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Architecture
Around The World

Heritage revamp: Primus Hotel Sydney

Case in point – Primus Hotel Sydney - a lavishly art deco city-central establishment that provides 5 star accommodation in the harbour city. The original building was first erected in 1939, serving as the decidedly glamorous offices of the Sydney Metropolitan Water Sewerage and Drainage Board until 2009. A once empty office space has been reinvigorated with warmth and grandeur thanks to a clever design incorporated by firm Woods Bagot that successfully paid homage to the original art deco design. The firm worked closely with GBA Heritage, recruited to craft an appropriate conservation management plan for the building, which remains heritage-listed. The project took two years of negotiations, working jointly alongside the NSW heritage department, the City of Sydney Council and builder Ganellen. As a result of the various partnerships, the building was lovingly restored with original features where possible – GBA Heritage explained of its process: “[we] prepared a detailed Conservation Management Plan to guide the conservation of the terracotta tiled façade and the subdivision of office floors into hotel rooms, recapturing the scale and architectural character of the former Rating Chamber that had been lost in the 1960s.” Primus-Hotel-Sydney---Reception What the team created was a building of 172 rooms and suites over six floors that remains an ode to a time of design decadence, with the jewel in the hotel’s crown its grandiose lobby. Starring in this room is a number of eight-metre tall marble pillars dating from 1939 – while hidden from public sight in 1965 with a mezzanine floor, the space was restored to its cavernous original with the help of Italian specialists who previously worked on Saint Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican. GBA Heritage’s associate director Jonathan Bryant told The Financial Times of this particular design feat: “It’s been an unveiling of a 50 year old secret…the lobby will be the jewel of the building.” Structural strengthening played an important part in the building’s refurbishment, with complex upgrades undertaking to ensure it was up to current building codes. Equally of interest to Woods Bagot was the choice in materials - a spokesperson commented: “Heritage features of the site, such as original marble columns, are celebrated while complementary finishes and materials have been added to create an elegant modern feel.” Whilst timber veneer panelling and plenty of marble are prominent, there’s a modern integration of design that involves an incorporation of an impressive number of skylights so as to welcome more natural light into the space. In a reflection of its modernity (and Australian location) a New York-style rooftop space complete with pool caps off the project – designed in a crisp open-plan style it’s not quite in-keeping with the interiors downstairs but a welcome modern touch that is a reflection of its new purpose as a glamorous bar functioning living space. Woods Bagot woodsbagot.com Primus-Hotel-Sydney---Level-7--e Executive-King-Room  abc
Architecture
Homes

Breaking the inside/outside divide with the Balmoral House

Balmoral is renowned for hosting some of Sydney’s finest views, from beach to bay and bush. It is in response to these views that architects Clinton Murray and Polly Harbison designed the Balmoral House for its owners. In a move that separates the house from the typical Sydney design, the main living spaces expand over outdoor garden space and a sculpture courtyard in the site’s centre. This design flourish provides a view directly through the site, so that passers-by are able to feel a connection to the harbour below. The entire design of the Balmoral House evidences a desire to both protect the occupants and simultaneously invite in guests through a strategically conceded design with no strict front wall but a modest setback and open fence. A second, street-side entry leads through to the courtyard that forms an outdoor foyer intended for entertaining. Art formed a pivotal aspect in designing the Balmoral House. Within the courtyard undercroft lays a figure with outstretched arms - a piece designed by Antony Gormley, selected to inspire curiosity and consideration about the space it inhabits. While the house is no gallery, but the form, setting, landscape and art are all insprired by a gallery’s sensibility as a fluid and interrelated system, with ‘art’ being treated as the third occupant of the house. A highlight of the design of the Balmoral House is the powder room; round in plan and coloured in red, the room is filled with round fittings and furniture, with a purposefully out-of-scale high ceiling designed to create a wonderfully playful Alice in Wonderland feeling. Clinton Murray clintonmurray.com.au BalmoralHouse_000073-e1442720380103 BalmoralHouse_005162-e1442720181729 BalmoralHouse_004916-e1442720199368 BalmoralHouse_004849-e1442720212221 BalmoralHouse_003648-e1442720252572 BalmoralHouse_002663-e1442720265465 BalmoralHouse_002446-e1442720286588 BalmoralHouse_000946-e1442720299742 BalmoralHouse_000491-e1442720353562 Photography by Brett Boardman. abc
Design Products

Talking Design with David Moreland

David Moreland creates sleek, innovative furniture and lighting pieces. The New Zealand based designer’s collection to date includes solid oak pendant lights; powder coated steel bookends in soft grey that resemble cloud formations; and a space saving ‘Shadow’ mirror designed to float seamlessly within the corner of a room. Adding to the studio’s growing list of subtle, intuitive pieces in 2016 are the two Helix and Area tables. David Moreland Helix Table | Habitus Living “The idea behind the Helix table was to try and have an accurately engineered piece still appear soft and light,” says Moreland. The tables’ legs rotate gently inwards, giving its symmetrical form some interesting, asymmetrical shadows. The Helix table is available with either black or white matt powder coat, combined with either a clear or smoke great glass, or oak plywood. David Moreland Area Table | Habitus Living The Area table offers a different, slightly more minimal aesthetic with a square top, continuous curved edges and a strong X-shaped edge that runs around the underside of the table. “I really like the large radiuses on the bottom corners of the Area tables,” says Moreland. “They help to alleviate what could be a heavy looking base, instead creating attractive, fluid lines.” David Moreland davidemorelanddesign.com David Moreland Helix Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Helix Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Helix Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Helix Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Helix Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Area Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Area Table | Habitus Living David Moreland Area Table | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Nine Emerging Designers to Watch

JamFactory’s exhibition program continually showcases the very best in both national and international craft and design. But while each exhibition boasts some of the biggest names in the business, it’s the annual showing of work by second year JamFactory Associates that generates the keenest interest. Nevistic Contained – JamFactory | Indesignlive Sylvia Nevistic | Indesignlive Sylvia Nevistic The nine Associates in this year’s offering, aptly titled Generate 2015, specialise in glass, furniture or metal design and are, quite simply, names to watch and remember. It’s a compelling launch pad for these emerging practitioners – who currently spend half their time creating new work under the mentorship of JamFactory’s creative staff and the other half working on JamFactory projects. Highlights from the exhibition are plentiful, with key pieces reinforcing JamFactory’s strength across multiple areas of production. From the furniture studio, Rhys Cooper’s covetable Split Desk is elegant in its form, with a strong sense of materiality and Nicholas Fuller’s Credenza Cabinet and Phil Chair are tightly resolved interpretations of classic modernist stylings. Fuller – JamFactory | Indesignlive Nicholas Fuller – JamFactory | IndesignliveNicholas Fuller The glass pieces in Generate 2015 evidence JamFactory’s tradition of innovation in this studio area and Andrej Larson, Kate Nixon and Drew Spangenberg’s works resonate in both form and colour. Each piece exhibits its maker’s own signature style, with Larson’s sculptures commanding scrutiny for their adept balance of craft, design and art sensibilities. Interestingly, the ceramics studio isn’t represented in the exhibition, but it’s work from the metal design studio that proves the most surprising. While industrial design is at the latter’s forefront, many of the Associates specialise in jewellery and the exhibition emphasises this point. Sylvia Nevistic’s Contained Adornment series of silver and mixed metal wearables are exquisite in their detail and Angela Giuliani’s rings perfectly flaunt her innovative, unorthodox eye. Giuliani – JamFactory | Indesignlive Angela Giuliani – JamFactory | IndesignliveAngela Giuliani When Generate 2015 opened at the Adelaide CBD hub late last year, the surrounding buzz was palpable; made all the more resounding by the consistently high calibre of work on show. An exhibition such as this one runs the risk of looking like a mash-up of disparate styles and mediums, but Caitlin Eyre has tightly curated it, and there are no weak points to be found. In JamFactory’s Seppeltsfield gallery, Generate 2015 appears even more cohesive thanks to the smaller venue. Roy One – JamFactory | Indesignlive Stephen Roy – JamFactory | IndesignliveStephen Roy The exhibition’s accompanying booklet is a smart piece of marketing collateral that features profiles on each exhibiting practitioner, alongside specially commissioned individual portraits and a group portrait. It’s savvy PR in this social media obsessed age, where personalised connection with an audience is just as important as the work on display. These designers deserve attention and Generate 2015 succeeds in providing a vehicle through which this can happen. Generate 2015 Rhys Cooper Nicholas Fuller Angela Giuliani Andrej Larson Sylvia Nevistic Kate Nixon Stephen Roy Drew Spangenberg Davide Spinoni JamFactory at Seppeltsfield Seppeltsfield Estate, Seppeltsfield Road, Seppeltsfield 6 February – 17 April 2016 Spangenberg – JamFactory | Indesignlive   Drew Spangenberg – JamFactory | IndesignliveDrew Spangenberg Cooper – JamFactory | Indesignlive Rhys Cooper – JamFactory | IndesignliveRhys Cooper Larson – JamFactory | Indesignlive Andrej Larson – JamFactory | IndesignliveAndrej Larson Nixon Afterwards – JamFactory | Indesignlive Kate Nixon – JamFactory | IndesignliveKate Nixon Spinoni Hopper – JamFactory | Indesignlive Davide Spinoni – JamFactory | IndesignliveDavide Spinoniabc
Design Products
Furniture

The Japanese minimalism of Hoshi

With a classical attention to detail, the Hoshi lounge comprises a timber frame in American Ash, with both fabric or leather upholstery, and a striking leather strap flourish on the rear of the couch. In the natural stain on the frame is a featured limed wash, or Japanese Black or walnut washes. H_EDIT_007 Hoshi also available in the form of a couch, single armchair and bench seat, and is now welcomed into the Stylecraft family. Hoshi is the first such Tom Skeehan design distributed by Stylecraft, following his prestigious award wins such as Qantas Spirit of Youth Award, Design Institute of Australia Graduate of the Year Award, as well as Indesign Launch Pad. Stylecraft stylecraft.com.au H_EDIT_005 H_EDIT_006 H_Edit_001 HOSHI_Singe_002 Process_HOSHI_002 Process_HOSHI_01    abc
Architecture
Homes

How the Mt Tamborine House Stands Clear

The building of glass and steel appears slender and fragile atop the rugged landscape, yet it is designed to manage extreme climate conditions with passive means. A true labour of love, Mt Tamborine House was made for Lachlan's parents, Craig and Christine for their retirement, constructed by Lachlan, alongside his father during a year long construction process. “It’s imagined as two sides, the “cave” that is the wind break and the front “glass house” that opens up to the north,” Lachlan says. The genius of the building transpires in the simplicity of the double sided plan and the dual personality that results. The glass house accommodates the social parts of the house, taking in northern sun and cooling north-easterly breezes. The cave house, by contrast, houses bedroom and service spaces and hunkers down to shield harsh western sun and south-easterly gales. The two wings work together, providing warmth and shelter or coolth and exposure, dictated by climate, mood and daily ritual. MtTamborine_01   The glass house celebrates the opportunities afforded by five acres of rolling meadow and mature vegetation on all sides of the property. A soaring skillion roof tilts up to capture the northern sun. Glass walls on three sides stack away to transform the large combined living, dining and kitchen space into an open pavilion in the landscape. A timber platform which encircles the house, seamlessly transitions building and nature. “Where the edge cantilevers on the eastern side, the idea is you sit and dangle your feet,” Lachlan says. With such verdant, natural surrounds and dark moody skies above, the architecture is subverted to becoming a simple framework for living. A muted interior palette of warm timber floors and white kitchen cabinetry give focus to the vibrant strains of colour outside. Black accents in the form of furniture, fireplace and curtains encircling the room, offset the brightness of a space flooded with natural light. The house performs well in all seasons and at various times of day with “luxury” expressed by simple means - a cool, breezy spot to read or a cozy place to gather in front of the fire. “There is always a sheltered position to sit when there is a wind,” Christine says. “A big fire warms it during the winter. In summer if gets hot all you have to do is open the doors.” Nielsen Workshop lachlannielsenarchitect.com MtTamborine_14 MtTamborine_30 MtTamborine_53 MtTamborine_38  abc
Architecture
Homes

What does a toy box built into a floor look like?

Austin Maynard Architects (AMA) is well versed in trying to get the most out of a small space. The Melbourne-based architecture practice has after all in its time, renovated and remodelled quite a few spatially challenged homes throughout Melbourne’s inner-city suburbs. But Mills House, their recent two-level extension to a heritage-listed weatherboard terrace in Albert Park, takes the cake for innovative planning. The client wanted a light-filled home that could hide the mess a new baby brings. So design architect and AMA co-director Andrew Maynard conceived the lounge area’s floor as a giant toy box. “The trick is to work with the chaos,” he says. “Rather than picking up toys and putting them back in a box, why not just sweep everything in from the top and sides.” Mills House’s sunken ‘lounge pit’ contains the mess and essentially functions as an enclosed, safe space for baby to play in. While the stepped timber floor is used as seating, it also houses underfoot storage space. This ingenious design solution keeps the walls free of cabinetry, working to make the interior seem bigger than it actually is; an advantage in a home measuring only six metres wide. 05_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts   The program shares a certain synergy with contemporary Japanese design and Maynard readily acknowledges this. “For years I’ve studied and referenced Japanese architecture,” he reflects. “And while I haven’t directly borrowed any specific ideas for this project, it definitely has the flavour of a contemporary Japanese home.” Living areas aren’t cluttered by unnecessary interventions and the new kitchen is located in the existing corridor so as not to compromise the open plan. The staircase even references a lightweight curtain, crafted from folded perforated steel sheet to minimise bulk. Maynard also utilises this material on the home’s rear façade to soften the harsh north-western sunlight. “Before the renovation, the client had felt very uncomfortable in the back of her house, but now the new façade reflects unwanted sunlight during the summer months,” he says. Maynard’s pared back, minimalist scheme is carried through to the extension’s upper level, with the upstairs bathroom’s bright yellow tub a bold flourish. Functionally, the custom fibreglass form is easy to maintain, but visually it also serves to break up his otherwise neutral material and colour palette. It’s a strong statement very much in keeping with the ground level’s inventive scheme, injecting just the right amount of whimsy into a thoroughly contemporary interior. Maynard Architects maynardarchitects.com 01_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 07_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 09_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 11_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 12_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 13_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 14_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 18_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 19_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 21_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts 22_Mills_Maynard_Bennetts   Photography: Peter Bennettsabc
Architecture
Homes

Community, not commodity: Why Nightingale is changing the future of housing

It all began with an email from Breathe Architecture’s Jeremy McLeod to a handful of Melbourne architects, suggesting they unite and lead the charge on sustainable urbanisation. “I said it's time we got together and built housing of meaning in our city again,” McLeod explains. Breathe Architecture’s The Commons was a prototype for The Nightingale Model. Located in Brunswick, next to a train station, tram line and bicycle path, The Commons forgoes underground carparking, airconditioning, private laundries and second bathrooms in favour of keeping costs low and eco-cred high. Nightingale is the next step up, the upgrade on The Commons. Improving on The Commons’ sustainability commitment, Nightingale 1.0 will solely use renewable energy, and continue to place emphasis on thoughtful materials and solid construction. There are green walls and rooftop gardens to lessen the urban heat island effect, as well as create shared spaces for the residents to come together and grow their own food. There’s also a ground-floor tenancy that generates income for residents, reducing corporation costs over time. These decisions have been made from in-depth discussions with the future residents – the design shaped by the specific needs of the residents that will live there, and the surrounding locality. But to make such a model replicable and long-term-inclined, Breathe needed a more sustainable financial strategy. So each Nightingale project is a triple bottom line development model, meaning it sees investment from the future residents, a group of architects, and 25 ethical investors – mum-and-dad middle-class Australians interested in creating a social impact. In the case of Nightingale 1.0, those contributing architects are Breathe together with Six Degrees, Architecture Architecture, Austin Maynard Architects, Clare Cousins Architects, MRTN Architecture, and Wolveridge Architects. And interestingly, Breathe is open sourcing the financial model, encouraging other architects to also challenge current thinking and offer a solution to the future of housing across Australia. “For me, The Commons was about building a prototype to say that as architects we can design housing that is sustainable, that is liveable, that is affordable, and we can show how that's done. It’s about setting the benchmark high, and it’s about encouraging other architects to say yes we can do that too. It’s about education,” McLeod says. Nighintgale - Habitus Living These projects are about mitigating climate change and lessening a city’s collective footprint on the earth, while also creating socially equitable, liveable, and affordable housing for everyday Australians. Importantly, this style of living is also about providing a platform for community, for neighbourly-ness, to return and to grow in our increasingly disconnected urban landscape. There was just one issue… Breathe didn’t have a planning permit. Or rather, in February 2015, Moreland City Council voted unanimously to support Nightingale as it was designed. However, during community consultation there were 177 letters of support and three rejections. One of those objectors appealed to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) based on the design’s zero carparking. “So we lodged a new planning permit application three days after the VCAT decision,” McLeod says. “It’s the same building, but with three car spaces in the back off the rear lane. We’ve been very, very conscious of keeping vehicles off Florence Street.” VCAT has since made determinations that zero carparking in developments in some areas of Melbourne, close to various public transport links, is a viable option. With setting the financial framework, lengthy development processes and the odd set back, it’s been a slow journey so far, yet one that McLeod hopes will continue, and proliferate, long into the future. So why is he doing this? “I grew up in an activist household. Both of my parents were hippies, and they dragged me around to protest marches and housing rallies in Canberra. My parents taught me that if you want to make a difference, you have to have a voice. And then I went to study environmental design, so I care deeply about sustainability. And then I studied architecture, and I cared deeply about my city, my street, my neighbours and the people that live within our global community. And I studied architecture thinking, naively, that I would be working to house these people. And what I didn't sign up for was being part of a profit-making machine where the end user, the community, was so far down the food chain that it wasn’t really part of the equation.” The elements that set The Nightingale Model apart from a typical multi-residential housing development may have been brought under critical eye, but these challenges only further solidified the intentions behind the project. It’s a project fueled by optimism; the collaborative energy of a growing bunch of positive placemakers. And it’s optimism that will soon be realised. Last week, the Moreland City Council Urban Planning Committee gathered again to vote on Nightingale 1.0. This time, council received 290 letters of support, and once again, approved the planning permit. The first Nightingale can finally commence build – one year on from it’s original approval. A town planning application for the second Nightingale project was lodged with the City of Darebin in December 2015, and a prospective site in Brunswick is being explored for Nightingale 3.0. While the venture currently encompasses a total of 44 apartments, the Nightingale waitlist is 800 people strong. Luckily, architects in Perth, Sydney and New Zealand have expressed interest in replicating the model. Nightingale nightingale.melbourne Nighintgale - Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Local House – St Kilda, Melbourne

What they have now is the aptly named Local House, a home that is open and connected, provides places of retreat, and is part of the community. "Spaces are playful; conceived more like a favourite local café than a private house," says Mel Bright of MAKE Architecture. "We always go through that thing of getting [the clients] to show us some pictures of what they like and they didn’t really show us any pictures of houses. They showed us all these pictures of cafes... and so our sense was that’s actually what they wanted.” Both aesthetically and in terms of how the space works, that's what MAKE ran with. Using the existing Bungalow as a base, MAKE have created a series of “intimate though connected spaces” with a strong connection to the outside. A new contemporary ‘gable like’ two-storey element at the rear opens up the living spaces to the sun and connects the kitchen/dining space to the garden, integrated seating blurs indoors from out, a screen, which fills the end of the upper extruded gable roof and connects the main bedroom to the living room, provides views over the rooftops beyond. Rather than distinction, the connection between exterior and interiors spaces are emphasised – the main living area feels “more like sort of a garden pavilion than an actual interior of the house." LocalHouse_Make_pic-31_7393 The rear of the house, which backs onto the laneway, has become a new flexible studio/garage and is similarly fluid. “Rather than turn its back on the rear laneway”, the space is designed more like a shop front with fully operable window, desk, neighbourhood seat and a small porch that all “connect with the communal public space.” “It’s not a new thing to activate and use laneways in Melbourne,” notes Mel, “but that conversation is typically about ‘the city’… We like that laneways might be these places where kids can ride their bikes up and down, and even though it might look a bit dangerous, if you start by activating it maybe the others will follow and it becomes a better place.” Already here kids run in and out and neighbours often stop by for a chat. Materials play a big role in this blending of public/private, inside/outside too. A black ceiling recedes through the house, concrete and red brick create a sense of external durability, connecting the two environments and at the same time calling up public spaces, bluestone pavers extend the cobbles on the street into the site. “We tried to again bring those sort of textures through… to try and drag that bluestone laneway all the way into the house,” says Mel. An important part of the clients’ brief was also “to provide space for them to live together and separately”. As well as the ‘café’ feeling, which MAKE have enhanced with socially conducive design elements, a blackboard family noticeboard, an indoor-outdoor fire place and a pizza oven, landscaped seat edges, Local House also provides the family with space to get away from each other while “under the same roof”. Steps and small seats are integrated wherever they can to provide informal spots to sit and reflect, bedrooms while closed off are connected by an essentially open living space, views from the studio (and even from the lane) reach “all the way through to the house”. There is also possibility to totally close the rear of the house down with blinds and screens and internally large sliding doors can close down different rooms as needed. “They love they way they can all be in the house doing their own things and still feel connected,” says Mel. If inspiration for this extension comes from “thinking about how this family live and enjoy life," it seems like MAKE have achieved it. The house is genuinely in dialogue with its surroundings – people and spaces, and positively encourages a way of living in line with the clients' values – respectful of both family time and being in solitude. MAKE Architecture makearchitecture.com.au LocalHouse_Make_pic-06_3352 LocalHouse_Make_pic-29_9008 LocalHouse_Make_pic-19_6529 LocalHouse_Make_pic-17_8234 LocalHouse_Make_pic-16_3362 LocalHouse_Make_pic-10_7733 LocalHouse_make_pic-03_1307  abc
Happenings
What's On

Art that engages: highlights from the Asia Pacific Triennial

Hero Image: TALOI HAVINI (ARTIST) Autonomous Region of Bougainville /Australia b.1981 Hakö people STUART MILLER (PHOTOGRAPHER) Australia b.1983 Russel and the Panguna mine (from ‘Blood Generation’ series) 2009, printed 2014 Digital print on Canson Platine fibre rag paper 310gsm, ed. 2/10 / 84 x 120cm Purchased 2014. Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery   The exhibition celebrates the cultural, visual, linguistic, social and religious diversity of our Asia Pacific neighbours. With a focus on works that are performative in nature, it is fully immersive. It is an exhibition designed for collective experience, with interactive pieces that encourage active participation from the audience, rather than mere passive viewing. Works like Asim Waqif’s All that we leave behind are the memories encourage viewers to touch, move and physically engage with the work. Likewise, scale also plays a considerable part in capturing the essence of the Asia Pacific. Min Thein Sung’s Another realm (horses) towers over the gallery commanding the full attention of visitors.The Asia Pacific Triennial is back! In its 8th iteration, APT offers a comprehensive taste of contemporary art from the Asia Pacific. It brings the region to life within the gallery space, with this year’s exhibition embracing an interactive twist. SHOULDERjustinBHENJIRA_001JUSTIN SHOULDER & BHENJI RA in collaboration with JAI JAI Ex Nilalang: Balud (production still) 2015 Single-channel HD digital video, 16:9, colour, sound Photograph: Gregory Lorenzutti. This project was assisted by a grant from Arts NSW, an agency of the New South Wales Government and supported by the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy, an initiative of the Australian State and Territory Governments. The program is administered by the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA). Developed for APT8 Image courtesy: The artists Contemporary issues are the undercurrent of many of the works with climate change, colonial influence, representation/misrepresentation and exploitative work practices being just some of the themes presented here. Whether investigating the binaries of the urban and the regional, or the personal and the social, a diverse range of perspectives offer insight into everyday life within the region on a macro and micro scale. In doing so, these works continue to accentuate the role of cultural production as a means understanding and engaging with current issues impacting on the region.APT8 is also a treat for the senses, with colour, sound and light all playing a part to enhance the impact of the exhibition. Rasen Kaigan’s Spiral coast is a particularly excellent example of this, with its moving use of light accentuating the haunting nature of her photographs that capture the aftermath of the 2011 Tsunami in Japan. APT8 will only be at QAG and GOMA until 10 April 2016. Be sure to pencil in a visit before then as an exhibit of this nature won’t be seen again until the next APT in 2019. Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art qagoma.qld.gov.au   Dagvasambu-Uuriintuya-_Path-to-wealth UURIINTUYA DAGVASAMBUU Mongolia b.1979 Path to wealth 2013 Synthetic polymer paint on canvas 149 x 99cm Purchased 2015 with funds from Ashby Utting through the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Foundation / Collection: Queensland Art Gallery   DAVILAjuan_Ohhhhhh!2014_001 JUAN DAVILA Chile/Australia b.1946 Ohhhhhh! 2014 Oil on canvas 200 x 250cm Photograph: Mark Ashkanasy Image courtesy: The artist and Kalli Rolfe Contemporary Art, Melbourne © Juan Davila   DUAN-Jianyu DUAN JIANYU China b.1970 Sharp, Sharp, Smart No.4 (from ‘Sharp, Sharp, Smart’ series) 2014 Oil on canvas 140 x 180cm Image courtesy: The artist and Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou Proposed for the Queensland Art Gallery Collection     SURYODARMOmelati_ImAGhostInMyOwnHouse2012_LawangwangiCreativeSpace_001 MELATI SURYODARMO Indonesia b.1969 I'm a Ghost in My Own House 2012 12 hour performance, mixed media installation and single-channel video Documentation of performance staged at Lawangwangi Creative Space, Lawangwangi Foundation, Bandung, Indonesia, 2012 Image courtesy: The artist  abc
Design Products
Lighting

BUSTER Bulb: Raising the bar in lighting

Defining the next evolution for an industry that is undergoing a change in ideals, the BUSTER bulb raises the bar in lighting technologies. Drawing inspiration from the Eddison filament bulb, a teardrop-shaped glass shell houses a resin light pipe that creates a crisp, clean quality of light. There’s a choice of three glass colours in either warm gold, smoked grey or bright crystal and the bulbs are finished with a satin metallic sheen, so they look as good off as they do when they’re on.

The resin light pipe at the centre of the BUSTER bulb is where the magic happens. These patented white fins allow ambient light to diffuse through the sides of the bulb and reflect down the centre of the pipe, where it exits as a spot light. The light pipe has enabled us to create a bulb that can provide subtle lighting in a room, whilst at the same time throw focused light onto tables and surfaces below.

You can get your hands on a BUSTER bulb online.

Buster + Punch busterandpunch.com

Buster Bulb - Habitus Living

Buster Bulb - Habitus Living

Buster Bulb - Habitus Living

abc
Design Products
Accessories

Intrepid Home brings Saudi Style to the picnic blanket

Handmade in Saudi Arabia and distributed internationally by New Zealand’s Intrepid Home, the rugs are hardwearing, water-resistant and available in over 20 different design choices. Able to be rolled up with a handle for transportation, the polyester and canvas mix picnic rugs are adaptable enough to flatter all occasions, from a picnic on the beach to a day in the snow. The rug comes from Richard Hoggard and Emma Robertson, who returned to New Zealand in 2013 to establish Intrepid Home following years of international travel. The luxury homewares brand is operated out of the duo’s Hawke’s Bay home, and features a range of exotic goods inspired and sourced from people and places across the world. Not content with simple being great design though, Intrepid Home donates a percentage of its annual turnover to Africa Food For Thought, South Africa – An organisation that starts feeding programmes in needy communities across Africa. Intrepid Home intrepidhome.co.nz 2F6A5374 018-403 036-403 Clear-cut-face-on Clear-cut-side-view-1abc