About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
What's On

Make it late – Melbourne Indesign’s Friday Up Late

Everyone loves a design event, but inevitably there’s work the next day. What if we removed all the work and left only the fun? It’s your date after-dark with the city’s best in design. And it promises to be a night of pure, unbridled  design awesomeness! Melbourne Indesign is excited to present Up Late Indesign, an exclusive Friday evening ‘bar hop’ between five of the city’s top design retailers. And, to up the ante, we’ve thrown in a few of our favourite cultural and fashion brands as well. Teaming up with COS, District, Euroluce, Hub Furniture, NGV, Zenith and Zip, Melbourne Indesign brings the CBD alive with a series of exclusive one-night-only experiences that will set you up for a weekend of design festivities. The evening’s events start with product launch parties, extend to drinks with top international and local design identities, and even include exclusive designer dinners. Teaming up with NGV, Melbourne Indesign also offers Friday nighters a rare first-look at the NGV’s Glenn Murcutt, Architecture of Faith exhibition, pre-opening. Curators Ewan Mceoin and Simone LeAmon (also a Melbourne Indesign Ambassador) will personally walk you through this exciting exploration of Murcutt’s Australian Islamic Centre project at Hobsons Bay, Melbourne. All in all, it’s sizing up to be a pretty hot date-night with design. And, if you stay out just a little too late, not to worry, Melbourne Indesign will be ready and waiting with coffee carts and design love on Saturday. Not even a slight hangover will keep you away from the pure design heaven of Richmond and Collingwood precincts on Saturday 13 August. Want to know more? Register for updates and we’ll also set you up with your attendance at the same time. Click here to register. Melbourne Indesign melbourneindesign.com.auabc
Happenings
What's On

Fugitive Structures at the Sherman Gallery

Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation’s (SCAF) Fugitive Structures is in its fourth and final iteration – final at least within the original framework of the program. Titled Green Ladder, and designed by Vo Trong Nghia of Vietnam based Vo Trong Nghia Architects (VTNA), the temporary installation has been crafted by binding simple bamboo ladders together to form a multi-tiered structure. The choice of bamboo — the world’s fastest growing plant that is sustainable, lightweight and low maintenance — is a material perfectly aligned with VTNA’s passion for truly green architecture. The vision and brief for Fugitive Structures involved an intimate, functional pavilion, to be designed by emerging architects from Australia, the Asia Paciic Region, or the Middle East.  A heightened visitor experience was sought, as was an original architectural vocabulary and experimental methodologies. SCAF_FugitiveStructures2016_VoTrongNghia_000001 Indeed for SCAF founder and executive director, Dr. Gene Sherman, experimental architecture is typically difficult to conceive. “Experimentation, whether in art, design, fashion or film – all of which falls under the remit of SCAF– requires the capacity to accept the metaphorical highways and byways of learning by trial and error,” she says. “Architectural experimentation and innovation are clearly no different: successful research and development stages might ultimately produce unpredictable outcomes; during the implementation phase, highly logical and carefully thought-through decisions can often be disrupted by unexpected obstacles. In staging these experimental structures various problems have arisen. Many have been surprisingly easy to solve; others, more complex. And yet for all its challenges, the Fugitive Structures series has been hugely satisfying. The first Fugitive Structures pavilion, Andrew Burns’ Crescent House (2013), quietly achieved many of Fugitive Structure’s goals. The following year, Robert Beson and Gabriele Ulacco of AR-MA took experimentation further with Trifolium (2014). Most recently, Sack and Reicher + Muller with Eyal Zur (SRMZ) created the most fugitive and ephemeral of the pavilions, Sway (2015), which extended across SCAF’s courtyard garden, and was the most expansive, occupying the greatest number of square metres. SCAF_FugitiveStructures2016_VoTrongNghia_006271 “It seemed to me from this single image and brief description that Vo Trong Nghia’s work focused on architecture in relation to society rather than on buildings designed to dazzle and impress. The more I discovered about Vo Trong Nghia, the more I understood that his practice aims to return nature to the urban environment, which he achieves via built structures that determinedly ‘green’ cities with multiple vertical and horizontal roof gardens,” Dr. Sherman continues. “The concepts of architecture as design, architecture as aesthetic endeavour, and architecture as form following function combine in Vo’s work to create architecture with a social agenda – his buildings connect communities at the most fundamental level.” Green Ladder is on display at Sherman Galleries in Sydney until 10 December 2016.  Vo Trong Nghia Architects votrongnghia.com Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation
 sherman-scaf.org.au Photography by Brett Boardman. Vo Trong Nghia | Habitus LivingVo Trong Nghia, Architect at Vo Trong Nghia Architects SCAF_FugitiveStructures2016_VoTrongNghia_006365 SCAF_FugitiveStructures2016_VoTrongNghia_006538 SCAF_FugitiveStructures2016_VoTrongNghia_007273 SCAF_FugitiveStructures2016_VoTrongNghia_006870abc
Design Hunters

Alex Buckman: Behind the Arbor Planter

New Zealand designer Alex Buckman is the clever mind behind the Arbor Planter, a new functional and minimalist range of planters that would look right at home in a myriad of indoor and outdoor spaces. Alex’s drive to create functional objects is what inspired him to design the planter, and his surrounds are what influenced the first product release in the Arbor series under his namesake practice, Alex Buckman Studio. After studying a Masters in industrial design at Victoria University in Wellington, Alex began working at Weta Workshop in their 3D modelling team but soon realised his true passion for design lay elsewhere. “I missed designing objects for the real world that people could appreciate, value and use everyday,” he explains. “I have always been interested in the emotive qualities of objects. How a beautiful light, chair, table – or a planter – can completely change the feeling of a space and create an emotional response. Walking into a room with selectively chosen, well-designed objects genuinely makes me feel inspired and energised, so I decided to start my own studio where this was possible.” Alex Buckman - Arbor Planter | Habitus Living The first product within the Arbor series, the Arbor Planter is stripped back to only the necessary components. Alex believes there is an honesty in the object that can be easily understood and observed, and this allows the plant to be the main focal point. “The Arbor planter is the stage and the plant is the performer,” he says. “They complement each other.” This design principle underpins Alex’s work, and is the common factor in his creative output. “It’s important that details in my designs have intent and reason that is clearly understood. I try to keep that consistent throughout the objects I design,” he shares. “This has huge influence in the type of materials I use. They are clean, concise, reliable and durable, while still having diversity in form and textural finish and quality.” Alex Buckman - Arbor Planter | Habitus Living Using a quick and iterative design process, the Arbor Planter was the result of an agile design method where Alex drew on tools including CAD and highly precise CNC manufacturing. Trailing many different versions and evolving designs quickly was at the core of Alex’s process, where physical prototypes were produced to identify small changes that were not conceivable in CAD. The planters were then assembled and finished by hand in his studio. “This transition from the digital machine to the human hand is very important,” explains Alex. “I think it’s essential for physical human interaction to exist in all products at some level, especially when those people value, admire and respect the product.” For the majority of designers their surrounds are what inform their work, and for Alex it’s no different. His desire to communicate through his work is equally weighted. “A lot of the work I’ve done takes on forms found in nature. I think humans are instinctively attracted to forms and patterns found in nature, which trigger innate responses in us,” he says. “I also want the objects I design to influence other people in a positive way, and for them to share the value and emotional response I have for our products.” Alex Buckman - Arbor Planter | Habitus Living Alex’s values and ethics are deep rooted in his design ethos, where his responsibility as a designer is “to bring as little ‘junk’ into the world as possible”. He believes this starts with using sustainable, renewable and recyclable materials, but it is equally important to Alex to design objects that a person will value. “I believe the way to do this is create objects that are beautifully made with high quality materials that evoke an emotional response. These are objects you can keep and cherish forever. Not just chucked out after a year or two. Alex chose to release the Arbor Planter as the first product in the series, because of the ability plants have to transform interior spaces, not to mention the wonderful benefits to our health and wellbeing. “For the vast majority of human history we have lived outdoors, therefore we are biologically hardwired to enjoy things that come from nature and nature-inspired forms,” Alex explains. “It’s nice to think you’re designing an object that is proven to have positive psychological effects. My house is full of plants and it is a wonderful place to inhabit because of that.” The Arbor Planter is available in black, white and pistachio as well as custom powder coated colours. Alex Buckman Studio alexbuckman.com Alex Buckman - Arbor Planter | Habitus Living Alex Buckman - Arbor Planter | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

When Architects Design Homes for Themselves

Skyline Drive was designed by seasoned architect and director of FGR Architects, Feras Raffoul, as a home for himself in the bustling north-west suburb of Maribyrnong. The imposing structure combines a brutalist and minimalist design philosophy; with an eye towards how the concrete and glass would develop their patinas over time. What resulted is a spacious three-storey home with a focus on the idea that ‘less is more,’ when it comes to luxury. “As an architect, designing my first home was an opportunity to express my ideas in full without receiving constraints from others, with the brief of designing and building a home with a maximum appeal and being as cost effective as possible,” comments Raffoul. In his day-to-day work, Raffoul works to briefs that might not provide a flexible amount of space to work with. Designing for himself was a unique experience, by contrast. Skyline Drive | Habitus Living Allowing his more experimental side to come out, Raffoul designed the house in an inverse manner, with the communal living room and kitchen spaces, and even the swimming pool, occupying the top tier of the home. The bottom floors are reserved for bedrooms and service spaces. Glass plays a prominent role on the top floor, allowing natural sunlight to seep into the living areas, and providing magnificent views of Melbourne’s skyline from both living areas and the pool. “Less is more. This is a home that strips everything back to its bare form, and embraces the items within the dwelling; such as furniture, fixtures, and fittings,” adds Raffoul. This stripped-back approach is embodied by Raffoul’s decision to, “remove items typically within buildings such as plaster, timber flooring, painting, skirting, architraves, timber doors, plaster ceilings, carpet, tiling; items that people traditionally feel are the staple items of interior design.” Skyline Drive | Habitus Living The liberal use of concrete and glass meant Raffoul could limit the number of craftsmen and specialists involved in the construction process of Skyline Drive. However, he notes that concrete can often be an unforgiving material to work with, stating that: “The main challenges lied in concealing hydraulic, mechanical and electric services within the structure and being certain that you are comfortable with all the decisions made, as they cannot be easily undone. Controlling the finish of the concrete and ensuring perfect joins between the glass and concrete was crucial.” The idea of modernity permeates the design of the building, embodying Raffoul’s belief that luxury living in architecture is achieved with, “modern lines combined with classical material, like stone, timber, or leather, and allowing the new to embrace the old. That is, the modern shell embraces the classical furnishings.” Skyline Drive | Habitus Living These classical furnishings are made most evident in the simplicity of the bedrooms and bathrooms. Elegant pendant lights hang from the ceiling, providing little notes of glass detailing reflect against the concrete walls. In the bathroom, the luxurious Fantini Acquatonica built-in shower panel with chrome finish beautifully contrasts the glass and cement. Raffoul worked closely with Rogerseller to choose which fixtures would work most seamlessly with Skyline Drive. For Raffoul, “simplicity is key; letting the fixture items be the showpiece. For instance; the custom stone washplane basins in the bathrooms complement the Milano Fantini mixers. Both have very strong shapes, with simple, elegant but solid forms complimenting one another, with the rest of the bathroom being the supportive palette.” Skyline Drive is a contemporary blend of concrete aesthetics with a pared back, and luxurious minimalism. In contrast to the heavy concrete structure, the liberal use of glass, small detailing and luxurious fixtures culminate in a spacious home built for an architect, by an architect. Photography by Peter Bennetts Photography. FGR Architects fgrarchitects.com.au Rogerseller rogerseller.com.au Skyline Drive | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Introducing the Phoenix Contemporary Finishes Collection

In recent years, there’s been an increasing demand for a wider variety and selection of finishes in the tapware world, so as to better suit the current interior design trend for mixed metals. Phoenix Tapware has answered this call with their new Contemporary Finishes Collection, which showcases a range of mixers, showers and accessories in a variety of finishes including Chrome, Matte Black, Brushed Nickel and Gun Metal. The Brushed Nickel and Gun Metal are exciting new additions to the Phoenix range, which compliment Chrome and Matte Black finishes and really open up the discerning buyers options to a world of exciting statement tapware pieces. Bathroom---Vivid-Twin-Shower-MB Chrome, the most versatile of tapware finishes, can be matched with many interior design schemes, and the stylish look of Matte Black tapware can be paired with minimalist environments and Bauhaus black and white designs. The Brushed Nickel finish is characterised by its warm, soft metallic appearance and brushed lines on its surface, and is a more toned down look that pairs well with white, as well as light coloured granite or marble. The softer, matte finish of Gun Metal will lend a sophisticated look to the room and complements white or grey tones. Neutral colours, timber or even brick can be used to warm up the look. Phoenix Tapware phoenixtapware.com.au Bathroom---Vivid-Twin-Shower-CHR VS790-GM-4 VS770-MB-Vivid-Slimline-Basin-Mixer VS770-GM-Vivid-Slimline-Basin-Mixer VS770-CHR-Vivid-Slimline-Basin-Mixer VS770-BN-Vivid-Slimline-Basin-Mixer  abc
Architecture
Homes

A High-End Contemporary Beach Shack

Interior designer Brett Mickan with project manager Nick English of Brett Mickan Interior Design (BMID) have turned their talented hands to a contemporary house in Clovelly, Sydney, creating a home that is luxurious and sophisticated, yet casual and relaxed. “I believe that making your home a calm and inviting space helps you de-stress from a hectic world,” says Mickan and it’s clearly evident in this three-storey house, home to a family of seven. “My goal is to meld the architecture, the location and the inhabitants to create a space that seamlessly belongs and talks about the people who live there,” he says. Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living On the first floor, a large open-plan living, dining and kitchen area extends onto an ocean-facing terrace, while a more formal living and dining room at the rear of the house backs onto a terrace, garden and fire-pit. Mickan appropriately took his colour cues from the landscape to create seamless visual movement from inside to outside. “We wanted to focus on the view,” say the homeowners, “so the house feels like an extension of what you are seeing outside with pared down colours.” Mickan also used natural materials such as oak, linen, leather and wool to soften the modern architectural lines and create a link to the landscape beyond. The result is a bright, casual and relaxed front living space for day-to-day living; and a back living space with a deeper palette and more sophisticated design sense for evening television and more formal entertaining. Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living Furniture, rugs, lighting and colour ground spaces, designate areas, and create a sense of intimacy throughout the home. Rugs offer a subtle change in texture and pendant lights—hand-blown glass in the formal dining area and open-weave rattan in the family dining area—“allow a statement without visual noise,” Mickan says. He sourced all the furniture, fixtures and finishes, and had the two dining tables and master bed frame custom made by local carpenter James Nixon using reclaimed timber. Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living An eclectic array of seating in the front room speaks to the relaxed nature of the house, the homeowners and the surroundings “I like a space to feel as if the client has collected the pieces and, somehow, they all just work together,” says Mickan. “Mixing styles, especially with vintage, helps the interior to create its own story rather than just being another contemporary home.” As Philippe Starck’s Mademoiselle chairs sit comfortably beside vintage willow-back armchairs and Porta Venezia barstools, the homeowners praise the designers: “They know how to combine bold and brave with traditional and old-fashioned all in one space; and with colour.” Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living Mickan also sourced the art to introduce colour that complemented the interior while representing the client’s story and interests. “The clients love the ocean,” he explains. “I also like the use of landscapes, especially abstract landscapes, to create a sense of view and depth.” And certainly, having moved to the area to be close to the beach and the outdoors, the family spend a lot of their waking time enjoying the “easy living” of the house. “It’s liveable but beautiful. It feels like a beach holiday house, but a grown up version.” Brett Mickan Interior Design www.bmid.com.au Photography: Thomas Dalhoff Architect: Tesselatte Architects Initial design: Alec Tzannes Builder: OneUp Building Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Where’s the Midpoint Between Contemporary and Classic?

The clients of the project were looking to explore contemporary design in a traditional context, allowing for new additions to juxtapose yet meld with the original weatherboard cottage The additions to the space intended to maximise the solar-passive performance of the house, as well as create a large host kitchen in the heart of the home and enable allow a new living and dining area for entertaining. These additions stand with a new sunken media room and guest accommodation space. These new additions were detailed to eliminate thermal bridging and create a modern, well-insulated space within the context of a traditional cottage. Designed to capture the sunlight in winter and prevent it from heating up the spaces in summer, the tziallas omeara design of the Bundaroo House walks a fine lie between modernism and classical design. The clients were passionate about the details of their house, and ensuring that the final build was both beautiful and energy efficient was at the fore of their minds. The final build is one they will no doubt cherish for years to come. tziallas omeara toas.com.au Photography: Tom Ferguson 1601 1603 1613 1615 1621 1629 Bundaroo | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters

Ivy Muse: Elegant Greenery

The brainchild of longtime friends Jacqui Vidal and Alana Langan, Ivy Muse is a design studio that produces retro-inspired plant stands and botanical wares. They are both self-taught designers, and regularly work with local Melbourne creatives and craftspeople to bring their products to life. Designing pieces they genuinely would love to own themselves is at the core of their creative output, “with an overarching mission to produce beautiful, functional pieces that really strive to encourage creativity with greenery”. Jacqui and Alana launched Ivy Muse in 2014. At the time Jacqui was living in an apartment with no outside space and Alana was in a rental, so they were both keen on the idea of getting creative and bringing greenery indoors. “When we came up with the idea for Ivy Muse a couple of years ago, it just clicked for both of us,” Alana shares. “We both also run our own separate businesses and had always been keen to collaborate together in some way.” (Alana runs her own online store Hunt and Bow, while Jacqui runs her own business Signed and Numbered.) Ivy Muse | Habitus Living Alana and Jacqui have drawn inspiration from the way people live and interact with plants in their homes to create their latest collection ‘Homebody’. “We wanted to encourage people to make the most of greenifying the space they have at home, whether big or small,” shares Alana. “‘​Homebody’ is about bringing a fresh perspective to the way we engage with plants and really showcasing them within the home.” ‘Homebody’ features seven Melbourne ­designed and made products. Three brand new plant stands can be found in the range, which are all available in black and white and a limited edition feature colour; glacier, nude and pewter. ‘Cubby’ offers the most flexibility, where it can be transformed into a stackable plant stand with the addition of leather straps – the result of a collaboration with Melbourne leather craftsmen, ​Wootten. This collection also sees the release of a brand new leather and powder­coated steel plant hanger ‘Saturn’, which Wooten also helped bring to life. Ivy Muse | Habitus Living The industrious pair have a clear love and passion for design and greenery in the home, and at the rate they’re working it seems there is no slowing down. Referring to their influences when conceiving a new range, Jacqui and Alana say it always varies depending on the what’s inspiring them at the time. “We usually get an idea for a collection out of the blue – we’ve already conceived our next two!” beams Alana. “From there we design products that fulfil that concept.” Alana and Jacqui also design with flexibility in mind. “Ivy Muse is all about encouraging creativity with greenery so every product can be used in multiple ways,” Alana explains. “We want our customers to know they’re getting a piece that can be treasured for years to come, and without the worry of getting bored with it.” Ivy Muse | Habitus Living Both agree that plant life is an important part of the home, pointing to the enhancements a plant can make in interior design and the health benefits that many often overlook. “Apart from the obvious fact that greenery is beautiful, adding plants to our living spaces can, and does, dramatically improve the look and feel of a home on so many levels,” Alana enthuses. “Plants can soften minimal spaces, add warmth and life, whilst also having the ability to draw attention away from unsightly aspects we’d rather hide. Not only that but studies have shown plants can offer us many benefits, including cleaner air and decreased stress levels, plus they can also help boost our creativity and memory retention. There’s really no down­side to them!” Ivy Muse Ivymuse.com.au Ivy Muse | Habitus Living   Ivy Muse | Habitus Living Ivy Muse | Habitus Living Ivy Muse | Habitus Living Ivy Muse | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Places

Café Melba: A Singapore Café with Melbourne Flair

Australian designer Emma Maxwell – who is known for her restaurant projects – hopes that when people enter the spaces she has designed, they will feel as if they have stepped into another world, departing temporarily from life’s daily grind. She says that she often imagines herself “taking the guest by the hand, leading them through the space and telling them a story.”

This modus operandi is evident in the recently opened Café Melba located at Mediapolis@one-north. This is the second outpost of the restaurant that serves Melbourne- and Asia-inspired cuisine. Maxwell, originally from Melbourne, has designed the space as a calm and comfortable escape in the heart of a business park, which is ideal for casual meetings or for unwinding after a long day at work.

Café Melba | Habitus Living

I love using strong and bold patterns within a material context,” Maxwell tells us. At Café Melba, furniture and interior features with soft, feminine curves create an inclusive and welcoming atmosphere, while bold patterns create space accents that are carefully balanced. The site overlooks a verdant green environment, which backdrops a series of booth seating.

“The colour scheme used within the space is very much a painterly and landscape driven response,” says Emma who took cues from the Australian landscape to create the interior palette. For instance, the soft moss green on the upholstery was inspired by foliage in the Dandenong Ranges outside of Melbourne, while the grey and pink wall tiles reflect the colour of the rock formations in the ranges.

Café Melba | Habitus Living

Maxwell also gave attention to enhancing intangible experiences. One of the challenges faced was that the 335 square-metre site had sharp and echoing acoustics. “A key objective is to focus all customer senses [on] their immediate table space and [on] each other to have a conversation and to hear each other,” she says. An even sound environment was cleverly created through custom-built ceiling panels made of recycled composite metal. They curve at a specific 30-degree angle to ensure that sound is filtered and refracted accordingly, while reflecting and shifting light throughout the space. This feature was inspired by Louis Poulsen’s iconic PH Artichoke lamp.

The space was also designed to be able to assemble or disassemble easily, in light of potential events that require more than 100 people to be comfortable within the space. “The layout had to be clear with a sense of community and dynamism. It still needed to feel light and open with a feeling of casual conviviality,” Maxwell explains.

Café Melba | Habitus Living

All furniture and lighting pieces were designed specifically for Melba by Maxwell – an approach she undertakes for all her projects. “Any chef worth their weight will not use a pre-mixed sauce from a tin, they will make their own stock and craft that sauce for the dish. While the sauce is unique to the restaurant, so are the interiors,” she explains.

Solid old growth oak tables and hand-crafted chairs were upholstered in recycled wool, one of Maxwell’s favourite features. The Kirkby Design fabric is made using salvaged yarns from the fashion industry and has limited impact on the environment. Maxwell also collaborated with Melbourne-based artist Geoffrey Nees to create art pieces for the space.

Emma Maxwell emmamaxwelldesign.com

Photography by Brett Boardman.

Café Melba | Habitus Living

Café Melba | Habitus Living

Café Melba | Habitus Living

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Architecture
Around The World
Places

Singapore’s Noshery by Nosh

Finding a lush and quiet spot to relax and dine in a bustling city like Singapore can be quite a feat, but Noshery, the latest brainchild by Nosh, aims to offer that very experience. Noshery is set in the quiet Rochester Park enclave and is located on the ground floor of Nosh’s black-and-white colonial bungalow. The interiors have been designed by The Strangely Good to be warm, inviting and homely, with familiar local references and inspiration from all over the world. Noshery Space | Habitus Living The walls are covered in striking botanical print wallpaper that was originally created by decorator Don Loper for the Beverly Hills Hotel in 1942. Michelle Lin from The Strangely Good describes it as “a Californian classic” that serves to “bring the lush greenery of Rochester into the space.” The dining space is eclectic, with rattan chairs that are meant to recall “a Balinese holiday”, French country bistro chairs, and tables with marble tops. The heavy use of wood is designed to create an atmosphere of “a rustic travel lodge set in the wilderness”, while dinner plates have been sourced from Chinatown and are similar to ones that one would find in a traditional Singaporean coffeeshop. Noshery Space | Habitus Living At the heart of Noshery lies a large communal table with a planter running down its middle – drawing yet more of the surrounding greenery into the space. “Noshery is all about bringing people together,” Lin explains, adding that the table was made out of recycled wood by an English carpenter. The hanging lampshades above the table are vintage industrial lamps that have been sourced from Germany and the Czech Republic. Knickknacks from all over the world have been artfully placed in all corners, like the way one would decorate one’s home. Some also belong to the owners. Nosh Founder Ravin Bajwa shares, “Some are heirlooms and hand-me-downs… The typewriter belongs to my father, and yes, it still works!” Noshery Space | Habitus Living Lin explains that the design team did not merely want to decorate the space, but to also “introduce culture, history, and stories” with each and every object chosen for the space. “We got vintage Twinning tins for planters and a delightful series of vintage Encyclopedia called The Observer Books from the UK. Such little touches can be seen throughout Noshery,” she says. “Even though The Strangely Good had a modest portfolio when it came to F&B projects, we felt that they could offer something different – something quirky, out of the box, and certainly original,” says Bajwa. Noshery offers all-day dining and weekend brunch. It also has a small outdoor patio and beer garden that opens up in the evenings. Aside from Noshery, guests can head to Nosh, an indoor/outdoor restaurant with a bar located on the second level. Nosh nosh.com.sg The Strangely Good thestrangelygood.com Noshery Space | Habitus Living Noshery Space | Habitus Living Noshery Space | Habitus Living Noshery Space | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

What is Australian Architectural Identity?

So much of Australia’s architectural identity is tied up in the suburbs – fortunately or unfortunately? Most publicised and awarded residences are located in the cities, inner-city suburbs, along the coast, or in romantic regional locations. But what about the space that’s in between?

There is a cultural cringe around the architecture – or lack thereof – in the suburban sprawl, where a high quota of the population resides. But it wasn’t always like this. Growing up in 1970s Melbourne, comedian and architecture aficionado Tim Ross has fond memories of riding his bicycle through the neighbourhoods of project homes designed by Pettit + Sevitt.

Invisible House | Habitus Living

So where has it gone wrong? And how can it be addressed? Along with Tim Ross, Paul Roser of the National Trust Victoria and Shelley Penn of City Design Melbourne, will together explore what Australia’s design heritage is, how it should be protected, and what needs to change, at Melbourne Indesign as part of the LiveLife Discussions.

There may be ways in which the suburbs – with their characteristic brick veneer – can be thought of fondly, rather than with a cringe. And in this discussion, we set out to find it. A Q&A session will follow the discussion so there will be an opportunity to voice your burning questions around the topic then.

Melbourne Indesign Live Life Discussions Heritage and Australian Identity indesigntheevent.com

Invisible House | Habitus Living

Photographed home is Peter Stutchbury Architecture's Invisible House. Photography by Michael Nicholson. Read more about the Australian home here.

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Design Hunters

Hay and Melbourne Indesign Partner Up

The Melbourne Indesign partnership comes following the brand’s recent Sydney expansion. The first of its kind, the Australian HAY store is spread over two floors, and is managed and operated by Cult Design. “From the beginning [Cult founder] Richard Munao has been a strong supporter and an important part of HAY before anyone else. The opening of HAY in Sydney is the culmination of 12 years with a great partner we are extremely grateful to work with”, co-founder of Mette HAY, comments. From grass-root beginnings in Chippendale, Cult was the natural choice for managing the Danish brand in Sydney, “I was immediately impressed with their designs and use of bright colour, which had a real point of difference from other contemporary Danish brands,” says Richard “At Cult Design we are very proud to have partnered with HAY since then and been part of their journey to becoming one of the most beloved design brands today” Collaboration and partnerships are at the heart of great design, and we couldn’t be more pleased to partner up for HAY for Melbourne Indesign 2016. Melbourne Indesign indesigntheevent.com/melbourne Hay hay.dkabc