About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
What's On

JamFactory and Koskela: Two Worlds Collide

JamFactory was launched in the 70s, Koskela in the naughties, separated not only by decades but borders, too, the two have come together in a bid to bring South Australian design to Sydney. From November to December Koskela will be hosting a pop-up JamFactory concept store in their Rosebery showroom helping the South Australian non-for-profit reach new audiences. The pop-up will include pieces by artisans of glass, ceramics, timber and metal. There will also be space for the newly launched JamFactory furniture and lighting collections. Collections which include pieces designed by the likes of Adam Goodrum, Henry Wilson, Daniel Emma and the head of JamFactory’s Glass Studio, Karen Cunningham. Welcome news for Sydney siders eagerly anticipating the pieces in person. JamFactory x Koskela | Habitus Living In line with both brand’s goals of backing local talent (financially and physically), proceeds from the concept store will directly support JamFactory’s training and exhibition programs as well as contribute to the income of the individual artists and designers. For those with a foggy memory JamFactory has been aiding emerging movers, makers, creators and shakers refine their craft and establish themselves on the design scene since 1973. In addition to a two-year Associate training program they also provide exhibition spaces showcasing contemporary Australian craft. And if you’re wondering where the name came from, don’t overthink it. The founding building was originally an actual jam factory. There they stayed for nearly 20 years before relocating to a purpose built location in the heart of Adelaide’s West End Arts Precinct in which they still reside today. JamFactory x Koskela | Habitus Living Koskela, on the other hand, is a much more recent addition to Australia’s design scene. Founded in 2000 by Russel Koskela and Sasha Titchkosky, the founders pride themselves on designing for longevity. So much so that at the heart of their practise is the reoccurring theme of designs destined to become classics. Not just for the sake of delivering quality to the consumer but out of respect to the environment, too. JamFactory x Koskela | Habitus Living With similar intentions to JamFactory, the Koskela showroom, a 100-year-old warehouse with sandblasted brickwork and a saw-tooth roof, house their own furniture as well as a carefully curated selection of sustainable and Australian-made homewares, furniture and art. They’re also deeply committed to social enterprise working with Australian Indigenous artists and artisans since 2009 to achieve economic independence. JamFactory x Koskela | Habitus Living With an eye for increasing their presence in the Sydney Market over the coming years, collaborating with Koskela is simply the first step in an exciting new direction for JamFactory. JamFactory jamfactory.com.au Koskela koskela.com.au Words Holly Cunneen. Photography Andre Castellucci, Anna Fenech Harris and Sven Kovac. JamFactory x Koskela | Habitus Living JamFactory x Koskela | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Joost Bakker Envisions Green Buildings Across the Globe

“My dream,” Joost Bakker says, “is that in 20 years’ time our food will be grown in the very suburbs in which we live. And all building rooftops will allow for that to happen. “I have no doubt,” he continues, “that by the time I’m 60 [17 years from now] suburbs will have more biodiversity than the densest rainforests. And it will be our buildings that grow the vegetation we eat.” Joost Bakker | Habitus Living “I really love my house,” says Joost. “But my biggest regret is that I didn’t put a green roof on it. Of course, once I’d finished the house, I had all this confidence and I realised in hindsight that I should have done it. From that moment on I vowed I wouldn’t do another building without a green roof.” A promise that he has made good on since then. Joost Bakker | Habitus Living It was always Joost’s intention to build his family home on leafy, green acreage, surrounded by gardens and bush. It took 10 years of hunting for himself and wife, Jennie, to find their perfect block of land – 2.4 hectares in the Dandenong Ranges of Victoria. “I wanted a place with good soil for gardening and somewhere I would be able to sit, have dinner and watch the sunset,” says Joost. They didn’t build immediately. In fact, they levelled an acre where the house would sit, and set up a septic system that would feed nutrients into their newly planted orchard. Joost Bakker | Habitus Living Joost, an ex-Dutch national, has vivid memories of his young life in Holland where a south-facing garden was an essential to every home. “I’ve found in Australia that home gardens aren’t as prevalent (or used as much for entertaining, dinners, etcetera), because we so often build on steep blocks. You might walk out onto your verandah, but unless you make a physical effort to create a garden…”  ‘Well, it’s worth it, bugs and all’, is Joost’s unspoken sentiment, as he points to his own permeable home layout, which allows the family to walk straight out and into the surrounding gardens from every room. Read the full story in Habitus issue #33, available now. Joost Bakker byjoost.com Words by Alice Blackwood. Photography by Earl Carter. Joost Bakker | Habitus Living Joost Bakker | Habitus Living Joost Bakker | Habitus Living Joost Bakker | Habitus Living Joost Bakker | Habitus Living Joost Bakker | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Furniture

A Bookshelf for Wine Lovers

Living Edge is truly at the vanguard of discerning taste. As the foremost design destination for architects, interior designers, and design enthusiasts, the team has curated a remarkable collection through Living Edge’s promise to foster and support authentic design. With an all-encompassing, holistic service, each brand in this impressive portfolio is carefully selected for the quality and significance of its designs, its responsiveness to the Australian market, and an uncompromising commitment to social responsibility at the core of sustainable design practice. Libreria del Vino - Wine Library | Habitus Living Recognising that ‘collecting’ and ‘connoisseurship’ are attitudes shared equally by wine- and book-enthusiasts, Living Edge have brought us the ultimate crowd-pleaser. Designed by the Australian-born, Italian-based brothers behind Elite, To Be, the Libreria del Vino (Wine Library) is inspired by those centuries-old vineyards dotted throughout Northern Italy. Redolent, equally, of both Tuscan charm and Milanese lustre, the Libreria del Vino bears its inherent drama with stylishly understated panache. Libreria del Vino - Wine Library | Habitus Living Available exclusively through Living Edge, the Libreria del Vino is a timeless, impressive and customisable wine storage solution constructed entirely out of laser cut iron corten. Perfect for use in kitchens, wine cellars, wineries, restaurants, and even homes, the Libreria del Vino is distinguished by a minute attention to fabrication and material detailing. Available in six different modules, the options for optimum customisation are virtually endless. The modular bookcase is rendered with even more charm through the addition of the ladder supported by rolling casters, accompanying rails and softly diffused back lighting. Holding different bottle sizes and shapes, the Libreria del Vino is available in oak, suar wood, corten hard finishing, lacquered in white, red, burgundy, ivory, dark grey and black. Living Edge livingedge.com.au Words by Christina Rae. Libreria del Vino - Wine Library | Habitus Living Libreria del Vino - Wine Library | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
Parties

Dinosaur Designs: 30 Years of Inspiration

Dinosaur Designs have been a significant powerhouse in the Australian creative community for 30 years, with their signature aesthetic infusing their numerous jewellery and resin object collections. In celebration of this, Louise Olsen and Stephen Ormandy, the dynamic duo behind the brand, have launched their first book, The Art of Dinosaur Designs in commemoration of their achievements and evolution.

"With this book, we want to open our hearts and minds to you, and share our inspirations, ideas and processes. We’d like to welcome you to our studio, where all our resin pieces are made, and share our insights into the processes we’ve developed over many years while creating the visual language of Dinosaur Designs," say Louise and Stephen.

The launch event was hosted at the Olsen Irwin Gallery in Sydney's Woollahra on the 28th of September.

Dinosaur Designs dinosaurdesigns.com.au

Words by Christina Rae.

Photography by Chloe Paul.

Dinosaur Designs 30th Birthday | Habitus Living Dinosaur Designs 30th Birthday | Habitus Living Dinosaur Designs 30th Birthday | Habitus Living Dinosaur Designs 30th Birthday | Habitus Living Dinosaur Designs 30th Birthday | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

A Photography Exhibition That Will Melt Your Heart

When we think of summer, we picture crowded beaches, sizzling barbecues, long road trips and ice cream trucks snaking their way down suburban streets. Yet when there’s ice cream and heat together, there’s melting.  While melting rarely brings joy, it can still be mesmerising or intoxicating. This is the feeling that artist Simone Rosenbauer explores, in her new show opening at .M Contemporary this October.

Simone Rosenbauer | Habitus Living

As bold, quintessentially summertime images, the Like Ice in the Sunshine series II (L.A) captures a melancholy reality: bitter or sweet. The images evoke the idea that all memories eventually melt into the flow of life. They recall summer’s heady experience and the fleeting nature of memories and life.

For her latest show Rosenbauer depicts American ice creams, melted under the sun awhile she was in residency at Little House Gallery in L.A.

Her work recalls the pop iconography of Andy Warhol's 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans shown in L.A in way back 1962. The melting motif even suggests the most famous melting image of all time, The Persistence of Memory by artist Salvador Dalí painted in 1931. 

Simone Rosenbauer | Habitus Living

In the 21st century the idea of melting continues to appear in art.  It has been appropriated by artists to symbolise something precious slipping away and used more literally, to discuss issues of global warming and consumer excess.

In recent years Simone Rosenbuaer has become best known for her series of melting ice creams and ice blocks, which are crushed, melted, dissolved and decomposing before our eyes.

Her very first series of Australian ice creams, was shown at .M Contemporary in February 2015 and in July 2015 at the Laurence Miller Gallery in New York. 

Simone Rosenbauer | Habitus Living

“For Like Ice in the Sunshine I focused on the happy simplicity of the iconic Australian Paddle Pops, to dwell on ephemeral experiences and to embody the frailty of changing identities,” artist Simone Rosenbauer says. 

Originally from Germany, the internationally acclaimed artist who now lives in Bondi Beach says that when "photographed on monochrome colourful backgrounds, ice melts under the hot Australian sun and is captured by the camera, leading to childlike summer metaphors".

“Objects trigger memory and stir a longing for things that have passed, their changing form is animated by the sun and captured in a frozen sliver of time,” Rosenbauer says.

Simone Rosenbauer | Habitus Living

M Contemporary Owner and Curator Michelle Paterson says the exhibition is exciting because people can connect to it straight away.

“The images are incredible in the flesh. They have to be seen on the wall for people to really appreciate them. I love them because Rosenbauer really draws upon her personal views of the self, fleeting moments and chequered memories to create this series. She takes the happy simplicity of an ice block in the sun and she captures moments loved and lost. She dwells on ephemeral experiences to chart the strength, and frailty, of changing identities,” Paterson says.

While the output of this artist is direct, unusual and even unexpected - it fits well with the Australian summer narrative. Leaping off of the walls with eye piercing clarity, these images, in their simplicity and gooeyness speak to the relaxed nature of Australian summers. They remind us to live in the present.

Like Ice In The Sunshine II (LA) by Simone Rosenbauer 8th of October - 29th of October 2016 .M Contemporary 37 Ocean Street Woollahra, NSW

Simone Rosenbauer simonerosenbauer.com

.M Contemporary mcontemp.com Words by Belinda Aucott.abc
Happenings
What's On

All Right, Stop. Collaborate + Listen @ CWID

We need to talk. The A+D community today is facing an unprecedented amount of backlash. You might think that, beholden as we are to the vicissitudes of commerce, our degree of agency is somewhat curtailed. And, in some cases this is true. There is, however, an extremely large degree to which the autonomy of the A+D community is actually growing from strength to strength. Thanks to our friends across the Atlantic, landmark legislation surrounding the intellectual property of design has finally granted us with a fully equipped arsenal of tools for self-protection. Now that we're finally making grounds on doing away with 'the replica' (and all errant forms of shady profiteering that market has bred), we now look to our involvement in other spheres of stakeholder engagement. Our participation in the private, public and even commercial spheres is suddenly under an almost crippling level of scrutiny. But this is not a bad thing in the very least. In what is undoubtedly an overdue turn in the pedagogical and socio-political thinking around A+D, we are now increasingly aware of our own complicity in what can sometimes be the dark underbelly of our industry. While we inch closer and closer to a more holistic standard of responsibility in architecture and design, I am starting to feel it is only appropriate that we take a moment to give ourselves the third degree. Has anyone stopped to think about what the new directions we're taking might just actually mean? Borrowing its name from Charles Kingsley's seminal 1855 novel, Contemporary is bringing a series of hot-topic panel discussions to the West for Contemporary Wine In Design, October 15th. Entitled Westward Ho! these seminars are imbued with as much spirit and reflection as Kingsley's tale of adventure, the New World and the inquisitive nature of reaching out to new frontiers. Butting in on the design discussion across Western Australia, these lively and heated industry talks put a spotlight on A+D in a wholly new way. Surrounding topics relevant to the disciplines and professions of A+D today, the foci may be West Coast, but the insightfulness is valid worldwide. So, are you ready? Here's a taste: East v West Design discussion often throws the words 'collaboration' and 'co-operation' around a little too recklessly. In Western Australia, the word 'competition' should be added to the mix. The focus and hype around A+D in this country is undeniably skewed in favour of the East Coast. But what does the West do differently? What is the distinction between the two orientations toward design? What can we learn? Design Democracy: ! or ? The way the public perceives design is often very different to how the industry perceives it. This comes as no shock whatsoever. With huge projects like the New Museum or the revamped Perth Stadium on the cards, the design discussion in WA is not in the studio: it's on the street. What does designing for the public sphere actually mean? Is this the only public? Meanwhile, in Europe, there is heated debate on the designer-side too. With landmark legislation that attempts to finally do away with 'the replica', democracy in design has come full circle to include the producer-side as well. When we talk about democracy in design, just how far-reaching are the ramifications? West-Side Stor(e)y Looking backward, moving forward, Perth's cityscape has a unique architectural identity. But, alongside massive redevelopments of some of the city's old icons - The Treasury, Allendale Square, the Walsh Family Residence - we have to think about what architecture is worth protecting. How important is creating or maintaining an architectural identity? How much of a role should architects and designers have in the story of Perth's identity? Go West! With the increased investment in Western Australia's cultural and civil infrastructure, we have to ask what our A+D community is doing that seems to be getting the world's attention. Tourism on the West Coast is growing from strength to strength annually, and the unique skyline of Perth is luring visitors from all over the globe. What did A+D do that has helped make Perth an international destination? How have they done this? Or, simply, why? With full CPD accreditation, the biggest names in A+D today, and the most controversial issues we're currently facing, be sure to register your attendance at Contemporary Wine In Design here. Contemporary Wine In Design contemporaryau.com/wine-in-design Words by David Congram.abc
Architecture
Homes

From Warehouse to Ware-Home

In reconfiguring the space of a two-storey warehouse into a three-floor home, Sydney’s MCK Architects opted to retain the existing vernacular of the space, and adapt adapted the dimensions to suit the home, rather than start from scratch. The result is a three storey high void running parallel to the length of the site, which sits adjacent to a floating cellar and below a rooftop vegetable garden. The design of the home revels in the opportunities the site offered, with a notably high internal void complimenting a smaller outdoor space that lets light in to what is an otherwise significantly industrial design. The exposed brick and wood style approach of the internal cladding continues MCK’s philosophy that the architecture of a design should be about form and space, standing as backdrop for the colour of the inhabitants and their family life. The family life itself continued to take place within the semi-completed work as it was built, which imbues the build with sincerity and a hands on approach, as a family watched their dream become a reality. The final build is a wonderful contrast of earthy materials, such as stone; timber, and concrete, which are set off by brighter fittings and furnishings that a warm, industrial flavour. MCK Architects mckarchitects.com Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Douglas Frost chelsea-st-4 chelsea-st-6 chelsea-st-7 chelsea-st-11 chelsea-st-3 chelsea-st-2 chelsea-st-1abc
Architecture
Homes

How Can We Create a Design Democracy?

House B, designed by Sandy Anghie in collaboration with Matthew Crawford Architects, is the sister-home of House A, reported earlier this year by our own sister site, ContemporaryAU. Far from being a twin, however, “the two houses respond to their east and west sites and are distinguished both in plan and elevation,” says Anghie. House B’s design works with (and is ultimately kinder to) the environment, making the most of natural light and cross ventilation to eliminate the need for overusing heating and cooling products. In what represents a highly considerate step forward in integrating sustainable design thinking into the residential sector, House B is characteristically responsive to the ecological urgency we currently face. Featuring high-level operable windows, thermal insulation, north-facing shaded openings (and the provision for future solar power collection), the environmental sustainability of everything from floorplan, spatial attuning, and the inclusion of more detailed elements comes as a much-welcome – and much needed – holistic approach. The house has a c-shaped floor plan, and is separated by a central courtyard into two zones: living and bedrooms. Demarcating co-operating but still distinct zones for privacy and communality in a single level home on a small lot (10 metres by 50 metres) may sound like a tall order, yet by separating space and thus behaviour in this way, House B has trounced off the challenge with the same characteristic aplomb of Anghie's entire portfolio. Every inch of the lot is optimised as the design reaches to the very parameters of the bounded property, while capaciousness, focal and spatial depth for freedom of movement are further supported by an open floorplan. Currently nation-wide, the disproportionate ratio of developed residential sites to our per-capita population presents a distinct challenge to our A+D community. Never has the need to deliver innovative and sustainable (ecological and socio-economic) design solutions been quite so pressing. “Currently 98.6% of houses in Dalkeith are single houses on quarter acre blocks, with the remaining 1.4% being older style duplexes. […] However, with an ageing population and reduced household sizes, other options are required” says Anghie. House B acts as a prototype for future developments in the neighbourhood, demonstrating what can be achieved with an economy of space: functional, spacious and sustainable homes without the need of building up. “While many people in Dalkeith have been reluctant to embrace development in the past, the house provides an example of how increased density can be achieved in a sensitive form”. Sandy-Anghie_House-B_02 It is clear that Anghie takes quite seriously the needs of a changing community, while maintaining a sensitivity to the current aesthetic formal language(s) of the neighbourhood. Elements of House B’s façade “take cues from the architecture of early to mid-century homes which characterise Dalkieth”. An echoing harmony of the old and new is created here as we see the influence of the area's characteristic art deco homes reflected in the modern geometric design of the space: a delicate and joyous meditation on those elements of refined yet extravagant balance, abandon and poise, so central to the palette and form of the early Twentieth Century. House B's neutral tonality and warm natural materials of stone, quartz and teak contributes to the feeling of refreshing modernity that feels always, already, infused with the familiar. Anghie’s design ethos is based around principles of collaboration. This latest offering continues the mutually collaborative engagement betwen homeowner and designer that extends from brief all the way through to delivery. Such a democratic approach to the design process allows a highly personalised nature to heavily inform the design of what is, quite essentially, the most important structure which we allow to shape our lives: the home. Sandy Anghie's orientation to the underpinning ethos and sociological stakeholder networks of A+D today represents what we believe to be an important step forward in responsive design practice. In what is undoubtedly an overdue turn in the pedagogical and socio-political thinking around A+D, Anghie's approach is indicative of the fact that we are now increasingly aware of our own complicity in what can sometimes be the dark underbelly of our industry. While we inch closer and closer to a more holistic standard of responsibility in architecture and design, Contemporary is proud to announce that Sandy Anghie will be participating in our upcoming inaugural event Contemporary Wine In Design, this October 15th. Weighing-in on our seminar Design Democracy: ! or ?, Sandy Anghie will be speaking alongside Alec Coles OBE (Museum of Western Australia, New Museum), Andrew Thornton-Hick (Ultimo Interiors), David Caon (Caon Studio) Peter Lee (Hassell) and Contemporary's Editor David Congram on the state of thought and thoughtfulness in design today. Design Democracy: ! or ? The way the public perceives design is often very different to how the industry perceives it. This comes as no shock whatsoever. With huge projects like the New Museum or the revamped Perth Stadium on the cards, the design discussion in WA is not in the studio: it’s on the street. What does designing for the public sphere actually mean? Is this the only public? Meanwhile, in Europe, there is heated debate on the designer-side too. With landmark legislation that attempts to finally do away with ‘the replica’, democracy in design has come full circle to include the producer-side as well. When we talk about democracy in design, just how far-reaching are the ramifications? Reserve yourself a place now by visiting the Contemporary Wine In Design seminar site. With full CPD accreditation, the biggest names in A+D today, and the most controversial issues we’re currently facing, be sure to register your attendance at Contemporary Wine In Design here. Sandy Anghie Home Design sandyanghiedesign.com Matthew Crawford Architects mcarchitects.com.au Photography by Dion Robeson. Words by Genevieve Muratore. Sandy-Anghie_House-B_03 Sandy-Anghie_House-B_13 Sandy-Anghie_House-B_09abc
Design Products
Furniture

Bringing European Design to Australian Shores

With the GDP across China, the Middle East and much of mainland Europe continuing to wane, the Asia Pacific region is blessed with a steadily growing economic climate. Sometimes, it is all too easy to take our general fiscal buoyancy and resilience for granted. But what would it mean for Asia Pacific if market size, competition, and cost became all too much to truly support the global A+D community? A worrying rhetoric frequently crosses the lips of the United States and Europe, especially, over the eternal struggle to support global design and architecture outside of the initial parent country. The worry should not be understated. Where, that is, there is the problem of generating external brand presence, forging a rapid and robust distribution network, the real tribulations of international design presence lies in avoiding compromise on the levels of quality, craftsmanship, design and engineering that is so central to any brand history. Walter Knoll | Habitus Living Marooned, as we are, in the middle of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, poised equidistant from most major international design houses and suppliers, the task of bringing Europe or America to the Australian market for design is mammoth and fastidious. One company that has taken the scuffles and hurdles of Australian isolation in its stride, emerging triumphant, is the renowned German luxury furniture manufacturer Walter Knoll. Since the inter-war period, Walter Knoll has been synonymous for furniture that is modern, ageless, and distinctly European in its vitality. But how has this powerhouse not only maintained but actively expanded its brand presence so far away from home and seemingly against all odds? At the heart of Walter Knoll’s success in Australia is the speed of their innovation cycle – the time period between product concept and delivery. What is otherwise known in the industry as ‘specification’, this integrated approach to design and supply rests on communication and accountability through the design/production lifecycle, and brings together designers, planners, logistics and production managers into the same dialogue as global trading partners and, finally, the consumer. For this German brand, getting customised European product on the spec is contingent almost entirely on lead-time reduction. Walter Knoll | Habitus Living After all, appreciating consumer trends and then delivering to that demand with speed across all facets of design, manufacture, logistics and dispatch enables both brands and suppliers to present demand-tailored products that improve turnaround time. As a result, Walter Knoll launched their Australian outpost – Walter Knoll Australia – back in 2007 in what was, then, a decidedly different design marketplace and, admittedly, quite a shaky global economic climate. This Adelaide-based subsidiary is the result of a decade-long partnership between the Australian market and the German brand, where Walter Knoll Australia both manufactures and supplies specialised collections for the Asia Pacific A+D community. In what is truly an inspired feat of lead-time-reduction, Walter Knoll Australia co-ordinates all elements of the supply chain in a management system as elegant as any of its iconic products. Synchronising the manufacturing processes of various partners, rigorous user-performance testing, product development, sourcing capabilities and co-ordinating local trading partners all under one roof, the Walter Knoll Australia subsidiary has achieved time and time again the most elusive reward of all: brilliance and relevance to the Australian market’s eyes. Walter Knoll walterknoll.com.au Words by David Congram. Walter Knoll | Habitus Livingabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Redefining Outdoor Living

EcoSmart Fire has released a range of new standalone fireplaces with an emphasis is on redefining outdoor living. “Our outdoor fires provide the ultimate drawcard with a myriad of benefits – warmth, captivating illumination, not to mention the ability to define spaces,” says Stephane Thomas, creator of EcoSmart Fire. “They add a simple but stylish design element to the outdoor room or garden – or indoor environment – creating a focal point and enhancing the ambience. The EcoSmart Fire collection has been designed to accommodate both the designer creating a custom fireplace feature, as well as the design lover after an out-of-the-box fire solution. Incredible versatile and clean burning, the EcoSmart Fire collection uses ethanol to give a clean burn, and allowed the designer absolute flexibility to create exactly what is needed – inside or out. “Akin to the kitchen being the heart of the home, these outdoor fires are the centrepiece of ‘gathering spaces’ – drawing people in, whether for a domestic or commercial environment,” says Stephane. From hand crafted freestanding pieces of fire furniture, to integrated grates for traditional fireplace conversion and burner kits for bespoke settings - EcoSmart Fire offers a complete collection of versatile fireplace solutions that make having an open flame incredibly easy, safe, and good for the environment. EcoSmart Fire ecosmartfire.com.au 19159917_ecosmart-base-privatecom-jap 19159921_ecosmart-wharf-privateres-jap 19159920_ecosmart-lh_series-privatecom-jap 19159919_ecosmart-step_fire_pit-private_res 19159918_ecosmart-glow-privateres-japabc
Happenings
What's On

You Gonna Learn Today: #CWID16

Borrowing its name from Charles Kingsley’s seminal 1855 novel, Contemporary is bringing a series of hot-topic panel discussions to the West for Contemporary Wine In Design, October 15th. Entitled Westward Ho! these seminars are imbued with as much spirit and reflection as Kingsley’s tale of adventure, the New World and the inquisitive nature of reaching out to new frontiers. Butting in on the design discussion across Western Australia, these lively and heated industry talks put a spotlight on A+D in a wholly new way. Surrounding topics relevant to the disciplines and professions of A+D today, the foci may be West Coast, but the insightfulness is valid worldwide. Seats are filling up fast for these talks, so be sure to register your attendance via the links below: East v West @ Arthur G Design discussion often throws the words ‘collaboration’ and ‘co-operation’ around a little too recklessly. In Western Australia, the word ‘competition’ should be added to the mix. The focus and hype around A+D in this country is undeniably skewed in favour of the East Coast. But what does the West do differently? What is the distinction between the two orientations toward design? What can we learn? Speakers: Richard Misso (The Stylesmiths), David Weir (David Weir Architects), Steve Cordony (Arthur G) and David Congram (Contemporary Editor) Reserve your seat here. Design Democracy: ! or ? @ Living Edge The way the public perceives design is often very different to how the industry perceives it. This comes as no shock whatsoever. With huge projects like the New Museum or the revamped Perth Stadium on the cards, the design discussion in WA is not in the studio: it’s on the street. What does designing for the public sphere actually mean? Is this the only public? Meanwhile, in Europe, there is heated debate on the designer-side too. With landmark legislation that attempts to finally do away with ‘the replica’, democracy in design has come full circle to include the producer-side as well. When we talk about democracy in design, just how far-reaching are the ramifications? Speakers: Alec Coles OBE (Western Australia Museum, New Museum), Peter Lee (Hassell), David Caon (Caon Studio), Sandy Anghie (Sandy Anghie Home Design), Andrew Thornton Hick (Ultimo) Reserve your seat here. West-Side Stor(e)y @ Innerspace Looking backward, moving forward, Perth’s cityscape has a unique architectural identity. But, alongside massive redevelopments of some of the city’s old icons – The Treasury, Allendale Square, the Walsh Family Residence – we have to think about what architecture is worth protecting. How important is creating or maintaining an architectural identity? How much of a role should architects and designers have in the story of Perth’s identity? Speakers: Clinton Matthews (Lantern Creative), Jemma Green (Curtin University), Suzanne Hunt (Suzanne Hunt Achitect), Benjamin Braham (Braham Architects) Reserve your seat here. Go West! @ Artedomus With the increased investment in Western Australia’s cultural and civil infrastructure, we have to ask what our A+D community is doing that seems to be getting the world’s attention. Tourism on the West Coast is growing from strength to strength annually, and the unique skyline of Perth is luring visitors from all over the globe. What did A+D do that has helped make Perth an international destination? How have they done this? Or, simply, why? Speakers: Michael Woodhams and Phillip Griffiths (AIA WA Chapter), Neil Cownie (Neil Cownie Architects), Jack Flanagan (Jack Flanagan) Reserve your seat here. With full CPD accreditation, the biggest names in A+D today, and the most controversial issues we’re currently facing, be sure to register your attendance at Contemporary Wine In Design now. Contemporary Wine In Design wineindesign.comabc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Art House Kitchen

The kitchen renovation, finished by The English Tapware Company, features a Perrin & Rowe Contemporary Orbiq tap with spray rinse, and is is complemented by burnished brass Jaspette drawer pulls from Armac Martin. Like fine art, these English-made fittings are an investment in value long term and in the enjoyment they impart every day. The Orbiq tape sees sharp detailing meet smooth cylindrical curves and a flawless finish. Designed to suit any modern kitchen, the Orbiq is the archetypal contemporary kitchen tap – with a cylindrical body, round levers and a curved spout. The Jaspette drawer is of simple yet beautiful design, finished with a unique, luxurious brass handle, utilising soft curves and straight lines. The English Tapware Company englishtapware.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald. Wood-St-House89 Wood-St-House77 Wood-St-House75 Wood-St-House74 Wood-St-House73 Wood-St-House70 Wood-St-House67  abc