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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes

Moving From a Spacious Property to a City Apartment

Conscious of the significant lifestyle change the move would provide for the residents, architect Sam Rigoli of Studio [R] worked seamlessly with the owner to create a new family home, far away from home. Creating compact living that simultaneously feels expansive was at the heart of the refurbishment, with Rigoli navigating within the pre-existing structure and original layout of the apartment. The colour palette is neutral, with a mix of white backdrops and a black background for the central communal hub: the living room and kitchen. In response to the major change in environment and lifestyle, Rigoli decided on the dark backdrop with the intention of it acting “as a way to calm the vibrant cityscape outside.” Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living The interior is fitted out with bleach blonde timber floorboards, which complements the clever joinery that Rigoli worked with the client to create – a useful perk when the client owns a high quality joinery company. Rigoli enthuses: “we worked to ensure that the storage and less attractive parts of ‘living’ were concealed or easily put away when an unexpected guest arrived.  The powder room and laundry, for instance, are hidden away in a joinery pod behind the bar.“ Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living A polished, curved mirror surface for the bar unit is designed to reflect the gleaming city lights at night-time that filter into the apartment, and liven up the living and kitchen spaces, with the kitchen at the top of the residents’ priority list. For Rigoli, the bar’s stitched leather top nicely complements the curved mirror, “adding colour and drama to the space without the need for a multitude of materials.” Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living “Our aim was to provide the kitchen as the central space for the layout where the family and friends could interact as a lovely meal was being prepared,” continues Rigoli, “The kitchen can be used for preparation, eating at, and also as a work space.” Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living Deeper inside the apartment, the bathrooms continue the darker palette of the kitchen, fitted out with black tiles and pale grey marble with black veins. The sleek colours offer a sense of reprieve from the busy city surrounding the apartment, and for the selected fixtures, Rigoli took his clients to Rogerseller, seeking similarly elegant and slim lined products, selecting the Catalano Premium and Verso washbasins and Sfera toilet, Apaiser Sublime bath, the sophisticated Fantini Levante tapware and Fantini Fukasawa hand shower, as well as accessories from the Cosmic and Hewi ranges. Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living “We selected the pans first, as the thin seat element was something that set them apart from most other products,” says Rigoli, “We then worked to select components that complements that sleek look. The process was very easy.” The resulting apartment is a cosy space of refuge from the city with a pared back interior that makes the home feel much more expansive than it is. Beautiful notes of contrasting finishes, from the marble to the reflective mirrors, balance the mix of black and white backdrops, harmoniously reflecting the cityscape outside, and truly creating a family home that is perfect for this new stage in its residents’ lives. Studio [R] Architecture studior.net.au Rogerseller rogerseller.com.au Bree Allen, Poppy Design 0499 777 867 Words by Christina Rae Photography by Tom Ferguson Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Living Studio R - Shelley Street Apartment | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes
MAGAZINE

How Do You Build in a World Heritage Rainforest?

Building anything in a previously untouched natural landscape requires a greater degree of sensitivity than usual. When that landscape is a 135 million-year-old rainforest in a UNESCO World Heritage site, the level of deference owing to the site itself trumps all other considerations. M3Architecture - Cape Tribulation - Daintree Rainforest | Habitus Living For Ben Vielle, one of the partners at M3 Architecture in Brisbane, who was asked by an existing client to build a holiday home on the fringes of the Daintree Rainforest, the idea proved irresistible. “The family came across this piece of land which was just an incredible find. The site runs from the start of the controversial Bloomfield track to the beach at Cape Tribulation. It’s just beautiful. They sent us an aerial photo of the area with an ‘x’ marking where they thought their site was. We don’t do too much residential work these days, but I knew this was an opportunity that was just too good to miss,” says Ben. M3Architecture - Cape Tribulation - Daintree Rainforest | Habitus Living While he was clearly very excited about working on the project, Ben also admits to some nervousness surrounding the ecological, cultural and political significance of the site. “The Daintree Rainforest is such a precious resource that we were nervous about building anything on the site to begin with. We decided fairly early on not to clear any mature trees. The site was quite dense but there were two clearings left by previously felled trees and we decided that they would be the best positions for building on.” M3Architecture - Cape Tribulation - Daintree Rainforest | Habitus Living Because it’s freehold land, the owners were actually entitled to clear as much of the forest as necessary to build a property, but both Ben and his client were keen to tread as lightly as possible. “In the original brief, the client was looking to create a boutique camping kind of a feel. Obviously the finished product is nothing like camping, it’s a three-bedroom house, but they were definitely looking to have that connection with nature, and to avoid dominating the site in any way,” explains Ben. Read the full story in Habitus issue #33, available now. M3Architecture m3architecture.com Words by Andrea O'Driscoll. Photography by Peter Bennetts. M3Architecture - Cape Tribulation - Daintree Rainforest | Habitus Living M3Architecture - Cape Tribulation - Daintree Rainforest | Habitus Living M3Architecture - Cape Tribulation - Daintree Rainforest | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
Parties

Celebrating B&B Italia’s 50th Anniversary.

The Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art played hot to B&B Italia and Space Furniture, who celebrated a landmark 50 years of B&B Italia Design lovers and design royalty enjoyed an evening of cocktails, mingling and a screening of the film B&B Italia. Poetry in the shape. When design meets industry. Following the film, indulged in the views offered by MCA's Sculpture Terrace, where guests mingled among some of the more iconic pieces from the B&B Italia range, all while enjoying a view of the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge. On display was the Husk collection by Patricia Urquiola, Naoto Fukasawa's Papilio series, and the Up series by Gaetano Pesce including the unforgettable red and white striped Big Mama. The night was a great celebration of design – and a look to the future. So here’s to the next fifty years! Space Furniture spacefurniture.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Neil Fenelon IMG_9850 IMG_9983 IMG_9943 IMG_9912 IMG_9898 IMG_9891 IMG_9862 IMG_9858 IMG_9852abc
Happenings
What's On

Unlocking Sydney’s Architectural Secrets

Celebrating its 12th year, Sydney Open is ready to open the doors to some of the city’s oldest and newest buildings – from the heritage listed HASSELL studio and the Mint, to the new Two International Towers in Barangaroo, With over 70 buildings and spaces across the Sydney CBD, Barangaroo, Walsh Bay, and The Rocks precincts, Sydney Open promises an intimate exploration of some truly unexpected design delights across Sydney. Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Living “Since the first Sydney Open event in 1997, over 62,000 people have explored over 400 buildings across the city. Sydney Open reminds visitors what an extraordinarily interesting city Sydney is,” enthuses Mark Goggin, the Executive Director of Sydney Living Museums, “Each year Sydney Open offers a glimpse inside Sydney’s incredible built heritage and insight into how great architecture influences our lives.” Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Living Sydney Living Museums is the caretaker of a number of Sydney’s historical sites in New South Wales, with a vested interest in ensuring that these buildings and public spaces stand the test of time and are well looked after on behalf of the people of New South Wales. Some of the buildings that Sydney Living Museum’s oversee include the Rose Seidler House, Government House, and The Mint. With such a distinguished history and area of expertise, Sydney Living Museums is uniquely positioned to curate the Sydney Open event. Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Living In celebration of the bicentenary of the NSW Government Architect’s Office, Sydney Living Museums has this year added an unprecedented number of public buildings that were created by the Government Architect’s Office, including Francis Greenway’s Hyde Park Barracks to the St. James Church. Excitingly, the St. James Tunnels are exclusively able to be explored by lucky holders of the Sydney Open Golden Ticket, as will the level 43 rooftop of the Two International Towers. “For anyone curious about their city, this weekend-long celebration of living architecture is not to be missed,” says Goggin, and we are inclined to agree. To purchase your tickets to Sydney Open, head to slm.is/open. Sydney Open 5th of November – 6th of November 2016 Sydney CBD Sydney Open sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/sydneyopen Sydney Living Museums sydneylivingmuseums.com.au Words by Christina Rae. Photography by Brett Boardman, Nicole England, Haley Richardson, Nicholas Watt and Stuart Miller. Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Living Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Living Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Living Sydney Living Museums | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

From auto-garage, to factory, to family home

The residential spaces of the warehouse have been stacking vertically, in a unique design flourish by MCK, serving as an alternate typology for the 21st century family home. Compared to the traditional horizontal standard seen in suburban development, the so-called W House delights in the site opportunities offered, with double height ceilings complementing the external courtyard of similar dimensions. This provides extended views to the city yet offers secure containment and a private space. The front façade leans back from the street, receding backwards to allow a sense of prominence for the heritage status façade. There is a journey from street to roof terrace, which is reinforced by the staircase focal point inside the space. A conversation with the surrounding environment is created with peeled back layers of factory and warehouse heritage, juxtaposed with white, floating and mirrored abstract design flourishes. This monochromatic approach continues MCK’s design philosophy that architecture should be about form and space, serving as a backdrop for the colour of the inhabitants and their family life. The W House received a commendation at the 2016 Australian Institute of Architects NSW annual Awards. MCK mckarchitects.com Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Richard Glover 1070-001 1070-004 1070-013 1070-029 1070-035abc
Design Products
Design Accessories

Is this the Future of Headphones?

On the tips of everybody’s lips at the moment is wireless technology: it started with the internet, then came smart phones. Streaming TV was soon to follow and now we’re looking at white goods that speak and interact with each other throughout the home. As the years between innovations dissipate into months some are beginning to wonder; just because it’s new, is it better? Just because we can do it, should we? There’s one example that’s sparked a pretty heated debate of late and following quite an influential move by apple, got people talking. I’m referring to, of course, wireless headphones. Here are where my concerns lie; sound quality – that’s an obvious one – earphones that rely on battery and, as silly as it may sound, losing track of something small that’s not plugged into something bigger. Having been sent a pair of the B&OPLAY H5 wireless headphones to roadtest I thought I’d share my experience. B&OPLAY H5 Wireless Headphones | Habitus Living Essentially we’re comparing the reproduction of sound to the transferring of sound. Straight up there was no issue with sound quality and the noise cancelling was like none other that I’ve experienced. Getting used to the wireless aspect wasn’t hard either, it was definitely easier not having to worry about where on my person – or in my seemingly bottomless bag – I put my phone. And tangled cords? Bye Felicia. Different sized ear tips give a tailored fit but make sure you try them all – a size too big fell out of my ears just as easily as a size too small did. Silicone ear tips are for the day-to-day while the Comply Sport ear tips are designed with a membrane to prevent moisture interfering with the electronics, making them ideal for gym use. That brings us to the battery life – the part we all love to complain about. A full charge, that’s five hours, lasts me about three days conservatively or one day on deadline. The charging dock is pretty discreet so while it might not be ideal to carry around it’s not too intrusive either. Ear buds that don’t fall out, tangled cords that don’t exist and some serious noise cancelling to drown out the ordeal of a daily commute? From day one I was on board. B&O PLAY beoplay.com  Words Holly Cunneen B&OPLAY H5 Wireless Headphones | Habitus Living B&OPLAY H5 Wireless Headphones | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

FORM + CWID After-a-Fair Wrap Party

Since 2006, FORM has been striving to create better communities, believing that the best and most vibrant places to live are those that nurture creativity, great design, and showcase cultural diversity. We can think of no one better suited to be our after party sponsor, and can’t wait to see what goes down on October 15th for Contemporary Wine In Design's final event the After-a-Fair Wrap Party! FORM work to build a cultural and creative ecology across Western Australia that values artistic excellence, expression, and improves access to the arts for everyone regardless of background. The group’s activities span high-level artist development and exhibitions, experiential installations and strategy, social and multicultural engagement, cultural infrastructure development, Aboriginal cultural maintenance, research, advocacy... and that's only half of it all! Ultimately FORM sees creativity as a catalyst for positive change, from the facilitating of relationships between artists and communities, to connecting creatives to stakeholders – positive outcomes are the main objective. The CWID After-a-Fair Wrap Party will be held at FORM’s latest project, The Goods Shed – designed by Cox Bailey Howlett & Bailey Woodland. The Goods Shed is FORM’s latest space for creativity, learning, and community engagement. The space has been designed as a hub where innovation can be fostered for both the general public and for the artistic community, to generate new ideas and build initiatives. The Goods Shed is housed in one of the state’s oldest surviving railway buildings, which has been newly restored and transformed to house a gallery, studio, workshop space, coffee window, and landscaped forecourt. The space will offer artist residencies in Perth, as well as the State’s regions. Residencies will result in artistic outcomes and community development across metropolitan and regional Western Australia and will ultimately function as a hub where visiting artists can develop and exhibit new work. For the first time ever, Indesign Media is bringing the design party to Perth - and The Goods Shed is hosting it. Join us at the Contemporary Wine In Design After-a-Fair Wrap Party on Saturday, October 15th. Rub shoulders with the industry’s leading players from across the state and the country, inspired by Perth’s growing design industry. #CWID16 After-a-Fair Get your tickets here FORM-6 FORM-5 FORM-4 FORM-3 FORM-2 13923562_10154303572886093_5341229669792741529_o_main  abc
Design Hunters
People

A Quiet Approach to Design that Screams Substance

Meeting Jacqueline Hunt for the first time she’s every bit the Jac+Jack woman: intelligent, cool, composed and somehow effortless but, most of all, super friendly. I take a seat on the Bertoia chair in the front of the new Bondi store while Jac grabs an Artek stool from out back. When I politely question the authenticity of the furniture her face drops, “Oh no, there’s nothing fake here”. I smile, relieved, and we begin our interview. Jac+Jack | Habitus Living Pushing back on a market saturated by excessive design is the rise and rise of quality basics. While this idea may have hit its stride in recent years Jacqueline Hunt and Lisa Dempsey, AKA Jac+Jack, have been doing it for years. Fifteen of them, to be exact. It’s a tall order to design spaces in which this quiet approach to clothing neither overwhelms nor under performs, but for five stores and counting, Jac and Lisa have enlisted the help of interior architect George Livissianis. He may not have been there from the beginning but, all things considered, it certainly seems he’ll be there until the bitter end. A casual conversation and a gut feeling saw this union of two like-minded design philosophies. Jac+Jack | Habitus Living Jac+Jack | Habitus Living All stores are designed to feel open and welcoming, an invitation to linger and browse. “[In the Bondi store] people are more than welcome to come in in their swimmers with water, with sand. That’s absolutely fine: prams, dogs, pets, whatever,” says Jac. And when questioned about the kind of atmosphere they’re trying to achieve in store she answers immediately, unambiguously with “a sense of ease”. The clothes themselves, made from natural linens, quality cottons, buttery soft cashmere and sumptuous silks, are incredibly tactile so George works to create spaces that mirror this. He uses similarly tactile, visual and natural materials such as plywood, copper, brass and marble. “I think the stores read very well [and] say exactly what we need [them] to say,” says Jac. Keeping their eyes peeled for a second London location and an open mind in regards to New Zealand, regional Australia and Asia – “TBA the USA” – things are hardly slowing down but, for the rest of the day at least, Jac has her sights set on finishing off SS17/18. Jac+Jack jacandjack.com George Livissianis georgelivissianis.com Words Holly Cunneen Jac+Jack | Habitus Living Jac+Jack | Habitus Living Jac+Jack | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Connect The Metal Dots

Norway’s Lars Tornøe has expanded the already successful Muuto hook family the Dots. Already a design love favourite, the Dots stand a new perspective on the hook as a concept, and Dots Metal is a further extension of this design family. Setting themselves apart in both scale and material, the new hooks allow for fresh applications. The original Dots design was derived from wood and timber, and was designed with a notable size in mind, while this new the new Dots Metal hooks have a sleeker and overall smaller look. Available in three different metals and emanating a more neutral expression, the Dots Metal is an easy choice for small spaces; such as for hand towels or dishcloths with a loop. The robust material makes it possible to use Dots Metal in the bathroom, as a knob on drawers, a cabinet handle, or closet door grip. Like with the original Dots family, the design begs for experimentation with layout – the Dots Metal range can be used singularly, in a row, in clusters or combined with their larger siblings 'the Dots'. “The characteristic little family of hooks is a friendly addition to any wall,” says Lars Tornøe on the design “Dots Metal are proud of their round edges and will treat your clothes with the greatest care. They will also let you arrange them on your wall in the pattern you like. Being a very social set of hooks, Dots Metal love to welcome other Dots to join them on the wall.” Tornøe graduated from the Bergen National Academy of the Arts and Design in 2006, and later that year co-founding the design collaboration Tveit & Tornøe. His designs for Muuto join the Muuto range of Scandinavian design. Muuto regularly joins forces with the leading contemporary designers to create original products with new perspectives. Muuto muuto.com Words by Andrew McDonald Dots_Metal_Control_med The_Dots_metal_3_sizes_aluminum_black_grey-med The_Dots_metal_3_sizes_aluminum_grey-mid The_Dots_metal_3_sizes_brass_grey-mid The_Dots_metal_set_of_5_aluminum_black_grey-med The_Dots_metal_set_of_5_aluminum_grey-mid The_Dots_metal_set_of_5_brass_grey-mid  abc
Architecture
Homes

A Secret Garden House For Tropical Living

For the Ng family, daily homecoming involves a distinct sense of transition from outside to inside, street to home; activity slows down to relative calm.The car returns to a cave-like garage – a granite grotto dramatised quietly by a circular skylight and the associated textural interplay of stone, water, timber and glass. Beyond the frames of a timber screen opening, a centralised steel and glass spiral staircase then leads one from this below-ground lobby to the rest of the home. Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living While the family of four had identified a substantial checklist of programmatic requirements (including having an karaoke entertainment room, a leisure room, a steam room and a shared study), their wishes for the character of the home remained relatively open: they desired a house that was luxurious, tropical, and contemporary. Robin Tan of Wallflower Architecture + Design was first and foremost interested in the ‘luxury’ of finding peace and tranquillity – which he says is not always easy to achieve given the density and urbanity of Singaporean residential estates. Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living “Our idea of tropical living is a house surrounded by garden. The idea is to create your own inward view,” he says, citing, as an inspiration, the si he yuan – the classical Beijing courtyard house designed to be shielded from the outside environment. While the Chinese housing model is thick-walled and laid out to emphasise Confucian ideals of a harmonised relationship with nature, individualism and meditative tranquillity, Tan is more interested to adapt these qualities to create a sense of comfort, quiet and privacy for the Singaporean house that is surrounded on all sides by neighbouring homes. Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living The house sits on an L-shaped site with a narrow frontage, with the land slightly raised behind. Tan saw in the topography an opportunity to camouflage the bulk of a large house, and to create a lush secret garden to screen it from prying eyes. The solution was to create a basement level and to tuck part of the house underground. “By burying one third of the house below ground, I create a basement level and form this ground (level) built ‘on stilts’,” Tan explains. This results in an architectural composition of two rectangular travertine blocks sitting on slender pilotis, with the common living spaces laid out above ground. Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living On this ground level, there is a generosity of space – a sense of openness with an intimate relationship with the landscape that gives full enjoyment of Singapore’s tropical climate and year-round greenery. Tan explains: “This ‘plateau’ ground level was planned to be a space that blended indoor and outdoor, soft-scape and hard-scape. It was to be one space, with several programs, rather than many spaces with determined boundaries and fixed functions. Trees planted heavily around the perimeter form a very private enclosure… Beauty comes from your unique asset which is the land – the land is your beauty.” Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living Throughout, Tan has used basic architectural principles of orientation, thermal mass, sun-screening and natural ventilation to create a house suited for the tropics. Every floor is designed to be cross-ventilated, with breezes encouraged to pass unhindered. In the basement, air flows through the large cave-like garage opening, passes through the timber slatted lobby and exits via a open-to-sky garden courtyard at the rear. Above ground, the lifted bedroom blocks are kept passively cool by layers of masonry, air cavities, travertine stone cladding, roof gardens and pergolas. Windows cut heat entry via low-emission glass and timber sunscreens filter the strong tropical sunlight. When the situation necessitates, the entire home can be closed off to tropical rainstorms or the haze from pollutive burning. Wallflower Architecture + Design’s Secret Garden House has just received an honourable mention at this year’s SIA Architectural Design Awards. Wallflower Architecture + Design wallflower.com.sg Words by Yvonne Xu. Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Living Secret Garden House - Wallflower Architecture + Design | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Tactile finishes meet organic lines at the Riverview House

Tactility and organic finishes were at the centre of the design aesthetic for the Riverview House. Locally sourced materials from MGArchitecture.Interiors resulted in a cohesive and streamlined outcome throughout. Each element of the design, from doors, to cabinetry to wall linings have been thoughtfully crafted to work with the existing framework of the original 1980s build. In a design planned to de-clutter, the ethos of “A place for everything” and desire to conceal the ordinary items of daily life give a sense of calm and space to the home. The original 1980’s house was designed with separate spaces for living, dining, food preparation and storage. Whilst this did allow for a stunning view for each room, the layout was not at all conducive to 21st century family life. Functionality and cohesiveness were at the core of the design approach – the ability to conceal much of the business of life behind sliding doors, and the ability to open everything up to allow a flow from one room to another give flexibility and class to the Riverview House. From individual cubbies for the three children, to the concealed shoe storage box at the entryway, the design of the house has been carefully considered and elegantly delivered. Bespoke heating registers became crafted as slots into the flooring and vertical board wall linings in locations to cleverly allow wet clothes to be dried efficiently in the Laundry space. MGArchitecture.Interiors mgai.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Peter Mathew River-View-House-15- River-View-House-14- River-View-House-13- River-View-House-12- River-View-House-11- River-View-House-10- River-View-House-9- River-View-House-7- River-View-House-6- River-View-House-5- River-View-House-4- River-View-House-3- River-View-House-2- River-View-House-1-abc
Happenings
What's On

Perth’s Contemporary Wine In Design is Coming

So you’ve probably heard that we’re coming for you, Perth. Contemporary Wine In Design is just around the corner, and we thought that you might like to know you’re already on the guest list. But you still want to know more, right? Well, From over 20 of Perth’s premier designer showrooms, all the big names in A+D today (all over the world), hot topic debates all over the city, wine (!), and the biggest party of the decade, you don’t want to miss out. Oh, what’s that? Party? Yeah, that’s right. One. Huge. Partaaay! Want a little taste? Well, we’ve just wrapped up Melbourne InDesign, and finally got back on our feet after that massive wrap party. Here’s how it went down. Team #MID16 brought back the industry’s most iconic bash – the Official Melbourne Indesign Wrap Party. Designed by SJB, Harry the Hirer’s recently unveiled showroom hosted this very important party where we rubbed shoulders with A&D’s most iconic players. A secret whisky room, jazz band, some pretty intense blue lighting, a surprise-reveal disco dance floor, and champagne for days. Thank you to everyone who joined us, partied hard and made some memories. Until next year! Our after party was proudly presented by Sunbrella, Sharp & Carter, Harry The Hirer, Starward Whisky, Eness, Flowers Vasette, and Cosentino. To get amongst it all at Contemporary Wine In Design, register your attendance here. Photography by Fiona Susantoabc