About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters

How Mr & Mrs White live and design with a desire for simplicity and quality

“Make it simple but significant” is the philosophy Nathan and Sasha White live by, and it extends to not only their lifestyle, but also their design work and aesthetic. The couple, otherwise known as Mr & Mrs White – both in life and business – design a range of handmade furniture and homeware that reveals their aspiration to live life simply and to live it well. “Our business was birthed out of the desire to not just fill the empty spaces in our house but to create a home; family is what we value most of all,” the couple explain. Indeed, family is how Nathan and Sasha met. Hailing from Sydney’s Northern Beaches, they first met as teenagers when Nathan would surf with Sasha’s brother. As the grandson of a skilled cabinet-maker, Nathan’s appreciation for the handmade led him to embark on a four-year shipwright apprenticeship. “My pop taught me the importance of detail, to never compromise on quality, and that woodworking and patience go hand in hand,” says Nathan. Meanwhile Sasha majored in graphic design at university, and like Nathan, had a love for the beauty and quality of natural materials. Yet both felt something was missing, so Sasha swapped computer for sewing machine and Nathan gave up boats for furniture, and “suddenly everything seemed a little clearer,” Sasha says. They started making things they could “sit on, eat on, organise and store things in, and most importantly bring people together,” the pair say; and they quickly knew this is what they were meant to do, “together.” 07 Photograph Above: Glen Allsop Working with timber, linen, and leather, Mr & Mrs White design home and office furniture and soft furnishings that are handmade in their Sydney factory. “We favour natural materials as they have endless possibilities and always get better with age,” Sasha says. They have also added shop fit-outs to their bow, having created a range of freestanding furniture and shop fixtures for a number of stores including Assembly Label in Bondi. “We loved the process of creating a shop that reflected the aesthetic of their brand and image,” Sasha says. “And since a lot of the pieces are variations of our own collection, the overall style and design is a reflection of our brand as well.” Indeed, Mr & Mrs White’s brand is greatly influenced by Mr & Mrs White’s lifestyle, which celebrates the ‘less is more’ philosophy. Their clean and minimalist aesthetic is warm and welcoming with subtle details that highlight the quality and craftsmanship of their work. “We value quality and the time it takes to do something with excellence,” Sasha says, “and our desire to live life simply and minimally has contributed to us creating furniture that fits within that lifestyle.”   Mr & Mrs White www.mrandmrswhite.net This story also appears in McGrath Magazine   04 05 08 01-Mr-&-Mrs-White Photography: Josh Whiteabc
Architecture

THAT House: Exploring the Private and the Public

In THAT House, Austin Maynard Architects have constructed a “home that is almost half the floor area of its neighbours, without compromise of spatial types, functions and quality,” with a design that focuses on the idea of being “alone, together”. AMA place at the center of their architecture the “aim to have secluded spaces within shared spaces. We’re not fans of open-plan living. We also avoid completely enclosing rooms or functions. We try to make the connection of each space adaptable and loose”. What emerges is multi-functioning spaces within the house, where, “the owners [can] be together, or secluded, or any level of engagement in between”. This can be seen in the ground floor study space that can be fully enclosed and turned into an additional bedroom. The connections between spaces are “adaptable and loose”, with the front garden extending into the home and creating a bridge between the kitchen and dining area. What this does is cultivate a feeling of space and openness, blurring “the line between inside and out”. Indeed, the idea of the ‘inside and outside’, as well as the ‘private and public’ has played a significant role in the creation of THAT House. AMA see a general trend in Australian architecture of the community “hiding or fortifying themselves” in increasingly large spaces. To avoid the need to completely hide in such a transparent house due to concerns about privacy, AMA installed upwards blinds as “a downward blind provides no privacy until it is completely down [and] an upward blind enables you to cut out almost all view into a home while still being able to look out… giving control over all levels of privacy”. At the heart of AMA designs is also a focus on sustainability. THAT House’s glass panelling is double-glazed, and the house has its own solar-panels, high performance insulation, and a large water tank with rainwater to be used to flush toilets and water the garden. Austin Maynard Architects maynardarchitects.com Photography by Tess Kelly Photography. ama_that_house_habitusliving ama_that_house_habitusliving ama_that_house_habitusliving ama_that_house_habitusliving ama_that_house_habitusliving ama_that_house_habitusliving ama_that_house_habituslivingabc
Design Hunters

Urban Yoga: Light and Sound Show

With various strands of the practice appealing to different kinds of yogis, the design of each studio is crucial to creating a particular atmosphere. They are wide-ranging: from earthy and 'hippy' in nature (think hemp, bamboo and a focus on the internal practices), to polished and contemporary (polished timber floorboards, art and mirrors).

Among the ubiquity, Urban Yoga manages to offer something different. The studio does away with tradition (no distinct yoga lineage and no Sanskrit), and focuses instead on a progressive soundtrack and curated visuals on a mega screen in the yoga room. The effect is of fusion: yoga practice with a club-like experience. During each session a playlist reinforces the physical crescendo and diminuendo of the sequence, while emotive images cycle through a reel as students cycle through the practice.

"The design concept was to bring a modern and urban feel to a yoga space, so as you can imagine, the contrast [to other studios] was important," says founder Jacinta McDonnell. "The visual aspect was designed to create a space where we could connect to ourselves and to our community; a space where we could step out of our day-to-day life, and into an experience which looks, sounds and feels better."

As well as being contemporary in approach, the result is highly stimulating, utilising the full benefit of technology to transport students from their busy urban lifestyles and further into the practice through sensory immersion. Which is just what Jacinta was aiming for – "We want yoga to be an experience, not just physical practice," she affirms.  

The concept speaks very clearly and successfully to the urban yogi who loves the contemporary music experience. Whether it's your cup of (herbal) tea or not, the distinctive approach is impressive, and offers something different for the adventurous yogi.

Urban Yoga urbanyoga.yoga

Construction Concept Projects Australia

Furniture, objects and custom items Zaffero

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ADVERTORIALS
Fixed & Fitted

Compact Precision: Achieving Fine Detail in Your Smaller-Footprint Projects

When every square centimetre matters, the attention to each and every surface, edge, joint and fixing is paramount. The product needs to be so highly considered that the design works doubly as hard as something more luxurious in size.

But this is not always the case.

Bigger projects often mean bigger spaces, bigger products – and bigger budgets. Often, the best research and technical development goes into the feature products that can only be selected for the most high-end (and high-cost-per-square-metre) projects.

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Falper's Quattro. Zero achieves a level of detail that is normally reserved for more specialty products. A 4-millimetre ultra-thin basin profile in the unique Ceramilux material, drip-proof countertops and 45-degree finishes are key features that this compact range offers to smaller-footprint projects.

Regardless of the physical size and budget, each of your projects – and clients – deserves the same level of attention to detail and Quattro.Zero responds to this need for design democracy. It means that there is never a need to compromise on quality or finish – whether you are working with your biggest client, or your smallest, a repeat customer or with someone for the first time.

Furthermore, the range enjoys the benefits of all of Falper's leading position in the market, with the superior quality and track record that the Italian brand enjoys. Additional features such as push-pull opening cabinets and soft close drawers, handles in metallic chrome and matte white and extensive configuration options make the Quattro.Zero a well-rounded option for your project.

For more information on the products specified contact Rogerseller.

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Architecture
Homes

Kelvin House: Light and Angles

FMD Architects beautifully responded to Kelvin House’s light-centric refurbishment brief with steep angles, strong lines, and a liberal use of timber. Most prominent in the briefing was the direction to “refurbish the existing single fronted terrace… and construct a new deck which maximises access to the north light while providing shade from the western sun”. kelvin_house_habitusliving What resulted is a north-oriented triangular deck with triangular criss-crossing timber beams above, providing structure and battened screening to filter light onto the open deck. Also lining the deck is a planter box vertically screened to the west. Inside Kelvin House is more timber detailing juxtaposed with the central black joinery that contains the bathroom, laundry, study, shelving and kitchen, designed to “define the transition from the old to new spaces”. On the corner of the joinery is a sharply angled bookshelf covering half of two sides of the joinery and showing timber edges to contrast with its black backing. kelvin_house_habitusliving A clever black marble island bench is the star of the kitchen, featuring sharp angles and concealing multiple bar stools underneath. The triangular angles are a recurring motif, “reiterating the forms of the deck [and] establishing a dialogue between the inside and the outside”.   FMD Architects fmdarchitects.com.au Architects: FMD Architects Project Team: Fiona Dunin, Andrew Carija, Alice Edmonds, Caroline Tan, Alan Chan and Rob Kolak Builder: Latrobe Building Service P/L Structural Engineer: Perrett Simpson P/L Photography by: Peter Bennetts kelvin_house_habitusliving   kelvin_house_habitusliving kelvin_house_habitusliving kelvin_house_habituslivingabc
Design Products

Walter G brings us a nostalgic new range

This beautiful and nostalgic collection was created organically by the team at Walter G and is entirely reflective of the essence of the brand’s aesthetic; a relaxed vibe of coastal living, with natural patterns, fresh colours and textures. Designed with the coast in mind, this new range is equal parts salty, rugged, and organic, intending to recall feelings of family holidays. The collection serves as a constant celebration of the essentially Australian relaxed holiday. EN4A9545_NikkiTohero “All new designs have been inspired by a dive into our antique textile suitcase or by the many reconnaissance trips we’ve taken this year,” say co-founders Lauren Bennett and Genevieve Hewson. The range comprises the Nagari and Bungle Bungles cushions, jointly inspired by a recent trip to the Kimberleys, the Batik design, available in 2 colour ways, and the Chalk and Pacific Blue designs, inspired by an old Venetian hand made paper. Walter G walter-g.com.au EN4A9535_NikkiTo EN4A9611_NikkiTo EN4A9671_NikkiTohero EN4A9709_NikkiTo EN4A9741_NikkiTo EN4A9789_NikkiTo EN4A9482_NikkiTo EN4A9478_NikkiTo  abc
Design Products
Lighting

Emerging Lighting Designers: Illuminating Experiments

HUGH ALTSCHWAGER A relationship with the land runs strong in Hugh Altschwager’s blood. He is a sixth generation farming son from South Australia and has Nordic heritage; and both are evident in his lighting designs crafted from Mt Gambier limestone and reclaimed Australian hardwood. Establishing Inkster Maken in 2013, Hugh says a large part of his work is “inspired by naturally occurring materials and the inherent qualities and characteristics that different varieties and species possess.” Hugh’s lighting, such as the Firefox Pendant and Flashlight Pendant, have a clean and balanced aesthetic and are made from stone and timber for warmth and tactility. “I’m drawn to using under-utilised natural materials,” Hugh says, “and develop self-taught techniques to work with them.” This includes turning limestone on a wood lathe or casting molten bronze into hand-carved limestone moulds, a process he developed for the recent Object Future III exhibition. Indeed, Hugh says, “knowing and understanding the capabilities and limitations of natural materials informs a lot of my designs.” And, he continues, “doing things that haven’t really been done before.” Hugh Altschwager inkstermaken.com Photographs: Hugh Altschwager, Foxfire Pendant, Flashlight Pendant, Eclipse Wall Light 3 4 1   LAB DE STU André Hnatojko, Dale Hardiman & Adam Lynch are the three designers behind Melbourne-based Lab De Stu. Meeting at RMIT University, the trio has been producing lighting individually and in collaboration since 2012, as well as working with other designers and under other affiliated brands, such as Dowel Jones and 1-OK CLUB. While the designers produce lighting quite different to that of their counterparts, “simplicity” is a uniting theme. “This is to aid manufacturing in Australia, while never compromising on quality,” says André. Taking inspiration from each other, the Lab De Stu collective enables André, Dale and Adam to “share new ideas in a forum that allows new ideas to grow.” In addition, other collaborations and businesses force them to adapt to new environments and scenarios, which, they say, results in a “creative process that is forever changing.” And certainly Lab De Stu is not just where these creative talents come together to push their concepts of design; it is also where their products collide. The colourful Polly Popper is a design created from a 50/50 split between Dale’s Polly light and André’s Popper light and it morphs forms and mixes materials to explore the possibilities of new outcomes. Lab de Stu labdestu.com.au Photographs: Lab De Stu, Polly Popper (André Hnatojko and Dale Hardiman), Dowel Jones (Dale Hardiman and Adam Lynch), Lord Scone (Dale Hardiman and Adam Lynch)  2 3.-Mr 4 Screen-shot-2016-01-20-at-5.12   LOZ ABBERTON Loz Abberton’s company Who Did That is aptly named since her range of lighting is so striking, one could easily ask, “who did that?” Based in a coastal village just south of Hobart, Loz takes inspiration from Australia’s heritage and landscape and nature’s patterns and materials, much like those great proponents of the Arts & Crafts movement. In fact, her design philosophy reads like a modern-day interpretation of the Arts & Crafts ethos as she creates “future-friendly” and “future proof” lighting designs. Loz uses sustainable resources and certified local materials (such as Chain of Custody certified timbers and kangaroo leather) and experiments with how they perform under external impacts. “This filters from a rural upbringing where items and resources had long lives; being repaired or reused was natural progress,” Loz explains. She takes great pleasure in the process of making and aspires to realise only “beautifully-crafted and timeless designs that are functional and highly durable, and with which people can develop an aesthetic and emotional connection.” The result is a series of pendants, such as the laser-cut and hand-woven Reggie and Pod Luxe, which play with pattern, symmetry and movement to create illumination and illusion. Loz Abberton whodidthat.com.au Photographs: Loz Abberton (Photo: Chris Crerar), Pod Luxe Wide (Photo: Chris Crerar), Black Hoop, Black Cotton 3 2.-Pod-Luxe-Wide 1   4   LIAM MUGAVIN After completing his degree in Industrial Design, Liam Mugavin headed to Japan for four years. In 2013 he returned to Australia to launch his own design practice and undertake a two-year intensive training program at JamFactory in South Australia; but he never left Japan behind. “My lifestyle and way of life definitely follow a Japanese approach,” Liam explains, “ironically I don’t own much furniture and eat sitting on the floor.” Using an amalgamation of craft and production-based techniques, Liam’s lighting is also inspired by Japanese aesthetics. “My work often features repetition of lines and negative space formed between lines,” he says, which is evident in the Toro Nagashi lighting collaboration with Melbourne-based Rakumba. Influenced by traditional Japanese lanterns, this series of lighting explores and reverses the nature of positive and negative space. Liam combines imagination, conceptual work, experimentation, and prototyping in a design philosophy he describes as “hands-on mindfulness.” The result? Each piece “is an evolution of the previous piece” and “a representation of my own experience rather than that of other people,” Liam says. Liam Mugavin liammugavin.com Photographs: Liam Mugavin, Toro Nagashi for Rakumba, Toro Nagashi for Rakumba, Koto 4.-Koto 3 2 1 A version of this story also appears in McGrath Magazine.abc
Design Hunters

Centuries of European design on display at the David Roche Foundation House Museum

Spanning some two centuries of European design, from the early Rococo of France to Faberge in Russia, the David Roche Foundation House Museum will be a new addition to the South Australian design and art communities. The new museum has been designed by Adelaide’s Williams Burton Leopardi Architects & Interior Design and is set to house the world-class personal collection of the late David Roche, a devoted collector who spent his life acquiring the finest of porcelains, painting and furnishings. David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living The David Roche Foundation House Museum will be made up of David Roche’s former home and a new adjoining $5 million building. The objects in the collection are to be presented in an opulent manner, recalling of how David Roche himself lived in the so-titled Fermoy House. “David, who spent his life on a quest to find the perfect object, would be absolutely delighted to know that his dream of a purpose built museum incorporating the house where he lived in North Adelaide since 1954, is now a reality and the joy he experienced from his collection can now be shared with people from across Australia,” says Martyn Cook, Director of the David Roche Foundation House Museum. David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living “Acquiring wonderful works of decorative art was his greatest passion,” Martyn said of his late friend “This passion took David all over the world so he could collect the best pieces possible. When he was about to add something to his collection, David would know exactly where it should be placed in his home. He was meticulous on where his works should be housed. All these ‘treasures’ gave David great pleasure up until the end of his life in 2013.” The museum is set open in June 2016. David Roche Foundation rochefoundation.com.au   David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living David Roche Foundation House Museum - Habitus Living  abc
Design Products
Accessories

Hold your plants in a handcrafted vessel and stand by Capra Designs

This clever couple hand craft plant vessels and create modernist-inspired wire plant stands and hangers. Thomas is a carpenter by trade, specialising in luxury houses with high-end modern finishes, while Bianca is an arts marketer by profession and avid hands-on maker. Fusing their strengths, they have created a range that would look perfectly at home in a range of indoor and outdoor spaces.

The wire items are designed with attention to form, balance and function, with each pot individually hand-crafted out of water-based resin and finished with a satin seal. Throughout the process of creating the range, several resin pour techniques were refined in order to create consistent but unique end products. They are powder coated either black or white allowing them to elegantly frame your colourful and vibrant pots and plants.

Capra Designs – Garden Pots and Stands – Habitus Living

We sit down with Bianca and Thomas to learn more about what inspired them to start Capra Designs and their latest range.

Can you tell us a little bit about the Capra Designs' journey so far? When did you first begin Capra Designs? 

We unofficially began Capra Designs around February 2015 when I started experimenting with mould making and water-based resin and Thomas developed sculptural plant holders to furnish our house. Realising we were creating with a type of resin that is largely unexplored in Australia and designing new styles of wire hangers/stands, we launched our first range November 2015.  More than anything Capra Designs grew out of my passion for plants and a shared interest in design and making.

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How would you describe your range? 

With the resurgence of indoor plants our current collection is about making plants a design feature in and around the home. While we want our pieces to be timeless and work in any surrounding we also love playing with patterns and colour. With this range we have been very conscious of ensuring that the product appears balanced whether it's holding a luscious fern or leafless cactus.

Capra Designs – Garden Pots and Stands – Habitus Living

Can you tell us about the process of creating your collection?

The process is extremely collaborative. Either Tom or myself design on paper and then discusses the item with eachother, looking at functionality, originality and where it fits in our range. Tom then creates prototypes of the wire items while I cast the pots, experimenting with colour and pour techniques.

There are many discussions and changes made before we finalise the prototypes and provide our manufacturer with wire specs. The pots are all handcrafted in our Melbourne studio. This process allows us to remain true to our passion of making and using our hands rather than being trapped behind a computer.

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What do you think is the common factor across your creative output? 

There are two common factors across our collection; the first is clean design lines and second is hand made individuality. The hand crafted nature of the resin products creates irregularities in colour and pattern of each finished product. This is evidence of the commitment to the hand-made process.

Capra Designs capradesigns.com

Photography by Eve Wilson

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Capra Designs – Garden Pots and Stands – Habitus Living

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Architecture
Homes

Beach House on Stilts by Luigi Rosselli Architects

Designed by Luigi Rosselli Architects, this beachside cottage is home to a couple who wanted a new addition to their home in northern Sydney. Above the existing bungalow Luigi Rosselli Architects added a new first floor with the couple's study and bedroom, and a captain’s deck aimed at the view of beach breakers in the horizon. With the existing front verandah extended with a wider side-covered terrace, "the first floor additions are discrete and set back to maintain the street cottage character," explain the architects. Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living   The verandah also conveniently links to the central kitchen and dining room, while a circular stair accessed from the front of the street leads to a relaxed timber verandah, ultramarine weatherboards and the original white timber windows which make for a naturally breezy, summery house. At the back of the house, facing into a small tropical garden dense with palms and ferns, there is a garden room with a massive sliding shutter that can be secured and protects the fully furnished room when no one is at home. Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living   The stair takes position centre stage in the house, supported by a solid stud wall filled with bookshelves and bathed in light. The additions are weaved through the old home with playfulness and sympathy towards the old timberwork and the relaxed atmosphere of the stilted beach bungalow. Luigi Rosselli Architects luigirosselli.com Design Architect Luigi Rosselli, Edward Birch Project Architect Edward Birch, Irene Brugueras (Joinery) Interior Designer Luigi Rosselli, Edward Birch Builder Stonewood Construction Pty Ltd Structural Consultant Rooney & Bye (Australia) Pty Ltd Joiner Sydney Joinery Landscaper Chris Hunt of Landskill Pty Ltd Photography Justin Alexander © Justin Alexander, Edward Birch © Edward Birch, © Luigi Rosselli Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living   Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living Luigi Rosselli Architects - Beach House on Stilts - Habitus Living          abc
Architecture
Homes

How Phorm Architecture created an escapist retirement retreat

When Ann and Doug Sockhill decided on a “green sea-change” in anticipation of their retirement, they settled on a mid-century house at Buderim on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast with impressive views of the Maroochy River Corridor and Mt Coolum. With unassuming ambitions to “bring the outside in… and make every room a pleasure to be in,” they engaged architect Paul Hotston of Phorm Architecture and Design to reimagine a new parent’s retreat, outdoor room and kitchen. “Our thoughts about the house were to throw all the plan onto the western edge of the site and basically walk the plan off the hill,” Paul says. “There’s this wonderful gum tree but also this axis which drives this line out towards Mt Coolum.” Red Soil House – Interiors – Habitus Living New territory is configured as part of a “promontory” extending perpendicular from the original house and including kitchen, outdoor room and peninsula master bedroom and ensuite.   Conceived as an “aerial courtyard”, the promontory shifts in “micro-terraces” allowing distant views of the landscape and silhouette of Mt Coolum to carry over furniture and be framed by the edges of the building. In a conscience effort to “transpose the terroir into the fabric of the building,” earth coloured metal sheeting is employed as external cladding. “The colour of the new extension references the rich ferrosol for which Buderim is famed, a deep red, acidic soil formed from volcanic parent material,” Paul says. At dusk, the effect is akin to the all-embracing glow of a campfire. During the day, the dramatic, visual contrast of sun-burnt earth against bright blue sky registers at a distance. Red Soil House – Interiors – Habitus Living The new kitchen is embedded in the material and spatial experience of the promontory. “The kitchen bench top reflects upon a monolith of textured black basalt,” Paul says. This black stone abuts time-weathered timbers to complement the eucalyptus-like patina of kitchen wall tiles. The visual presence of nature is reaffirmed in a material palette brought together here with sensitivity and skill. In the master bedroom, the ensuite is elevated to take in views of the horizon through a generous corner aperture. The ash coloured tub continues the thread of “obsidian colour drawn through the details of the interiors”. “Our bedroom has come out to meet the big gum tree… [which] feels as though we are in the treetops with the kookaburras,” Ann says. “From the shower recess… we can almost touch the greenery.” Phorm Architecture + Design phorm.com.au Red Soil House – Architecture – Habitus Living Red Soil House – Interiors – Habitus Living Red Soil House – Architecture – Habitus Living Red Soil House – Architecture – Habitus Living Red Soil House – Interiors – Habitus Living Red Soil House – Interiors – Habitus Living Red Soil House – Interiors – Habitus Living  abc
Design Products
Furniture

The integrity and charm of Weekend Trader

Across a variety of materials, from marble and stone to brass and metals, linen and skins, Weekend Trader has a modern yet warm design aesthetic for contemporary living. Founded in 2012 by designer Terry Curtis, Weekend Trader ebbs and flows between industrial, chic and contemporary items for the home. “My style is simple, pared back and modern,” says Terry “I am inspired by yesteryear but with a contemporary twist, timelessly refined, versatile, and honest goods that come together. “Thanks to a background where design and style have been handed down through generations, and an expertise in manufacturing, graphic, and product design, I have always been drawn to the magnetic pull of design furniture and lighting. “Sustaining what is beautiful and local shouldn’t be difficult if you care about what goes into your space.  I have a small group of talented local craftspeople making our pieces. Waiting a few weeks for quality hand-made pieces that last a lifetime is a simple equation.” Weekend Trader strives to make a difference between in the environments its pieces inhabit. A strong sense of anti-throwaway culture it instilled in the design of its objects, which are built on the principles of authenticity, integrity and permanence. Weekend Trader weekendtrader.net wt-slider-8 wt-slider-6 wt-slider-5 wt-slider-4 wt-slider-3 wt-slider-2 wt-slider-1abc