About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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APPROVALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Two specialists, One Kitchen

Sub-Zero is the food preservation specialist. Having spent 70 years creating products of uncompromised craftsmanship for keeping food fresher for longer, Sub-Zero extends its design philosophy beyond that of the humble fridge, employing state-of-the-art food-preservation technologies. Sub-Zero has pioneered the dual refrigeration technology, which saw the proliferation of separate cooling systems for the refrigerator and freezer. This simple idea that the refrigerator and freezer don’t share air makes a huge difference in the freshness and flavour of food. In the refrigerator fresh food stays fresh in cool, moist air while in the freezer, frigid, dry air prevents freezer burn. Optimal humidity and proper temperature design is crucial to keeping food fresh. To preserve your individual identity and feed your inner Design Hunter, Sub-Zero offers a range of designs that stand out or sit seamlessly alongside existing kitchen space; from side by side refrigerator and freezer units, to slender columns and drawers. Built-in models are available with hand-finished wrapped stainless steel doors and others can be faced with custom hardware or cabinet panels. Handsome lines, a distinctive grille and sleek hinges are unmistakeable elements making Sub-Zero a design icon. Matching the cooling properties of a modern Sub-Zero fridge are the heating powers of Wolf cooking devices, which enable such precise temperature control to ensure dish you have in mind is the dish brought to the table. The Wolf designs are sleek with modern flair, or classic with professional-style equipment, with the equipment ranging from the compact to the grand; build your kitchen around your preference. With gas, electric, dual fuel, induction, and steam all available in the Wolf range, there’s no need for the design lover to compromise From hot to cold and back again, Sub-Zero and Wolf are two specialists destined to harmonize in one exceptional kitchen. Sub-Zero Wolf subzero-wolf.com.au ICBIC-30RID_ICBIC-30FI_ICB427G_ICBDF484CG EC24_CW24_CSO24TE_IC-24R_IC-24FI_DF366_PW362418_crop 1489-1008-1009-Ad-9_Pro-48-DualFuelRange-48_v5_G7C1_300abc
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Design Products
Furniture

A Sunburned Country: Design and the Australian Sun

You would be hard-pressed to come to an absolute conclusion whether, for Australians, December 1st or January 1st causes more celebration. Sure, the New Year seems to capture our imaginations with brilliant fireworks displays across the country. But, December 1st sets fireworks off in our hearts every year without fail. As the first day of summer we suffuse it with so much fantasy: the dreamed sensation of sunshine on the back of our necks; the smell of sunscreen and sea-salt; of those long afternoons spent sipping local wines of such unique sweetness, like a tart green apple sliced with a cold steel knife. The Australian orientation toward summer proves that our way of life quintessentially revolves around the outdoors. However, this doesn’t come without its distinct problems. The Australian climate is notoriously harsh and unforgiving. Stylecraft | Raft | HL Recent innovation to research and development processes within our A+D community has been concerned with ways in which we can respond to such extreme conditions. For instance, Urban Commons – the proudly Australian-made and owned furnishing brand established in 2011 – understands that central to designing for the Australian outdoors is the need to consider endurance as a key element in the design process. Their recent Raft Collection by Justin Hutchison for Stylecraft takes materiality one step beyond ‘longevity’ to really respond to what endurance might mean under the unforgiving conditions of the Australian sun. Stylecraft | Raft | HL Featuring heat-retardant mild steel zinc powder coating, the Raft Collection of modular seating options is rigorously tested for superior anti-corrosive powers. High-purity fine-grained zinc particles doubly prevent the eroding properties of salt, long-term rust and sun bleaching. Coupled with the hard wood element of Australian Spotted Gum slats, the Raft Collection weathers our local extremes while remaining just at home on balconies or rooftop gardens as well as residential or commercial spaces. Stylecraft | Raft | HL Designed to promote the ‘common spirit’ of connecting people with one another and their environment, the collection’s adaptability allows for multiple configurations thanks to various length platforms, high or low backrests, accompanying tables, slide armrests and planter boxes. All upholstered elements adhere to the demanding R+D standards of engineering Stylecraft is known for: the robust performance characteristics of textiles that are resistant to fading, degradation, sunlight and chemical exposure. Stylecraft stylecraft.com.au Words by David Congram.abc
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Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Celebrating 130 Years of Methven Innovation

Methven was founded in New Zealand in 1886, originally specializing in the manufacture of high quality brassware – and over the years the Methven team has learned a lot about water, from how to treat precious natural resource with care, to how to harness its power to cleanse, calm, refresh and invigorate. Entering its 130th year, Methven is now a renowned name in world leading water technology, matched with beautiful design. This award winning design popularity stems from a deep knowledge of water and fluid dynamics tied to Methven’s unique history on the small island nation of New Zealand, which has imbued a deep consideration for this resource as the company has grown over the last 130 years. The milestone anniversary has Methven joining a prestigious group of companies around the world that have been in business for such a huge time. It’s in this historical year that New Zealand Prime Minister the Right Honourable John Key officially opened Methven’s new head office and state of the art global experience centre and manufacturing facility. 19159917_methven_opening-0202 This all-new purpose-built facility demonstrates a long term commitment to local New Zealand manufacturing, and includes stations for every part of Methven’s process from design, engineering and tool making, to eventual foundry, polishing and assembly. The site also features a dedicated space for the showcasing of the company’s proprietary technology and innovative designs, The Source. 19159918_methven_opening-0050 Part showroom, part inspiration zone, the area has been designed to allow freethinking and unfettered interaction with Methven products, including the award winning Satinjet and Aurajet showers. Products in the space are showcased on mobile product pods, working shower displays and in two designed specified functioning bathrooms. 19159919_methven_opening-0038 So happy 130th anniversary to Methven – we can’t wait to see what these designers have in store next. 19159920_methven_opening-0058 Methven methven.com Words by Andrew McDonaldabc
Happenings
Parties

Celebrating the Dulux World of Colour Series II

The Dulux World of Colour Series II sees a new Colour Atlas & Fandeck launched to the joy of painters and design lovers the country over. The Colour Series II is Dulux’s biggest colour launch in a decade, and the party in Surry Hills’ Dolphin Hotel was one to match. A dance routine, live entertainment, and of course a photo-shoot with the famous Dulux Sheepdog, were the background the night, where Dulux’s all new and expanded colour range was the star. The World of Colour Series II, and accompanying 2017 Colour Trends, prescribes colour as antidotes to many challenges of modern life – colour can serve as a practical solution to transforming the feel and design of a space to become a private haven for relaxation. The night was a colourful celebration of all things design, and a great way to kick off the new era of Dulux colour. Dulux dulux.com.au 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11424 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-26735 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-26729 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-26726 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11758 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11753 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11752 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11710 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11676 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11639 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11637 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11625 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11607 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11575 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11570 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11556 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11529 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11517 2016-Dulux-Colour-Launch-Sydney-©-SaltyDingo-2016-11510  abc
Happenings
What's On

At Home: Modern Australian Design

Hero Image: Shrink Lamp by Daast Design, Jugaad with Car Parts by Trent Jansen, ION ‘O’ Lights by Porcelain Bear & Pheasant and Pangolin Vitrine by Kate Rohde. The outstanding work of 50 leading Australian designers and studios is currently on display in Parramatta, Sydney, as part of At Home: Modern Australian Design at Old Government House. Hosted by the National Trust and curated by David Clark, the exhibition is a considered and surprising look at domestic design across a 200-year period. Juxtaposing modern and contemporary furniture and objects with those from the early to mid 1800s, At Home draws attention to materials and craftsmanship and the evolution of furniture forms and types. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-25 Julian Cabinet by Khai Liew, Signature Rocker by Tony Kenway & Broached Colonial Prickly Lamp by Lucy McRae. Old Government House is Australia’s oldest surviving public building and houses a collection of furniture produced during the colonial era by Australia’s newly arrived convicts and cabinetmakers. The Late Georgian furniture, most made by copying imported pieces and catalogue models, was intended to impress and was positioned in public rooms to convey authority and relative grandeur, and in private rooms for family life and personal interests. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-37 Jugaad with Pottery by Trent Jansen, Matisse Chairs by Frag Woodall, Don Coffee Table by Don Cameron & Sen Light by Liam Mugavin. Clark has curated more than 60 modern objects throughout Old Government House, placing them for functional or formal resonance or to emphasise similarities and differences. In many cases they sit alongside their traditional counterparts: Adam Goodrum’s colourful Stitch Chair (2008) is side by side with the red-upholstered dining chairs, and Tony Kenway’s sinuous and fluid Signature Rocker (c.1988) is next to a graceful and curving chaise longue. In other cases they have replaced the originals: Goodrum’s Broached Colonial Birdsmouth Table (2011) maintains the dining room’s military flavour with colourful legs referencing the sailing masts that were vital for mobility and expansion, and Sarah King’s imposing and masculine Carbon Wingback Chair (2009) is now in Governor Macquarie’s office. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-38 Ribs Bench by Stephan Lie & Jugaad with Pottery by Trent Jansen. These pairings, plus many others, draw attention to lines, forms and details and cleverly establish a dialogue between old and new. Many of the modern pieces, such as Grant Featherston’s Scape chair (c. 1960s, reissued 2016), appear right at home, while others couldn’t be more different yet still find resonance. For example, the articulated fan-like form of Stefan Lie’s Ribs Bench (1998) is perfectly echoed in the carved settee opposite, while Korban/Flaubert’s Armour Screen (2012) is like an abstraction of the chequered floor. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-4 Broached Colonial Birdsmouth Table by Adam Goodrum, Stitch Chairs by Adam Goodrum, Three Decanters by Brian Hirst and Georgia De Maria, Advent Candelabra by Charles Wilson, Flute Pepper Grinder by Charles Wilson, Vessel by Robert Foster &  Waratah Decanter and Protea Cups by Lucien Henry and Vert Design.   There is an exceedingly high level of craftsmanship across all objects although the resources they are made with vary greatly. While the original furniture is made from traditional materials and Australian timbers, the modern objects are composed of everything from recycled car parts, carbon fibre and aluminium to resin, sheet music, 3-D printed polymers and linoleum. Indeed, this contrast and diversity reveals how much the craftsmanship brings to the value of a piece rather than the material itself. At Home is a showcase of past and present contemporary furniture design, and although these aren’t pieces that most people typically lived with then or live with now, their selection and placement encourages visitors to consider how domestic design has evolved and what we do live with now and why. At Home: Modern Australian Design Old Government House, Parramatta 11 November 2016 – 22 January 2017 nationaltrust.org.au/event/at-home/ Words by Rebecca Gross. Photography by Michael Wee. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-20 'The day a white man gave a black man (his) land' by Joan Ross, Carbon Wingback Chair by Sarah King & D E Desk Set by Daniel Emma. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-11 Liquid Moon Table by Louise Olsen for Dinosaur Designs, Toile artwork by Julie Paterson. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-13 Broached Colonial Briggs Family Tea Service by Trent Jansen. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-16 Embryo Chair by Marc Newson, Rooster by Roxanne Petrick, Girl with bird on head by Rhonda Sharpe & Woman and two birds by Dulcie Sharpe. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-42 Pregnant Chair by Trent Jansen, Ball Wallflower Lights by Anna Charlesworth & Cage Pendant Light by Anna Charlesworth, Applique rug from Designer Rugs x Bernabeifreeman collaboration. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-34 Plane Table by Fred Ganim. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-51 Armour Screen by Korban Flaubert. AtHomeOGH_Michael-Wee-Photography-12 Broached Commissions Piano Credenza by Adam Goodrum & Government Side Table by Charles Wilson. abc
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Fixed & Fitted

Enhancing Mobility in the Bathroom

The bathroom is often a challenging space to design and organise, with so many amenities and fixtures required to make it fully functional. There’s a fine line in striking the balance correctly between practicality and aesthetics, and sometimes, it’s the little things that get missed in the design process. Accessibility and mobility is element in bathrooms that is becoming increasingly important, particularly in regards to those with reduced mobility, from the aged to the disabled, and even those who have a propensity for stubbing their toes when entering and leaving the shower. Stormtech is Australia’s leading drainage manufacturer and supplier consistently at the forefront of bathroom design trends and well aware of what aspects of wet area design ought to be considered of vital importance. With the thought of improving accessibility and functionality in the bathroom for an ageing population, Stormtech has developed their Linear Drain selection, with their signature sleek and elegant aesthetic combined with sophistication and quality. 19159916_65ag_disabled_ Their linear drainage solutions are a specifically designed to remove potentially hazardous nature of traditional ‘step-down’ barrier drainage, as the linear drains can be seamlessly integrated into the floor, working perfectly with contemporary open plan design. Set directly into the floor, the water drainage solutions enable easier maneuverability when transitioning from bathroom to shower for both the resident and carers alike, whilst also complying with Australian Building Code requirements. Suitable for both indoor and outdoor applications, the linear drain offerings are sleek in design, with an elegant and ultra-modern look that subtly complements any bathroom aesthetic. Stormtech stormtech.com.au Words by Christina Rae. 19159918_cairns_houseabc
Design Hunters

Habitus #34 is Getting Ready to Meet You!

With the amount of time we spend staring at our screens, its surprisingly refreshing to put down the gadgets and connect.

Looking up and surveying the world around us, we are surrounded by spaces that encourage different social interactions and social lifestyles. Architecture and design have long been masters at influencing this, gently encouraging us to relax, explore, and be – together.

From providing the finishing touch of a living room to large, public pavilions, architecture and design cultivate and nurture our social lives. Indeed, for many architects and designers, fostering a sense of community and interpersonal connectivity is a core drive in every facet of their work.

While it is often easier to pick up our phones and fire off a text message instead of co-ordinating a time and place to meet, these digital interactions can become a little too impersonal. It’s time to get back in touch with the physical realm, curl up on a lounge, and swap stories with loved ones.

Come and meet the Habitus team, and the new issue on the 1st of December.

We're ready to get social with you!

Habitus #34 Launch Event When: 6pm, 1st of December Where: 90-96 Bourke Road, Alexandra, Sydney, NSW RSVP here

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Homes
Architecture
ARC - Feature

How to Breathe New Life into a Modernist Home

When European refugees and migrants arrived on Australian shores before, during and after World War II they bought new hope for a new life, along with their European sensibility for modern architecture and design. Indeed, as European architects designed homes for like-minded clients they spurred the development of Modernist architecture in Australia. Sycamore-St-01 Adam and Rachela (Helen) Ser arrived in Australia in 1953; Adam was a Jewish partisan during WWII, and Helen an Auschwitz Survivor. They established a successful garment business, and when money allowed they purchased a small block of land in Caulfield South and commissioned a family home in 1968. Michael R. E. Feldhagen, a Jewish architect who migrated from West Berlin and was mentored by Ernest Fooks, designed the Ser’s Modernist home with custom joinery and furniture by local craftsman Jakob Rudowski. Sycamore-St_0461 In 2013, Adam and Helen’s granddaughter Danielle and her husband Adam inherited the house and in 2015 engaged Brad Wray of Branch Studio Architects to restore and update the residence with nods to the past, present and future of the house. “There is often a very fine line between creating a nostalgic ‘museum’ of something that was and removing all notion of the existing all together,” Brad explains. “We wanted to bring the house into the twenty-first century while honouring its rich history and the people who made their lives there.” Sycamore-St_0238 The façade maintains its aesthetic and historic integrity with formal structural lines highlighted in black and existing orange bricks retained. Inside, the front of the house has been reconfigured to accommodate bedrooms and bathrooms for Danielle and Adam’s growing family; a self-contained basement anticipates when the children grow up, but for now accommodates a wine cellar and writing room; and the bathrooms are dark and bold. The powder room has concaved green tiles for light and texture, while the moody ensuite features a concrete bath, basin and vanity tops poured in situ by Hungry Wolf Studio. Sycamore-St_0266 Brad took special care to reincorporate and modernise Rudowski’s elaborate and intricate joinery – a stand-out element of the original house – and lined the light-filled galley that connects the front and rear of the house with lime-washed plywood. It also features photographs of the original home by Nils Koenning. “This space acts as an umbilical of sorts, linking and closing off the living, kitchen and dining spaces of the house from the bedroom areas,” Brad explains. At the rear of the house, the ply cabinetry continues through the kitchen and living room creating a soft, minimalist and tactile feel; and an intimate television room onto the open living and dining area while a large deck extends outside. Sycamore-St_0138 Memories of the past have been respectfully restored throughout the home; wallpaper kept where possible, and pendants, chandeliers and furniture restored, including the rosewood sideboard, bar unit and sofas by Rudowski. Brad also contributed to the furnishings, designing and making the blackbutt and concrete coffee table and oak and steel dining table. Sycamore-St_0014 Modernist architecture was designed to foster a new and modern way of living and represented the promise of the good life. Danielle and Adam’s home, now restored and updated, has once again been designed for a new and modern way of life, without any loss of its cherished memories or Modernist legacy. Branch Studio Architect branchstudioarchitects.com Words by Rebecca Gross. Photography by Peter Clarke. Sycamore-St_0486 Sycamore-St-03 Sycamore-St_0310 Sycamore-St-02 Sycamore-St_0305 Sycamore-St_0401abc
Design Products
Accessories

All about that bass

As seasoned Design Hunters it’s in our nature to craft highly designed spaces to live and breathe in. So when technology makes a point to champion the visual appeal, it feels like oil and water with a drop of detergent. As much as we love going out and experiencing different design aesthetics in the public sphere – new cafes, restaurants, bars, art shows and so on, there’s something to be said for staying in and enjoying the home: the space we’ve meticulously curated to provide refuge, sanctuary and easy luxury. Three new home entertainment systems from Bose – the SoundTouch 300 soundbar and the Bose Lifestyle 600 and 650 home entertainment systems – have been designed to slide seamlessly into your perfectly curated living spaces so you can do just that. Bose sound system | Habitus Living One of the distinctive factors of the SoundTouch 300 is its sleek appearance. A thin profile, long lines and glass top means its discreet presence won’t compete with your existing set up. As for the tech talk it’s Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabled so you can wirelessly connect TV and music streaming services while the QuietPort technology delivers a deep, clean bass at any volume without distortion. The soundbar can even send signals to the left and right side of the room, so if you don’t have surround speakers, you can have surround sound. Bose sound system | Habitus Living For those with a penchant for the full set, the Lifestyle 600 and 650 home entertainment systems might be more up your alley. Tiny OmniJewel speakers, along with an inoffensively petite center channel and base module, prove sound systems these days don’t have to take up as much space as they used to. And, as with the SoundTouch 300, the quality of sound is better than ever. Bose bose.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Bose sound system | Habitus Livingabc
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Happenings
What's On

Open House Perth: How to be a Tourist in Your Own Town

Many travellers would concur that the best way to see a city is by foot. This intimate mode of travel allows for aging walls to be stroked, concealed laneways to be stumbled upon, strangers befriended and the sounds and smells of the destination to be experienced. This was a thought that came to mind after the Open House Perth weekend. Open House Perth is a not-for-profit global event which showcases architectural masterpieces that would not typically be open to the public. Most spaces- residential, commercial and food and beverage destinations- are cleverly clustered so they can be travelled to by foot. Petition-Beer-Corner-1Petition Beer Corner The two day event has been getting bigger and better since it hit the streets of Perth in 2012, increasing its impressive line-up yearly and hitting 220,000 visits since its inception in WA. A few months prior I was offered an ambassador gig by superwoman, aka: Carly Barrett (director and founder of OHP Perth, architect, new mum and poodle owner). To Carly, my spruiking of the state’s spectacular homes across social media and in my work as a design journalist was doing the local architecture community a favour. But in reality, being lucky enough to have unprecedented access to spaces, and speak to the architects behind them was my absolute privilege. So, how can you achieve the ultimate staycation in just two days? Never fear, below is an ambassador’s guide on how to make the most of your next OHP weekend. Rahaman-House-1 Rahaman House STEP ONE: Have a sticky beak inside the homes To get to really know a city it is important to see how the people who inhabit it live. Recently Tim Ross highlighted Perth’s “McMansion” predicament in his ABC program, Streets of Your Town. Admittedly WA does have pockets of the state that have been invaded by formidable homes (larger in fact than our US residential counterparts) which follow a strict “the bigger the better” design philosophy. Yet the 14 residential spaces open for OHP told a different story: these cleverly designed abodes proved you don’t need a wealth of square meterage to live the great Australian dream. West-Leederville-4 West Leederville Cottage A highlight of the line-up was the West Leederville bungalow respectfully restored by Studio Atelier’s Kimberley Tan and Jeff Swinyard. The duo renovated and added to the 1903 rundown cottage, which had a long, sordid past of being the resting place for some questionable characters. The result is a natural light-flooded space, with a cottage style façade at the front and modern glass rear leading to a rooftop terrace to the back. West-Leederville2 West Leederville Cottage In North Perth the Dolce Lane home by Klopper and Davis was a crowd favourite, if social media posts are anything to go by. The dynamic team have an astute eye for designing new homes that feel as though their four walls have a long story to tell, when in reality the letterbox was put in place just months before. Inside, the heavy dark face brick of its façade flows through its interior brightened with floor to ceiling glass walls, raw concrete flooring and warming timber features. Boulevard-House-1 Boulevard House The salty suburb of Cottesloe lured in the masses with its two offerings, one being the Beach Box designed by architect Gavin Hestelow of Weststyle Design and Development. Covered in a striking bronzed armour and split into two separate realms, the home impressed from the outset. Inspired by the quintessential beach shack, Gavin has meticulously considered each design choice, from the strategically placed louvers to draw in the sea breeze through bay windows. West-Leederville-3 West Leederville Cottage STEP TWO: Explore the heart of the city The pulsing heart of the city is typically where a tourist’s journey begins. Yet in a haste to check into the hotel, or make the 7pm booking, we don’t stop to take in the buildings we are rushing past. Claisebrook1 Claisebrook Design Community The old Palace Hotel first opened its doors in 1897 continues to stand out amongst its shiny skyscrapers neighbours in the CBD. Inside sit the offices of global architectural firm Woods Bagot which has restored the building into a monochromatic masterpiece. The offices themselves are a combination of lengthy desks and streamline lockers, with their staff coming in each morning to take whatever desk tickles their fancy. This is all complemented by the structure’s original majestic high ceilings, flooring and features. Claisebrook-2 Claisebrook Design Community STEP THREE: Mostly importantly, eat and drink! Every savvy traveller knows they need a stomach full of delicious sustenance, and liquid energy on hand, to cover as much distance as possible. The 12 food and beverage destinations made sure no tourists went hungry across the weekend. Petition-Beer-3 Petition Beer Corner Undoubtedly, the one stop shop on this year’s line-up was The State Buildings. Home to the second best hotel in the world – COMO the Treasury – and the recipient of countless national architecture and heritage accolades, the 140-year-old building is a testament to the world-class architecture that WA has brought to the design world. From Telegram for coffee, Sue Lewis Chocolatier for heavenly hand-crafted morsels and Petition for a well-deserved Denmark Riesling, the grande dame was the perfect final resting place for any tourist, new or old, to put up their feet. Open House Perth openhouseperth.net Words by Jade Jurewicz. Photography by Dion Robeson. Claisebrook Design Community by Coda Studio. Boulevard House by Officer Woods Architects. West Leederville Cottage by Studio Atelier | Styling by Anna Flanders. Petition-Beer-2 Petition Beer Corner Boulevard-House-3 Boulevard Houseabc
Architecture
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Homes

Playing with Light in a Heritage Home

In the inner coastal suburbs of Sydney is the Power Lane House, which was the heritage site of a growing family who were after a space for the parents to retreat as well as additional storage. The challenge to create additional space while still celebrating the authenticity of the original heritage house was at the centre of the design process for CHORDstudio, who planned a house where the garage at the rear would tie in with the newly designed upper level extension, enabling light and sun exposure throughout. This challenge was resolved through the design of an upper level structure sitting behind the ridgeline of the existing heritage build, angled away from the street. This effectively obscures its view from the front, retaining the heritage visage from street level. This ridgeline is picked up again in the garage design, creating a sense of continuity between the two new built forms and the original house. By minimising overshadowing in the design, the client’s desire to keep light and sun exposure in the outdoor entertainment area is met with ease. The structural design continues the design intention of separating the new from the old, with a steel frame sitting atop the existing house without touching any of the existing walls. The interior design of the upper retreat was planned to harness and channel light and sun throughout. By peeling the roof back to expose a deck and large window spaces, the retreat has a sense of openness even when closed. The space can also be opened to create one large space, which includes the deck area along with a lounge and sleeping area. This playful designing around light and connections to the outside world continues in the auxiliary spaces, where a double skylight hover over the hallway like a halo, feeding light into the hall and connecting bathroom. CHORDstudio chordstudio.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald. Photography by David Yeow. 6256 6263 6257 6275 6278 6276abc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted
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Fiercely Modern: The Revival of Art Deco

The Art Deco movement defined that brief moment of peace, frivolity and ease between the First and Second World Wars. Instantly recognisable, its formal aesthetic language of strong vital lines and dramatic playfulness with symmetry stretched beyond architecture and design through to photography, film, fashion, music and even hairstyles – an utter permeation of the cultural landscape. Deco, in short, stood for something: that modernity will be confident, unapologetic, open and free. P. Bisschop is bringing back Art Deco and that spirit, today. art-deco-01 When we think about the 1920s and 1930s, we think towering skyscrapers and a cultural decadence fuelled by the jubilance of the inter-war period; a growing middle class across the globe; the beginnings of mass-production and disposable income; the invention of plastics and of mass international tourism. In New York, the iconic Chrysler Building was constructed, and in Paris, the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées paved the way for the likes of Henri Sauvage’s La Samaritaine department store, all bearing the distinctly brazen yet stately aesthetic of Art Deco. Driven by a desire to be fiercely modern, the Art Deco movement made its way into technological developments and fashion, soon becoming the recognisable ‘look’ of progress and the unflinching confidence in the New World. p-bisschop-monopool-01 So what is the art deco style? Art deco is characterised by luxurious materials and a use of geometrics and symmetry gracing every detail. From reflective exteriors to lavish interiors rife with the sunburst motif, lacquered surfaces, and sumptuous textures, Art deco looked towards the future. In Australia, art deco architecture and design was mostly prevalent in local apartment and residential buildings as well as towering office buildings, and even the ANZAC War Memorial in Sydney. From wrought-iron gates to geometric parapet and roof design, the light touch of Art deco is evident across many residential dwellings. p-bisschop-mono-pool-03 Taking this aesthetic from the outside to inside the home, the German hardware giant, P. Bisschop, has brought a number of art deco styled door and window hardware to Australian shores. With over 100 years of manufacturing experience under their belt, P. Bisschop has truly lived through each and every design movement since 1889. Offering a wide range of escutcheons, plates, door handles, pulls, locks, letter plates, numerals and bell pushes, P. Bisschop has ensured that every minute detail within the home can work seamlessly with the art deco aesthetic. p-bisschop-monopool-04 Their hardware offerings all carry out the perfect geometric symmetry iconic to the art deco style, available in a wide range of finishes from including polished brass, satin and polished nickel, to chrome and ebony. For P.Bisschop brand enquiries please visit Mother of Pearl & Sons Trading showrooms in Sydney and Melbourne or contact MonoPool. Mother of Pearl & Sons info@motherofpearl.com Monopool info@monopool.asia Words by Christina Rae The Chrysler Building, New York | Photography by Chris Parker   abc