what is your goal? My goal is to be a wonderful teacher, to inspire others to feed their creative soul and to create works of art that move people emotionally. I like to think I am heading in the right direction! Where can people in Perth see your work? Studio 124, Mosman Park The Studio Gallery and Bistro, Yallingup, WA A & A Art Display – various installations (see website) The Art Label (see website) Genevieve Montgomerie gmontgomerie.com  abc
Happenings
What's On

Björk Digital touching down at Carriageworks

In an Australian exclusive, Björk Digital will be held at Sydney’s Carriageworks from June 3 to 18. The innovative gallery project invites visitors to experience digital and video works borne of Björk’s collaborations a range of visual artists and programmers. Being held as a part of Vivid Sydney, Björk Digital is being celebrated with a special appearance from Björk herself, who will be curating a one off night of music at Carriageworks where she will DJ with special guests on Friday 3 June 2016. “I felt it is time to premiere my recent virtual reality stuff and am delighted to do so in Sydney,” the famed musician says on Björk Digital “We have made seven 360 videos for Vulnicura and I am enthusiastic about this natural continuity of the music video: the intimacy, total merge of surround sound and vision makes VR an ideal home! Looking forward to celebrating it whilst DJ-ing with some good friends there!” A curated program of Björk’s extensive video work will also be presented, spanning the artist’s 24-year career, featuring her award winning collaborations with directors Spike Jones, Michel Gondry, Nick Knight and Stephane Sedanaoui. There will be an additional educational aspect to the gallery, with an immersive multi-media experience showcasing the interactive musical instruments and apps from Björk’s Biophilia album. Carriageworks carriageworks.com.au 14515060311421863183bjork_vulnicura_alt 3500abc
Happenings
Parties

Celebrating the launch of the Zip Hydrotap

The night was in celebration of the launch of Zip Water’s new HydroTap Design Range and included an insightful presentation from Zip Water’s CEO John Doumani who spoke on the history of Zip Water and the innovative future plans of brand moving forward.

Guests were treated to an exquisite menu by ARIA and Matt Moran which included Pan roasted Cone Bay barramundi, Charred peaches with Serrano jamon and Moran’s take on the classic pavlova with elderflower, pineapple and raspberry. 

Photography: Esteban La Tessa

Zip Water zipwater.com

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Design Hunters

Blue forest raises awareness of urban greenery

Running as part of Art & About Sydney, The Blue Trees by artist Konstantin Dimopoulo is a thought-provoking community art project that aims to draw attention to global deforestation in a highly visual way by turning trees bright blue.

Created for the first time in Sydney by renowned artist Konstantin Dimopoulos, the project will see up to 40 trees painted with an environmentally safe, water-based colourant that will gradually disappear over time.

The Blue Trees, an initiative first launched at Vancouver Biennale in 2009, has become a global public-art hit featuring in more than 14 cities around the world. Konstantin said his inspiration for creating the artwork was to raise social awareness about the role of trees as the lungs of the world.

“Colour is a powerful stimulant, a means of altering perception and defining space and time, and blue is a colour not naturally identified with trees – it suggests that something unusual is happening," he explains. "In nature, colour is used as a means of protection and a mechanism to attract. The Blue Trees is an attempt to elicit a similar response and inspire conversation and action around deforestation issues.”

See the trees at Pirrama Park, Pirrama Road, Pyrmont, New South Wales, Australia.

Art & About Sydney artandabout.com.au

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Architecture
Places

How to Transform: from Factory to Food

After sitting vacant for a number of years the site of the former industrial property has been suitably transformed into a sophisticated and experimental restaurant. Designed by Breathe Architecture with the client’s wholefood vegetarian menu in mind, the greenery-enclosed space expresses the goal of Transformer, to honour the seasons. The existing building has been largely retained, including a small courtyard covered in ivy, which informed the design concept of extending the idea of the garden to inside the restaurant. Unique in its simplicity, Transformer is an exercise in creating more with less. The space maximises flexibility through retaining much of the existing warehouse, preserving the classic structure and texture of the electrical transformer factory. Robust, unpretentious and functional, Breathe used a simple palette of honest, raw, local and natural materials for Transformer, referencing the vegetarian menu of the restaurant. These materials include a number of recycled timber battens, recycled messmate table tops from the old Geelong station, mild steel door frames & joinery, locally manufactured brass door furniture and tap ware, cyclone wire planting screens, and exposed cement sheet linings in bathrooms in lieu of tiles. The final touch was to simply allow nature to take its course, with the greenery running wild in the space. Photography by Peter Clarke. Breathe Architecture breathe.com.au 01_Peter_Clarke 09_Peter_Clarke 08_Peter_Clarke 07_Peter_Clarke 06_Peter_Clarke 05_Peter_Clarke 04_Peter_Clarke 02_Peter_Clarkeabc
Architecture
Around The World

Escape to the Estate Trentham

The house, built in 1912, has been decorated and designed by owner Lynda Gardener, also of Gardener and Marks Interiors, and has been inspired by Scandinavian interior design. A mix of fresh white walls, dark floors and airy rooms are complemented by old and new natural wood furniture, sourced from everywhere from European flea markets to local country stores. “I always start with what inspires me about the house in the first place, the surrounds the old features and so on,” says Lynda. “The bones of the house were just perfect; a 1912 federation house with wide verandahs all around, lent itself to be a whiter brighter almost Scandinavian feel to the interiors – I always want all the interiors between all the homes to compliment each other but at the same time have a totally different experience once you set foot inside.” Just an hour outside of Melbourne and comprising three distinct areas, the House, the Barn and the Garden, the Estate Trentham is a boutique accommodation and event location, suited in equal parts for a romantic get away or a larger event or celebration. The-Estate-web-shot24 The house features two main bedrooms in, and a repurposed potato pickers shed serves as a third bedroom, a few steps from the main house and overlooking the herb gardens and mini orchard. Filled with old and one off furniture pieces, the house features collections of vintage paintings, crockery and art, while a main bathroom features a huge bath for two. The Barn, located adjacent to the house, is surrounded by established curated gardens, and serves as a space available for events, gatherings, workshops, weddings and photoshoots. Finally, the Garden is the source of herbs and produce for the Estate Trentham. The fresh herbs, salad leaves and vegetables are available for guests to hand pick and use during their stays at the house. “The Estate is set in huge big gardens and is all about the gardens,” Lynda says of the Estate, “We have a full harvest garden for guests to enjoy, make a fresh salad, or pick a few veggies from the garden and roast over a long weekend stay!" The Estate Trentham theestatetrentham.com.au The-Estate-web-shot25 The-Estate-web-shot23 The-Estate-web-shot22 The-Estate-web-shot20 The-Estate-web-shot17 The-Estate-web-shot13    abc
Architecture
Homes

Styling Living in a Traditional Japanese Home

Finding a balance between traditional and modern architectural elements is important for contemporary renovations to old buildings with history. One challenge involves understanding the needs of the new users of the space, whilst being sensitive to what already exists. Tokyo-based architecture firm Keiji Ashizawa Designs recently renovated a traditional Japanese home in the suburb of Daikyocho, located in central Tokyo. The aim was to maintain the historical features of the original house, whilst incorporating a modern and functional interior. Ashizawa explains, “[Effort was made] to find the beautiful elements [that already existed] in the original house. To find a balance between the new and old construction.” DKCR_101_DC59131_L1 The owners approached Ashizawa as they appreciated his understanding and his sensibility towards traditional Japanese architecture. They were confident he could maintain the original traditional structure whilst incorporating modern elements. Ashizawa explains, “As the owners already understood my work style, it [made for a] smooth and comfortable process.” New modern components were included in the renovation. However, several traditional elements that were important to the owners were retained, such as the Japanese washi (paper) screen doors and the aged wooden cabinets. “I tried to find materials that matched the space or element. I used coloured glass for the original cabinets, and as the existing wood was really textured, it worked very well. I often use steel in my work, and in this renovation I could maintain a contrast between the modern steel [elements] and traditional wooden structures.” DKCR_116_DC59281_L The new renovation enhances the owners’ lifestyle with additional space for their professional and creative work. Ashizawa explains, “We arranged the existing plan for the owners to use the space in a more specific way for their music and photography.” Located in a prime yet traditionally conservative area, the Daikyocho neighbourhood is nestled between the Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden and the Tokyo National Stadium, and is home to both residences and small offices. However, new prefabricated builds are increasingly becoming popular due to mass-production offering minimised costs and quality control. Therefore it became important to the owners to maintain their home’s original traditional facade with an almost unexpected modern interior. Ashizawa notes, “The traditional streets in Daikyocho affected our subtle renovation and design approach for the house.” DKCR_108_DC59162_L-915x587 Whilst culturally and structurally challenging, Ashizawa explains that a renovation project is often more interesting than an architecture project that begins from a completely blank canvas. “With a renovation project, my design philosophy calculates the [existing] plus the [new design], which equals a total of two. As long as we can maintain the existing well and insert the modern design nicely, we can make something new. The owners admired both historical and modern Japanese design, and were looking for the perfect balance.” The neighbours too, responded positively to the renovation. “They are happy that we have preserved the house, as it probably provides a memory and retains a part of their life for years to come.” Keiji Ashizawa Designs keijidesign.com Photographer: Takumi Ota DKCR_114_DC59225_L DKCR_111_DC59208_L1 DKCR_119_DC59267_L DKCR_113_DC59245_L DKCR_103_DC59362_L DKCR_123_DC59390_Labc
Design Products
Furniture

Ross Didier’s Brydie Lounge Designed to Reflect Change

The Brydie lounge is inspired by the continued tensions of heritage battling against contemporary thought that were played out amongst the fashionable elite, as depicted in Brideshead Revisited.

"The Brideshead narrative is set during a time where the last bastion for the extravagant Edwardian period was changing socially, politically and aesthetically," explains Ross Didier.

This evolution of tradition into the new is embodied by the careful selection of premium grade materials and layering, combined with colour and softer form.

With a wide range of sizing and configuration options, the Brydie lounge is classically tailored and designed to create aesthetic balance with structured upholstery supported on slim, elliptical shaped legs. Customisation of the elliptical legs includes options of polished brass, polished silver, and black or powder coated colours to specification. Fabric or leather coverings can also be specified to choice.

In the Brydie lounge, Didier continues to deliver quality designs that are both Australian made, and Australian designed.

Didier Didier.com.au

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Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Poliform’s Phoenix Kitchen Allows the Freedom to Truly Tailor to Personal Preference

Kitchens always convey a lot of personality and Poliform's Phoenix kitchen is a meeting of aesthetics and high-tech, allowing for the flexibility of personalisation along with a timeless elegance in its design. The kitchen features slim modules and distinctive handles extending the linear continuity between cabinets obtained from the combination of the straight channel and the 90° carved door profile.

Poliform's Phoenix kitchen provides a vast range of options for customisation from embossed and glossy lacquer finishes; to various oaks, elm and walnut; Scotch brite steel; and DuPont Corian glacier white.

Poliform poliform.com.au

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Design Products
Furniture

Hunting for George and Grazia & Co collaborate

Jo Harris, Hunting for George co-founder says that they were thrilled to collaborate with Grazia. "We’ve known each other for a few years now and we’ve always admired Grazia’s exceptional knowledge of materials and craftsmanship," she explains. "Her devotion to Australian made is something that we also wanted to support. We relish the opportunity to make products locally when we can.” Hunting-For-George-Loft-Collection-08-Mr-Mrs-Smith-Is-Back The collection includes Rollo, a cylindrical solid ottoman available in a range of wool and leather upholstery. The ottomans, made in Melbourne, are constructed from a timber frame, covered with a green star rated commercial grade foam and then upholstered in either a quality wool upholstery or tan aniline leather. Hunting-For-George-Loft-Collection-27-Upholstered-Oliver-Bed The collaboration also introduces wool upholstery to the classic Hunting for George Oliver bed.“It was important to us that we maintain the uncomplicated nature of our design and we felt that this fabric would be able to complement a range of different colours and textures in the bedroom,” shares Lucy Glade-Wright, Hunting for George co-founder. All products are available online – Hunting For George huntingforgeorge.com Hunting-For-George-Grazia-and-Co-Lucy-Jo Hunting-For-George-Oliver-SideTable-Black-02   Hunting-For-George-Grazia-and-Co-Ottomans-07-Leather Hunting-For-George-Grazia-and-Co-Ottomans-05-Grey Hunting-For-George-Grazia-and-Co-Oliver-Bed-02abc