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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Places

How to Bring Middle Eastern Style to Inner Sydney

Inspired by the changing nature of light, Nour is a fresh, relaxed and contemporary restaurant in Sydney’s Surry Hills – offering a mix of Lebanese and Middle Eastern cuisine with an aesthetic to match. Natural light fills the space during the day through large arched windows that at night help the space transition seamlessly to an intimate, clean space. Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living “Flooded with natural light from both the street front and the terrace – Nour (meaning light) became the name, and the over-arching principle of the concept,” says designer Paul Papadopoulos of DS17, “It was such a unique character of the space that we really wanted to make the most of it. From there our way of thinking was to achieve the correct layout for both the operation and the experience of the diner, and merging that with inspiration from Middle Eastern landscapes and architecture for a fresh, contemporary and new brand and interior.” Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living The result for Nour is a harmonious blend of rich and muted hues, recalling Middle-Eastern landscapes and a combination of dusty pink tones – bringing a relaxed and contemporary sense of balance. Subtle pink hues and a mix of earthy and airy shades challenge traditional interior perceptions of colour and serve as a visually arresting, yet never distracting aesthetic. Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living “The rich and muted hues inspired by Middle-Eastern landscapes, which are used throughout the space in feature wall finishes furniture, furnishings and tableware, add depth and warmth to a very fresh and clean base palette of grey and white concretes, white tiles and light timbers” says Paul. Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Natural Oak, marble, copper detailing, and woolen fabrics play off one another to build to a fresh and sophisticated result. The furniture throughout Nour carries and sense of lightness and ease, mirroring the literal light that fills the space throughout the day, adding to patrons feelings of relaxation in the space. The variety of seating arrangements too, from the bar to the open dining areas and the private dining room, have been considered to create a sense of welcoming calm. Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living An antidote to an overly bustling Crown Street, Nour uses cool and soothing Middle-Eastern styling to create a feeling of wellness to match its cuisine. Nour noursydney.com.au DS17 ds17.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald. Photography by Bob Barrett. Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Living Nour Sydney - DS17 | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
Design Stories

Your Chance to Win!!

Tim Ross – broadcaster, comedian, mid-century design enthusiast and addict, INDE. Awards judge and Habitus favourite – presents Streets of Your Town, a two-part series exploring the aesthetic of Australian suburbs from the middle of last century to present day. The 1950s saw pioneering – and now celebrated – Australian architects embrace Modernist architecture and adapt it to the Australian aesthetic, lifestyle and needs. Streets of Your Town boasts unprecedented access to some of our most iconic homes conceived by the likes of Robyn Boyd, Sydney Ancher, Roy Grounds and Harry Seidler. But by the 70s something changed – who can say what – and Australians began to embrace featurism (read: McMansionism). New builds increasingly saw enormous dwellings with a massive street presence. A trend that has – regrettably – stuck around to this day. In Streets of Your Town Tim Ross is looking to uncover why our suburbs looks the way that they do. Streets of Your Town shop.abc.net.au/products/streets-of-your-town-dvd Tim Ross timross.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen *To celebrate the release of the DVD, Habitus has two copies to give away to new newsletter subscribers. Simply sign up to receive our newsletter between now and midnight Wednesday 23 November 2016 AEST for your chance to win!abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Industrial Chic Meets Luxury Skincare in Aesop’s New Seoul Store

Aesop is a brand that has achieved the impossible – global saturation while maintaining a sense of bespoke locality. That’s the dream, right? And how is it that they manage to pull this off? By investing heavily in design; local designers and high-end materials. torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-07 The luxury skincare brand's insistence on investing in design has taken ‘materiality’ from an elite luxury to a mainstream necessity; hence, the ‘Aesop Effect’. The most recent example of this philosophy in action is the brand’s ninth Seoul location, Aesop Samcheong by Torafu Architects. torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-05 Located in a cute single-storey street front building, Aesop wanted to inhibit the cultural vibe and intensity of the area’s lively Gyeongbokgung city palace. torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-09 The largest and most obvious example of this brief was the architect’s decision to retain the original ceiling, making a strong feature of its wooden truss. The building itself had undergone a number of renovations over its many years, and had accumulated a strange collection of incompatible materials, and while wanted Torafu to maintain this haphazard vibe, they also sought to find a consistent design element to tie it all together. torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-03 Consequently, the internal fixtures and fittings are stainless steel, with surfaces and tables taking on the same deep blue color as the building’s exterior. Sinks for consultations have been united with point-of-sale counters within a single unit found at the center of the store. A sprawling network of pipes above the table provides the water supply and lighting for the sink area, while simultaneously highlighting a striking piece of furniture. torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-06 The Aesop Effect means that materiality is no longer a ‘nice-to-have’ for our smaller scale clients, but is now a key necessity for their future growth and success. And we as an industry have a big responsibility in fulfilling this high level of expectation. Aesop aesop.com Torafu Architects torafu.com Words by Sophia Watson. torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-08 torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-04 torafu-architects-aesop-samcheong-seoul-korea-designboom-02abc
Architecture
Places

Garden State Hotel: The Place To Be

Melbourne is renowned for picturesque parks, which gave Victoria its age-old slogan “The Garden State.” That title now lends itself to the Garden State Hotel, a buzzing new venue at 101 Flinders Lane redesigned by Technē Architects with interior construction managed by the team at Schiavello. Celebrating the best of Melbourne, the Garden State provides a lush oasis at the heart of a design-rich labyrinth of restaurants and bars. Garden State Hotel - Techne Architects | Habitus Living Garden State Hotel is the latest venture of the Sand Hill Road group, which has garnered a reputation for revitalisation. “Pubs have been one constant throughout Melbourne history. We love to breathe new life into venues to create community pubs that become meeting places for family, friends and colleagues,” says Matt Mullins, co-owner of Sand Hill Road. Excited by its size, location and significance of the site, Technē created a sprawling four-level venue focused around a public bar and beer garden. A former textile mill, the building retains its Victorian-era façade with Classical architectural elements and high-arching windows, and distinctive saw-tooth roof. While the middle two bays of the roof have been exposed to open the beer garden to the sky, the rear two bays have been replaced with a multi-level structure of the venue. garden-state-hotel-04 On the ground level, a traditional pub circulates around a fluted-timber island bar surrounded by booths, bar tables and a double-sided fireplace for cold winter days. The public bar opens to the beer garden with cascading levels and large leafy ficus trees, and to the rear, the Garden Grill restaurant has dusty pink wall paneling, smoky mirrors and hand-blown glass pendants. Downstairs, the Rose Garden is an intimate and eclectic saloon with crystal chandeliers, vintage vases and hand-painted rose motifs in a character-filled space with aged red brick and industrial steel beams. Upstairs, the Balcony Dining Room overlooks the beer garden, and The Observatory looks out on the twinkling lights of the city. garden-state-hotel-02 Garden State Hotel has been designed for a population that increasingly lives and works in the city and it brings together Melbourne’s vibrant laneways, iconic gardens and lively culture, affirming itself as yet another Victorian slogan: “The Place to Be.” Technē Architecture + Interior Design techne.com.au Schiavello schiavello.com Garden State Hotel gardenstatehotel.com.au Words by Rebecca Gross. Photography by Shannon McGrath. garden-state-hotel-05 garden-state-hotel-06 garden-state-hotel-03abc
Happenings
Parties

The Australian Ballet Celebrate A Visionary

Choreographed by John Neumeier, Nijinsky tells the story of legendary dancer and director Vaslav Nijinsky and his rise and fall through the world of ballet. The ballet is a tour de force for company, with a special focus on the male dancers, who are given the opportunity to evoke Nijinsky’s distinctive and challenging modernist style amidst sets and costumes inspired by the exotic glamour of the Ballets Russes. Running at the Sydney Opera House until November 28, the ballet kicked off the Sydney run of Nijinsky with an intimate gathering of some of Sydney's finest in dance, art, design and culture. Australian Ballet australianballet.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald. Photography by Ben Symons. Akira-Isogawa-103 Todd-Sampson,-Jet-Sampson-080 The-Australian-Ballet-dancer-Brooke-Lockett-116 The-Australian-Ballet-dancer-Brooke-Lockett-116-Jasmin-Durham,-Coc-Mathieson-111 Paul-Mac-086 Leo-Schofield,-Bronwyn-Bishop-107 Kelvin-Ho-and-Jacqueline-Perrett- David-Wenham-072  abc
Happenings
What's On

An Emerging Designer Furniture Exhibition

The up and coming designers from the National and International RMIT degrees will be showing off their stuff in one of their first major public showings. The Associate Degree in Design: Furniture is a two-year course where these RMIT students have been primed for becoming furniture designs and makers. A heavy emphasis on workshop skills, new technologies, and environmental concerns were taught in the modern context. Previous students of this degree include the very successful Dale Hardiman and Adam Lynch of Dowel Jones and Lab de Stu, Alessi produced designer Adam Cornish, Melbourne Movement selected member Alexsandra Pontonio and Richard Greenacre the Vivid Award winner 2015. With a caliber like this, who knows where the current students will turn up after this! This is a terrific opportunity to see the next faces of Australian design before anyone else. A selection of the designs are presented below. The exhibition will run from November 18 to 20. Words by Andrew McDonald RMIT rmit.edu.au stream-table Ultimate-side-table-copy Cubish.-Blackwood-and-Oak.-- FLIP-Tableabc
Architecture
Around The World

Let’s Go Rooftop Glamping in 1970s Caravans

Finding Notel is a mission in and of itself: before finding the hidden door in a nearby coffee shop you’ll need to acquire a secret code for your smart phone, which you will then need to swipe at the entrance. With no concierge to lead the way, the Notel experience from the beginning makes it clear that this is no ordinary hotel in Melbourne and guests should expect the unexpected. After making your way to the rooftop, the sight of six shiny silver airstream caravans are there to greet you, ready for a unique stay that is perfect for those who aren’t after your typical hotel fare. Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Shipped over across the Pacific and all the way to Geelong, James Fry journeyed to the United States on a mission to find and facilitate the acquisition of authentic 1970s airstreams, so beginning the Notel adventure. Fry had owned the three-storey carpark with his father for the past decade and felt that the location was perfect to create something special in the heart of Melbourne. The six airstreams were completely cleared out before their voyage, and upon arrival in Flinder’s Lane, were lifted to the rooftop of the car park with the use of a 50 tonne crane. Notel Hotel | Habitus Living “I had a million ideas of what I wanted to do with the space. I tossed around roof top cinemas, restaurants and even a pool, but I wanted something totally different and something that would excite everyone. I feel with NOTEL that we have nailed it. This prime real estate in the heart of the city that will bring people into Melbourne,” says Fry, “Every new wrinkle I have and every bag under my eye has been worth it. I know everyone will love NOTEL as much as I do." Notel Hotel | Habitus Living With the electric pink and white interiors being designed by Edwards Moore, and the overall development and planning by architects FMSA, Notel is a retro revival that is simultaneously extremely modern. The amenities include complimentary wi-fi and Netflix, as well as a free mini bar packed with treats. Inside each airstream, the sheets, linen, towels, and bathroom products have all been specified from local Melbourne businesses, exemplifying Fry’s passion for supporting the local community and his enthusiasm for all that is Melbourne. Notel Hotel | Habitus Living For Fry, ““We are all about Melbourne – the street art, coffee culture, the food, the fashion and all the hidden little gems. We want everyone to experience Melbourne as a local and not as a tourist.” Notel Hotel notelmelbourne.com.au Words by Christina Rae. Photography by Andrew Curtis. Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Living Notel Hotel | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

So, You Think You Can A+D?

Toward the end of February every year, one of those dime-a-dozen stalwart Manhattanites splashes a forensic obliteration across the front page of The New Yorker. And, every single year, it’s the same – something rather like: “I was compelled to sit through another cavalcade of self-congratulation. It’s simply obscene: all this neediness; all this foolish hullaballoo; this litany of designer brands and flawless dentistry; this monstrous gasconading pageantry”. You get the idea… Of course, they will then proceed to wryly sneer at the Academy for awarding Ms Streep her annual sparkly treat (but then back-pedal to declare that, once again, Queen Meryl’s performance was unimpeachable and – unsurprisingly – award-worthy). You might be wondering why I am writing about the writing about The Oscars. Well, the design industry is set to welcome another industry award programme into the fold next year. I know, I know – I hear you: do we need another award? And where does this manic hunger for acclaim and recognition even come from? It’s easy to write off awards as an exercise in vanity. But the reality is so much more meaningful than that. Honour, distinction, privilege, tribute, admiration. An award is a symbol demarcating bravery, the need to recognise especial qualities of vigilance and fearlessness. They hold the best of us to a particularly high standard of culpability and quality. They are a goal. They are a gold standard. They are our milestones. They are, quite simply, the only collateral we have to really observe, challenge and interrogate what we are doing, where we are going, what we (should and/or do) value. Far more than a shiny statuette, a ball gown, a throng of paparazzi and a flute of champagne, an awards programme stands for our own momentum as an industry. They celebrate the achievements of veterans and novices in one consistent narrative of excellence, progress, and ambition. This is the INDE. Awards. The INDE.s are a new kind of awards programme by the creative industry, for the creative industry. INDE. recognises the innovative design story of Asia Pacific – on our own terms. The program is fuelled by your’s truly, Indesign Media Asia Pacific, and supported by the exceptional curatorial eye of a prestigious panel of A+D heavyweights across the region. INDE. commemorates home-grown bravery, innovation, drive and the local spirit of all architecture and design achievements. “Championing the best in design and architecture across Asia Pacific has always been our number one commitment,” says Raj Nandan, Founder and CEO of Indesign Media. “We can’t wait to celebrate this love of great design with you in 2017, the year of INDE. Awards”. INDE. Awards indeawards.com Words by David Congramabc
Design Hunters

Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs

2016 marks Designer Rugs’ 30th year in the business, during which time they’ve accrued a design legacy like no other. The highly skilled local team has produced rugs in commemoration of the Pope and the Queen, collaborated with Australia’s top design, fashion and art world talents, and created a cannon of woven work for a multitude of prestigious projects in Australia and around the world. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Living The founders – Eli, Nuri and Yosi Tal – established Designer Rugs in 1986 with the desire to manufacture a product not previously seen on the Australian market. Uninspired by the dull and unimaginative rugs being imported into Australia, they decided to create hand-tufted rugs that reflected the vibrancy of this country, it’s landscapes and creative talent. Despite having no knowledge of retail or rugs, they jumped in and gave it a go, and thirty years later their bold commitment to originality and design remains the cornerstone of Designer Rugs’ success. designerrugs09 The Tals opened a small factory in Marrickville, followed by a showroom in The Rocks, and while managing director Yosi says it was: “sheer luck and serendipity we survived in those early years,” Designers Rugs’ lucky break came when St Patrick’s Cathedral commissioned a custom rug to commemorate Pope John Paul II’s visit to Australia in 1986, and Parliament House commissioned a rug for the Queen’s Bicentennial visit in 1988. By the 1990s the fledgling company had caught the attention of leading architects, designers and artists adding the likes of Harry Seidler, John Coburn and Howard Arkley to a impressive role call of clients. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Living Designer Rugs’ reputation for collaboration continued to develop with collections by some of the biggest names in Australian design. Some of the first were by painter and tapestry-maker Alun Leach-Jones; and fashion designer Linda Jackson, whose rug ‘Hibiscus and Hacienda’ (1993) is in the collection of the Powerhouse Museum. The brand has always been passionate about creating a strong link between the manufacturing, art and design worlds, and the creativity of these diverse artists and designers has proved to be a constant source of inspiration for the team. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Living Recent collections have included artists and designers such as: Greg NataleMinnie PwerleAlex Perry and Annie Georgeson, and a collection for the iconic English brand Wedgewood in celebration of its 250-year heritage. They have also collaborated with Oscar-winning costume designer Catherine Martin, a partnership that led to designing rugs for The Great Gatsby and Faena Hotel Miami Beach, adding richness to the fantasy and theatricality of Martin and Baz Luhrmann’s inimitable cinematic vision. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Living Designer Rugs’ extensive work with architects and designers across hospitality, commercial, civic and retail projects is not just confined to Australian shores. They’ve created custom rugs for a vast portfolio of international and local projects including the Australian Embassy in Paris and Tokyo, Laucula Island Resort in Fiji, Corrs Chambers Westgarth offices and Emirates One&Only resorts in Hayman Island and Wolgan Valley. Other prominent projects include the Emirates Birdcage marquee, as well as a restoration project for the State Theatre in Sydney for which Designer Rugs recreated the original carpet from 1928 – something that had never been done before. These projects have allowed the brand to work with a diverse scope of design styles, creative visions and even historical records, and have allowed them to build up a really incredible internal knowledge base and heritage. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Living Everyday brings new learnings as the talented in-house design team skilfully work with designers and architects to ensure their vision of scale, colour and detail translates effectively into woven form. No two jobs are ever the same and by working with many of the world’s finest designers and architects Designer Rugs are constantly challenged and motivated to innovate, keeping the output fresh and engaged. Designer Rugs is committed to actively supporting education and innovation in the textile and design industries, hosting regular competitions in collaboration with UNSW Art & DesignTAFE NSW and International School of Colour and Design to provide students with unique opportunities and experience, as well as the bi-yearly EVOLVE competition for professional architects and designers, with the opportunity to win a trip to Milan, a rug and 10 per cent royalty for two years. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Living Their commitment also extends to philanthropic endeavours, including partnering with Vogue Living to auction custom-designed rugs by 10 interior designers and artists to support Camp Quality. The event yielded much-needed funds and kick started new collaborations with Akira Isogawa and Dinosaur Designs whose rugs continue to be some of the brand’s most popular. “We don’t see ourselves as just a rug company;”, says Yosi, “we see ourselves as a design company that makes rugs. Our clients are looking for something special to create the final aesthetic, and our rugs and the stories embedded in them bring this element of personality to the room. Our true skill is helping to construct a product that meets that vision and as a result creates an emotional connection.” Designer Rugs designerrugs.com.au Words by Sophia Watson. Three Decades of Design With Designer Rugs | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Around The World

Bringing Designer Hotels to Fiji Shores

The design and refurbishment projects are seeing a relaxed and modern style to three already world-class resorts across Fiji. Currently under construction and due to open during the next 18 months, the resorts include the Sheraton Resort & Spa at Tokoriki Island, the Westin Resort & Spa in Denarau, and the all-new Momi Bay Resort. Buchan Group Associate Margaret Davis says the Sheraton Tokoriki and the Westin Resort & Spa needed a laid back and welcoming aesthetic in their designs so as to better encourage patrons to emulate each hotel’s picturesque surroundings. “Buchan’s concept design of the Westin Resort & Spa Denarau will see the transformation of its garden view guestrooms into luxury spa suites with separate dining and pool areas from the main central facilities, as part of the resort’s exclusive new spa offering,” she said. “The first option includes the merging of two guestrooms to create large one-bedroom suites. Our second design will see the extension of the ground level suites to include large ‘indoor/outdoor’ bathrooms complete with a five-piece offering, as well as a private deck and plunge pool.” Buchan also shouldered the concept design and refurbishment styling for the Sheraton Resort & Spa at Tokoriki Island’s current central facilities and pool areas, due to reopen in early 2017. “Since Fiji is one of the world’s most well-known honeymoon destinations, we were tasked to undertake the interior design concept for the resort’s new luxury honeymoon suites,” Ms Davis said. In late 2016 and early 2017, construction on the Momi Bay Resort will be completed, and open as a five-star resort, designed by the Gold Coast team at The Buchan Group. The 250-room resort, to be operated by Marriott will become one of Fiji’s main overwater bure resorts and is centred on a 21-hectare lagoon. Buchan Group buchan.com.au The-Buchan-Group---Sheraton-Tokoriki-Fiji-dining---small The-Buchan-Group---Sheraton-Tokoriki-Fiji-reception---small The-Buchan-Group---Westin-Denarau-suite---smallabc
Architecture
Places

Let the Penny Drop! A Tongue-in-Cheek Melbourne Cafe

The Penny Drop sits at the base of the new Australian Tax Office building in Box Hill, its name playing on the concept of the ‘penny dropping’ from the pockets of the ATO office above. Kylie Dorotic and Alicia McKimm, directors at We Are Huntly, have used art deco light fittings and warm textured surfaces to great effect, with a circular theme running throughout in reference to Chinese symbology and its spatial proximity. The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living “The space planning was a direct response to the concept of the penny dropping,” explains Dorotic. “The curved form of the bar and seating layout that surrounds it echoes the ‘ripple effect’ – the same effect the owners hoped The Penny Drop would have on Box Hill and its residents.” The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living Situated at the base of the commercial building, We Are Huntly’s challenge was to activate the shop front to instill life into the empty 350 sqm shell. The 100-seat cafe, restaurant and bar needed to be “a transitional space”, which would cater for the morning coffee and takeaway trade, those dining at lunch and dinner or popping in for a drink after work. The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living “The coordination of services was extensive,” explains Dorotic. “It was important that The Penny Drop had three separate service zones: kitchen, bar and a coffee counter with a takeaway offer. With this to consider we created a combination of seating areas that would cater for individuals as well as large groups, offering flexibility.” This sees design solutions in the form of a large, curved marble bar encircled by an outer rim of seating, both small and large tables with enough room between each to talk comfortably, one large communal table and a coffee counter. The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living Designed in collaboration with Melbourne graphic design studio Pop & Pac, the interior responds directly to the brand identity. “The brand is subtly instilled within moments of the floor plan, joinery, textures and custom fittings such as the copper disk pendant, deliberately tilted like they were paused in motion,” says Dorotic. The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living Dorotic and McKimm set out to achieve a warm inviting space, “something that was unexpected and destinational”. The pair have used a restrained selection of materials, bringing warmth, light and surprise to the space. Custom light fittings, timber screens and warm yet hardy material choices in the form of blonde timber, marble and copper add both a soft and sharp contemporary feel, with sweeping curves, pink and grey hues and natural light lending an additional softness to the interior. The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living We Are Huntly have crafted a vibrant and comfortable cafe space, which many would find hard to leave. Quite simply, The Penny Drop is just another example of how these shared environments have become an ingrained part of our culture and a destination in their own right. “…The cafe environment often becomes an extension of a home, a working environment or a place to dine with friends,” shares Dorotic. “By creating a welcoming interior we are encouraging the community to be inspired and find use in these considered spaces that are ever changing.” The Penny Drop thepennydrop.com.au We Are Huntly wearehuntly.com.au Words by Ashley Tucker. Photography by Brooke Holm. The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Living The Penny Drop - We Are Huntly | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
Parties

Celebrating the Launch of Sensa Granite and the Growth of the Dekton xGloss Family

Unveiling the icy new additions to the Dekton xGloss range with a special collaboration with Gelato Messina, Cosentino shared the new Fiord, Tundra and Glacier natural surfaces at an intimate gathering in their Sydney Showroom. With slabs of each surface decorating the space, guests were able to touch and view the intricate depth of the texture and shine.

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Along with the Dekton xGloss range, Cosentino also debuted their new Sensa Granite collection. Just as flawless as their xGloss range, Sensa Granite adds a new texture offering to Cosentino's collection. With eight colour-ways, Sensa Granite shows off rich colours and texture along with strong and exotic veining. Orinoco's base is black, but erratic veining of gold, copper, and white enrich its overall appearance, while Colonial White sports flecks of red graining across the white background. Other offerings in the Sensa Granite range include Black Beauty, Glacial Blue, Indian Black, Ice Blue, Moak Black, and Bianco Antico. 

A creative and apt collaboration with Gelato Messina added another element to the celebration, with Gelato Messina custom making gelato flavours to correspond with each of the Sensa Granite, and Dekton xGloss finishes.

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On such a festive occasion, Cosentino also announced the winners of their 10th Cosentino Design Challenge, with UTS students Christopher Kerr and Levi Fletcher taking home the crown for their project Dek-ScapeVogue Living editor, and judge on The Block, Neale Whitaker who assessed the entrants commented that, "Of the submissions, Dek-Scape feels the most considered and achievable. I think Dekton has a potential application for public outdoor use and the suggested uses of DEK-SCAPE could easily work in any Australian city. The reference to the Sydney light rail makes it feel timely too."

Dekton dekton.com.au

Sensa Granite sensagranite.com

Words by Christina Rae.

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