About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Happenings
Parties

New Kids on the Block

Hosted by Pirovich in their display suite for the new 10 Keele Street apartment complex, we spent the evening discussing the culture of the area – and how design can both preserve and enrich it – as well as the always topical live-work-play balance, and how developers are responding to new models of living. On the panel providing their [expert] two cents were a couple of key players not only in and around the industry but in and around the precinct. Chris McCue, Director of Architecture at Carr Design Group, which is the architecture and interior design firm who along with Pirovich were behind the development, and Jean Graham of Winter Architecture come from the architectural-and-design, industry-based side of things. Seb Costello, self-proclaimed local historian and owner-operator of the cocktail bar Bad Frankie, and art dealer James Makin of James Makin Gallery – both just a stone’s throw away from the development – brought the locals-only, lived-experience element to the conversation Naturally the idea of local culture dominated: how it has changed over the years (and whether that’s a good or bad thing), how developments such as Keele Street are able to balance the preservation of existing culture with forward thinking design, designing microeconomics into the area and for quality of life. If you missed this one – make sure you don’t miss the next. 10 Keele St 10keelestreet.com.au Seb Costello badfrankie.com Jean Graham winterarchitecture.com.au James Makin jamesmakingallery.com Chris McCue carr.net.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Aleksander Jason HABITUS_22NOV-6 HABITUS_22NOV-211 HABITUS_22NOV-195 HABITUS_22NOV-184 HABITUS_22NOV-153 HABITUS_22NOV-152 HABITUS_22NOV-138 HABITUS_22NOV-136 HABITUS_22NOV-129 HABITUS_22NOV-126 HABITUS_22NOV-124 HABITUS_22NOV-117 HABITUS_22NOV-112 HABITUS_22NOV-111 HABITUS_22NOV-102 HABITUS_22NOV-97 HABITUS_22NOV-91 HABITUS_22NOV-87 HABITUS_22NOV-86 HABITUS_22NOV-82 HABITUS_22NOV-77 HABITUS_22NOV-71 HABITUS_22NOV-70 HABITUS_22NOV-64 HABITUS_22NOV-53 HABITUS_22NOV-46 HABITUS_22NOV-41 HABITUS_22NOV-28abc
Design Hunters
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Trophy Hunting: It’s a Big Game

I am the eldest of four children. I know, right – my poor mother. Perhaps it was due to our collective penchant for sport, academics, or the arts, but not a single weekend passed without my poor mother shuttling us about from one football field to a cricket pitch to an orchestral practice room… you get the idea. But it was neither physical exhaustion nor fuel prices she regretted. So, her regret? A momentary lapse in her interior-decorating. You see, over the years, my poor mother’s living room wall became progressively encrusted with all manner of ribbons, medals and trophies. Extrapolating some form of interior-decorating scheme from a rag-tag bunch of jaunty girls with high ponytails and netball bibs, exaggerated cello scrolls and a haphazard palette of bronze, silver, gold, glass and emerald glitter Lucite (…no joke) was obviously going to be impossible. In a way, trophies are strange things. Everyone wants so much to receive one and, when we’re lucky enough to win, we bring it home and have to confront its ugliness. We confront, that is, the embarrassment of being awfully chuffed to bits, but not wanting to keep it. I don’t mean to be terribly blunt, but why are there so many ugly awards? It’s not too flippant a question, really. And it was certainly one haunting us when we launched the INDE. Awards. Being, quite simply, an awards programme celebrating only the best in design, we couldn’t possibly recognise incredible feats of creativity with a hideous trophy or dull plaque. And, heaven forbid (!) we recognised the incredible achievements of our Asia Pacific A+D community with some monstrous inflation of our logo – we’ve always thought a that tactless move. That’s not the point: it’s not about us – it’s about you. Quite a conundrum. But because the INDE. Awards are a brand new awards programme by the Asia Pacific A+D world, for the Asia Pacific A+D world, we thought: ‘why not have each of the awards, themselves, reflect that?’ And that’s exactly what we’ve done! I am excited to announce that one of Australia’s top design duos have been busy at their studio reinterpreting their iconic style for the INDE. Awards. Dinosaur Designs and their internationally recognised aesthetic language of vibrant colours, dramatic shapes and trendsetting designs is the perfect brand to help bring you the INDE. Awards in July 2017. Commemorating the fearlessness, innovation and ambition of all architecture and design achievements across all countries of the Asia Pacific region, the INDE. Awards represent only the best and brightest in regional A+D. After 30 years of creating contemporary jewellery, homewares and products that cherish the spirit of design in our region, Stephen Ormandy and Louise Olsen – the brains behind Dinosaur Designs – reflect so much of the essence behind INDE. With a courageous passion for art and design being core to their creative vision, with every collection Dinosaur Designs releases Ormandy and Olsen challenge us to consider the importance of design in our everyday. So, have we piqued your interest? The INDE. Awards designed by Dinosaur Designs are up for grabs. Go on, you’ve got what it takes. We’ve always believed in you.   Inde.Awards indeawards.com Dinosaur Designs dinosaurdesigns.com.au Pictured: Dinosaur Design Earth Bowls from Rainforest Collection.abc
Design Products
Furniture
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Minimalist Style, Maximum Space

Anaca Studio’s new range has been designed specifically for the apartment and small living designer hunters in mind. Planned with a mind to add a sense of designer charm to the daily life for Australians embracing cosier and more compact homes, the new line is sleek, modern and unified by a raised nature. Being off the ground maximizes the experience of space and light in smaller spaces, and the minimalist approach to each piece has the sense of each piece never overpowering the room it inhabits. Exquisitely refined with thoughtful details, the range expresses a fresh take on iconic mid-century European modernism, with each piece standing alone comfortably, or complementing Anaca Studio’s current range. The new range comprises four products, anchored by the Camille sofa, an elegant blend of classic Scandinavian style and modernist minimalist aesthetics. The sofa pairs naturally with the Edgar coffee table, a model of simplicity and lightness, and the Felix sideboard, defined by a handsome minimalism and clean lines. Rounding out the range is the Emi solid timber stool, which serves as a unique flourish of luxury in the collection. Thoughtfully articulated, all pieces are designed to be perfectly suited to apartments and small-space living arrangements. All pieces are available in a variety of sizes and finishes. “Having spent half my life in Europe, I have been influenced by beautifully styled small living spaces. I wanted to create a line of products that would offer this European flavour to the growing number of Australians shifting toward apartment and smallspace living,” says designer Anne-Claire, “Australians are diverse, cultured and pragmatic people that seek out style with substance and integrity—Anaca Studio designs each piece with that firmly in mind.” Anaca Studio anacastudio.com.au Gemmola_AnacaStudio_June_39598 Gemmola_AnacaStudio_June_39853 Gemmola_AnacaStudio_June_39655 Gemmola_AnacaStudio_June_40061 Gemmola_AnacaStudio_June_40050 Gemmola_AnacaStudio_June_40036abc
Architecture
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Places

Chinatown, Fitzroy Style

The new restaurant taking residence in Fitzroy’s iconic Builders Arms Hotel, Ricky & Pinky is a dining space that defies traditional definitions. Designed to offer a drinking and dining space with flexibility, warmth and authenticity, Ricky & Pinky is a space that brings to mind the Chinese restaurants of ‘60s and ‘70s Australia as well as traditional Chinese design, all with a modern flavour. Chinese restaurants within Australian pubs hark back to the classic days of modernism, with mid century pubs juxtaposed with Chinese dining houses. Ricky & Pinky channels this historic marriage into a contemporary eating and drinking hotspot, with architecture and designed by Sibling. The design flourishes of the pub’s interior recall traditional Chinese ideas of infinity, with welcoming gateways and interior objects connecting spaces seamlessly. The space’s existing internal walls reveal an open and lively restaurant, resulting in a fun, yet restrained space. Classic elements of Chinese dining are seen in the fish tanks and round tables, complete with the ubiquitous lazy Susan. New relaxed textures and chilled lighting concepts give a warm and inclusive environmental feeling to the space, and a view that allows patrons to see to the kitchen further the sense of communal dining that so many Chinese restaurants convey. With a matching menu that eschews formal structures and includes shared plates and snacking options alongside larger dishes, Ricky & Pinky is a modern establishment with an eye towards the past. A playful and vibrant contemporary space built on traditional ideas; the Sibling design matches the unique vibe of its Fitzroy location. Sibling siblingnation.net Words by Andrew McDonald 69429247a7eba5f3cc8ba90fe45f5961 Ricky-Pinky-Harvard-Wang-3 Untitled-1 Ricky-Pinky-Harvard-Wang-2 Ricky-Pinky-Harvard-Wang-1abc
Architecture
Around The World
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A Bush Getaway With 1920s Tram Accommodation

The W-Class tram, or Jean Claude Van Tram as its known around Camp Kulning, was in operations around Victoria between the 1920s and 1980s – but how does such a vehicle find its home as a secluded getaway bedroom? Angela Henley, owner of Camp Kulning, isn’t sure of how the tram ended up on the Lauriston property, but was in a sorry state when she purchased the property in 2014. After a four-month redesign and restoration process, the tram is the show-stealing icon of the out-of-the-way getaway, now housing two bedrooms, and an adjoining living room and book nook, furnished with a wood fire, comfy chairs and bean bags. While the tram is eye-catcher of the residence, an accompanying cottage is a slightly more modern place for guests to relax and take in the bush surroundings of the Macedon Ranges. A cosy space with a potbelly fire, split system air conditioning and heating system, a collection of vintage designer furnishings, record player, books and board games, the cottage is an ideal space for a secluded getaway for anyone looking to indulge in a simpler life, if only for a weekend. Rounding out the trio of yesteryear accommodation is a 1952 Globetrotter caravan, based is just a few short steps from the cottage. Sleeping 2 people in a double bed, the caravan recalls Henley’s original desire for the space, which she envisioned as an old world caravan park or summer-camp. This park attitude is what drives the overall design of Camp Kulning. While there are three separate sleeping areas, the space is envisioned as one place for friends or couples to share in communal living, a fact driven home by the communal kitchen based in the cottage. The three sleeping areas are set on an acre that backs onto the Lauriston forest, offering spectacular views for guests while they relax or dine in the BBQ area or fix cocktails in the retro tiki bar hiding inside one of the sheds. Camp Kulning AirBNB.com.au Marnie+Hawson,+Melbourne+Interior+Photographer+for+Airbnb+and+The+Shack,+Lauriston-1 Marnie+Hawson,+Melbourne+Interior+Photographer+for+Airbnb+and+The+Shack,+Lauriston-3 Marnie+Hawson,+Melbourne+Interior+Photographer+for+Airbnb+and+The+Shack,+Lauriston-2 Marnie+Hawson,+Melbourne+Interior+Photographer+for+Airbnb+and+The+Shack,+Lauriston-4 Marnie+Hawson,+Melbourne+Interior+Photographer+for+Airbnb+and+The+Shack,+Lauriston-5 Untitled-1abc
Architecture
Homes

Expanding Melbourne’s Suburban Typology

The newest collection of townhouses on Albert Street in Melbourne’s Preston was designed with the intent to build on the suburb’s status as a flourishing hub coming into its own within the city. Seeking the opportunity to add something inherently ‘Melbourne’ to the suburb’s streetscape, boutique property developer Milieu worked in collaboration with DKO Architecture and DKO’s development sister, Open Field to turn their vision into a reality. Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living “Albert Street is a new suburban typology that respects the history and culture of the Melbourne suburb while seeking to offer an alternative and new way of living,” says Jesse Linardi, Design Director of DKO. The facade of the eight architecturally designed homes is a playfully modern take on the classic Melbourne townhouse with generous and sun-drenched interiors to match. Four townhouses and four apartments were developed, with all residences having immediate access to the park through a central walkway. Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living For Milieu, Preston is, “popular with young families and the artistic community – and the word is out about Preston’s abundance of retail, entertainment, recreation and education options. Bordered to the east by Darebin Creek and home to one of Melbourne’s best fresh food and produce markets, Preston is enlivened by its rich cultural heritage, diverse population and myriad of public transport options.” Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living In terms of the interiors, a sleek, minimal palette was used, with a careful use of natural materials. Blonde timber floors are contrasted against stainless steel Ilve appliances and white cabinetry and walls, lending the residences an expansive feel. For both DKO and Milieu, there was a heavy focus during the design process on ensuring that the living spaces were sophisticated and livable – perfect for young families to grow in. Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living “Albert Street reflects our commitment to considered design, through the creation of attainable homes for Preston, and for those who appreciate fine architecture,” says Michael McCormack, Founder and Director at Milieu Property. DKO Architecture dko.com.au Milieu milieuproperty.com.au Words by Christina Rae. Photography by Dan Hocking. Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Living Albert Street - Mileu - DKO Architecture | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Design Hunters: Woods and Warner

Sonia Warner and Jacinta Woods began Woods and Warner in 2007 after working together at Sydney furniture supplier, Living Edge. Noticing how their different skills complemented one another perfectly, they decided it was a recipe for success and set out to build a design practice of their own. Almost ten years on, Woods and Warner has grown to employ a team of four designers who focus on designing residential and commercial interiors from the ground up. Avalon-1 Sonia and Jacinta meld design and decoration to create beautifully resolved and considered spaces for their clients. They take a creative approach to colour and have an innate fearlessness of combining pattern and texture. Not the type to box themselves into a certain look or trend, they offer their clients solutions that span a wide variety of bespoke furnishings and finishes that range from the dramatic to the refined. “We have an appreciation of bold and dramatic spaces and work well in that genre,” explains Sonia. “Having said that, as a business it’s like we have split personality. We can look at a residence that deserves a nature-driven palette and slip into the style like a great pair of shoes.” PALM-BEACH17 Sonia and Jacinta believe that a great designer will always push the boundaries and remove their own emotional response to a creative solution. They have developed a notable aesthetic that features a monochromatic base palette with strong highlights that follow through into their decorating choices. “We often say to our clients on the first consultation, ‘if you are looking for an all white or beige interior we won’t be the practice for you.’ We like to see spaces pushed to a level that can make our clients feel excited at times and sometimes uncomfortable,” says Sonia. Rose-Bay-12 To help design a home that is a reflection of the person inhabiting the space, both designers focus on how the space will be lived in when conceiving their ideas. “Our love for different trends and styles is exercised through all of our clients homes,” explains Jacinta. “When we commit to a job it’s like we pack our suitcases and imagine ourselves living, eating and sleeping in the home. I guess with this attitude in the forefront of our minds we can assure our clients that they work practically and aesthetically.” Rose-Bay-10 Comfort is an important quality when Jacinta and Sonia consider the design of an interior. They use lighting, furnishings and fabrics to craft a desirable space to live in, but according to the pair the layout is what can ultimately make or break a space . “Living spaces are the hub of the home so the need for them to perform correctly is paramount,” explains Jacinta. “Too often you witness homes that have great proportion and grandeur, however they’re totally unused. If the layout has not been considered, the end result can feel limiting and spaciously unresolved. A good floor plan maximises space and considers proportion and traffic, ensuring that the environment is warm and inviting.” Rose-Bay-23 When reflecting on how much Woods and Warner has evolved over the past nine years, Sonia and Jacinta believe their field has changed dramatically since they began, and credit this to driving their success. “Australian designers are becoming so successful not just on a national level but also internationally. We can’t ever say we are starved of great design – we may still be starved with our freight into Australia however the liquidity of items available to us now is amazing,” says Sonia. “Clients in the past 10 years have also grown in their knowledge of styles and trends more than ever before. We have had to work harder and more creatively, however the results and efforts have been warmly received.” What's your favourite: Chair model? The Gubi Beetle Chair Residential space? Hecker Guthrie's latest Melbourne Prahan residence Commercial/hospitality/retail space? The Tramsheds at Harold Park Mass produced good? The Kikki K Gold Paper Clip Item in your studio? Our Kerry Armstrong artwork “Silvi Wanted to PlayWoods and Warner woodsandwarner.com.au Words by Ashley Tucker. Photography by Anneke Hill, Jessica Lindsay, and Tom Ferguson.

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Design Hunters
People

The Inner Workings Of Room 11

It’s been sixteen years since Room 11 first caught the industry’s attention. The Tasmanian practice arrived on the scene with the type of youthful energy that immediately turns heads and gets people talking. They had the goods to back it up too, introducing an architecture so fresh and pure in form and concept it leaves even the minutest detail exposed. The fact every single one of their projects still stands up to scrutiny is a testament to the considerable talents and expertise of the practice’s co-founders Thomas Bailey, Aaron Roberts, Nathan Crump and James Wilson. James, Thomas and Aaron first met at the University of Tasmania and even though they were studying at the School of Architecture, they were moving in Art School circles. It was Aaron who found the room (with a number 11 on the door) that would serve as their regular meeting place, where they gathered with other like-minded students to produce new work. The emphasis was on cross-disciplinary collaboration and sharing creative ideas in much the same way as an art collective does. Unsurprisingly, they graduated with a broad understanding of different ways of working and when they eventually established Room 11, it was with a strong sense of where they stood within a learned architecture tradition. Nathan came on board soon after and the four of them continued to champion a design approach that’s elemental, direct and experiential. Thomas Bailey, Aaron Roberts, Nathan Crump and James Wilson Room 11 Design Studio Thomas Bailey and Nathan Crump remain the Directors of the studio, alongside a team of seven working across two studios in Hobart*. The practice’s core values haven’t changed since those early undergraduate days and its residential, commercial and public work is still distinctly Australian, in as much as it has a modesty that reflects a local vernacular borne of place. “We’re driven to make really powerful architecture and we want to do it in a way that’s logical in terms of construction and process, while aligning our work with a sort of regional Brutalism,” says Thomas. In this respect, the practice follows in the footsteps of Glen Murcutt and Sean Godsell and Thomas cites Craig Rosevear, John Wardle and J Esmond Dorney as early influences. Designing spaces that impact the end user through dramatic spatial sequencing has long been a priority for Room 11 and there’s a strong desire to do this with the minimum of means. Significantly, the fewer stages involved in achieving this outcome, the greater the scope for intellectual rigour, which is particularly evident in the practice’s seminal works, from Clifton Beach House to Little Big House and GASP.
The Pavilion at Glenorchy Art And Sculpture Park (GASP). Photography by Ben Hosking
The Clifton Beach project may have launched the profile of the practice locally, but it was Little Big House that was the true measure of their ability. It’s actually Thomas and Megan’s own home and while it was a personal undertaking, it was also an unprecedented opportunity for Room 11 to express a design clarity that’s genuinely progressive. The project talks loudly to the practice’s fundamental principles – there’s a reductiveness to it, but also a strong sensual relationship to landscape. Indeed, Little Big House, situated on the eastern slopes of Mount Wellington high above Hobart, has a structural lightness that belies its staggering performance, made possible because of good orientation and an understanding of micro-climactic factors. It is environmentally responsive architecture at its very best and for Thomas, it also serves to succinctly contextualise the issue of climate within their overall design process. As he explains, “Architecture is a synthesis across broad perceived boundaries where lots of elements have to be distilled into something at one point. Climate is imperative, but so is the client, landscape, detail and form. The great skill of architecture is to bring them all together with a sense of clarity for a particular site and budget.”
The Pavilion at Glenorchy Art And Sculpture Park (GASP). Photography by Ben Hosking
They proved this possible with GASP (Glenorchy Art and Sculpture Park), comprising a series of pavilions and boardwalks along three kilometres of the River Derwent. It’s such a finely nuanced yet solid piece of infrastructure, all the more impressive for its handling of extreme weather conditions. It reveals the poetry in Room 11’s architecture as well as a commitment to delivering functional results underscored by highly critical thinking. Such solution-based outcomes are also possible because of the practice’s deft handling of materials. GASP’s palette is particularly robust and the practice is widely recognised for its singular use of materiality; timber in Little Big House, for example, and most recently, stone for D’Entrecasteaux House in Apollo Bay. Thomas doesn’t believe there’s a generic set of rules that can be applied to all projects and that’s why each Room 11 building appears customised, with a high degree of detailing and craftsmanship. He’s currently continuing the practice’s explorations of material and place with finely tuned small projects along with works of a much larger scale. Expect Room 11 to still be pushing boundaries in another sixteen years’ time, challenging what’s become acceptable to further progress tradition. Room 11 room11.com.au Photography by Adam Gibson *This is a corrected version of the original article from issue #41 of Habitus, 2018. Habitus apologises for unintentional inconvenience caused and misinformation communicated.  Thomas Bailey, Aaron Roberts, Nathan Crump and James Wilson Room 11 Design Studioabc
Design Hunters

Carriageworks 2017 Season – Top 5 Picks for Design Hunters

Carriagworks has long had a commitment to new and exciting Australian art, culture and design, as well as the showcasing of the best in the International scene. “In 2017, we have collaborated with Australian and International artists who consistently question and experiment with form – whether music, fashion, food or art,” says Carriageworks Director Lisa Havilah. With over 60s projects on the calendar, the art and design lover has a lot to choose from and we’re here to help. Here are the top five Habitus Living picks for the avid Design Hunter… Imagined Touch Design is an undeniably tactile experience. Great design isn’t just pleasing to look it, it feels good to be a part of. But what if feeling was your only way of communicating? Imagined Touch sees two Deafblind artists offering an insight into a life devoid of both sound and sight. Through art, theatre and sensory performance, this piece explores how Deafblind people navigate, communicate and connect with others through touch Running: January 9-15 Night Market A regular highlight of the Sydney summer calendar, the Carriageworks Night Market is this year curated by award-winning chef Kylie Kwong, and takes inspiration from some of the great cities in Asia. The design and culture hotspots of Japan’s Harajuku, Korea’s Seoul and Shanghai’s AnFu Lu see the 2017 Night market alive and bustling. Running: January 28 MDLSX Breaking down barriers is at the heart of all great design and art. MDLSX is an innovative performance that breaks down ideas of gender, the body, skin colour, and more in what serves as a kind of “Monster-Performance”. Running: March 16-18 Sydney Contemporary Australasia’s premier international art fair returns in 2017 with the nation’s largest and most diverse gathering of galleries. The third year of Sydney Contemporary will appeal to the serious collector, art lover and the curious Running: September 7-10 birdfoxmonster Bird seeks love, fox plays dead, monster becomes machine. This is the unique idea behind birdfoxmonster, a meeting of two worlds; performance and visual art. Part immersive interactive installation and part dining experience, this is an event not to be missed for those will a love of the unique. Running September 21-30 Carriageworks carriageworks.com.au WEB_Imagined-Touch-photo-by-Jeff-Busby-WEB Imagined Touch Image-Zan-Wimberley-WEB Night Market MDLSX-motus_DIANE_ilariascarpa_9521-1 MDLSX BIRDFOXMONSTER_Erth-Studio-A-birdfoxmonster-2016.-Image-Scott-Wright-2 birdfoxmonsterabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Ten out of Ten for Keele Street, Collingwood

With so many developments and apartment complexes popping up in our cities we can be hard pressed to differentiate one from another and you’d be forgiven for ceasing to attempt to do so. It’s up to the architects, builders, developers and interior designers to ensure one project stands out from any other. 10 Keele St | Habitus Living That’s certainly easier said than done but developments like 10 Keele Street in Collingwood, Victoria, might make you think otherwise. Despite highly crafted fixtures and fittings scattered throughout, marble benchtops, Miele appliances, spacious floor plans and a large communal outdoor terrace with a garden space, dual aspect balconies and expansive views, the end result looks like an exercise in self control. Understated luxury at its best. 10 Keele St | Habitus Living Carr Design Group is the architecture and interior design firm behind the project paying a meticulous amount of attention to detail ensuring a cohesively curated overall aesthetic. Charged with the building and development side is Pirovich, a family owned and operated company first started in 1984 by husband and wife duo Peter and Lorraine. 10 Keele St | Habitus Living Location plays a huge factor in the design of these apartments paying due respect to the history and heritage of the area while staying true to the forward thinking – and moving – generation of buyers. Ten Keele Street looks to Collingwood’s iconic industrial architecture and offers a place for living that is imbued with light, texture and elegance. 10 Keele St | Habitus Living In any precinct that’s experiencing a residential boom it’s important for developers to actively support a live-work-play balance in the immediate surrounds. In Collingwood this has seen a thriving cultural scene and the rise of café culture, bars, restaurants, retail and art spaces in the area. Ten Keele St, Collingwood 10keelestreet.com.au Pirovich pirovich.com Carr Design Group carr.net.au Words by Holly Cunneen 10 Keele St | Habitus Living 10 Keele St | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

If You Only Attend One Warehouse Sale this Weekend…

Designer Rugs has made a name for themselves as being consistently at the forefront of design for rugs. This year, the family owned and operated manufacturer celebrated their 30th anniversary and legacy of exciting collaborations. The company's reputation for collaboration developed with collections by some of the biggest names in Australian design. Some of the first were by painter and tapestry-maker Alun Leach-Jones; and fashion designer Linda Jackson, whose rug ‘Hibiscus and Hacienda’ (1993) is in the collection of the Powerhouse Museum. The brand has always been passionate about creating a strong link between the manufacturing, art and design worlds, and the creativity of these diverse artists and designers has proved to be a constant source of inspiration for the team. From Friday the 18th of November till the 20th of November, the Designer Rugs' showrooms in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane will be opening their doors with a special opportunity of a warehouse sale, offering an extensive collection of production samples, seconds, and discounted lines at up to 80% off. For design lovers, this is an opportunity that isn't to be missed!

Sale event starts Friday 18th November and continues Saturday 19th and Sunday 20th November – see below for details for each location:

SYDNEY: 509 Parramatta Road Leichhardt NSW 2040 Friday 18th November – 9am – 5pm Saturday 19th November – 10am – 5pm Sunday 20th November – 12pm – 5pm

MELBOURNE: 565 Church Street Richmond VIC, 3121 Friday 18th November – 9am – 5.30pm Saturday 19th November – 10am – 5pm Sunday 20th November – 11am – 5pm

BRISBANE: 628 Wickham Street Fortitude Valley QLD, 4006 Friday 18th November – 9am – 5pm Saturday 19th November – 10am – 5pm Sunday 20th November – 11am – 4pm

Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.au

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Design Products
Furniture

Bring the Natural Back to your Home

With this collection, Knock on Wood returns to the forest; working with bare logs, raw and rustic without embellishment. Forests have long held an appeal to designers and designer lovers alike – often beautiful, forests take little and give a lot. This collection celebrates forests and nature in all their glory. Forest Rays Inspired by the woods, the Forest Rays log lamp has been designed to capture the sense of mystery that forests have held in the minds of so many. Trunks and logs have been used for these lanterns, which are lit internally. Through this internal lighting, the knots and cracks in the wood allow light to leak out in an uneven and visually arresting display. Forest Flame The Forest Flame collection comprises a matching coffee table, mix-and-match coffee island, side table, chest of drawers, and bed. The six foot long coffee table is carved from a single log and has been treated to give a natural, burnt look finish. The pointed tip of the shape, along with the burn stains, create a sense of rustic drama in the table. The coffee island combines a rustic aesthetic with refined modernist design. The coffee island has been designed to serve as a stylish statement in a modern living room. The three-part creation features textured teak wood, with each unit able stand alone as a separate part, or combined together to form an unusual and eye catching ensemble ensemble. The stylish, solid wood side tables are your personal part of forest at home. Ideal in the living room or bedroom, the solid wood tables have been made through one large piece of wood being turned on its side and worked down on the lathe. Matching the side tables, the Forest Flame chest of drawers make for a continuation of the forest motif in the bedroom. A harmony of burnt pinewood with steel frame, the raw wood edges on the front of each drawer serve as statement marks and unique handles. An ode to nature, the Forest Flame bed uses materials in their natural form, combining natural teak wood, rusted mild steel and natural linen fabric. Knock On Wood knockonwood.in   DSC_0288 DSC_0229 DSC_03781 DSC_0186 DSC_0147 DSC_0350abc