About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

What does the Next Generation of Showering Look Like?

The Aurajet represents the next generation in shower design, already having received twelve design awards, from the Australia Good Design Award, the German Design Award the Red Dot Design Award and more. The challenge in the Australian shower and tapware industry is to create a shower that balances water saving without compromising the showering experience. Aurajet delivers this balance by achieving with a pinnacle level of shower enjoyment, while still maintaining a three Star WELS rating at a peak flow rate of nine litres per minute. Continuing with the design company’s ethos of creating amazing water experiences that don’t cost the earth, Methven has designed a unique halo shaped showerhead with hidden nozzles that generate individual jets of water that collide against precisely-angled surfaces, creating a visually arresting fan of droplets. This precision engineering delivers up to 20 per cent more total spray force and two times the water coverage on the skin compared to conventional showers, leading to a more invigorating and luxurious showering experience. Aurajet technology has been integrated into the Reece distributed Aio shower collection. Incorporating high-end aesthetics and materials, Aio uses intriguing contours and a modern minimalist composition throughout the range. Methven methven.com H&IMainBthrm-#27-8bit_With-Credit Methven-Aio-Shower-Overhead-Drencher-Chrome-Spray Methven-Aio-Shower-Overhead-Drencher-White-Insitu Methven-Aio-Shower-System-White-Drencher-Spray Methven-Aio-Shower-System-White-Insitu Methven_AioAurajet_Shower_Black Methven-Aio-Shower-Spray-Horizontalabc
Architecture
Homes

The Great Wall of WA

Winning awards for residential architecture is hardly anything new for Luigi Rosselli Architects. The Sydney-based practice recently received one of its most prestigious commendations when The Great Wall of WA won the Collective Housing category in the UNESCO-endorsed TERRA Award. Winners were selected across ten categories by a ten-person jury chaired by architect Wang Shu, in what is the first international prize for contemporary earthern architecture. The Great Wall of WA breaks from Luigi Rosselli Architects’ usual aesthetic, yet undisputedly possesses the practice’s characteristically refined high-end styling. Compromising a 230-metre-long rammed earth wall (the longest in Australia), The Great Wall of WA encloses a line of 12 earth-covered residences. Built into a sand dune, these apartment-type dwellings with shared kitchen facilities, provide short-term accommodation for a cattle station in the Pilbara region during mustering season. The Great Wall of WA - Luigi Rosselli Architects | Habitus Living According to the practice’s founder and principal Luigi Rosselli, the accommodations’ design represents a new approach to remote North Western Australia architecture; one that’s increasingly moving away from sun-baked, thin corrugated metal shelters, to naturally cooled architecture earth formations. And indeed, it is the wall’s 450mm-thick rammed earth facade in a distinct sawtooth formation that lends the ambitious project its most compelling expression. A robust material palette ensures the residences are maintenance free and energy efficient, with sandy clay, gravel and bore water sourced from the site of the wall’s construction. By burying each dwelling and minimising external walls, the interiors are kept cool enough to eliminate a need for air conditioning. Water also evaporates out of the clay to lower internal temperatures for the musterers’ respite. The Great Wall of WA - Luigi Rosselli Architects | Habitus Living While the sand dune forms the roof, each dwelling features a Corten awning that provides plentiful shade from the harsh sun. It’s a well-considered material selection that displays a patina sympathetic to its natural surrounds. The awning also mirrors the entrance’s concrete slab, which contains gravel from the local river, lending it a rusted orange hue. Modest screens separate the 12 dwellings and landscaping ensures each one has its own ‘back yard’, imbuing the project with a sense of familiarity and home. Rosselli also clad the chapel on the sand dune’s apex in Corten, which complements the gold anodised aluminium on its interior walls. The new circular structure features a glass-covered oculus and is used by the cattle station community for meetings and as a place of meditative retreat. While its sliding full-length windows are often open, they serve to protect the pavilion from the area’s frequent dust storms when closed. The Great Wall of WA - Luigi Rosselli Architects | Habitus Living The scheme’s amber tones contrast with the interior of each dwelling, which was designed by interior designer and architect Sarah Foletta. Natural, muted colours define her clean, minimalist arrangement and while this too is robust, in keeping with the exterior, it’s also incredibly sophisticated. The Great Wall of WA not only appeals for its resoundingly successful environmental response, but for the unexpectedly stylish execution of a resilient design in an uncompromising context. Luigi Rosselli Architects luigirosselli.com The Great Wall of WA - Luigi Rosselli Architects | Habitus Living The Great Wall of WA - Luigi Rosselli Architects | Habitus Livingabc
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Fixed & Fitted

Haiku Home, a New Residential Division from Big Ass Fans

Haiku Home products boast multiple finish options and sophisticated design to help users bring cutting-edge technology and convenience into their homes without sacrificing style. Each product can operate automatically and efficiently on its own or be grouped with other devices for a fully responsive home. The Haiku Home portfolio builds on the already award-winning design of the original Haiku fan, now modelled to retail for a fraction of the price. Coming soon is the sleek, intuitive Haiku Light fixture as well as the Luxe Series, which includes half a dozen luxury metal finishes including brushed copper, brushed gold, brushed aluminium, satin nickel and oil-rubbed bronze. There is now a Haiku product to fit every homeowner’s personal style and budget. Built in technology, including temperature, humidity, light and occupancy sensors, allows Haiku products to adjust fan speed and light levels automatically for maximum comfort and energy savings with little to no interaction. “Homeowners have plenty to worry about each day,” said Brian Smith, director of Big Ass Fans Australia. “Our purpose is to create products that not only add to the aesthetic of your home, but also react to your needs and preferences in a way that takes some of the work out of your hands. Ultimately, we’re helping to build a better home.” Haiku Home haikuhome.com.au 19159917_44954 19159919_haiku52_caramel_standard_black_sensemeabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Furniture

Is Investing in Classic Design the Answer to Throwaway Culture?

The axiom of quality having an inverse relationship to price is something with which we all grew up. There was a time where, it appears, we believed it too. Unfortunately it seems that time ended a while ago – and nobody apparently noticed. Annually, billions of dollars are being spent on design products that are used, today, and in landfill, tomorrow. These disposable design svengalis are unconcerned with inventory; directing, instead, their effort to manufacture that is instant, large-scale, and absorbed by expressing ephemeral trends. By all accounts, we have become a generation hardwired to consume and dispose at an alarmingly high rate of turnover. The psychology of push-to-posh – the aspiration of high-end branding and design without the quality-assurance or price tag – has lead many in Australia’s design community to ‘work back’ from this unhealthy and unsustainable consumer development, to offer design pieces that are proofed against the future. Classic, timeless, resilient design has never been more necessary. At the forefront of this reactionary movement to supply design that will last but not age is Walter Knoll – one of the leading international manufacturers of fine upholstered furniture and office facilities. Celebrating their sesquicentenary this year, the brand is renowned for their unflagging commitment to raising the design bar higher and higher for leading-edge products for which icon-status is an inevitability. Now 150 years older – and definitely 150 years wiser – there are a few lessons to rediscover as we look back over the brand’s history in design. Repeatedly leaving their mark on furniture history with pieces equally classic and avant-garde, on the occasion of their 150th anniversary, Walter Knoll presents their ‘Classic Edition’: classics that recount design history. Vostra Walter Knoll Team, 1949. Daring, up-to-the-minute and certainly unconventional, the 1949 Vostra Chair is a perfect example of the spirit of awakening typical of a confident and hope-filled world emerging from the Second World War. It exudes the charm of memory and corresponded to the attitude to embrace modernity. With simple, clean lines, its timeless quality makes a courageous statement about seating: the new world will be a casual one. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving Votteler Arno Votteler, 1956. Speaking so much to the inspirations of mid-century modernity, Arno Votteler’s eponymous design is a quiet classic that celebrates Scandinavian objectivity and rigour with an essence of lightness, ease and relaxation. The angular volume of upholstery rests on an ultra-delicate tubular frame supporting graphic armrests. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving 369 Walter Knoll Team, 1956. Strict straightness and austerity furnishing was still prevalent throughout Germany in the mid 1950s. So, when the 369 armchair came on the scene, the attitude of Bauhaus, the avant-garde and Scandinavia, coupled with the recent invention of plastic, made flowing forms and sweeping vital lines the new ornamental form of modern living. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving 375 Walter Knoll Team, 1957. This easy chair designed by the in-house Walter Knoll team at the end of the 1950s is charmingly stately. Supple, comfortable, the 375 is indicative of a newfound joie de vivrethat coincided with gathering economic momentum. Lightweight and refined, the 375 stands for valuing the private life in the age of progressive affluence. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving Haussmann 310 Trix & Robert Haussmann, 1962. Reimagining the fusty old Chesterfield, the Haussmann 310 became instantly iconic for uncompromised upholstery expertise and modernity – the cornerstone of the Walter Knoll philosophy. Designed in 1962 as part of the Swiss Design Collection, this legendary club chair holds growing old with dignity and undying noblesse. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving FK Jørgen Kastholm & Preben Fabricius, 1967. In the 1960s, the bucket seat was forging a new formal design language of unique form, clear contours and unflinching lines. The FK comprises a bucket and three-star base, light volume, and graphic concision – defining contemporary minimalism in design. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving Fabricius Preben Fabricius, 1972. This Conversation Chair encapsulates the history of furnishing: precision-processes, top-quality surfaces, uniting functionality with Scandinavian aesthetics. Insouciant and casual, the Fabricius maintains slim-line elegance with statement modesty. Walter Knoll | HabitusLiving Berlin Meinhard von Gerkan, 1975. Designed originally by Meinhard von Gerkan for Berlin’s Tegel Airport VIP Lounge, the Berlin Chair is a masterpiece of functionalism, material harmony and precision. More gently, more quietly, greater assurance, the Berlin chair is both timeless and familiar. Walter Knoll | HabitusLivingabc
Happenings
What's On

Go and Visit the Pop-Up Palissade Tearoom

Cult and Hay have partnered with The Rabbit Hole Organic Tea Bar and enlisted Melbourne-based stylists We Are Triibe to create a pop-up concept cafe in a heritage listed terrace at 48 Kensington Street, Chippendale. 160824_Hay_Palissade_0303 A concrete courtyard, sandstone walls and Australian natives such as wattle and banksia provide the perfect setting in which to display the new collection, as well as giving it a unique Australian twist. Palissade is seamlessly integrated into the courtyard so that you can not only view the collection with an eye to how it would look in your own, but also experience and use it with insight into how it feels. 160824_Hay_Palissade_0016 From Monday to Friday over the next two weeks the installation will be open to the public between 12:00 and 5:30 with a unique, specially designed tea menu being served from 2:00 to 4:00. 160824_Hay_Palissade_0484 If the lure of design doesn’t have you reaching for your coat and keys surely the promise of lavender shortbread, matcha marshmallow and a warming tea of ginger, cinnamon and organic honey-bush will. The tearoom will be serving afternoon tea between 2-4pm daily. The Pop-Up Palissade Tearoom Thursday 25th of August – Friday 9th of September 48 Kensington Street, Chippendale CULT cultdesign.com.au HAY hayshop.com.au Photography by Toby Peet Styling by We Are Triibe 160824_Hay_Palissade_0059 160824_Hay_Palissade_0395 160824_Hay_Palissade_0457abc
Architecture
Homes

Building Family Ties

RT+Q has designed a total of 83 houses since its inception in 2003. “The office is set up in such a way that everyone eventually does one house,” says Rene Tan, the firm’s director. With the number of its residential projects approaching high double digits and each team member’s active involvement in the design process, every new residence the firm does is a unique collaboration between the design team and the client, allowing each house to be a distinctive reflection of its owner’s identity, while retaining the sophisticated aesthetic that is a constant across the firm’s many residential works. House with Pianos | Habitus Living It is in this spirit that the House with Pianos has been designed for a couple with three young kids, and the family’s four treasured pianos. Having reached out to RT+Q after seeing one of the firm’s previous jobs, the clients asked for a comfortable, safe and accommodating home for their growing family, where their children could play freely both indoors and out. House with Pianos | Habitus Living “The spaces in the house are generally kid-friendly,” says project lead Virly Martadinata. “On the first floor, big sliding glass doors open up to the pool deck that leads to the front garden, so the children are able to play both indoors and outdoors without going through the main entrance. On the second level, there is a double volume family area, where the parents can look over their kids from the walkway outside of their master bedroom, or check in on them through a one-way mirror in their walk-in wardrobe.” House with Pianos | Habitus Living The semi-detached House with Pianos and its unusually wide plot posed a couple of challenges to the design team, including the task of getting the natural light and ventilation into the internal areas along the party wall. To minimise the dark spaces, the team shifted the building form’s main volumes that were initially stacked one atop the other to allow for vertical and horizontal openings and penetrations within the volumes to bring in light and air. House with Pianos | Habitus Living “The overall form started with a simple box sitting on another slightly narrower box,” says Martadinata. “The top box has shifted and skewed away from the party wall to allow for natural light and also to create an overhang for the pool deck below.” This design move also allowed for an integration of multiple courtyards and outdoor decks on the upper floors of the house, facilitating ventilation and adding bit of greenery into the living spaces, with additional punctures in the slanted roof bringing washes of light into the rooms below. House with Pianos | Habitus Living With the client not wanting too much furniture to clutter the house, the rich materials and the double volume spaces have instead taken centre stage. The first storey floor plan became an open, expansive space, maximising the use of the wide site, with the living, dining and dry kitchen areas merging seamlessly into each other, both visually and through the use of fair faced concrete and homogenous tiles. On the second floor, the design team used fair faced brick cladding to emphasise the double height family room, immediately highlighting the glass bridge, glass lift shaft and walkways connecting the bedrooms above. Using warmer materials like brick cladding and timber for floor surfaces on the upper levels, while confining the hardier, cooler materials mostly to the first level, the design team created a subtle distinction between the public and private areas, while retaining the visual linkages across the floors and connecting the spaces and the family as one. House with Pianos | Habitus Living As Rene Tan elaborates, the House with Pianos design came together through a continuous weaving of different design elements that, together, convey a narrative and create a unique, liveable space. “In our projects, everything must have a story,” says Tan. “For the House with Pianos, we wanted to bring light in and make room for open balconies and decks so that there was some sense of a tropical place. We knew the family lived very casually with kids all over the house, so we wanted to bring them together, maintaining a generous sized living space and creating a sense of connectivity throughout.” RT+Q Architects rtnq.com Photography by Ong Eu Ho Fabian House with Pianos | Habitus Living House with Pianos | Habitus Living House with Pianos | Habitus Living  abc
Architecture

A Little Risqué Retail Design

Lonely – a lingerie and loungewear label admired globally for challenging the stereotypes of its genre, chose Rufus Alexander Knight to imagine both their Wellington and Pronsonby stores. Knight, who also designed the interiors of the Alexander Wang flagship in London, mixed hard and soft surfaces – reflecting the brand’s broader ideals of luxury, intimacy and confidence. Lonely-108 Lonely boasts a strong digital foothold, with some 276,000 Instagram followers, sell-out online sales, and a visual diary aimed at celebrating diversity and empowerment titled ‘Lonely Girls Project’. In the same way that the label was being received online, its stores “needed a look and feel that had a visual experience that would translate across the same physical & digital platforms,” Knight explains. Lonely-76 The brief was to fashion the two stores, “with a design direction that reflected the brand’s global outlook and to create a space which would align them with international shopping districts such as Paris, New York, and Tokyo, as they strengthen their global reach from a well-established online following.” Lonely-212 Materials and textures are muted, softened and tactile – a palette of warm grey, earthy green, and deep purple were used to continue Lonely’s theme of sophistication and simplicity. “Conceptually I was interested in exploring an idea of what we referred to as ‘soft industrial’,” says Knight. “A dichotomy between robust materials that had a tactile or unexpected finish.” Lonely-177 Knight has achieved this through rough salvaged timber laid in an ornate parquet, using a classic grey marble but removing it’s cold glossy sheen through sandblasting, and by incorporating an industrial aluminium mesh but with a fine delicate perforation. ‘This assemblage, combined with Lonely’s focus on exceptional follow-through and customer service, makes the space feel sophisticated without feeling unapproachable,” he adds. Lonely.Ext-6 Knight’s intent for Lonely’s bricks and mortar frontage was to dissolve “the transactional nature of retail”, and to relax the sales and fit process, giving the spaces a strong sense of domesticity. “I think the ‘muted-ness’ of the retail experience is also because Lonely has such a strong visual component, through the Lonely Girls project, we were able to make a commitment to let the store say something through its design and materiality rather than any hard branding.” Lonely-128 “While fashion is in constant flux, the transactional nature of retail hasn’t changed much over time, now however, the value lies in how you frame the transaction between customer and product, and by incorporating design into this process brands can better articulate their values and learn more about themselves ultimately offering a better product.” Lonely lonelylabel.com Lonely.Ext-17 Lonely-118abc
Design Hunters

Industria X Changes Hands

Industria X was established in 1999 alongside second hand component Max Watt's Industria as a shopfront on Gertrude Street, Fitzroy. Run by Quenton and Sue Buckley, Industria X became the ‘go to’ shop for custom-made industrial furniture and synonymous with interesting one-of-a-kind vintage furniture. After almost 15 years in business, the Buckley’s decided on a change of pace and handed over Industria X to their friends, Mark and Emma Cleine. “Collectively, both Industria identities were a pioneering aesthetic in the mid 90s,” says Emma. “Mark and I have always had a great respect for Industria X. We jumped at the chance to take on Industria X’s iconic designs and begin a new journey for the company.” Industria X | Habitus Living Based in Mornington Peninsula, Emma runs the creative direction side of Industria X, while Mark looks after the manufacturing. Emma’s background in homewares design and Mark’s carpentry skills have made them a formidable design force, which has seen them steer Industria X into a familiar, but contemporary direction. Industria X | Habitus Living Their latest range is a refinement and exploration of the established utilitarian design philosophy of Industria X intermixed with some experimental additions. “The range has reinforced our understanding of where we fit in the market; trolleys, chairs and stools,” says Emma. “We want to continue the highly functional industrial aesthetic inspired by ex-government, mid-century Australian issue furniture and French industrial trolleys.” Industria X | Habitus Living New to the Industria X range are painted and powder coated surfaces, spanning chairs, tables, stools, lampshades, vessels, trays and trolleys. The contrast between powder coated steel surface with a finely finished natural surface like wood is striking, and has remained core to the Industria X aesthetic. Emma has also introduced her own artwork to their new artist’ series Highbar Stools, alongside the work of Newcastle artist Annie Everingham. Industria X | Habitus Living While Mark and Emma have been busy over the past 18 months there are no signs of slowing down. As they continue to work on the design and manufacture of their furniture collection, they also create bespoke pieces for clients in between. This variety of work helps to influence and contribute to future ranges, continually inspiring new ideas and designs. “We reflect upon bespoke pieces we have made throughout the year for clients and revisit some of our favourites,” says Emma. “We like the challenge of working on new projects and designing site specific furniture. This leads us to explore new designs within our own work.” Emma adds that their current bathroom renovation at home is sure to inspire their next range, with new fittings on the cards. “Art imitating life is the best way to be isn’t it?” Industria X industriax.com.au Industria X | Habitus Living Industria X | Habitus Living Industria X | Habitus Living Industria X | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Enter Now! Last Chance to Take Home Smeg Gold

Smeg is well known for their industry leading design, high quality technology and Italian style. The Smeg Tour competition recognises the brand’s legacy of design in Australia and abroad. The competition invites Australian architects and interior designers to submit a kitchen project utilising Smeg appliances. Four winners will join Smeg following the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale Vernissage with an amazing prize package…
  • Return, economy domestic air transfers if necessary, and return, economy flights from the winner’s Australian home city to Venice, Italy
  • All airport transfers
  • Three (3) nights’ accommodation for one person in Venice, excluding the Smeg Tour
  • Complimentary Vernissage passes and further hospitalities.
  • An invitation to the Smeg Tour, which will visit the Guido Canali-designed Smeg headquarters in Guastalla, as well as sites of architectural, historic and cultural significance
  • Opportunity to host an ‘in-practice’ post tour Italian Smeg lunch with colleagues to share your experience.
Visit Smeg for more info, and entries close 5pm 31st August 2017 – so get those projects in ASAP!  abc
Architecture
Homes

Terra Bella: How to Revamp a Colonial Regency Home

Over the last decade, jewellery designer and communications advisor Rosemary Luker has spent many months overseas. For her, Paris is now like a second home. There she has a group of close friends, her own bicycle to navigate the cobbled streets, and a studio workspace she can use. But it's not just Paris where she spends time. One of her close friends lives in Palermo, Sicily, and she visits often, enjoying its 'decaying baroque madness', while another resides in Stockholm — a place of land and water, abundant wild nature, a beautiful old city centre and cutting-edge contemporary design. MNP3726-019_F While each city has something different to offer, perhaps it is Stockholm that most closely mirrors what Rosemary loves about life in Sydney and the character of her renovated Colonial Regency house in inner-city Glebe, which she shares with her adored kelpie Tilly and a constant stream of house guests. "The choice was between here and the eastern suburbs," recalls Rosemary. "I chose Glebe because of its trees, its culturally rich and diverse population, and this house's connection to the ground and the cycles of nature." Revamping Terra Bella | Habitus Living The house, originally called 'Terra Bella', was one of two identical brick cottages built side by side by prominent colonial surveyor Ferdinand Reuss in the 1870s. (Sadly its twin was demolished in the 1960s when heritage mattered little.) When Rosemary bought the house more than 15 years ago, it was in a derelict state, with birds roosting in the two upstairs bedrooms tucked under the slate mansard roof. Downstairs were four rooms and the bathroom was in an outhouse in the back garden. Only the kitchen at the rear had been recently 'refurbished'; its new knotty pine interior resembling, in Rosemary's words, 'a Swedish sauna'. MNP3726-031_F She called in architect Virginia Kerridge with the brief to capture northern light, improve the internal flow of the house, and create two workspaces: one for her jewellery, and a separate office for her work as a communications advisor to architects. "Virginia did all that, but kept the sense of the age and layering of the house," says Rosemary. "In Europe you see very old buildings with contemporary elements. At its best, they know how to make it work." Read the full story in Habitus issue #32, available now. Virginia Kerridge Architect vk.com.au Words by Jenna Reed Burns Photography by Michael Nicholson & Jason Busch MNP3726-151_Fabc
Architecture
Homes

A Taste of Barragan-Inspired Architecture

There are two stories to this house in the leafy Melbourne suburb of Camberwell. One is its owner, a prominent plastic surgeon specialising in craniofacial conditions affecting children. He was a member of the highly specialised team of surgeons who, in November 2009, separated the Bangladeshi conjoined twins Krishna and Trishna in a 27-hour operation at Melbourne's Royal Childrens Hospital. The other story is his and his wife's obsession with the architecture of the great Mexican architect Luis Barragan. 20141015_DX_1393_F Their interest dates back to around 1991 when, while working and training in Mexico City, they became familiar with the Barragan House in Tacubaya and experienced firsthand some of the houses of Andres Casillas de Alba, who worked with Barragan from 1964 to 1968, before forging a successful career of his own. Casillas, now aged 82 years, collaborated on Barragan's signature work, the Las Cuadras, San Cristobal house and stables from 1966. Since 1994 he has overseen restoration works on the Barragan House now listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Earlier in his career he attended the Ulm School of Design (a successor to the Bauhaus) in Germany; as well, in the late 1950s he worked in the Milan studio of Italian architects Mangiarotti and Marassutti. christinefrancis02 Determined to have a Barragan-inspired house in Melbourne, in 2003 the couple commissioned Casillas to design a house for them on a site in a tree-lined street remarkable only for a streetscape of unremarkable late Edwardian houses. Originally conceived of as a modernist structure in white-painted, rough-cast render, in the manner of Barragan, there soon came a shift to constructing the house from insitu reinforced concrete; influenced by the surgeon and his wife's growing interest in the concrete buildings of Tadao Ando (a trip was made to Japan to study closely Ando's buildings and the quality of his concrete finishes) and the fact that one of Casillas' own later projects was realised in off-form concrete. Reminded that Barragan never worked in concrete, the answer is that if Barragan were alive and still practising today "he would almost certainly be”.

Read the full story in Habitus issue #32, available now.

Evolva Architects evolva.com.au

Words by Joe Rollo.

Photography by John Gollings and Christine Francis.

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Happenings
What's On

A Look Back at the Design Community’s LiveLife Discussions

Kicking off the series on Friday the 12th of August at Darkon Architectural Lighting, we were greeted with a circus of Laughing Clown games and freshly popped popcorn in anticipation of the first panel: Disrupted Design Living – the New Commune. Helming the panel was Assemble Papers’ very own Sara Savage, accompanied by architects Clare Cousins of Clare Cousins Architect, Monique Woodward of WOWOWA Architecture & Interiors, and interior designer Katy Svalbe from Amber Road Design. Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Beginning the talk with an assertion that “Architects are the defenders of the public interface,” the panellists discussed the need for architects to push to produce better outcomes to solve major problems in the housing market. An interesting case study that was focused on was Clare Cousins’ Nightingale project which sought to take the role of the developer out of the project, and instead focus on creating an alternative sense of community in vertical living, emphasising the necessity for architects to create commissioned work with a public twist. Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Next up was a stellar discussion hosted at Arthur G, where Arthur G had collaborated with Molecule Studio and Radford Furnishings to create an Alice in Wonderland inspired installation – complete with a Cheshire Cat topped cake. Hosted by Alice Blackwood, the co-editor of Indesign Magazine, the panel saw energetic banter from comedian Tim Ross, Shelley Penn from the City of Melbourne, and Paul Roser from National Trust Victoria, on the topic of Heritage and Australian Identity – the Brick Veneer and the Suburbs. Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Tim Ross stayed true to his comedic core, making the audience laugh with the bold assertion that terrace houses are an Australian icon, and, for all their faults, we accept them for what they are, blemishes and all. To Ross, they are the “cockroach of design,” in that they are ever-present and constant in the suburbs. Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Roser and Penn discussed the necessity of Heritage Advisors, and the trickiness of navigating the balance between a public that might not understand, or value, what makes something ‘heritage’, with the real danger of people saying ‘I don’t get it’ as a result of this. For this panel: “the beauty of the suburbs is that they’re wonky and mismatched – it doesn’t have to be beautiful. It’s boring when they’re all beautiful and new and say nothing about Australia, and don’t reflect where we’re from.” Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Last, and definitely not least, was a fantastic panel hosted at AJAR furniture and design, complete with 8,500 red butterflies installed by DKO Architecture across the ceiling and walls, considering Lighting the Home – Showing How We Live. With some of Australia’s greatest designers, Mark Elliott the director of Point of View led an energetic discussion with Nick Harding of HA Architects, Ross Hines from Tongue and Groove, lighting designer Volker Haug, and Habitus’ very own cover man for Issue #31, Christopher Boots. Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Debating the merits of LED lighting, the panel covered the murky history surrounding it, and the fact that recent technological advancements has seen better quality of light coming from LED lighting, almost ready to truly rival traditional lighting. The practicalities of lighting in a fit-out were also discussed, with a thoughtful observation that the practical and the aesthetic need not always compete; sometimes, a trio of large pendants suspended over a kitchen island might not always be the best idea for a social kitchen, and it might be better served by a smaller, less obstructive strip of lighting instead. Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living All in all, it was an extremely successful series of panels, and we’re honoured to have had so many esteemed members of the design community take part, from our hosts, to our panellists, and the highly-engaged audience, take part in such spirited conversation on the topics we think matter to the design community. A giant thank you to all who came along, and we’ll see you again next year! LiveLife Seminars proudly partnered by HAY and Assemble Paper. Melbourne Indesign indesigntheevent.com/melbourne/ Photography by Fiona Susanto Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Living Melbourne Indesign Live Life 2016 | Habitus Livingabc