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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes

An Environmental Hideaway In the Heart of Sydney

88 Angel Street is the result of an environmentally conscious design from Steele Associates Architects, and takes the form of a three-terrace development, which was planned to stand as proof of the commercial and practical viability of residential buildings designed with sustainability as the central goal. The visually arresting green roofs cloaking the buildings are the tip of the iceberg of a unique and totally environmentally conscious trio of homes, where the subtle elements are as impressive as the more eye catching and obvious ones. For Steele Associates Architects, the challenge was to put together a suite of environmentally sustainably features within an aesthetically pleasing and comfortable space, all while keeping construction, and eventual living and maintenance costs, at a reasonable level. From the design, to the sourcing of materials to the construction itself, every part of the building process was researched, modelled, tested to have the minimum environmental impact, and the results speak for themselves. Not only is 88 Angel Street a visually striking and liveable design, the terraces have been rewarded with the Best of the Best award at the Sustainability Awards. "88 Angel Street continues a trend for the Sustainability Awards program by being the third multi-residential project in as many years to take out the Best of the Best award,” remarked the judges on the award, “We’re urbanising on an unprecedented scale and we need comfortable, playful, socially enriching and environmentally friendly housing options if we want to accommodate our population in a humane and sustainable manner. 88 Angel Street, in all of its meticulous commitment to best practice sustainable building and material procurement, is certainly one of those options, and we hope that this award will encourage many more inner city developments just like it” The spatial design of 88 Angel Street is driven by passive solar strategy principles, where stack-effect ventilation serves to exhaust summer air through the shaded glass roof, while all rooms across each of the three terraces have windows that ventilate and maintain weather-tightness. Steele Associates Architects steeleassociates.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Anna Zhu 122_88Angel_Arch-(11) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(29) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(28) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(18) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(15) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(9) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(6) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(5) 122_88Angel_Arch-(34) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(40) 122_88Angel_ArchLR-(43)  abc
Happenings
Parties

Technē Turns 15

Over its 15 years Technē has completed landmark projects for Melbourne institution MovidaPorsche, Tonka, Mazda and Deka Immobilien as well as multi-residential developments such as Park Edge Terraces and Iris Apartments.

Technē specialises in bespoke architecture matched to a keen understanding of commercial function and design durability. The studio’s work is informed by art, engineering, the environment and sustainability. Led by Justin Northrop and Nick Travers, Technē focuses on bespoke and authentic design, where each architectural response is unique to its context and human usage. This has seen Technē take the logical step of expansion into the hotel sector. The studio is currently working on hotel projects in South Australia, Tasmania and New South Wales.

To celebrate, Technē hosted a party at one of their recently completed hospitality projects, the Garden State Hotel on Flinders Lane in Melbourne.

Technē techne.com.au

Words by Sammy Preston.

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Happenings
Parties

Champagne Meets Sculpture in the Enchanting Tree

On the 20th of October, Sydney celebrated the opening of the annual Sculpture by the Sea exhibition decorating the Bondi to Tamarama coastal walk with over 100 sculptures by artists from across the world. Champagne titan Perrier-Jouët joined in the festivities with the unveiling of The Enchanting Tree, and a special private twilight tour of the exhibition by artist Harrie Fasher in the Bondi Headland.

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The Enchanting Tree is a sinuous sculpture which embodied the image of champagne overflowing – each branch of The Enchanting Tree coiled lightly around flutes of champagne which guests could pluck and sip from at their whim. The tour wound down with an intimate dinner at the Icebergs Dining Room and Bar where Head Chef Monty Koludrovi created a bespoke three course menu for the evening, paired perfectly with some of Perrier Jouët's finest rosés.

Sculpture by the Sea is open to the public from the 20th of October till the 6th of November, 2016.

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Words by Christina Rae.

Photography by Ken Butti.

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Perrier-Jouet Enchanting Tree Sculpture | Habitus Living

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Design Hunters
People

Building a Green World One Bamboo Stick at a Time

Behind the warm and friendly face of Vietnamese architect, Vo Trong Nghia, is a quiet and determined force in the world of architecture. Awards, accolades and a swell of interest have pursued this man since 2006 when he established Vo Trong Nghia Architects (VTNA) in Ho Chi Minh City. But despite the attention, Vo remains the antithesis of a ‘starchitect’, pursuing architecture for humanitarian and environmental reasons with great sensitivity and finesse. His innovative practice has redefined ‘green’ architecture, demonstrating the structural and poetic prowess of bamboo and proving that affordable architecture is not only attainable but also desirable. 01_Phan-Quang_F The path forged by Vo is shaped, like any, by circumstance and opportunity. As the youngest of seven brothers growing up in rural Vietnam without electricity or running water in the aftermath of war, his childhood was scarcely advantageous. Such conditions make his architectural qualifications obtained from the prestigious University of Tokyo seem quite remarkable. “I didn’t have anything else to do but study,” he says of his natural propensity for scholarship. _DMS8106_F Returning to Vietnam in 2006, Vo established VTNA in Ho Chi Minh City. His 10-year absence, which coincided with rapid development and destruction of the natural environment, fuelled his determination to find ways of introducing fragments of landscape to heavily polluted and populated areas. “The first step was to make the city more green; that was the easiest thing to do,” Vo says. These intentions translated to a range of experimental projects which integrated green facades, applied passive ventilation and lighting strategies and utilised bamboo as a cheap, sustainable and culturally appropriate construction material. Bamboo quickly became synonymous with his early practice and continues to define a lot of his work. O_B02_F Wind and Water Cafe (2006) was the beginnings of VTNA’s experimentation with ‘green steel’, the natural material with a tensile strength similar to steel, but harvested locally at a fraction of the cost. Exploiting the inherent qualities of bamboo to curve, flex, and appear like timber with a natural grain and character, the pavilion employed bamboo culms by the thousand in a series of arches to support a flat, bamboo-framed canopy. HFT05_F Vo’s dedication to social and environmental issues permeates all aspects of his work and family life. With an almost naive innocence he speaks of his future vision for cities as complete ecological systems, “Where very little energy is used, where city farms feed the people, where there are systems in place to re-use and recycle and where people live in harmony with nature.” And if you think commercial success would change him in any way, you’d be wrong. “In my home there is no television or internet and no air conditioning,” Vo says. “We try to live with less not live with more. Simplicity makes us happy.” Read the full story in Habitus issue #33, available now. Vo Trong Nghia Architects votrongnghia.com Words by Michelle Bailey. Photography by Hiroyuki Oki, Phan Quang and Toby Scott. CF038833©TobyScott_F 03_Phan-Quang_F 5166_OKI_Fabc
Design Hunters
People

ANEAU: A Band of Women, Quilting to Define Their Future

The story of ANEAU and creative director Anna Westcott begins with a hand-crafted childhood quilt that was heavy in pattern and covered in appliqué swans. The vintage style of the aptly named Swan Song quilt seems a world away from Anna’s first quilt collection under her newest venture ANEAU, but if you look closely enough, you can still see hints of pattern and the occasional appliqué present in the series. Hannah-001_R “When I moved back from New York, I was spending a lot of time with my grandmother,” says Anna, “She’s a mad quilter, so I would help her make things while also having my own vision for what I wanted to make. I ended up making them for friends and their babies as gifts and everyone really loved them, so I thought that it would be amazing to do something like this – ANEAU happened really organically.” Before ANEAU, Anna was immersed in the fast-paced world of fashion, working extensively with the likes of creative director at Hermès Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski, Electric Feathers founder Leana Zuniga, and the creative director at Jac+Jack Patrick Blue. Hannah-012_R On the similarities between fashion design and lifestyle design, Anna notes that, “I’ve always been really interested in the actual textiles themselves, and I think one of my strong suits in fashion has been colour, so that’s kind of put me in good stead for what I’m doing now because it’s all about pattern and combining different colours to create a beautiful graphic within the textile form.” While she still does freelance design work for fashion labels like YEVU and creatively directs lookbook shoots, Anna is excited by the prospect of ‘slow’ design: “The ethos of ANEAU is to really develop something and spend a lot of time developing it. In the fashion industry you don’t have enough time to develop product – it’s very fast. So I like doing things at my own speed.” Hannah-004_R The name ANEAU itself was suggested by Anna’s mother, and incorporates Anna’s own initials and that of her grandparents, fortuitously also being the french word for a circular band of metal. ANEAU’s quilt offerings are all handcrafted in the foothills of the Himalayas by the women of the Purkal Stree Shakti Shamiti collective – a not-for-profit foundation teaching local women how to quilt and help them to support themselves. “My idea was to find a women’s collective because that’s what I grew up with – a circle of women; my aunts, my grandma, and my mum getting together on the weekend and chatting,” says Anna, “Going and spending time with the women at Purkal Stree Shakti – they create an almost sacred space. They’re just chit-chatting all day and really enjoying being at the foundation and talking to each other. So that’s what powers me and inspires me.” ANEAU aneau.com Words by Christina Rae. Photography by Hannah Scott-Stevenson. Hannah-010_R Hannah-009_R ANEAU-Astar-Travel-Lounge-Plinth ANEAU-Astar-Travel-Lounge ANEAU-Aquila-Bedroom-Plinth ANEAU-Aquila-Bedroom ANEAU-Eye-Travel-Loungeabc
Happenings
What's On

After-a-Fair: The Contemporary Wine In Design Wrap Party

Last Saturday Perth was brought alive with all the greatest of local A+D quite unlike it has ever been before. We cannot tell you how proud and happy we are that #CWID16 was a huge success and that all generations across the design disciplines flocked to our exhibiting showrooms to embrace the fullness and depth of A+D today. While it was a day brimful of learning, luckily the wine was flowing freely to help take the edge off... just a little. After a day jam-packed with events all across the Perth CBD, Claremont and Subiaco, the best and brightest in A+D descended upon one of the city's latest arts and culture hubs: FORM.'s the Goods Shed. Brought (literally) alive by a stunning hanging garden by Stem & Stamen, cutting-edge AV technology by GemTek, and only the finest in locally distilled moonshine whiskey by Whipper Snapper Distillery, every single guest was guaranteed to go home grinning ear-to-ear. Thanks for the memories, Perth. Until next time. Contemporary Wine In Design 2016 contemporaryau.com/wine-in-design Words by David Congram. kb-12882 kb-12883 kb-12900 kb-12923 kb-12936-Emma-Van-Dordrechts-conflicted-copy-2016-10-17 kb-12942abc
Happenings
What's On

A Titbit from Tokyo

What could be better than an afternoon at the Museum of Contemporary Art? Capping it of with a signature cocktail and panoramic views of the ever-iconic Sydney Harbour would do it. Paper Moose, who worked on last year’s sun soaked Gin Garden bar at the MCA as well as with Vivid Sydney and the Sydney Opera House, have collaborated again with the museum to bring Sydneysiders Cherry Blossom Bar; a unique pop-up on the ground floor terrace tailored specifically to complement the art series exhibition Tatsuo Miyajima: Connect with Everything. The bar is open from Friday 28 October, a week ahead of the exhibition which opens the following Thursday. MCA Cherry Blossom Bar | Habitus Living Everyone and their neighbour’s son seem to be on board this year and we couldn’t be more excited. Japanese saké, whisky and beers will sit alongside locally sourced Australian favourites for those unwilling to venture. For those who are, each month there will be a signature cocktail infused with classic Japanese flavours courtesy of QT Sydney’s resident mixologist, Jared Thibault; locals and winners of the Best International Bar and Best Australia & Pacific Bar at the 2015 Restaurant and Bar design Awards, Archie Rose Distilling Co have tailor made a gin to perfectly complement saké; and a bespoke menu – featuring the ultimate bento box – was devised by Culinary Edge to help you soak it all up. MCA Cherry Blossom Bar | Habitus Living "The cocktail list, menu and the bar design itself are a respectful pastiche of the very best of Japanese design and flavours. We’ve aimed to incorporate traditional elements with a contemporary twist," says Sarah Barron, Events Manager for the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. This isn’t the first exercise of the like by the MCA. And following the success of the café’s dedicated Korean menu launched to coincide with the New Romance: art and the posthuman exhibition earlier this year and last summer’s Gin Garden bar likewise complementing the Grayson Perry: My Pretty Little Art Career exhibition – it isn’t likely to be the last. The Cherry Blossom Bar is open Friday 28 October 2016 until 5 March 2017, Thursday to Friday from 4pm until late, and Saturday to Sunday from midday. Tatsuo Miyajima-inspired Cherry Blossom Bar mca.com.au/series/cherry-blossom-bar Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Stuart Garske MCA Cherry Blossom Bar | Habitus Living MCA Cherry Blossom Bar | Habitus Living abc
Architecture
Homes

Redeveloping a Housing Commission for the Future

Fishermans Bend House was once a one-bedroom dwelling developed by the Housing Commission of Victoria to re-house growing numbers of people living in the slums of Port Melbourne post World War II. Now, seventy years later, it is the sustainable four-bedroom home of a retired man and his adult children, and has been designed as a good-sized family residence for future occupants. 02.-Fishermans-Bend-House.jpg Architect Adam Dettrick designed the extension to the existing home and respecting the tradition of the house he looked to its history and the site, as well as being driven by social and environmental sustainability. “A building needs social intelligence to become a great place to live and connect with the outside world, and obviously it needs to draw upon our planet’s resources wisely,” Dettrick explains. 06.-Fishermans-Bend-House.jpg The Housing Commission of Victoria developed the house as part of Fishermans Bend, which responded to the 1930s housing crisis, and while it may have been short on space and comfort – the only addition being a rear lean-to extension to accommodate the bathroom and outhouse room – it was big on ideas. “We had the original building drawings and we looked at what the Housing Commission was doing in the 1940s, which was using pre-cast concrete panels that were very innovative for the time,” Dettrick says. 10.-Fishermans-Bend-House.jpg Continuing this concrete tradition, Dettrick sought to utilise the latest technology in insulated pre-cast panels, however, due to trees and power lines that made craning impossible, poured the panels in situ. The concrete panels form the new volume of the home and wrap around a spacious outdoor area, like a traditional Chinese courtyard house, while also providing other private and intimate outdoor spaces. “The different outdoor courtyards and balconies allow such a rich and varied connection with the outside world,” Dettrick explains. “The house form is used to create, orient and shelter these outdoor spaces and generate areas to entertain friends, to catch bay views, and to read a book and reflect.” Fisherman's Bend House - Adam Dettrick Architects | Habitus Living Dettrick also looked to the history of the local area for patterning and colour. The concrete walls and timber screens carry a linear abstraction of the fisherman’s bend knot, while the orange panelling is a colourful accent both inside and out, and references the predominant terracotta roofs of the former estate, as well as the ships and shipping containers of the historic fishing area. “The house is richly detailed but each component works to complement its unique identity so there are no loud statements,” says Dettrick. 08.-Fishermans-Bend-House.jpg Inside, the home is designed to have a “long life and loose fit,” as Dettrick considered its present residents and potential future occupants. “There’s an element of surprise as you walk through the house and it reveals its private courtyards and bedrooms slowly and sometimes unexpectedly for such a relatively small footprint,” the architect explains. He strategically placed bedrooms and living areas to provide options for different age groups and family types, as well as positioning the master bedroom on the ground floor to aid ageing in place. 09.-Fishermans-Bend-House.jpg Fishermans Bend House has already seen one lifetime in its first incarnation, and now larger and far more sustainable its set to see many more, as well as the lifetimes of those who reside there now and in the future. Adam Dettrick Architects adamdettrickarchitects.com.au Words by Rebecca Gross. Photography by UA Creative. 04.-Fishermans-Bend-House.jpg 01.-Fishermans-Bend-Houseabc
Architecture
Homes

Building a New Beginning After the Canberra Bushfires

Canberra juggles with the lofty task of being Australia’s capital city and political heartland while also being dwarfed in population by Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Adelaide. As the country’s largest inland city, Canberra’s unique location means that there is ample bushland surrounding and weaving through its suburbs and national icons. While this provides distinctive lifestyle opportunities for its relatively youthful population including easy-to-access recreational activities, the significant presence of bushland presents a potential hazard during the notorious bushfire season. Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-160 After the 2003 Canberra bushfires, a parcel of land was re-released for sale, of which a small portion was purchased by the young Archer family. Seeking to build a home that complemented the surrounding landscape, the Archers enlisted the skills of Peter Kuhnell of Kuhnellco Architecture to create a family home that would adapt to the family’s changing needs. “The project is about new beginnings for a young family. It’s a response to the harsh beauty and extremes of the surrounding landscape,” begins architect Peter Kuhnell, “I took the Australian rural vernacular as inspiration, and as such, the detailing of the pavilions is deliberately uncomplicated.” peter-kuhnell-archer-residence The ensuing home is heavy on timber, with the pale wood blending in seamlessly with the vibrant greens and earthy colours surrounding the plot of land. Kuhnell was conscious of needing to create a fluid space for the Archer family, resulting in a central communal pavilion for family gatherings, and a variety of spaces extending out from it. The mix of spaces gives the residents the ability to come together as a family, and find privacy when they so choose. Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-208 "We investigated the idea of “starting out” through the planning, looking at post-colonial settlements, where utility takes priority, and pre-colonial gathering places which often incorporate ceremonial communal area," continues Kuhnell, "we approached this project with the theme of new beginnings, not just for the Archer’s but also for their community." Kuhnellco Architecture kuhnellco.com.au Words by Christina Rae. Photography by Roger D'Souza. Kuhnellco Architecture - Archer Family Residence | Habitus Living Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-329 Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-319 Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-163 Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-088 Peter-Kuhnell---Archer-Residence-082abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Cornersmith: A Cafe With a Conscience

Five years ago Alex Elliott-Howery and her husband James Grant had a small idea and a big vision. They wanted to eat at a café that shared their philosophy on making thoughtful decisions concerning food, food waste and the environment. A café that – coupled with “really good food and really good coffee,” – had great vibes and a real sense of community. When they couldn’t find one, they opened one. Situated on the corner of Illawarra and Petersham Roads in Marrickville, Sydney, Cornersmith was born. A dedicated picklery and workshop, also on a corner, was opened 18 months later and now, at the corner of View and Piper St South their eagerly anticipated second café has opened in Annandale. Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Living But Annandale isn’t a carbon copy of Marrickville; it isn’t a carbon copy of anywhere for that matter. Where Marrickville is slightly dark, moody and maybe a little industrial Annandale is decidedly lighter in appearance and atmosphere – inspired by the Australian Bush. “We’re very much about Australian products and looking at what we have rather than outside of that [so] the Australian Bush is what we went with, which is the colours I guess,” says Alex. The interiors are a combination of blonde timber, shades of blue and pale pink marble. “It feels very nice and light and calm in here. Even when it’s crazy busy,” she adds. Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Living The bespoke joinery, cabinetry and furniture are the handiwork of their dear friends and keen collaborators at Smith and Carmody and Jonathan West. And if you’re worried about growing businesses finding it harder to stick to the guns they first started with, don’t be. “We’re getting better and better at it,” says Alex. There’s a huge composting system outback, they’re still very much trading with locals for excess backyard produce (and excited to see what the new area has to offer) and Sabina, the head chef, “is constantly coming up with ways to make new delicious things out of things that would otherwise get thrown into the bin,” says Alex. Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Living Despite burgeoning business it seems the biggest challenge for Alex isn’t moving forward but taking a step back. “I just want to make sure that everything is still very Cornersmith, very us, but with other people doing a lot of it. [In the past] James and I have been so hands on and now we’re taking that one step back. It feels like a very exciting time for us. We’re tired but we’re good.” Cornersmith cornersmith.com.au Smith and Carmody smithandcarmody.com.au Jonathan West jonathanwest.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Joshua Morris Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Living Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Living Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Living Cornersmith Cafe | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Zhu Ohmu’s Coiled Ceramics

Coil upon coil, Zhu Ohmu’s works slouch and slink, plants seemingly woven into the ins and outs of the ceramic vessels. The works are a manifestation of her passion for the “symbiotic relationship between nature and the urban environment,” and the striking result of a trained artist, but a self-taught ceramicist. Zhu Ohmu is a pseudonym, harking back to Taiwanese born, Melbourne based Rose Weir’s cultural heritage. “I’m trying to reclaim and reconnect to my cultural heritage with my artistic identity – Zhu was the name of the first documented ancestor from my mother’s paternal lineage,” Rose explains. Rose lost some of that connection with her culture while growing up in New Zealand, where she graduated from the Elam School of Fine Arts with Honours, in 2011. Rose may have studied art, but her focus was on water colours and paintings. Her first foray into clay was when she “started playing with air dry clay to hold (her) growing collection of houseplants.” Her friend Hannah Valentine invited her to do a two person show, and Rose’s beginnings in ceramics began to flourish. Zhu Ohmu - Ceramics | Habitus Living Pushed by the upcoming exhibition, Rose felt she needed to “do ceramics properly,” but a Christmas time period meant no pottery classes were available. Like any good millennial she took to blogs and YouTube tutorials. “In hindsight, teaching myself without being overly influenced by formal techniques encouraged me to be very experimental,” says Rose, “and helped me form an amoebic aesthetic through this medium.” “I originally explored clay coils as a response to 3D printed ceramics. Corresponding to biomimetics - the imitation of models or systems of nature,” Rose explains, “I wanted to see how forms would turn out if I copied the way the 3D printer mound coils on top of each other with my hands.” The result is charming – and though technology inspired – a clear celebration of the artist’s hand. “Vessels are built through stacking, folding, pressing, pulling and these actions are often dictated by the weight of moist clay,” Rose explains, adding that forms emerge intuitively. Being self-taught comes with its obstacles. “The self-formulated coiling technique often leads to breakage and misconstruction during the building, drying and firing stages,” says Rose. But she has learnt to embrace these breakages, learning from the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi. Zhu Ohmu - Ceramics | Habitus Living The unknown also means Rose must allow her works to evolve naturally, often with the choice of plant to add to a piece made towards the end, when she knows what will fit. The vast variety of plants she uses in her works is testament to her love of botany. “I constantly find inspiration from mother nature and those who promote sustainable living,” says Rose, adding that this list encompasses” scientists, activists, photojournalists, philosophers and indigenous communities.” Her passion for the environment has also led to her involvement with the Honey Fingers Collective, which she describes as “both a creative pursuit and a way to contribute to our urban ecology.” Aside from working on projects with the collective, Rose says she’s “just letting things progress organically, a bit like my coil pots, and seeing where things take me.” The young artist isn’t afraid of big projects however, “ I do have some large ambitions,” she says “For example I’d love to work on a piece one day involving large scale reforestation – like Joseph Beuy’s 7000 oaks." Zhu Ohmu zhuohmu.com Words by Naomi Russo.abc
Architecture
Homes

Secret Society Turned Boutique Hotel

The Warehouse Hotel, located on the Straits of Malacca trade route, was designed by the award-winning homegrown agency Asylum, and features new double-high ceilings and peaked roofs, juxtaposed against the original industrial details of the over-century-old space. The space, originally known in Asia as a godown, was recognised as a hotbed of activity for secret societies, business deals and underground spirit distilling in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This history was channeled into the design of the space, with local design and culture at the core of the design ethos for Asylum. In-room minibars, uniforms, bicycles, artwork, guidebooks and coffee & tea were all locally sourced in order to properly an authentic Singaporean experience. This aesthetic and sense of belonging is further reflected in the hotel’s rooftop infinity pool, which enables riverbank views and a sense of connection to the neighbourhood’s mysterious history. "Hotels are a natural extension of our strength as a hospitality group - both in concept design and guest experience,” says Wee Teng Wen, Managing Partner, of the Lo & Behold Group, managers of The Warehouse Hotel “The fact that The Warehouse Hotel is located in a 'godown' is particularly unique and creates the opportunity to offer something with depth and soul. We’re proud that this heritage project is our group’s inaugural hotel - owned, designed and operated 100% locally." The hotel’s signature restaurant and bar, Po, was crafted by Chef-Partner Willin Low, who designed his dishes to homage to the tradition of the city of Singapore. Po’s cocktail programme charts the history of the building through its three phases of life – rustic, spice driven concoctions, representing the building’s life as a spice warehouse; house-crafted spirits paying tribute to the forbidden underworld distilleries; and finally fresh flirty cocktails inspired by the building’s era as an infamous disco. From the room design to the public spaces, traditional design elements, such as traditional rattan and natural leather, bring a sense of history to the modern industrial feel of the space; recalling the secret history of the warehouse, yet with eyes firmly set on the future. Asylum theasylum.com.sg The Lo & Behold Group lobehold.com Words by Andrew McDonald The-Warehouse-Hotel_Sanctuary-Desk-Closet-Bathroom_270916_Hi-Res The-Warehouse-Hotel_02A-Riverview_Room_Hires_6000px_270916abc