About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
What's On

Make Nice at Vivid: Celebrating Creative Women in Design

Featuring designer and illustrator Leslie David, set designer and art director Adi Goodrich and photographer and director Elizabeth Weinberg, Make Nice will see panels that present a female perspective on the creative industries. Together, these creative women will speak on creativity in interior design, graphic design and fashion, with a focus towards curators, artists, producers, photographers, artistic directors, writers, stylists, and illustrators of all genders. In curating an event for women working successfully within industries that are often seen as being nonlinear and isolated, the program hopes to kickstart conversations and collaborations that aren’t available within the existing landscape. Running from June 2 – 4 at Cake Wines Cellar Door and aMBUSH Gallery, Make Nice’s above international guests join homegrown contemporaries, Vivid Ideas director Jess Scully, designer Suzy Tuxen, documentary photographer and journalist Elize Strydom, writer and editor Brodie Lancaster and M&C Saatchi Head of Art, Niccola Phillips for the talks. Co-Director, Alex Winters, believes that now is the perfect time for a female-lead event like Make Nice, “there’s a growing need for women in the creative industries to promote and encourage each other. By growing relationships with our peers, we will all gain by sharing our industry knowledge and forging friendships and connections” June 2 – 4, 2016 Make Nice make-nice.com.au MakeNice_AdiGoodrich MakeNice_BrodieLancaster MakeNice_ElizeStrydom MakeNice_JessScully MakeNice_NiccolaPhillips Work-by-Leslie-David Work-by-Suxy-Tuxenabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

The Latest in Pool Design with Stormtech

Swimming pools are a central communal space in the modern home, allowing residents and visitors the perfect vehicle for improving health and wellbeing, as well as providing a social space for those hot summer days. In the design of a pool and spa area, however, one aspect that often gets overlooked is the drainage systems, and the important role they play in ensuring optimal hygiene, surface water management, and safety within the pool, whilst maintaining an elegant aesthetic. The immediate landscape of a pool plays a significant role in ensuring safety and visual appearance over the long lifespan of a pool, and the continuous walkway around the pool should be designed to slope away from the rim towards grated drains to prevent external matter from entering the pool. In controlling the direction that water splashes out of the pool and into the grate, the landscaper or pool designer can also prevent the potential for fall hazards caused by slippery decks, algae and mildew growth, and water wastage caused by insufficient drainage. Pool Design with Stormtech | Habitus Living For the design of pool deck drainage systems, designers and home owners can choose between spot drains, linear drains, or trench drains. Each of these forms provide their own unique benefits in terms of form and function of the pool itself. Spot drains are small, singular drains that are connected underground by a PVC pipe, and are often inefficient in water removal. Linear drains, on the other hand, are extremely popular in commercial and residential pool settings for their slim and long design, as well as the efficient design for high volume water removal. Pool Design with Stormtech | Habitus Living Stormtech's latest Linear Drain range takes the best aspects of linear drain systems, maintaining the narrow profile and high capacity drainage system that allows for versatility in pool design, particularly in wet-edge and infinity pools. The versatile design allows for the drainage grates to be used for pool surrounds, preventing pool water contamination particularly in grassy or garden areas, and reduce the impact of stormwater on pool water.

Crafted entirely with high quality Australian manufactured stainless steel, the Stormtech Linear Drain range is a versatile, aesthetically elegant, and highly functional solution to improving any pool or spa area.

Stormtech stormtech.com.au

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ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Furniture

Scandinavian Precision with Huset

Scandinavian design is a movement that embodies a minimal design philosophy combined with functionality and quality. Emphasising dramatic angles with timber and bevelled edges, Huset introduces the Jutland table and Merano chairs with all the hallmarks of Scandinavian precision. Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living Danish designer Mads K. Johansen crafted the Jutland dining table, manufactured in collaboration with European fine furniture specialist TON. Modern in design, the Jutland table is a solid Oak Danish dining table that embodies Scandinavian philosophy with its restraint. The Jutland emphasises the natural grain of timber with bevelled edges and tapered legs supporting the expansive tabletop, resulting in a timeless aesthetic that is as ageless as the Danish oak itself. Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living Italian designer Alexander Gufler collaborated with TON to create the elegant Merano arm chair, which is a piece of understated luxury in any domestic setting. Dramatic angles lead the eye of the viewer around the carefully sculpted shape of the chair, meticulously balancing form with function. While the curved seat and backseat offer an unconventional sling form in dining chairs, the smooth shape allows for optimal comfort and grace in appearance. Again, showcasing the beauty of timber, the Merano chair is a modern and chic design statement. Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living TON is the European manufacturer of both the Jutland table, and Merano chairs. Founded in 1861 by Michael Thonet, of Gebrüder Thonet Vienna fame, TON has been dedicated for centuries to the production of high quality, timeless, and beautiful furniture pieces. Always at the forefront of contemporary and classic design, TON works in collaboration with designers across the world to produce furniture that stands the test of time. Huset huset.com.au TON ton.eu Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Living Scandinavian Precision with Huset | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Living Large in an Eco-Smart Studio Apartment

The designers at Liquid Interiors have turned an old and cramped 400-square-foot studio apartment on Hollywood Road in Central, Hong Kong into a comfortable and spacious home filled with eco-friendly features. “We wanted to make the space as big as possible… to create an example of how you can humanise space in city living,” says Rowena Gonzales, CEO of Liquid Interiors – the firm behind the project. To enhance spatial quality, the flat features bespoke furniture that cleverly maximises and conceals storage. Half of the wall that divides the bedroom and the living room is a wardrobe, while the other half is kitchen storage. The wooden platform that elevates the bed provides additional storage space. As Gonzales explains, the design team took “every single inch of the space and used it.” Eco Smart House | Habitus Living When the open kitchen is not in use, the sink, refrigerator, and storage are neatly hidden behind stainless steel cabinet doors. The table at the centre of the living room serves as the cooktop, the dining table, and the workstation. The living room can also extend into the bedroom, where the television and beanbag seats can be concealed when not in use. Eco Smart House | Habitus Living Since the client works as a pilot and requires quality sleep at different hours of the day, the flat has double glazed windows that insulate noise. The automatic 100% black out blinds, together with a smart circadian lighting system, provides optimal lighting that ensures minimal disruption to the biological sleep cycle. “Health and wellness are two main aspects of this design,” says Gonzales. “We have adapted the space for city living.” Eco Smart House | Habitus Living Eco Smart House | Habitus Living Continuing with the theme of health and wellness, the apartment is connected to a rooftop terrace that serves as an outdoor exercise and meditation space. The meditation area is defined by a canopy bed on a wooden platform, and with a stone table, stools, a projector screen, and two sun chairs that slide back into the platform when not in use, the roof terrace can easily transform into a party space. Eco Smart House | Habitus Living Eco Smart House | Habitus Living The roof terrace also features a green wall of herb plants. “The green wall captures some of the heat. We also see plants as art,” says Gonzales. The terrace is accessible via an iron door. “We found two antique iron safes from the apartment that belonged to the original owners [before the renovation]. The design of iron door was inspired by these safes,” Gonzales says. The two iron safes are used as bedside tables on the terrace. Eco Smart House | Habitus Living Responding to the client’s brief for a ‘minimalistic’ and ‘eco-chic’ home, the flat is designed to be energy efficient and sustainable. Low-e double glazed windows minimise solar heat gain in summer. A ceiling fan is installed to enhance ventilation, reducing the need for air-conditioning. A heat pump and a solar water heater help to reduce the client’s water-heating bill by 87%. Eco Smart House | Habitus Living Eco Smart House | Habitus Living LED lighting is used in the whole apartment to save energy, while an activated carbon water filtration system is used in the kitchen. Internal air is also purified through HEPA air purifiers. Gonzales explains that the client is “very into technology”, which is why the team has focused on designing a home with smart features that promote “an energy efficient lifestyle”. Eco Smart House | Habitus Living With this project, Liquid Interiors attempts to “uncover nature and bring peace of mind back to city [living],” says Gonzales, adding, “We want to create a sanctuary right in the middle of Central.” Liquid Interiors liquid-interiors.com Eco Smart House | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Habitus at Cosentino Talking Eurocucina

On Wednesday the 25th of May, Cosentino hosted a panel for architects and designers reviewing Salone del Mobile's Eurocucina segment for 2016. Chaired by Habitus editor Nicky Lobo, the panel saw an in depth discussion on what Australian designers can learn from Eurocucina, as well as the latest innovations in kitchen and bathroom development. With input from SJB's Liljana Gazevic, interior designer Belinda Chippendale from Hare + Klein, as well as Indesign Media editor Alice Blackwood, the panel highlighted and analysed the most striking themes at Eurocucina. Showcasing Cosentino and Dekton's latest products, the event also featured a photo wall with a competition to win a tennis ball autographed by Dekton ambassador, Rafael Nadal. Cosentino Australia australia.cosentinonews.com Dekton dekton.com.au [gallery columns="5" ids="52133,52134,52135,52136,52137,52138,52139,52140,52141,52142,52143,52144,52145,52146,52147,52148,52149,52150,52151,52152,52154,52155,52156,52157,52158,52159,52160,52161,52163,52164,52165,52166,52167,52168,52169,52170,52171,52172,52173,52174,52176,52177,52178,52179,52180,52181,52182,52183,52184,52185,52186,52187,52188,52189,52190"]abc
Happenings
What's On

Discover the Original at Etsy Sydney Made Markets

We chat with designer, Etsy store owner and maker of wonky, playful ceramic creations Bea Bellingham about the event and what makes Etsy so great. What can we expect at the Etsy Sydney Made Markets? Expect a celebration of all things handmade and a chance to meet some of the region’s best makers, designers and curators at the more than 70 stalls. You’ll also get a chance to strut your stuff at the silent disco entrance, refuel with some delicious food truck delicacies, and soak up the array of nearby Vivid Sydney waterfront activities. Where do you think Etsy fits in the broader design community? I think for a lot of people Etsy is a stepping stone into the design community. Its accessibility allows those creatives who may have not known where to start showing their work previously, now not only have access to a world-wide audience, but also a supportive local community through its teams (such as Sydney Made). On the flip-side, Etsy is an easy-in for members of the public to get to know the amazing array of designs out there, and get to know the makers behind them. I think one of the reasons Etsy is such a successful platform is that it doesn’t try to take over the existing communities, but actively supports the sellers within them. It means that sellers can grow within Etsy, while exploring the broader design community. BeaBellingham_Working1 Bea in her workshop What does ‘authentic’ design mean to you? For me, authentic design is putting a yourself into a work. As an artist I’m influenced by hundreds of other designers, makers and artists; but I’m also influenced by hundreds of personal experiences. Authenticity comes when you take a little bit of these ideas and memories, chuck them in a mixing pot and try to pull out something that represents you. I feel that it’s important the work that comes out of my studio has been hand-formed and hand-painted, but most importantly has a little bit of me in each piece. 2016AW_Bannana_Acc_HR A collection of Bea's designs What inspires you when you’re designing? I find inspiration seeks me out more often than not; conversations with friends, something seen in day-to-day life, a joke, a colour, a pattern, a shape, a doodle and even let the clay tell me the shape it wants to be. I find the hardest part is trying to filter the noise into something usable, and this usually comes through trial and error.   Where do you think Australian design is headed? I hope to see more of the personal, thoughtful, playful and handmade design that I’ve come to love from Australian designers. 2016AW_all-patterns Bea's ceramics Who are some of your favourite Australian Etsy stores? https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/AmyBlueIllustration Pop-culture delights that crack me up. https://www.etsy.com/au/shop/TheBilboaLoft Beautiful hand-printed clothing that makes me want to take a permenant east-coast roadtrip www.etsy.com/shop/ElisaBartels This clever lady does wonderful things with Australian porcelain and is working on amazing naturally dyed fabric to-boot. And all of these makers and more will be there on 4 June and the Etsy Sydney Made Markets! Etsy Sydney Made Markets vividsydney.com/etsy Things by Bea etsy.com/shop/thingsbybea Copy-of-StallholderGrid02-web   Copy-of-StallholderGrid01-web Some of the stallholders who will be present at Etsy Sydney Made Marketsabc
Design Hunters

Pangea Maps Reveal Beauty Below Our Ocean’s Surface

It’s easy to forget that a whole world lies below the ocean surface, but Pangea Maps’ carefully crafted representations are a stunning reminder. Tom Percy, the industrial designer behind the project, was “inspired by the work of Marie Tharp, an oceanographer, whose life’s work was to create a map of the entire ocean floor.” Pangaea Maps | Habitus Living Working with Bruce Hezeen, it took the American cartographer 18 years to publish that first paradigm-shifting map of the ocean’s floor. “There is now this growing understanding of the vastness and beauty below the water’s surface,’ says Tom, “and I wanted to bring it to life for people…the maps are a way to help form people’s experience and connection by representing their ‘home’ in an entirely new way.” Pangaea Maps | Habitus Living The project which now sees Tom creating custom maps of coastlines across the world, began two years ago, as a gift. It was his father’s 60th birthday and Tom wanted to make a 3D map that would celebrate the water depth contours of Moreton Bay, Brisbane where he grew up. The finished product, made of plaster from a polyurethane mould, was beloved by his father. However, the project really took off when Tom debuted it at a local market. “Since then I have had hundreds of requests for maps of coastlines around Australia and the world” says Tom, “It’s great to see other people enjoy them.” Pangaea Maps | Habitus Living After such humble beginnings the pieces have evolved, with a move from the smooth textures of the plaster to stepped, laser cut wooden layers. The transition to sustainable plywood was perfect,” says Tom, “as the laser cutting method provided a whole new level of detail and dimension to the maps.” It was also important to Tom that the maps be made of sustainable materials. “We want people to feel connected with their natural surrounds,” he says, ”ultimately we all have a responsibility to care for the environment.” Pangaea Maps | Habitus Living To create each map requires intensive research, using bathymetric data (depth data) to sketch out the contours. Tom cuts up to 15 layers of plywood ocean contours, each via laser to allow for precision. He then glues each layer together piece by piece. Picking new coastlines to represent is difficult, but Tom carefully weighs both the bathymetric data and the more allusive, emotive weight of a place, saying he is “mostly influenced by people and their stories relating to the water and surrounding coast.” Pangea Maps pangeamaps.com Pangaea Maps | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

A Taste of Factory Design District

Sydney’s annual Vivid Festival is a 23 day celebration of innovation, creativity and community, centering around the exchange of creative ideas with a series of talks, exhibitions and, of course, the lighting up of various landmarks within the heart of the city. This year, Vivid Ideas introduces the inaugural Factory Design District – a three day event and exhibition celebrating the growing local Australian design industry and the authenticity of design. Organised by Kobe Johns, Factory Design District is a collaboration of designers and makers across Australia, from artists, to industrial designers, and local food and wine vendors. We had the opportunity to ask a few of these designers what their thoughts were on authentic design, where they think Australian design is headed, and what they’re most excited for at Factory Design District. Factory Design District 2016 | Habitus Living Adam PriceJP Finsbury Bespoke Joiners Let’s Talk About ‘Authentic’ Design One of the biggest topics at Factory Design District, and across Vivid Ideas, is this idea of ‘authentic’ design. Whether this deals with the fight against replicas, or paring back design and using raw materials in composition, ‘authentic’ design is a flexible concept that is at the heart of the work of all designers at Factory Design District. Fresh Prince is a collaboration by Sydney based creative couple Richie and Alice, who are heavily inspired by nature and the intertwining of timber and nature: “Authentic design, for us, is living the creative process with honesty and integrity, and combining context with an understanding of your craft to bring considered ideas to life in the world. Design is a creative process, not just a product. It is the ability to solve problems with imagination and sophistication.” fresh-prince-01 Fresh Prince “I feel authenticity in design is very much about 'the way' a solution is addressed or how a finished design is resolved in fulfilling the desired outcome,” says Jonathan West, who emphasises tactility and playfulness in his pieces, “Each person’s design process is personal, so how an endpoint is reached is subjective. As long as the process addresses the needs for design in the first place, I think there is authenticity.” Jonathan-West Jonathan West Light designer ILANEL creates whimsical lighting with a contemporary note, adding, “Authentic design is about using materials without masking them, showcasing their strengths instead of trying to hide their weaknesses. It's about representing function in its most optimal form, about having a conviction in elegance through efficiency, and dropping the external ornament and finding beauty in pure content.” ilanel-01 ILANEL For Emma Elizabeth of the LOCAL DESIGN collective, “Authentic design to me means, a design from the original source, a design with integrity, thought, power and originality,” but she is weary of the recent rise of replicas within the field, “Unfortunately in this day and age though authentic design has become to mean not fake, not replica, not a copy, which is a sad development. “ local-design-01 Emma Elizabeth and Tom Fereday of LOCAL DESIGN What Inspires You? With a myriad of beautiful pieces showcasing at Factory Design District, we thought we’d ask where the all important ‘spark’ of inspiration comes from in the making process. “Inspiration comes in many forms: it can be the way light falls in a room, a line from a poem or from working on a design itself,” comments Louise Olsen of Dinosaur Designs, who designs anything from ceramics to jewellery. All of Dinosaur Design's resin is handmade in Australia, along with some precious metal jewellery pieces. Olsen continues, saying: “One design can lead to many more ideas, as it’s a very fertile time that often works as a springboard into a whole other collection or point of view.” dinosaur-design-01 Dinosaur Designs “The ISM design team is inspired by everyday life, travel, art, music and nature. Our Grapho Bubble was inspired by a recent trip to Japan and the Japanese celebratory Kamifusen hanging balls,” enthuses Celina Clarke, the co-founder of ISM Objects, “We find inspiration all around us and then we enjoy being able to use our expertise in materials and manufacturing techniques to turn ideas into innovative products.” ism-objects-01 ISM Objects ILANEL is poetic about his inspirations: "The world around me, science and natural phenomenons. My clients and their dreams." ilanel-02 Why Bespoke? In a design market where larger and international designers are able to mass-produce designs, smaller, more local designers, are emphasising the role of bespoke design for the discerning design hunter. “People are becoming more thoughtful in their purchases as they look to enhance their lives by creating a home filled with memories, meaning and fulfilment,” say Makers Lane, who specialise in creating exciting and distinctive design pieces, and are passionate about the collaborative process behind bespoke design, “People value having a story associated with special items in their lives, whether it’s a dining table or a custom designed engagement ring. Everyone has their own story, and our customers enjoy being involved in the creation of something special.” makers-lane-01 Makers Lane “Bespoke simply means made to order. For me this means developing intelligent products which can be sold singularly or en masse with choice of finishing,” explains Tom Fereday of LOCAL DESIGN, “This is a point of difference that Australian manufacturers and designers are providing and something that I believe is genuinely important to people who do not simply want generic products.” local-design-02 Tom Fereday, LOCAL DESIGN For Kobe Johns, the architect of Factory Design District and half of the creative duo JP Finsbury Bespoke Joiners in collaboration with Adam Price, the question of ‘why bespoke’ is a simple one to answer: “Because you can.” jp-finsbury-01Kobe Johns and Adam Price, JP Finsbury Bespoke Joiners But there is a delicate line between bespoke design and larger scale production, with significant implications for both, as Kristian Aus notes: “The work that I do rides the line between bespoke and mass production. Bespoke products are great at providing a customised experience. Mixing that with elements of mass production help to create products that are more accessible to more people.” kristian-aus-01 Kristian Aus Where is Australian Design Headed? “Australian design is so far away from the rest of the world. This can be an incredible advantage as well as a disadvantage,” enthuses Dinosaur Designs' Louise Olsen, “We think there’s currently a real confidence in Australian design and a lot more diversity and innovation. We’re seeing design from Australians all over the world.” dinosaur-designs-02 Dinosaur Designs “I think it's a very exciting time to be an Australian designer, our aesthetic and design values are becoming more and more intriguing to the rest of the world. Yet Australian designers have many obstacles to overcome: distance, youth, and the un-authentic retail environment,” comments Emma Elizabeth of LOCAL DESIGN, “but we are strong willed and I think even with these obstacles, they can only make us push the boundaries and move our ideas further.” Factory Design District 2016 | Habitus Living Tom Fereday, LOCAL DESIGN Makers Lane add that: “The creative talent in Australia is at an all-time high.  The challenge is in providing a commercial environment that enables and supports Australian designers to keep growing and developing their talent. We would like to see more locally sourced procurement for projects and homes.  If we are to continue to grow the local talent, we need to ensure that there is a sustainable industry that enables young designers and Makers a career path.” makers-lane-02 Makers Lane What are you most excited for, at Factory Design District? We asked the designers at Factory Design District what they were most excited for, and it seems like for the most part, they’re extremely thrilled by the niche nature of the event, and the fact that they’ll be able to see what fellow local designers are creating and hopefully, bounce some collaborative ideas off of each other. “It's exciting to see so many talented makers, both established and emerging, come together under one roof for Factory Design District. It will be a great opportunity to get a glimpse of the people behind the products, to observe how different designers think and create – a chance to walk around inside the magazines I normally pour over on the weekend,” says Fresh Prince. fresh-prince-02 FRESH PRINCE The duo behind JP Finsbury Bespoke Joiners are effusive: “We are looking forward to meeting new people, seeing other makers and what they do - and hopefully collaborating in the future.” As for Tom Fereday, the answer is a tongue-in-cheek one: “Young Henry’s Beer!” All of these wonderful local designers and more will be at Factory Design District as part of Sydney’s Vivid Ideas Festival. Factory Design District Friday 3rd of June – Sunday 5th of June 2016 901 Bourke Street, Waterloo factorydesigndistrict.com  abc
Architecture
Homes

Open Door Policy

Laid out to facilitate this functional versatility the other key virtue of the kitchen plan is to seamlessly connect the indoors and outdoors – an open-door-policy being an almost year-round possibility in subtropical Queensland with its humid Summers and mild and sunny cooler months. The length of the extension containing the kitchen space is oriented towards the north, with fully openable expanses of glazed doors and louvres opening to the backyard and pool area and capturing an abundance of natural light and prevailing breezes. Read the full article in the Kitchen and Bathroom special issue of Habitus magazine, on sale now! Shaun Lockyer Architects lockyerarchitects.com.au Glenwood-St-Residence__041 Glenwood-St-Residence__046 Glenwood-St-Residence__045 Glenwood-St-Residence__042abc
Design Hunters

Something Beginning With

Like most things, designing and developing a truly beautiful and functional new piece of furniture is all about inspiration, research, sweat, skill, luck, chemistry … but that’s only one part of the equation. Having the business savvy and marketing nous to successfully float it out into a world crowded with stuff is the other bit. Not that these are mutually exclusive elements and skill sets in the business of design. In fact it’s precisely when the skills and temperaments of a dynamic team overlap and coalesce into a coherent whole that things really start to happen. Something Beginning With | Habitus Living Something Beginning With was formed in 2011 when industrial designer Lisa Vincitorio and visual artist Laelie Berzon combined forces with a vision to create a furniture range that merged high quality design, visual appeal and local manufacturing. What Berzon brings to the job at hand is a deep understanding of colour from a visual arts perspective and a strong furniture sales background. Lisa Vincitorio is industrial-design trained and is perhaps best known for her ‘Fruit Loop’ and ‘Revolution’ pieces she designed for Alessi. Something Beginning With | Habitus Living Together Vincitorio and Berzon conceptualise each product. Vincitorio looks after development and engineering; Berzon sales and marketing. So far the pair have launched 21 products ranging from sofas, lights, armchairs, stools, occasional tables, ottomans, rugs and storage. The latest, Finn easy chair and coffee table, are the result of an extensive development process. The easy chair’s base is constructed from oval tubing to complement the soft curves of the shell and it is designed to be both “unique and adaptable”, says its designers. Something Beginning With | Habitus Living The coffee table is designed to complement the chair, is made in powder-coated metal and is suitable for outdoor use. SBW also tailor furniture from the current collection for clients as well as create bespoke furniture from concept to fruition to suit a client’s specific requirements. The company’s Melbourne-based manufacturing network provides SBW customers to have access to furniture from the existing ranges that can be adapted to their choice of colour, finish, size or specs. Something Beginning With somethingbeginningwith.com.au Something Beginning With | Habitus Living Something Beginning With | Habitus Living Something Beginning With | Habitus Living Something Beginning With | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Woollahra’s Orama House

The new wing has bare concrete walls, is minimal in form and detail, flooded with natural light through windows framed in dark steel, and has a stainless steel kitchen at its heart. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living The original Victorian villa to which it’s been added, on the other hand, was built at a time when turned timber, decorative detail and iron lacework were some of the most obvious signatures of a fine home. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living These contrasts in styles, materials and building methods of the old and new may be obvious, but the similarities are not so apparent on a first glance. Look more closely though and you soon see that the 19th Century and the 21st Century elements of this home have been designed and built with the same intricacy, attention to detail and immaculate craftsmanship. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living ‘Orama’, a gracious Victorian villa in the well-heeled inner Eastern suburb of Woollahra was added to and renovated by architects Smart Design Studio to meet the needs of a family. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living The fundamental idea was to address the original villa as a distinct identity. The villa houses the bedrooms, bathrooms, formal living and study spaces. Beautifully-crafted elements such as fireplaces and early paint schemes were retained, while other parts of the villa were updated with sensitively-chosen fittings and fixures to bring out the best of the old building. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living By contrast the new addition was designed to be clean-lined and minimal, a striking double-height living room at its nucleus, with raw textured concrete extending from the walls out into the garden and pool. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living The bare concrete walls provide a dramatic canvas for the owners art collection and six-metre-tall windows admit plenty of light into the living space and kitchen and overcome the limitations of the south-facing site. Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living Upstairs in the new wing is a guest bathroom and guest bedroom and a glassy link between the old and new parts of the home. Smart Design Studio smardesignstudio.com Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Living Woollahra's Orama House | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters

Elements of Change

White kitchen cabinets – tick. Snowy marble countertop – tick. Pale wood surfaces – tick. Trio of pendant lights – tick again. If that kitchen sounds over-familiar, it’s because it is. When it comes to today’s cook zones, we’re in danger of becoming a tad clichéd in our choices. The same could be said of modern bathrooms, where colour and decoration have become dirty words. We all love an all-white palette, slinky marble and blonde timber (the fantasy kitchen/bathroom du jour), but there’s a world of alternatives that aren’t currently seeing the light of day. We’re not advocating a return to Seventies avocado suites, wall-to-wall carpet and floral tile strips in bathrooms, we just want to understand why our most important rooms are becoming more ‘same, same’ than different. polytec-coloured-oak-in-Peacock-Oak-RAVINE Perhaps it’s because our love affair with real estate has led to a narrowing of the style parameters for the two rooms considered key to making a smart sale. The more we see houses as investment properties to makeover for profit, the less we’re likely to personalise our spaces, or take risks that might alienate buyers. With the sheer diversity and innovation that’s now out there to choose from in textures, materials and finishes, there’s now no excuse for not making a confident design declaration in ways that stretch from the discreet to the courageous, the understated to the daring See a special look at daring modern kitchens and bathrooms in the special Kitchen and Bathroom edition of Habitus magazine, on sale now! KARTELLbyLAUFEN_amb-(29) Axor_One_Couple-Shower_2abc