About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Furniture

Tables a’la the Paris Metro

Each design in the Metro series is clad in handcrafted porcelain tiles, designed to reference the iconic Paris metro train system. Porcelain Bear is known for its deep understanding of porcelain, which has allowed the creative talents of designers Gregory Bonasera and Anthony Raymond to push the boundaries of the material. The Metro is a reflection of Bonasera’s love of the city of light “I’m a Francophile,” he says, “I love Paris and it was one of my first international trips when I was 21. I adore the work of Hector Guimard, who designed a lot of the entrances to the Paris metros. Although our Metro series doesn’t reference Art Nouveau, it does reference the Paris Metro” The Metro series features porcelain-tiled columns in three size variations, ‘Slender’ (260mm diameter); ‘Burley’ (300mm diamtere); and ‘Butch’ (410mm diameter). The Burley and Slender designed are available in occasional tables under the ‘Metro Side’ banner. The Metro Coffee table is a striking coffee table that features one or two Metro columns, complete with an elegant marble top and base. The series also includes dining table variations, featuring the Butch design and a solid marble top. Porcelain Bear’s Collingwood showroom, features a floor-to-ceiling black column made from Metro modules and a 24kt gold-coated porcelain wall sconce, “It’s also a really beautiful reference to the Paris Metro,” explains Bonasera. “It’s a demonstration of how versatile the Metro series is.” Paris has served as a source of inspiration for countless creative minds, artists and designers, and Porcelain Bear’s Metro series continues this tradition. Porcelain Bear porcelainbear.com Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Side-Cluster-8 Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Coffee-3 Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Dining-with-Fruit-Tree-2 Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Dining-Table-1 Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Side-Burly-7 Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Side-Butch-5 Porcelain-Bear_Metro-Side-Slender-6abc
Architecture
Homes

Warm minimalism with the Creer House

Designed to accommodate the clients and their two children, while still having room to entertain a large extended family, the Creer house has a modernist and contemporary feel, with many opportunities for light the flow into the house. The brief from the clients sought open plan living area that opened to a spacious entertaining rear yard and swimming pool, which saw Hancock Architects having to adapt the existing residential space to better suit the new brief. The house was designed as two individual modules with a circulation passage joining them together and running through the centre of the overall space. This central passage allows for circulation through the house as well as another light penetration point. The upper level of the house is where the private spaces exist; bedrooms and bathrooms are located on either side of the central passage, which houses stairs and an open plan multi use space. 35creer_L_09 The ground floor houses a separate family room at the home’s front which, though open plan, has been designed with certain spaces for different usages in mind, resulting in a L shaped plan. The walls in this area are fully glazed to the rear garden, brings the external courtyard into the room. “The building has a sense of modern elegance with clean simple lines,” says architect Tanya Hancock “Though it has a crisp modern composition the house has a warm inviting feeling. The large double doors open up to a large double height entry foyer creating a sense of largeness with a prominent staircase leading to the upper levels” Hancock Architects hancockarchitects.com.au Photography by Simon Whitbread. 35creer_L_04 35creer_L_21 35creer_L_35 35creer_L_49 35creer_L_52 35creer_L_55 35creer_L_57  abc
Architecture
Places

A Modern Dining Experience at Gerrale St. Kitchen

Recently shortlisted in the Hospitality Design category of the 2016 Australian Interior Design Awards, H&E Architects’ design of Cronulla’s Gerrale St. Kitchen is best described as a simple and modern dining room, with a lick of Scandinavian influence. H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_051_RetinaRes “One of the biggest influences for the project was the food,” Brad Burrow, project team leader at H&E Architects explains. “In the case of Gerrale St Kitchen our client wanted to pursue a shared plate menu, designed to be relaxed and informal. Our design approach was create intimacy by arranging the floor plan into a series of smaller spaces to create an atmosphere reminiscent of a family dining room.” H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_105_BLG_RetinaRes This sees design solutions in the form of large communal tables and big open plan dining areas, including the kitchen that is cleverly oriented to separate the café and restaurant. Large mirrors reminiscent of P&O style portholes line the northern boundary wall, monolithic tiled surfaces clad bars and columns, and spherical planters and light fittings hang from the ceiling. H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_186_BLG_RetinaRes The material palette is fresh and stripped back, and subtle curves, warm timbers and round light fittings soften the interior. Oak banquettes and leather sofas help to add a homely touch to the fitout, softening white surfaces, blonde timber and sharp contemporary accents of bronze and blackened steel. H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_161_BLG_RetinaRes The design needed to accommodate a few challenges, including the existing ground level shell that contained a prominent column arrangement and a low concrete soffit. “An important design element to the project was the glazed roof to the restaurants northern area,” explains Brad. “Being under a residential apartment complex we were restricted to a relatively low ceiling height. We wanted this space to give you the feeling you were sitting in an outdoor room that expanded beyond the confines of surrounding walls.” H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_125_BLG_RetinaRes The restaurant was divided into three distinct spaces running lengthways through the site. The kitchen and a mid-height wall defines the first area. High tables and stools at the bar line the perimeter of the kitchen to create a more casual dining experience with views through to the charcuterie and oyster display. The central secondary dining space is contained by tiled columns and a full height timber glazed wall with low seating running lengthways. The third space is light-filled and narrow, with plants and a fireplace to anchor the room. Here, exposed off-white brickwork and an expansive glazed roof run the entirety of the room. Whatever space diners find themselves dining in, these clever design solutions allow for varied dining experiences, whether casual and relaxed, or intimate and homely. H&E Architects h-e.com.au Gerrale St Kitchen gerralestkitchen.com.au Photography by Ben Guthrie. H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_247_BLG_RetinaRes H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_237_BLG_RetinaRes H+E_GerraleSt_Kitchen_133_BLG_RetinaResabc
Architecture
Homes

Would you live in a Former Pigeon Shed?

The Pigeon Shed sees a once dilapidated space overrun with pigeons, transformed into a modern and stylish home for new family. The core idea behind the design was to breathe new life into the space while retaining and rebuilding as much of the existing structure as possible; to overlaying a new program without sacrificing the character and spatial experience the large warehouse offered. A central triple height void offers up a dramatic entrance and gathering space, and also allows light to fall naturally through the building. The circulation paths in the house are expressed through concrete forms, crossing and spiraling through the open space. The main outdoor space of the Pigeon Shed flows naturally from the dining area, and holds a glass-fronted pool across its width. Further outdoors, the contribution to the public sphere is a revitalized warehouse building both typical of the locale, yet unique amongst its surrounds. Introduced material and form to the external façade is intentionally industrial and contextual – steel, concrete and cement sheet. Design decisions for both the personal and public arenas, as well as the selection of finishes and fittings, were deeply important to the clients, and matched with MCK’s philosophy that integrates disciplines of conservation, landscape, structure and service. MCK Architects mckarchitects.com Photography by Richard Glover. 1077-003 1077-005 1077-009 1077-014 1077-013 1077-012 1077-011 1077-030 1077-034abc
Architecture
Homes

A Minimalist Residence in Toorak

Designed for a couple of soon-to-be empty-nesters, the LSD Residence is a striking, asymmetrical, and cement-heavy home in Victoria's Toorak. Contrasting with the concrete walls are generous ceiling to floor glass windows on the second floor, with the blinds creating an intriguing pattern when the house is viewed from afar, and allowing residents privacy from the outside world.

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

The site of the house is narrow and long, and Davidov designed the residence itself to consist of three central blocks with two glazed interstitial zones containing the entrance and staircase, as well as the kitchen area. Wanting both a communal alfresco and bar area for social gatherings, and a separate kitchen for the real cooking and cleaning, the house features a butler's kitchen placed in close proximity to the larger central island open kitchen.

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

The master bedroom makes the most of the cement and travertine composition of the residence, with a curved concrete slab concealing a shower and LED lighting contrasting with the natural lighting that is a principle feature of the rest of the house. For Davidov, "The curved wall of the shower animates the stark façade of the building, which, depending on the lighting levels and time of day emerges and submerges from view from the street."

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

The LSD Residence plays with a palette of neutral colours, contrasting the cooler concrete with warm, blonde timbers, and prominent double-glazed glass.

Davidov Partners Architects davidov.com.au

Photography by Jack Lovel

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living

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Design Hunters

Skye Jefferys Explores the World, Through Both Art and Her Life

Some artists have become known for their use of certain colours (Yves Klein Blue can’t help but come to mind). Some artists however, become known for their use of many colours, for their exquisite handle on how colours work together. Skye Jefferys is one such artist. However the Australian born creative, whose career has gone from strength to strength in the last few years, hasn’t always practiced her craft. Starting out as a designer, it took Skye a few years to pursue the career she’d always dreamed about. Balancing-the-alchemy_2015_120-x-180cm It was, in Skye’s words, “a very slow transition.” Which isn’t to say Skye wasn’t laying the foundation for her later practice, “With all my design work I would intuitively use painting techniques…to communicate an idea.” Despite this however, she “always felt dissatisfied and frustrated, like I needed to escape.” In 2010 she began to study part-time, undertaking a Graduate Certificate in Visual Art at the VCA. Skye says she knew then “that painting was where I felt both challenged and at ease.” Since then she’s slowly carved out a reputation for herself as an artist skilled with colour. Skye refers to something her favourite artist, Australian painter Aida Tomescu, has said, that painting is a “matter of relationships,” and that colour can “bring on a different one… it asks for it, it asks for another voice, for a conversation.” Opposite-of-Infintity_2015_90-x-78cm Though she’s from Melbourne (and has lived all over Asia Pacific) Skye now lives in Singapore, where she’s carving out time for her art between looking after her two toddlers. “Motherhood has forced me to be more efficient with my time because it is so limited,” Skye says, adding that “an art practice is a life-long pursuit and I plan to be doing this when I’m 70.” Skye and her family moved to Singapore in part to pursue a career opportunity for her husband, who works in education. But the pair also “wanted to explore the world and expose our children to a different way of life.” Though it’s been a few short years, Skye clearly sees the move as a success, “I know they are too young to really appreciate it right now, but it’s definitely shaping who they are,” she muses, “Moving around so much changes you. Each time you step outside your comfort zone and have to re-create your life you are thrown new challenges and given opportunities to grow.” The idea of challenges and comfort zones also inform Skye’s practice, “I’m interested in this idea of limitations, whether real or imagined, and how we respond to these,” she adds. Skye’s work can be seen in the group exhibition ‘Current’ at Boom Gallery, Geelong. It opens on the 15th of July. Skye Jefferys instagram.com/skyejefferys Boom Gallery boomgallery.com.au PurpleRain_2015_120-x-100cm Airplant-and-Totoro_2015_120-x-100abc
Happenings
What's On

How to LiveLife in Design and Architecture

What are the burning questions about living in design today? We seek to explore some of these in the LiveLive series of Design Hunter Conversations at Melbourne Indesign in August. The talks will take part as panel discussions led by the Habitus team and involving industry members who will offer their insight, experience and opinion on these topics.

We look at Heritage and Australian Identity as expressed through the architecture of the suburbs, asking the questions: what kind of architecture and design is worth protecting? How is an architectural identity forged and how (and when) shoud it change?

Disrupting Design Living looks at the idea of communal living – how is it defined and how can it work? The social and psychological benefits are weighed up against the practical, logistical and financial considerations.

Finally, lighting is the subtle, yet powerful element of space. As consumers and home-owners become more educated about design and architecture, attention to how our living spaces are lit will become more important. What is a good balance between natural and artificial lighting sources? What environmental concerns are we responsible for?

You can dive into a lively discussion on these topics with us during Melbourne Indesign. The three events will take place across Melbourne on Friday the 12th of August.

Sign up to Indesign: The Event for all the latest updates and information on tickets.

Indesign: The Event indesigntheevent.com

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Happenings
What's On

Indesign is returning to Australia’s capital of culture

Brought to you by Indesign Media and the Habitus Living team the 2016 edition of Indesign: The Event retains the features we know people have come to love, but also offers a host of new features for both visitors and exhibitors. Melbourne Indesign 2016 will be taking it to the streets – bringing the design experience back to the city. Visitors can expect innovative installations, game-changing talks and true immersion in the design lifestyle of their city. Our crowd-favourite celebration of creativity, The Project, is returning in 2016 – again promising diversity and excitement through collaboration, and given 2015’s projects including everything from a colourful, child-like ball pit to a live dance presentation, The Project is sure to only keep getting bigger and better. For the design hunter, we'll be running a series of seminars under the LiveLife banner. Hosted by members of the Habitus editorial team, these talks will feature prominent members of the design community, and will probe how architecture and design intersect with how we live. Melbourne Indesign indesigntheevent.com/melbourneabc
Architecture
Homes

Northcote Residence

Set amongst an eclectic assortment of Edwardian homes, sweeping historic mansions, and new apartment complexes, this family home in Melbourne’s Northcote has a façade that is at once striking and deceptive. K2LD Architects are responsible for the building’s new design – and their brief was simple – create a setting that supported the owners’ passion for cooking, while capture the site’s sweeping CBD skyline views. Inspired by the verandah front of the existing structure, K2LD responded with a humble, low-lying street frontage, and soaring, light filled living spaces cleverly concealed beyond the front door. Northcote Residence | Habitus Living “At first, we thought the site’s dramatic fall from street front to its rear would be our greatest constraint, however, we came to see it as an opportunity to play with the internal scale and a way for us to take full advantage of the uninterrupted views to the south,” says K2LD Principal Tisha Lee. The new form is subtle and unassuming with restraint exercised heavily throughout to allow for moments of simplicity, with panoramic views given the space to speak for themselves. Northcote Residence | Habitus Living “Adopting a discreet presentation to the street, the northern elevation presents as a pair of inverted ‘Ls’; one concrete and lightly hovering over the ground plane, the other constructed out of blackbutt timber batten sunshades,” says Lee. The rich palette of natural materials of the home’s frontage offer a taste of what is to come, with these textures carried through to the interiors. A timber clad master suite is cantilevered over the living spaces below. “An extrusion of the external timber form, the master suite creates an architectural connection between inside and out,” says Lee. Northcote Residence | Habitus Living “Practical and functional, yet architecturally sophisticated, we see this as a home that can not only withstand being lived in but was intentionally built for a lifestyle of socialising, entertaining, interaction and play.” K2LD Architects k2ld.com.au Photography by Shannon McGrath. Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living Northcote Residence | Habitus Living  abc
Design Products
Furniture

Knoll introduces the Bertoia Diamond Chair in 18-karat gold

Paying homage to beryllium’s golden quality that Harry Bertoia so favoured, the Bertoia Diamond Chair is released as a part of Knoll’s yearlong celebration of the life and work of Harry Bertoia, recognized worldwide for his groundbreaking furniture designs for Knoll. Bertoia's Sonambient sculptures provided the inspiration for the release of the Bertoia Diamond Chair. Knoll Design Director Benjamin Pardo explains “Harry’s own work was mostly done in beryllium," Pardo states, "including many of his Sonambient sculptures.” In celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Platner Collection, Knoll has rolled out the Platner Gold, an 18k gold-plated finish option, for the Bertioia Diamond Chair, as well as the Platner Lounge Chair, Platner Arm Chair, Platner Stool, Platner Dining Table, Platner Coffee Table and Platner Side Table. The Platner Collection was designed 50 years ago, in 1966 by architect Warren Platner, who always intended it to be gold-plated. The pieces in the Platner Collection are made of hundreds of individual hand-soldered welds. Platner himself favored more expressive and shapely designs than those generally called in modernism. "I, as a designer, felt there was room for the kind of decorative, gentle, graceful kind of design that appeared in a period style, like Louis XV” he once remarked. Knoll knoll.com Bertoia-diamond-Chair_mood BERT_0216 Harry-Bertoia-Bertoia-Diamond-Chair_product Knoll-Bertoia-Diamond-Chair-in-18k-Gold-Plated-Finishabc
Design Products
Furniture

Communal Use with the Carafe Table

A versatile table designed for contemporary urban living, the Carafe Table offers an attractive and adaptable surface for working and entertaining, and pairs this with insightfully designed storage features. Like the communal drinking vessel, the carafe, the table takes its name from, Carafe Table embodies a convivial spirit where family and friends gather. With modern spaces of living and working blending, the Carafe Table has been designed to blend the functions of the kitchen bench top and work desk, able to transform easily between ‘working’ and ‘dining’ modes. Discreet drawers elegantly designed into the table’s side address storage, and offer up easy places to put objects such as cables, cutlery, paperwork or linens. “In my inner city apartment, the dining table is the most utilised piece of furniture. It’s the centre around which all activity revolves,” says designer Charles Wilson on inspiration behind the Carafe Table “During the week, it’s my workstation, a quiet place from which I look out to the harbour, reflect on my designs and perfect their production. At the weekend, it’s the gathering place for family and friends who drop in, kids in tow, everyone pitching in preparing food and mixing drinks.” The design of the piece was driven by a sense of seeing the dining table as a utensil itself. Efficiently adapting to the demands of urban living and the crumbling nature of the 9-5 workday. “There is no one perfect dining table, a good design is like a snapshot of our needs,” says Wilson, "the Carafe Table addresses the complexity of our working and family lives, redefining the dining table as a utensil.” Herman Miller hermanmiller.com.au Carafe_01-6 Carafe_07-1 Carafe_08-4 Untitled-1 Untitled-2  abc
Design Products
Lighting

Jewellery meets industry at Volker Haug

The Chain Volker Haug lights see a balance of two spherical lights like a perfectly weighted scale, and can serve as a wall mount or as a ‘U’ and chain pendant with a ceiling mount that mirrors the light fitting below. VH-chain-on-U-frosted-RB Also available in pendant form, the Flipside lights use angled metallic discs to house the light source and are able to be customised in a range of finishes, from copper to marble and brass. VH_Flipside-Copper-group The Side Kick and Side Step designs in the range are twists on the traditional pedant design, where simple design meets structural lines and honest craftsmanship. Modular and customisable, the pendants can combined in a variety of ways, allowing for a personalised light arrangement for each user. VH_Side-Series-Brass-Group Since founding his eponymous studio in Melbourne some ten years ago, German born Volker Haug has developed a deserved high reputation in unique lighting design. His work features a distinct and strong aesthetic, incorporating industrial and minimalist styles with a strong sense of colour. Working with high-end materials, such as brass, copper, porcelain and glass, alongside recycled and reclaimed materials, Haug creates unique pieces that are playful, sculptural, functional and surprising. Volker Haug volkerhaug.com VH_Side-Series-kick-single-Brass-Group VH_Side-Series-White-Group VH_Wall-Step VH_Wide-Step-black-opaque-on  abc