About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Furniture

It Takes Two To Tango

Light and elegant, Tango is a new table from Australian designer Ivan Woods. Designed as a table that can embrace numerous possibilities in terms of use or companion status in a room, the table was inspired by the two become one nature of the tango dance. Like that dance, the table embraces the user's desires, enabling multiple formations allowing for potential expression, improvisation and connection. The angled leg frame and slender top of the Tango define the airy aesthetic and sense of movement of the design. A spontaneous table that is multipurpose, whether it’s used for a home, office, café or retail space, Tango channels a geometric aesthetic that serves as an elegant piece that can be nested together to create layers and an arresting visual rhythm to the environment in which it resides. Tango_Brochure1-3 The compact size and lightweight nature of Tango make it easy to move around and suit any purpose. The tables are available with a veneer, leather or a powder coated top and are complimented with powder-coated legs. Through unifying the colours of the base and top, a stand alone table can have a refined appearance, or a mix up colours in a gathering of nested tables could create an interesting composition. Australian made, Tango features å 5 mm thin aluminium top coupled with 8 mm wire base that uses minimal materials while still retaining strength. Schiavello schiavello.com Tango_Brochure1-7 Tango_Brochure1-8 Tango_Brochure1-10 Tango_Brochure1-11 Tango_Brochure1-28 Tango_Brochure1-29  abc
Design Hunters

Connecting with Kin Design

Husband and wife team Dermot and Janelle Lenaghan founded Kin Design with an honest love for good design, and the belief that the things we surround ourselves with are central to our identity. After a 2015 launch at the DEN Furniture and Design Fair, the duo have gone on to create a visual identity of simplicity, function and longevity through a minimal and modern range of cool furniture. A previous life as a graphic designer has served Dermot Lenaghan well in his new role of creative director of Kin Design, with a strong sense of style and no-fuss craftsmanship imbued in all Kin products. Kin_connect-collection Central to the kin approach is the value placed on precisely how things are made. Dermot explains, “Working in close collaboration with specialist local craftsmen, our products are skillfully and ethically produced in Australia, which allows us to have direct control from concept to realisation, ensuring high quality and consistency.” When asked about how they approach designs for kin, Dermot says “Good design for us means, combining the rational with the emotional, to enrich objects through an emphasis on craftsmanship, considered detail and natural materials. We hope to connect and harmonise our products with the people who use them and the spaces they inhabit. “We love seeing our products used in beautiful interiors,” says Dermot “It is particularly satisfying to see our pieces compliment and complete a considered space.” Kin Design Co kindesignco.com kin_black-bar-stool-styled Kin-low-stool-detail kin-connect-high-stool_raw kin_cooper-footrest-detail kin_connect-raw-low-stool_hires kin_connect-low-stool-group kin_connect-bench-styled kin_connect-bench-seat-styled kin_connect-1200-dining-table-raw-oilabc
Architecture
Homes

Worth the White

When architect Chris Bosse bought this small inner-Sydney terrace in a quiet side street near Paddington’s main drag, its Victorian charms had been overlaid with a few 1980s “improvements”. Faux Greek columns, an arch in the living room and exposed clinker brinks were a couple of the additions a previous owner had decided enhanced the existing Victorian aesthetic. Stripping away the unsympathetic elements was easy. “The challenge,” says Bosse, principal of international architects LAVA and a man of exacting tastes, “was working out how to translate design principles on a small scale, on a domestic budget within a heritage structure. It’s about compact inner city living.” The two-bedroom house was opened up to the small courtyard by adding glass doors and timber sliding screens for shading and privacy. The staircase was also screened to create storage and act as a balustrade and light feature. BOSSE_Paddington_0102 European oak timber boards have been added over the existing floor – thereby avoiding costly repair or removal of the old flooring and dealing with the different surfaces, tiles and timber. Bosse has created storage along every possible surface – the dining/living area has floor-to-ceiling shelves, some open to display treasured possessions. The kitchen is small but cleverly planned, featuring a curvaceous, custom-made and designed fiberglass island bench (fabricated to measure in China from a 3D model). The cupboards are solid plywood, their edges exposed and laminated in white. Furniture-wise Bosse is not a fan of anything that’s not the Real McCoy, so he bought secondhand originals on ebay – designer pieces such as a Shaun Dix table, original Arne Jacobsen chairs, B&B Italia lounge chairs and French designer furniture by Ligne Roset TOGO 1973 in LAVA green and orange and a Knut Hesterberg coffee table from the 1960s. As for lighting the architect has chosen Danish designer Louis Poulsen’s light in the living room. Over the dining table is a pendant piece called NAfir, shaped like trumpets or flowers. Bosse met Karim Rashid in an airport taxi and told him he loved his lights and four weeks later had a call from Rashid’s manufacturer in Venice telling him he was sending him some lights. In the kitchen the cloud-like design was designed by Bosse and LAVA – laser cut plywood ribs over an off-the-shelf light tube. Chris Bosse chrisbosse.com LAVA l-a-v-a.net BOSSE_Paddington_0096 BOSSE_Paddington_0006 BOSSE_Paddington_0003 BOSSE_Pad0001 BOSSE_Paddington_0471abc
Design Hunters
People

AP Design House: Minimal, Curated, and Tactile Interiors

Offering services in design and decoration, and a well-considered collection of retail objects, the famous words are clearly evident in AP Design House's eye for detail. “Less is more, but you need to be clever about it,” says principal designer Alexandra Ponting. “Everything needs to have a place. It needs to be functional and practical as well as beautiful.” Ponting established AP Design House in Brisbane seven years ago, and recently opened the practice in Sydney with an office on Moncur Street, Woollahra. With new customers and clients in Mosman and the Eastern Suburbs, as well as a steady following in Brisbane, AP Design House undertakes residential projects that range from large-scale renovations and new builds, to small-scale upholstery and art selection. AP Design House | Habitus Living AP Design House’s minimal, curated and tactile aesthetic is evident across their spectrum of projects, and it combines a shared love of mid century and elegance. “We're always paring back interiors until we get to a point where we can say it doesn’t need anything more or anything less,” Ponting explains, referencing Coco Chanel who famously encouraged women to take one thing off before they leave the house. But while minimalism reigns, it’s certainly not to say their interiors are sparse and unwelcoming. Quite the opposite; they’re warm, fresh, and inviting, and demonstrate the pair’s skills with layering, texture, colour and art. AP Design House | Habitus Living Taking inspiration from travels abroad, Ponting regularly attends overseas design fairs, including Milan Design Week, Maison & Objet in France and the Contemporary Furniture Fair in New York, keeping abreast of new products and designers and sourcing vintage and antique pieces. As they add more residential projects to their belt, AP Design House’s future is bright and they hope to turn their talented hands to boutique hospitality projects. They are currently working on a century-old house in Mosman, injecting a contemporary feel while respecting its original foundations. “It’s such a beautiful project to be part of,” the designers explain. “It’s so rewarding when the project comes to fruition.” AP Design House apdesignhouse.com.au This story also appears in McGrath Magazine AP Design House | Habitus Living AP Design House | Habitus Living AP Design House | Habitus Living AP Design House | Habitus Living AP Design House | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Inner Dialogue

It’s easy enough to enthuse about a new extension “having a dialogue” with the old part of a house it’s improving. Ditto talking about such matters in spatial or material terms or how an existing structure and a new wing attached connect, converse or juxtapose, with each other. All that said there’s nothing like the use of a few recycled materials to physically connect two halves of one home that were imagined and built around 100 years apart. That is to say the incorporation of red bricks from this original site (which were made locally in Melbourne’s inner suburb of Northcote) have been extensive, notably as a floor finish and bath surround (in one of the home’s three bathrooms). This along with the internal brick path, also constructed from bricks found on the site, forms the junction between old and new and continues from the entry to the home and end beside the home’s new pool. Wolveridge Architects wolveridge.com.au Read the full story in Habitus’ Kitchen and Bathroom Special issue, out now. Wolveridge_Plant_28 Wolveridge_Plant_20 Wolveridge_Plant_03abc
Design Products
Furniture

Ace: From Suitcase to Lounge Chair

Available through Normann Copenhagen, the Ace lounge collection innovatively marries luxurious upholstered furniture with functional flat-pack principles. Distinctly Scandinavian in style, Ace is an expressive design inspired by an urban lifestyle. Designer Hans Hornemann took inspiration for Ace from his own life in Copenhagen. With the idea of young urban dwellers at the fore, the design process prioritised quality and aesthetics, without compromising on value, flexibility or price. “I wanted to challenge the flat-pack concept and give it another meaning. I sought to create attractive, upholstered, high-quality furniture that took the best from the flat-pack principle. A reasonably priced piece of furniture, without several weeks’ lead time, that you can fall in love with and bring home with you straight away,” explains Hans Hornemann. Flat-packed upholstered lounge furniture sounds like a mad idea, or at least one that would hardly result in a premium chair. With this challenge in mine, Hans Hornemann considered it a requirement that the function of Ace did not involve compromises of the design. The resulting chair is constructed from moulded plywood, covered with foam for the highest possible comfort. The back is flexible and offers the user a relaxed, springy feeling, ensuring great sitting comfort. Ace combines intelligent engineering with an elegant visual impression and is available in two fabrics; vibrant velour and a flecked wool textile, as well as soft, leather. Ace has legs in stained beech, in matching colour tones as the fabrics for a uniform, minimal expression. In addition to the Ace lounge chair, the Ace collection includes a sofa, a dining table chair and a footstool. Normann Copenhagen normann-copenhagen.com 6030_Ace_Series_16 6030_Ace_Series_15 6030_Ace_Series_12 6030_Ace_Series_11 6030_Ace_Series_17 6030_Ace_Series_2 6030_Ace_Series_1  abc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Dolce & Gabbana and Smeg Unite To Create Luxurious Limited Edition Works Of Art

Channelling of Dolce & Gabbana’s much-acclaimed 2016 summer fashion collection, the new Smeg retro style FAB28 refrigerator sees Sicilian history stake a place in the modern designer kitchen. Wonderfully eye-catching and unapologetically bold, the FAB28’s depict motifs and colour palettes drawn directly from the famous Carretto Siciliano, or Sicilian horse drawn cart design. A limited edition range of FAB28s has been transformed into the luxury Dolce & Gabbana designer collection, epitomising the both brands passion for style and design. The exterior surface of the refrigerator has been is richly decorated in hand painted, unique Sicilian symbols; lemons, the trinacria, cart wheels, medieval knights and battle scenes cover the fridges, with no two the same. With numbers strictly limited to just 300, each piece has been designed with history in mind, with family heirloom status an almost definite. Each Sicilian tableau has been embellished with classical floral motifs in a colour palette of predominantly red, yellow, teal and Mediterranean blue, which is the result of several Sicilian artists and artisans being commissioned to hand paint each refrigerator. The artists include brothers Antonio and Giuseppe Bevilacqua who specialise in artistic ceramics and are noted for their colour palette of bright yellow, intense blue, emerald green and deep black representing the Sicilian sun, sea, hills and lava on Mount Etna. Adriana Zambonelli and Tiziana Nicosia are a mother and daughter who share the same passion and skill for creating dramatic and outstanding Pupi, or traditional puppets. Smeg smeg.com.au Dolce & Gabbana dolcegabbana.com FAB28R-DG_TZ02RD_4 FAB28R-DG_TZ01YW_8 FAB28R-DG_TZ01YW_2-1 FAB28R-DG_BV02PB_9 FAB28R-DG_BV01YW_3 FAB28R-DG_BV02PB_8  abc
Architecture
Homes

In the Black: Openness and Darkness Combine in Melbourne

The fact that the Frame House is so very different from its neighbours, might seem like stating the obvious given the home’s imposing, black, brooding, rectilinear form. Or put it another way, this isn’t the sort of mannered home you’d normally associate with Melbourne’s leafy south eastern suburbs. It’s not only what it looks like that sets it apart, but the way it addresses the street and sits on the block that really distinguishes it. And that’s because this is a hood where the homes have a wide footprint and present their most impressive face to the street, with a minimum setback. Frame House | Habitus Living The Frame House, designed by Carr Design Group, instead rejected the norm and is settled back within its landscape – taking the lead from Australian modernist architecture, such as the work of Guildford Bell. From the street the house presents its shortest elevation – traditional notions of street appeal mean nothing here. This not only provides seclusion and privacy but also gives the impression of the house sitting in a much larger setting. Frame House | Habitus Living Built for a family of four in steel and zinc, the homes sits within a stepped landscape of terraces and pavers and opens up to a tennis court and swimming pool. On the ground floor is a formal living room, kitchen, dining and family living area and a guest bedroom and ensuite bathroom. The family living area is the heart of the home, spilling to the tennis court, pool and onto terraces to the west and the north. Framed by large glass sliding doors, the entire ground floor can be completely opened up to allow for cross ventilation. Frame House | Habitus Living There are four bedrooms upstairs, accessed via a folded steel staircase or elevator. The master bedroom features a luxurious ensuite bathroom, a walk-in-wardrobe and a study. The children’s bedrooms share a bathroom, designed to be flexible and divided into three parts (the owners didn’t want each child to have their own ensuite). There’s a five-car garage on the lower ground floor, a wine cellar and a rumpus room. The rumpus room can be reached from the pool and a barbecue area above via an outside staircase – just so the children don’t need to run through the living space dripping. Carr Design Group carr.net.au Frame House | Habitus Living Frame House | Habitus LivingFrame House | Habitus Living    abc
Architecture
Homes

The T Weekend House

Osaka-based architecture studio Process5 have designed a modern, minimalist weekend residence for its clients, who are looking to enjoy a quiet sanctuary away from their fast-paced urban city lifestyle. The T Weekend House, named in likeness to its T-shaped design, is situated in a mountainous location overlooking the Western Coast of Osaka. T Weekend House | Habitus Living The owners desired a house that would help them focus on appreciating the outer city slowness, a place where they could relax on their valued weekends. Architect Ikuma Yoshizawa of Process5 explains, “The owner purchased a long and narrow sloping land with 13 metres of difference in elevation on a small hilltop overlooking the sea in the distance, and wished to spend time [enjoying] various activities and relaxing, which is not possible in the city.” The design incorporates the owners’ active hobbies such as gardening, fishing and surfing, which are impossible to enjoy in a dense urban city where space is limited. T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House is designed over three floors and accessed from street level, including a main lounge area and a master bathroom located on the site’s West elevation. The private bedrooms have been designed to be accessed by a voluminous stairwell with a height of over 10 metres. An extended roof terrace provides 360˚ views overlooking the coast and mountainous landscape. The house exterior is a mix of wood, reinforced concrete and brick in neutral tones of grey and white, complementing the region’s natural landscape. Due to its exposed positioning, particular attention was paid to the circulation of air and location of natural light inside. A generous breeze is provided from the west, with both horizons of sunrise and sunset attracting maximum daylight. T Weekend House | Habitus Living Yoshizawa explains, “Air flow was taken into account to create a natural and pleasant space for the homeowners.” The understanding of the region’s natural aerial dynamics were incorporated in the structural design, by planning wide [open] interiors [that bring in] ventilation.” T Weekend House | Habitus Living Reinforced concrete and wood were the main material of choice, enforcing a strong structure for the site’s sloped positioning whilst ensuring a fortified base and footing supporting the complete floor area of 175.55 square metres. Positioned high up on a hill, there were challenges in ensuring that the house could withstand seasonal weather conditions and geographical changes. As the site is found on a sloped and rocky tract, the underground base was transformed into a larger opening as a strong substructure, made with concrete and using a special tree structure as a gate type frame. T Weekend House | Habitus Living Although the area sees numerous holiday home builds, the local residents have welcomed the new unassuming, modern project. Yoshizawa explains that the modest house almost integrates into the landscape. “We considered [a way] to create [a home with] low visual impact to complement the surroundings. Due to the site’s sloped positioning, we were able to suppress the height of the building’s visibility from road level.” Process5 process5.com Photos by YFT (Keishiro Yamada) T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House | Habitus Living T Weekend House | Habitus Livingabc
ADVERTORIALS
Happenings
What's On

Magispace x Cult Pop-Up Celebration

Magis has been in the business of elegant and innovative design for 40 years, with a legacy of collaborating with globally-acclaimed designers along the likes of Konstantin Grcic, Jasper Morrison, and Marc Newson. From the iconic Magis Proust chair made in partnership with Alessandro Mendini to the Me Too Magis Kids collection, Magis explores the boundaries of design, playing with predominantly plastic and metal mediums. Magispace x Cult | Habitus Living In celebrating the achievements of Magis, Cult’s Sydney and Melbourne Showrooms have been temporarily regained to make room for a dedicated space honouring the works of Magis. For their Sydney showroom, the Cult team moved their extensive range of wares around the showroom, and filled the central space with new 2016 products and design classics from Magis. Over a busy couple of days, they also painted the walls of the central space in white, with an eye-catching and bright orange feature wall, working in collaboration on the overall Magispace design with Magis’ Alberto Perazza. Magispace x Cult | Habitus Living The Magispace showcases are a tribute to Magis’ extensive contributions to the design industry, and will be open for a two-week period after their respective launch dates in Sydney and Melbourne. 4-17 May | ‘Magispace x Cult’ at Cult Sydney 26 May-7 June | ‘Magispace x Cult’ at Cult Melbourne Magis magisdesign.com Cult cultdesign.com.auabc
Design Products
Finishes

Diesel Living and Iris Ceramica Bring Industrial Home

Above: Hard Leather Diesel Living continues its design evolution with a new collaboration with Iris Ceramica. The Diesel Living design brand, an offshoot of popular clothing label Diesel, chose Iris Ceramica as its design partner for 2016. Diesel Living with Iris Ceramica pairs the company with the Italian manufacturer of high tech glazed ceramics to create a bespoke project that expands Diesel’s home decor offering and creates a fusion between the living area and the bedroom, through a grunge inspired industrial palette. Inspired by traditional industrial design and the feeling of the metropolis, the new collections interpret urban style through the hard rock aesthetic of Diesel: metal tones, iridescent colours and rough resin decorate the ceramics. The collections comprise Concrete, Industrial Glass, Camp, Stage and Hard Leather. All ranges have been designed for both floor and wall coverings and explore different moods within a unified aesthetic. “We are honoured to enter into this partnership with one of the leading players in the fashion and lifestyle industry, that has been able to constantly innovate, becoming a global leader over time,” says Iris Ceramica CEO Federica Minozzi “The Veneto-based brand’s trendsetting spirit teamed with our technical know-how in product prototyping and manufacturing successfully combine to deliver alternative, stand-out solutions to the world of interior design”. The Diesel Living with Iris Ceramica collections are part of the ongoing Diesel Living project, which previously saw Diesel collaborate with Moroso for a furniture range, Foscarini for a lighting collection, Scavolini for a series of kitchen and bathroom options, Berti for wooden flooring options, and Seletti for a collection of home accessories. Iris Ceramica irisceramica.com Diesel diesel.com IndustrialGlass_grey Industrial Glass diving_grey_paviStage concrete_black_paviemnto Concrete camp_army-canavas+glze+rock_grey_rivestimento Campabc
Design Products
Furniture

Hand Pressed Veneer Returns With the Noah Sideboard

Jardan's extensive furniture collection is always growing, with each and every piece designed and produced possessing its own unique story to tell. The Noah Sideboard is a recent addition to the Jardan range, as part of the larger Apartment Collection. Its sharp, sleek lines and angular base make it eye-catching, and the design speaks to Jardan's passion for traditional craftsmanship and contemporary manufacture. Made from hand pressed veneer board with individually cast solid brass handles, Noah combines state-of-the-art manufacturing with traditional hand-pressing veneer techniques. In creating this piece, the Jardan Lab was particularly inspired by intricate weaving techniques and, with Noah, looked to achieve this aesthetic using modern construction methods. Jardan - Noah Bedside Sideboard | Habitus Living Noah was designed to be produced on Jardan’s in-factory CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machine which enables every unit to be made with exact precision. In their initial design developments, the Jardan Lab intended the entire piece to be cut on Jardan’s flatbed CNC, but found that doing so would prevent the veneer grain from perfectly matching. As such, the production process was tweaked to allow the door and drawer fronts to be hand-pressed, which was a lucky decision resulting in the veneers appearing to flow into one another, providing a beautiful detail and a lovely twist to this modern, Australian designed sideboard. Jardan Lab jardan.com.auabc