About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters

Porosity Kabbari: Cross-Cultural Exchange

Most designers routinely obsess over the fine details of their projects for months if not years, so a project that involves sourcing materials from a junk market in Mumbai, producing a number of products and exhibiting them to the public in a three-week time frame would bring many to the verge of a nervous breakdown. _SP_3392 But this is what designer Trent Jansen, artists/architects Richard Goodwin and Bijoy Jain and design thinker Ishan Khosla signed up to when they agreed to participate in Porosity Kabari. Executed in February 2016, the project culminated in an exhibition at Studio X in Mumbai and a photo shoot within a beautiful colonial building with the delightfully Orwellian name of The Ministry of New. The project’s intent is contained in its very name – Porosity, meaning the quality of things being able to pass through: water, air, and even people and ideas. Kabari is the Hindi word for junk. The project set out not only to source its raw material from the Chor Bazaar (Thieves Market), a vast junk market in Mumbai, but also to use the fabricators that work within the vicinity of the bazaar to create the finished objects. _SP_3581 Porosity Kabari challenges many of the preconceived conventions and encourages new ways of looking at process and manufacturing and ultimately questions what constitutes a designed object. By immersing the designers in a foreign culture and encouraging observation, adaption and a fluid, open-minded approach, the project unlocked ways to a more human design process. Along the way the designers also discovered the true nature of India’s caste system and how it relates to the making of objects to feed the needs of a country with a population of 1.3 billion people. The project was engineered to show that it is possible to design within such parameters with materials that come to hand – even if it at first they closely resemble junk. Ishan_Khosla_Partition_of_the-Mind_050A5314 Within the apparent chaos of Indian street life, there is an ecological force at work driven by the necessity to survive through being resourceful and inventive, rather than for the scientific awareness that drives environmental endeavours in the west. Read the full story in Habitus issue #32, available now. Porosity Kabari trentjansen.com Photography by Neville Sukhia, Richard Goodwin, and Ishan Khosla. Ishan-Khosla-Construct-_-deconstruct-_-construct_SP_3142abc
Habitus Loves
Design Products
Design Accessories

Iittala X Issey Miyake: Welcome to The Fold

Though pocketed away in two different continents, both Japan and Finland speak an aesthetic language of modesty and simplicity. Sharing mutual design histories at the vanguard of minimalism, they also share a profound appreciation for tradition, innovative materials and new technologies. Iittala X Issey Miyake | Habitus Living So when Finland’s Iittala and Japan’s Issey Miyake announced their upcoming homewares collaboration, the design world could hardly imagine a more ideal union to bring harmony and calm into our homes. The Iittala X Issey Miyake Collection of textiles, ceramics and glass invites users to meditate on the quiet daily rituals of our domestic lives. Setting a serene mood in a subdued colour scheme, timeless delicate shapes tempt us to relish the tactile experience of each individual article. The thirty-piece range offers a broad array of essential objects covering bags, tea ware, glass, cutlery and cushion covers. Iittala X Issey Miyake | Habitus Living-1 The tonal narrative of charcoal, grey marle, ivory, blush and muted jade – evocative of the Japanase tradition of hanami – is a playful leitmotif that continues through to napkins that open like unfurling cherry blossoms. Miyake’s latest iteration of his signature pleat becomes, in the current collection, a spirited meditation of the transformative negotiations between 2D and 3D. Pentagonal smoked glassware from the Iittala Concept and Design Team introduces a surprising geometric instance. This “non-daily element”, they hope, “will bring a special moment”. 5753204 Midori Kitamura, President of The Miyake Design Studio, considers the Iitala X Issey Miyake Collection a significant moment for the global design community: “[t]he continuous research and development seen in the fashion designs of Issey Miyake is now crystalised in the collaboration project with Iittala”. 57530009 Harri Koskinen, Iittala’s Design Director, views this first collaborative foray for the two brands as perfectly symptomatic of their twofold appreciation of “tradition, functionality, craftsmanship and the use of innovative materials and methodologies in their design work”. The Iittala X Issey Miyake Collection brings harmony to the home with precious moments of surprise, serenity and joy. The Iittala X Issey Miyake Collection will be in store October 2016. Iittala X Issey Miyake iittala.com.au Iittala X Issey Miyake | Habitus Living-1 Iittala X Issey Miyake | Habitus Living-1 Iittala X Issey Miyake | Habitus Living-1abc
Design Hunters

Doshi Levien: on Design, Inspiration, and Their Home

In what was a truly candid discussion about their experiences since boldly quitting their jobs and establishing Doshi Levien in 2000 (and going on to win the EDIDA Designer of the Year 2015), it was clear from the outset that this was a couple that was more than happy to share the lessons learned along the way. “I think design is more than a profession; it is a way of life and I always say that inspiration is everywhere as long as your eyes are open,” says Nipa the previous day, as we sit on the rooftop of the nearby Alex Hotel. Doshi Levien - Habitus #32 | Habitus Living “I think that’s because you’re very interested in the visual culture,” Jonathan counters. “In my case I would say I’m really looking at how things are made and the technical resolution of elements, as I’m looking around the whole time to figure out how things are put together in terms of materials and structure.” Home for the couple and their son is a duplex in Barbican Estate, an iconic 1960’s-era brutalist housing estate in London. With barely a trace of what occupied the space before WWII bombings devastated the city, architects Peter Chamberlin, Geoffry Powell and Christoph Bon created a complex that accommodates approximately 4000 residents and has since been labeled a site of special architectural interest for its scale, cohesion and the sheer ambition of the project. Doshi Levien - Habitus #32 | Habitus Living Inside the home, collections of artifacts, metal bowls, mirrors and photographs by Indian screenwriter and photographer Sooni Taraporevala decorate the walls as well as the floors. “Design for me is very much about caring about our everyday environment and how I do things, whether it’s how I lay the table, how I make the bed, or even enjoying the simple gesture of cooking,” says Nipa. “Design seems to permeate everything we do.” Doshi Levien - Habitus #32 | Habitus Living As for their favourite spaces within the home both Nipa and Jonathan agree on the living room. “I tend to use the floor a lot, particularly when practicing singing with our son, so using the Rabari rug that we designed for Nanimarquina in this space is really special,” says Nipa. When not at home the couple and their son can be found at the theatre or opera in London, at a lesson learning classical Indian music, cycling along the canal, or enjoying a dim sum lunch with family at Yauatcha. A typical trip to India can include a visit to a spa in the Himalaya Mountains, or swimming in Udaivilas overlooking Lake Pichola. Read the full story in Habitus issue #32, available now. Doshi Levien doshilevien.com Photography: Filippo Bamberghi and Christopher Tubbs Stylist: Sissi Valassina Doshi Levien - Habitus #32 | Habitus Living Doshi Levien - Habitus #32 | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Unfurled House

In Sydney’s Petersham, architect Christopher Polly has designed what could only be described as an opus of geometric twists and clean monochromatic strokes – a truly unique reflection on the dynamic, real-time interactions between space and people. Creating the impression of sentient, animate architecture, this home gently stirs itself into a vertical-horizontal unravelling through cellular rooms and unbroken indoor-outdoor spaces. And surprisingly, all this up-to-the-minute modernity is socketed within a deceptive Federation façade. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living Responding to the established conditions of the original dwelling was the persistent rationale for Christopher Polly. The property is “sensitively stitched to the rear original fabric, while retaining its front Federation masonry and hipped envelope was part of its environmental, economic and planning values”. One of the persistent challenges, he continues, “was achieving the client’s entire programme in a highly creative manner [but] within a modest footprint”. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living Breathing new, and very ambitious life into this original Federation home – but without compromising on sustainability – was by no means a trifling job. Unfurled House creatively transforms a three-bedroom Federation dwelling with one living space into a four-bedroom home with two living spaces, an enlarged kitchen and bathroom, state-of-the-art laundry facilities, and an extra study with considerable storage. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living An intermediary form, framed in black steel angle and plate, folds from the underside of the property’s rear to meet the two-storey volume. The interplay serves as a link for utility spaces, circulation and a northern courtyard situated at the centre of the home. Projecting ‘wedges’ at the rear further unfurl the exterior façade to provide ground-floor storage on the terrace, a daybed nook within the ‘public’ living space, and a private reading room at the very apex. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living The impressive project is achieved with sustainable practices and inspired design solutions throughout. An intelligent use of fenestration placement allows expansive enjoyment of outdoor spaces while also harnessing natural light and promoting passive ventilation. Black trimmed projecting hoods, and contrasting white external and interior blinds temper solar penetration while encouraging a spatial interplay of public, semi-private and private rooms. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living Recruiting the expertise of acoustic consultant Sebastian Giglio, the family were intent on also minimising the noise pollution of the property, situated smack-bang below a busy flight path. Crafty use of insulation, internal linings and a central vaulted ceiling all contribute to the overall desire for acoustic attenuation. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living Warm and respectful nods are scattered throughout the home. The preserved Federation plaster ceiling rosettes and hall sconces, for example, offer a distinctive counterpoint to the restrained material palette and monochromatic colour scheme. And chic, streamline furnishings coupled with the Bauhaus-inspired minimalism of Vernor Panton pendant lamps breathe serenity and an elegant simplicity through the home. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living As you navigate the nexus of spaces the architecture gently unfolds you out onto a rolling lawn. Separated only by a thin barrier of glass, the family’s use of the design carves connections to the sky, with its light streaming through the entirety of the structure. Christopher Polly Architect christopherpolly.com Photography by Brett Boardman Photography. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living  abc
Architecture
Homes

Tomorrow’s Concrete

This low maintenance, contemporary four bedroom home located in Concord, Sydney, is a dramatic celebration of the owners’ love for concrete, and a quietly daring – very charming – colour palette of muted neutrals accented with explosive neon touches. Thanks to the brains of envelope-pushing architecture and design firm Studio Benicio, this formerly featureless and tired red brick home has been transformed to allow more space and greater amenity for this family of four. Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Although often considered raw, basic or just plain brutal, it is evident that this family recognised the extraordinary potential inherent in concrete beyond simply being one of building. With this deep-seated love for the manifold possibilities, flexibility and wow-factor of this oft overlooked material stemming from their family-operated formwork business, concrete is both a part and (in many ways) the sum of a truly unprecedented home. Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living A core element of the home is its seamless transitions between indoor and outdoor spaces, as well as between the house’s individual rooms and areas, which responds to the family’s desire for spaces that double for communal gathering and retirement. The fluid spaces allow for an ease of movement, and an integrated visual aesthetic, while also observing current council approval systems regulating similar modestly sized plots. Though designed to ensure that the development would be approved quickly, the Development Approval Controls of the local council presented the distinct challenge to the Studio Benicio team that any “inconsistent” contemporary design influences would be considered non-compliant with the home’s one-time typical red brick suburban heritage. Albeit from quite different perspectives, both residents and council placed stock in seamless integration: between the spaces of the house and within the site’s history. Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Inspired elements such as the poolside floating concrete awning, and expansive concertina full-length doors ensure that indoor and outdoor elements work happily with the property’s orientation, existing pool and amenities locations, and bring the advantage of not appearing to look (or function) like an add-on or inconsistent afterthought. Along with the retractable glass roof, this space can be enjoyed as an extension of the internal living space year round. Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living The construction of the house is predominately concrete from structure to finishing touches. And, while certainly not the most pervasive material in residential suburbia – or at least not quite to this degree – the combination of concrete and alucobond cladding carries the threefold benefit of being aesthetically arresting, personally distinctive, and requiring little to no further maintenance for its resident families for generations to come. Studio Benicio studiobenicio.com Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Living Concrete Futures | Studio Benicio | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Urban Luxury

The newest kid on the block in Sydney’s inner-city suburb of Erskineville is Eve, a multi-residential project by Fridcorp. Designed by architecture firm DKO, the project is defined by quality design and attention to interactions – between space and site, various finishes, residents and public spaces, and even between neighbours. DKO created a sculptural and modern façade for Eve, distinguished by white glazed-brick exteriors and a sweeping entrance. With dark chocolate brown brickwork at the base, panels of bright white stucco are punctuated by black metal trims framing windows and doorways, with bronze detailing charmingly offsetting this disciplined palette. Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living “The relationship between site and surrounding suburb is intrinsic to the project’s design language,” says David Randerson, director at DKO and the project’s lead architect. “It is conceived, designed and shaped as a response to a range of local elements, such as the distinctive curved corner treatment of numerous local buildings, along with an honest and robust materiality.” He continues, “We wanted to create a local landmark but with a sophisticated approach,” Randerson says. “So the project has a grand entry that is set back from the street.” In addition to rethinking the street corner with the curved archway, DKO reconsidered the standard approach to apartment design and made a section of the ground-level apartments along Pearl, Zenith and Macdonald Streets outward rather than inward facing. He also inserted a European-style stoop that presents a pleasing interface between the building and the public, as well as creating seven lobbies throughout the site. Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living Eve’s secluded, landscaped courtyard designed by 360 Degrees includes built-in timber seating that provides an opportunity for neighbourly engagement, a detail that is especially important in growing communities such as Erskineville. Mature trees and plants fill the large, concrete raised planters and line the gently winding pathways that lead to Eve’s respective buildings. The 1000m² resort-style rooftop garden offers another vibrant communal space for residents and their guests to relax or entertain. Located on the site’s northern-most building, the rooftop garden is located on level four, providing a lush view of the beautiful rooftop deck to residents in surrounding buildings. From the rooftop, guests are treated to expansive views of Sydney’s skyline. Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living Stained natural timber flooring lines the rooftop deck and a large built-in seat provides an area for repose. Residents can reserve one of three white timber rooftop cabanas, two of which contain cooking facilities. Fridcorp commissioned custom dining tables for the pods. Rose gold accents, a theme found in the apartments’ interiors, continue in the rooftop’s light fixtures. The apartments’ sophisticated and restrained interiors were designed by Hecker Guthrie in collaboration with DKO. The intelligent and efficient floorplans have wide frontages giving the apartments a spacious feeling. Full-length windows allow natural light into the space, enhancing the amenity. Hecker Guthrie appointed the interiors with blonde American oak floors and white walls, with home owners choosing from either a dark grey or all-white colour palette. Rose gold-coloured accents, found in tapware, light fixtures and door handles, pepper the apartments. Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living Open plan living, dining and kitchen areas cater to the relaxed lifestyle, with the apartments’ deep balconies (some as large as 73m²) offering that quintessential Sydney touch. Sleek kitchens, outfitted with Smeg appliances and marble and porcelain benchtops, provide a luxurious space for meal preparation and entertaining. Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living Eve’s bathrooms contain oval sinks, marble splashbacks, white tiled walls and marble flooring. Rose gold accents are carried though in tapware and light fixtures. The design and material palette create welcoming spaces that serves as a retreat from life’s daily stresses. Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living “We’re very proud of Eve – from its exceptional design to its high-quality interiors and the development’s exemplary communal spaces. We think the project demonstrates that Sydney’s apartment planning guidelines allow for the realisation of very good design,” says Paul Fridman, founder and director of Fridcorp. DKO dko.com.au Hecker Guthrie Studio heckerguthrie.com Fridcorp fridcorp.com.au Photography by Peter Clarke Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Living Urban Luxury | Fridcorp Eve | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Around The World

A Cultural Retreat by the Beach

Located in Seminyak, Bali, the Katamama hotel sits on the Jalan Petitenget beach belt – a stone’s throw away from Potato Head Beach Club, the island’s cultural institute, also owned and managed by the PTT Family. Contrasting the lively atmosphere of the beach club, the boutique hotel offers a quiet and private retreat for guests to wind down. The space is imbued with a sense of familiarity and warmth, and designed with the ambience of a home in mind, rather than a hotel. There is no lobby at Katamama; guests check in within the comfort of their suites where timeless design prevail over unnecessary ornamentation.

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Singapore-based design studio Takenouchi Webb designed the Katamama interiors in collaboration with the PTT Family Creative Team. According to Marc Webb, co-founder of Takenouchi Webb, the team drew inspiration from Katamama’s architecture, designed by Indonesian architect Andra Matin. The building is composed of 1.5 million handmade Balinese bricks – the same material used to construct Balinese temples.

“The dominant handmade, local brick material of the building was a strong influence in determining the mood and palette of the interior design,” says Webb, who sought to unite the hotel’s exteriors and interiors as a seamless entity.

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Implemented on selected walls in the rooms, the raw bricks were tastefully merged with a palette of teak flooring, solid timber slats and rough pale-coloured plaster. The bathrooms with their terrazzo floors and walls stand in playful contrast to the main spaces. The diverse material palette contribute to the creation of an informal setting, allowing travellers to feel at home.

“There was a strong direction from [the clients] to source [for] local materials and accessories,” shares Webb. The suites display a wealth of Indonesian materials and craftsmanship. A series of bespoke furniture, amenities and decorative elements were handcrafted by Indonesian craftsmen through traditional practises – exhibiting the rich heritage of the archipelagic state in a contemporary context.

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Working with a Surabaya-based carpenter, Diraja Surya, the PTT family customised teak furniture featuring smooth curves and pencil legs, interpreting a marriage between Indonesian and European mid-century design. Cementing the homely aesthetic, the suites were also furnished using the owner’s personal collection of vintage furniture by the likes of Hans J. Wegner, Arne Jacobsen and Josef Hoffman, to name a few, and art supplied by Ark Galerie, offering a glimpse into Indonesia’s art scene.

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

“People now want an authentic and personal experience when they come to this beautiful and culturally-rich island,” says Ronald Akili, the co-founder of the PTT Family. Guided by a ‘handcraft hospitality’ concept, the rugs, bed throws and bathrobes were naturally dyed and hand-weaved by Tarum, a textile workshop based in Gianyar. Room amenities were traditionally dyed and stamped by Tjok Agung Indigo, a husband-and-wife team based in the outskirts of Bali. Guests may also marvel at the pottery pieces by ceramists Gaya and Jenggala – based in Ubud and Jimbaran respectively. Various storage containers featured in the rooms were made using woven orchid vines from the East of Bali.

A total of seven types of suites make up the 58 rooms in Katamama. The smallest suite spans 82 square metres, while the recently launched Katamama Suite, the largest single unit spans 320 square metres, featuring two bedrooms, a separate living, dining space, floor-to-ceiling windows and a terrace framing sweeping views of the Indian Ocean.

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

The overall design expression was also extended to public premises within the hotel, including the cocktail bar Akademi and Spanish restaurant MoVida.

Our innovative cultural programming lets guests go past the regular tourist activities and really learn and explore Indonesia’s artistic, traditional and cultural practices,” explains Akili. Striving to create unforgettable experiences through its establishments, the PTT Family believes in collaborating with multiple creators from across various fields, be it art, music or design to create its own signature.

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

The group is currently developing its second and third hotels, Kataoma and Katamama Canggu, working with Rem Koolhaas and his firm, OMA and Brazilian architect Marcio Kogan and his firm, Studio M27, respectively. Each property will bear a unique personality, united by a drive to push the boundaries of modern hospitality.

Takenouchi Webb takenouchiwebb.com

PTT Family pttfamily.com

Photography: Martin Westlake (courtesy of PTT Family)

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

Katamama - PTT Family | Habitus Living

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Architecture
Places

A Gold Coast Dining Experience

Luchetti Krelle’s hospitality fit-outs are easily some of the most memorable in the country. The Sydney-based practice (co-founded by Rachel Luchetti and Stuart Krelle) is as prodigious as it is versatile, with a portfolio ranging from the techno-candy loveliness of Hello Kitty Diner to the austere elegance of Acme. For their recent interior design of Chef Chase Kojima’s Japanese restaurant Kiyomi on the Gold Coast, they utilised a pared-back material palette to sensually evoke the stylistic traditions and visual culture of Japan. _DSC0172 “Our focus was on the well considered and detailed principles of Japanese design,” says Krelle. “Sharp lines, ordered space and an identifiably Japanese palette of steel, timber and granite.” The scheme’s overall materiality is particularly successful in communicating the restaurant’s hospitality offering. More importantly, it creates a strong sense of intimacy that was much needed in a space devoid of any clearly defined boundaries. Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Living Kiyomi’s long, narrow site is located in the lobby of Jupiters Casino and was originally open to the corridors leading to the complex’s hotel rooms. Minimising this exposure involved inserting partitions into the dining area, which serves to distinguish it from the public circulation areas. Luchetti and Krelle also installed ceiling structures to further contain the restaurant and heighten its ambience. The predominantly black and brown colour palette adds to the warm atmosphere and is complemented by bronze and copper accents. These amber tones are introduced judiciously in the wall sconces and carpet, which instantly appeals for its highly detailed custom gingo leaf motif. Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Living This patterning contrasts with the monochromatic granite and blackened steel and is reiterated in the dining area’s ‘jigsaw puzzle’ wall. While it features circular Japanese motifs representing family and the seasons, the wall’s dynamism rests in its painstaking construction from hundreds of solid timber blocks arranged at varying heights. But the interior’s most unexpected feature is a specially commissioned fluorescent mural by Japanese artist Que Houxo. As Krelle explains, “We had the idea to include his work in the fit-out because we wanted to incorporate a burst of colour that would draw people’s attention down the narrow site.” The painting’s installation at the rear of the restaurant effectively creates visual intrigue, as its luminous composition is hard to ignore. Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Living While Luchetti Krelle’s concept respectively embraces the principles of Japanese design, it does so with a contemporary twist. Their use of texture, colour and pattern also reflects Chef Kojima’s culinary stylings, making Kiyomi’s dining experience truly holistic. Kiyomi jupitersgoldcoast.com.au/restaurants/kiyomi Luchetti Krelle luchettikrelle.com Photography by Michael Wee.  Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Living Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Living Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Living Kiyomi - Luchetti Krelle | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

A Concept House for Western Australia

Perth is a unique city in Australia, and is often glossed over in comparison to Sydney and Melbourne when it comes to the idea of Australian design. The area itself poses its own unique challenges, as the climate and environment of Western Australia is vastly different from its East coast counterparts, and requires a different design sensibility to cater to it. MSG Architecture challenged themselves to create a compact, sustainable, and versatile concept house that would be suitable for Perth’s ever-changing suburban environment. What resulted is the Erpingham House. Erpingham House | Habitus Living “We were inspired by a need,” says Michael Gay, the director of practice at MSG Architecture, “We wanted to create a [a home] that respected the unique Western Australian aspects of place, culture, space, material, light, sound, air and time, [but] to do this we needed to put our own money where our mouths were.” Located in Hamilton Hill, south of Western Australia’s Fremantle, Erpingham House has 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and an open-plan design to make the most of the 150m2 space that the house covers. With a focus on environmental sustainability and financial viability, the concrete floor of the house is designed to absorb the heat of the sun and reflect it throughout the home as the day progresses, just as the strategically placed glass windows are intended to make the most of the natural Northern light filtering into the home. Erpingham House’s corrugated iron facade is also an economical and lightweight choice for construction. Erpingham House | Habitus Living “Erpingham is trimmed down to the essentials. In fact, a brave client would choose to trim it down even more,” continues Michael, “We struck a balance of comfort and leanness in order to appeal to a wider market. Everything we put in the building was considered in this way.” In the creation and testing of the prototype, Michael and his interior designer wife moved into the home, intending on living there for several years. During the construction phase they had the unique ability to alter aspects of the design as they came across unexpected obstacles and ideas – one of the advantages of having the client for the project being themselves. Erpingham House | Habitus Living “The house is both environmentally and financially sustainable for our times. We believe the definition of sustainability is doing more with less,” says Michael, “There is no point reducing your carbon footprint if your living footprint is dinosaur sized.” With Erpingham house now built, the concept house can now be fine tuned to allow for MSG Architecture to continue to adapt to the changing landscape in Perth, providing a viable alternative option for Western Australia. MSG Architecture msgarchitecture.com.au Photography by John Madden Erpingham House | Habitus Living Erpingham House | Habitus Living Erpingham House | Habitus Living Erpingham House | Habitus Living Erpingham House | Habitus Living Erpingham House | Habitus Living Erpingham House | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Mad About Lighting

We’re down with indoor/outdoor living. We can tell you the difference between granite and quartz. We even know the basics of how to make a home more sustainable. But start talking LEDs and lumens and there’s a collective glaze that settles over even the most ardent design and architecture aficionado.

Why is lighting such a difficult subject to understand? For one thing, it’s technical. There’s a bunch of science behind lighting – what works, what is efficient and what is potentially harmful. On the other hand, it’s extremely emotive and, as such, difficult to define.

Despite the challenges, Habitus is going to dive into the murky waters to shine a light on them (see what we did there?). A panel of industry experts will divulge their tips for lighting in the home exploring questions like: How do we live with light? What are the benefits of natural vs. man-made lighting and how can we use both effectively in the home? What is a good balance between function and decoration? And many more.

Speakers are lighting designers Christopher Boots and Volker Haug, lighting retailer Ross Hines, and architect Nick Harding.

‘Lighting the Home’ is part of the LiveLife series presented by Habitus, and will take place on Friday 12 August as part of Melbourne Indesign.

Register for updates and we’ll also set you up with your attendance at the same time. Click here to register. Melbourne Indesign melbourneindesign.com.au Christopher Boots photography by Mark Roper VH_Side-Series-White-Group Volker Haug Side Seriesabc
Design Products
Furniture

What Does 150 Years In Design Look Like? A Visual Essay…

  . h12 Wilhelm Knoll 1865 Wilhelm Knoll, the founder of the Knoll dynasty, opens the doors of his “leather shop” in Stuttgart, Germany. Widely travelled expert in leather: in 1864, annual stay in Paris – the world centre of leather, fashion and luxury goods. “Knoll leather” becomes the hallmark of quality, and the House of Württemberg names Wilhelm Knoll, "Supplier to the Royal Court." 1866  TV is invented. The first transatlantic cable is put into operation. Here, the world began to look at the idea of fusing technology with design, where televisions became almost like sculptural pieces in the home – assuming of course, that you were lucky enough to have one... 1906 The leather furnishings factory (Ledermöbelfabrik) becomes the leather seating factory (Ledersitzmöbelfabrik Wilhelm Knoll). h81906 – Peter Behrens is responsible for the architecture and corporate identity of AEG. h18 Left: Willy Knoll (1878 – 1954). Right: Walter Knoll (1876 – 1971).   1907 In 1907, Wilhelm’s sons Willy and Walter take over their father’s business and start producing seating, beginning the Knoll family design dynasty. This year under Willy and Walter, the company introduces the first 'club armchair' to Germany. It was a revolution in the fashion of luxury furniture at the time, pushing the boundaries of traditional aesthetics and materials.         1907 – Wilhelm’s sons Willy and Walter introduce the first club armchair to Germany. 1907 – Wilhelm’s sons Willy and Walter introduce the first club armchair to Germany. Walter Gropius founds the Bauhaus in Weimar. 1919 - Walter Gropius founds the Bauhaus in Weimar.   1919  The hugely-significant Bauhaus Movement is born. Walter Gropius founds the Bauhaus in Weimar. “The psychology of seating”: the lightweight Prodomo armchairs perfectly reflect the spirit of the times of the twenties. 1920s – “The psychology of seating”: the lightweight Prodomo armchairs perfectly reflect the spirit of the times of the twenties.   1925 – 1929 Advocating modernity and leveraging of Germany's growing influence in design around the world, the urbane gentleman Walter Knoll, founds his own company at the age of 50: Walter Knoll & Co. GmbH. 1925-1929 – The “Prodomo“ models developed by Walter Knoll are seen as the first modern upholstered furniture in history 1925-1929 – The “Prodomo“ models developed by Walter Knoll are seen as the first modern upholstered furniture in history.   1927 – The exhibition "Die Wohnung“ (The Apartment) under the direction of Mies van der Rohe (pictured) at the Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart sets standards for modern building and living all over the world. 1927 – The exhibition "Die Wohnung“ (The Apartment) under the direction of Mies van der Rohe (pictured) at the Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart sets standards for modern building and living all over the world.   1938 Being equipped with the knowledge of the Bauhaus movement and the abilities of his family, Walter Knoll´s son, , goes to the U.S. in 1938 – originally to sell the products of his father. However, fate intervenes where he meets the architects of modernity and opens his own business in 1939. Stuttgart - centre of the avant-garde: Oskar Schlemmer and his "Triadic Ballet“. 1938 – Stuttgart - centre of the avant-garde: Oskar Schlemmer and his "Triadic Ballet“.   1939 The start of the Second World War. The German design economy has to take second place to the war effort, and as a result, the expansion at Walter and Wilhelm Knoll comes to a standstill. Production has to concentrate on manufacturing articles important for the war. 1942 As the WWII escalates, serious bomb damage causes the Walter Knoll production to be closed. 1945 End of the war. The company faces a new start. 1946 Robert Knoll becomes a partner at Walter Knoll. 1947 While Germany is still accustomed to more traditional furnishings after 1945, Walter Knoll is presenting a modern way of life to shape the future of Germany's design economy after the war. Hans Knoll supports his father in this time of reconstruction with the “Vostra“ model. 1948 IBM makes the first mainframe computer. This of course has huge implications on the design world. Traditional handmade craftsmanship is challenged by digital technology. The bucket seat 369 at the Hilton Hotel in Berlin – still one of today‘s modern classics. The bucket seat 369 at the Hilton Hotel in Berlin – still one of today‘s modern classics.   1949  Founding of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). Konrad Adenauer becomes Chancellor. During this exciting polictical period in Germany, the upholstered version of the Vostra armchair perfectly reflects people’s attitudes in this time of awakening, and propels Walter Knoll to regain international recognition. h20   1950 The Furniture Fair in Cologne is the breakthrough for furniture by Wilhelm Knoll. Dieter Knoll takes over the running of the company Wilhelm Knoll after the death of his father, Willy. 1953 – Student hall of residence in Hamburg, with Vostra armchairs. 1953 – Student hall of residence in Hamburg, with Vostra armchairs.   1953  The establishing of the now famed HFG College of Design in Ulm and the national Foundation of the Design Council (Rat für Formgebung). 1956 - The Walter Knoll Votteler Chair 1956 - The Walter Knoll Votteler Chair   1957  Bundesrat (Upper House of Parliament) passes a bill on the equality of men and women. The impact of this political movement revolutionised design, widening the boundaries of what design and architecture could (and should) be. 1957 - Walter Knoll 357 Chair 1957 - Walter Knoll 357 Chair   1962 – Walter Knoll Haussmann Lounge 1962 – Walter Knoll Haussmann Lounge   1964 Walter Knoll retires. The company is handed over to Robert Knoll and Dr. Walter Combe. 1968 – Olympic Stadium in Munich designed by Frei Otto   1968  Frei Otto designs the tent-like roof construction for the Olympic Stadium in Munich. This is treated as an opportunity to further establish and showcase Germany's design culture, the centrepiece of which is the Olympic Stadium in Munich. h22   1969  The Moon landing; Neil Armstrong (USA) is the first man on the moon. This sends an inspiring message to rest of the world. 1975 – The furnishing of Berlin‘s Tegel Airport. The Berlin Chair is created for the airport‘s VIP lounge. 1975 – The furnishing of Berlin‘s Tegel Airport. The Berlin Chair is created for the airport‘s VIP lounge.   1970 The Contract division of Walter Knoll is established in the seventies. Elegant executive offices, comfortable swivel chairs, fine conference facilities, as well as elegant sofas for foyers and lobbies account for the success in furnishing business premises. Walter Knoll were pioneers in establishing design's role in the workplace. Berlin‘s Tegel Airport in 1975 Berlin‘s Tegel Airport in 1975   1975 – Walter Knoll Berlin Chair 1975 – Walter Knoll Berlin Chair   1972 – Walter Knoll Fabricius Chair 1972 – Walter Knoll Fabricius Chair   1975 The furnishing of Berlin‘s Tegel Airport is without doubt one of the highlights of the company‘s history. Together with architect Meinhard von Gerkan, the Berlin Chair is crafted exclusively for the airport‘s VIP lounge. 1982 Stephan Combe and Michael Knoll become Managing Director of Walter Knoll. 1983  The first commercial mobile phone is launched onto the market (Motorola), changing the way we do business and interact socially forever. 1985 Walter Knoll takes over the company Wilhelm Knoll and continues to sell the products as the “Wilhelm Knoll Collection”. 1993 The famous furnishing family Benz buys the Walter Knoll company. Markus Benz, the oldest son, has been running the business ever since with the experience of excellent upholstery craftsmanship and modern corporate culture. A significant moment for the brand. 1990  German reunification means a negotiated 35-hour week is introduced in Baden-Württemberg, changing the German economy – where all business', including Walter Knoll, were challenged to re-adapt and grow. 1993 Founding of the European Union (EU). The better connected Germany and by extension Walter Knoll, with their wider European neighbours, which had great influence on the brands output. 2003 The last Volkswagen Beetle is manufactured in Puebla/Mexico, and is seen as the loss of one of Germany's greatest design legacies. 2007 Walter Knoll Australia born, and Walter Knoll receives the Design Management Europe Award for their successful design management. 20047 - Steve Jobs introduces to world to the first iPhone. 2007  Apple introduces the first generation of the iPhone. And everything changes rapidly. The way people consumed design shifted tremendously, and Walter Knoll adapted their brand accordingly without compromising the philosophy of the brand. 2008  The crash of the American bank Lehman Brothers marks the beginning of the global financial and economic crisis. Design, particularly luxury design, takes a big hit. But Walter Knoll perseveres, reassessing what is most important to them. 2012 - Walter Knoll Mötzingen 2012 - Walter Knoll Mötzingen   2012 Inauguration of the new multifunctional building for assembly, production and logistics in Mötzingen.   2013 Famed multidisciplinary identity architects, the Ippolito Fleitz Group, join forces with Walter Knoll to evolve the physical experiences created by the brand in the Walter Knoll showrooms, display areas of their partnering distributors and global design event stands. h24 2014 – Walter Knoll interactive "The office in the jungle?" stand at Orgatec, Germany by the Ippolito Fleitz Group.  2015 Walter Knoll celebrates 150th anniversary! h31 wk_jaan_living_0037 Want to know more about what it takes for design to survive 150 years? Head to Walter Knoll Australia, available nationally.   abc
Architecture
Homes

High House: Fluid Design in Fitzroy

With the rise of apartment living and mass urbanisation in Australia’s capital cities, it’s hard to find the space to accommodate the grandiose homes that once were a part of the Australian dream. Dan Gayfer Design's High House is a renovated terrace that re-invents inner city terrace living, incorporating "a high level of functionality, flexibility, interaction and detail in a house with high ceilings, a high roofline and high levels of natural light." 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-2036-Hires-High-House The heart of the design centers around flexibility, and a need to accommodate a young family with a four-year old daughter, and an active social life. As such, the home is open-plan, with a width of five meters and a multitude of spaces to allow for both small and large gatherings. Notably, the house is filled with strategically placed skylights, windows, and doors to allow for optimal natural lighting to filter into the home, accompanying the unusually high ceilings on both the ground and first floor. 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1477-Hires-High-House Of the original terrace, only the original front two rooms were retained, and the ultimate design of the High House focused on the organic everyday movements of its residents. For Gayfer, the sumptuous fit and design out of the upstairs terrace and the outdoor courtyard, “facilitates the client’s tendency to lounge, dine, rest and entertain outdoors whenever possible,” making liberal use of marine grade custom upholstery and custom seating. 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-0798-Hires-High-House One of the most striking features of the house is a playful use of pastel tiling both within the bathroom, and outside, with soft pink tiles lining the upstairs terrace, and a light grey for the kitchen splashback and island. The bathrooms are tiled in muted baby pink and sky blue respectively, contrasted with timber, white porcelain, and black fixtures, giving the spaces a warm and contemporary feel. The advantage of having the client’s family member as a tiler facilitated this, as well as the unconventional tiling of seats, benches, balustrades, and remarkably, the entire façade of the rear of the house itself. 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1391-Hires-High-House Significant emphasis was placed upon encouraging interaction, between small and large groups of occupants, in all living spaces,” continues Gayfer. The sliding doors are easily moved boundaries to expand space as needed between the indoors and out, and each design feature of the home from ledges to steps, to built-in furniture and benches, “are all purposefully located to facilitate and promote conversation and activity between occupants.” Dan Gayfer Design dangayfer.com Photography by Dean Bradley. 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1448-Hires-High-House 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1991-Hires-High-House 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1956-1-Hires-High-House 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1373-Hires-High-House 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1247-Hires-High-House 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1083-Hires-High-House 20160229-DGD-HIGHHOUSE-1777-Hires-High-House Dan Gayfer - High House | Habitus Livingabc