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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes

A Home built around Gatherings and a Rain Tree

  Its magnificence could not be ignored, and it would be a shame to do so, so the architects have embraced the historic feature. "Its presence is ingrained within the very architecture of the house itself," says the architect. We spoke to Maria Arango, Director at ONG&ONG to find out more about 65BTP-House, how the design responds to the tree, the family its made for, and the location its built.   ONG&ONG Habitus Living -What was the brief for this project? The space was, first of all, intended to be a sanctuary for the client and his family – a space where they could feel comfortable and at ease. Additionally, the client has strong ties with his religious community and intended to host many gatherings in his home. Therefore, the brief was to create a warm family home that also had a generous amount of space for guests.   ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living - What did you enjoy most, or least, about the process of creating this space and why? It was enjoyable to know that we were able to provide a well-proportioned home that fulfilled the client's detailed requirements, its potential as a luxury home while retaining an understated aesthetic style and its essence as a humble, family home. We were also given a great opportunity to work with the client on the selection of materials to be imported from Indonesia, selecting the specific tone of teak to be used next to the granite and achieving a successful combination of natural materials which gave the house an interesting, overall look. Finally, one of the most successful achievements of the design was how it's so interwoven with and centred on the Rain Tree, and how it ensured that the Rain Tree continues to remain the "protagonist" of the space. The pre war tree definitely had historical value and that’s why it was woven so intimately into the architecture house and the layout of the various spaces. ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living   - How did the local climate, building vernacular or local landscape influence your design? The layout of the house was designed specifically to accommodate and maximise view of the Rain Tree. While the land space for this project is large, we tried to minimise the footprint of the house on the land and hence minimise the impact of the house on the land as much as possible. This resulted in the creation of large green spaces, such as the garden spaces, optimising this rare luxury of a huge land space and maximising the opportunity to enjoy the rain tree and the garden within the space. We even took advantage of the sloping topography to open up the basement area, so that the rain tree and green spaces can be viewed and accessed from the basement. ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living   ONG&ONG Habitus Living - What sort of materials did you use? There was extensive use of materials such as natural rock surfaces, which are featured prominently throughout the house, from the raw granite in the outdoor facade to the granite flooring inside. All of the timber pieces are teak imported from Indonesia. Many different types of stone were used, with ivory travertine in the powder room and golden travertine in the spa room. Blocks of granite stone with natural finishes were also used in the spa and powder rooms. In the living room, a marble called Crema Caterina is used. ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living   - Are there any sustainable qualities to the design? By having a layout ideal for cross-ventilation, this promotes natural ventilation. A 2-metre overhang also helps to reduce heat retention and absorption by providing shade, while the installation of rain harvesting tanks capitalises on Singapore’s high rainfall by collecting and reusing the rain water for irrigation.   ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living   -What about this space makes it a special and personal project for you or the lead architect/designer? This project in particular is very special because the clients were heavily involved in the design process. Although they had a number of requirements that posed certain challenges to us as the designers, we managed to resolve those issues and the clients were very happy with the results – so that in itself was incredibly encouraging. In particular, we were glad to have met the client’s requirements of not having a large and imposing design for the house, despite the large plot of land, but instead allowing for a lot of open green spaces. It was also great that we could incorporate the historic rain tree into the overall design scheme. ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living   -Are there any other particularly noteworthy points you can share? The layout of the house was designed specifically to accommodate and maximise view of the rain tree. While the land space for this project is large, we tried to minimise the footprint of the house on the land and hence minimise the impact of the house on the land as much as possible. This resulted in the creation of large green spaces, such as the garden spaces, optimising this rare luxury of a huge land space and maximising the opportunity to enjoy the rain tree and the garden within the space. We even took advantage of the sloping topography to open up the basement area, so that the rain tree and green spaces can be viewed and accessed from the basement.   ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living   ONG&ONG | Habitus Living Plans   ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living ONG&ONG Habitus Living
Photography by Derek Swalwell   DROPBOX
  Architect: ONG&ONG Project directors: Diego Molina & Maria Arango Team members: Julius Daguio Caramat, Tomas Jaramillo Valencia, Ryan Manuel, Camilo Pelaez Nino, Eleazar Dela Paz Manahan, Chee Yunn Ee Location: Singapore Date of project completion: November 2013 Parameters of project: GFA: 1,447.28 sqm Site area: 2,161.80 sqm Civil & Structural Engineers: JS Tan & Associates Mechanical & Electrical Engineers: Rankine&Hill (S) Pte Ltd Quantity Surveyor: Rodney Chng & Associates Pte Ltd Main Contractor: Deenn Engineering Pte Ltd Land Surveyor: Tang Tuck Kim Registered Surveyor ONG&ONG ong-ong.comabc
Happenings
What's On

Who’s Afraid of Colour?

Last time the National Gallery of Victoria attempted a landmark survey of Aboriginal Art it was 1981 – a decade before Indigenous women started gaining recognition for their art and 16 years before the Venice Biennale show that placed it on the world stage using powerful works by Emily Kam Kngwarray, Judy Watson and Yvonne Koolmatrie. All 328 works in the 1981 exhibition were men’s. My how things have changed. NGV’s highly anticipated new show Who’s Afraid of Colour? is a discipline-hopping, stereotype-defying celebration of the work of 118 Indigenous women via 300 works drawn from the NGV’s now vast collection of more than 4000 pieces. Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Living Curator Judith Ryan, NGV’s Senior Curator of Indigenous Australian Art, says Who’s Afraid of Colour? showcases “pioneers and innovators” working in everything from customary woven objects to body ornamentation, batik, blown glass, paintings on canvas and skateboard, digital and photographic media and large-scale sculptural installations. “We’re looking at the artists who are adventurers, who are breaking new ground with their work,” says Judith. Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Living Keen to highlight not only the artists’ bold use of colour but entire bodies of work never before shown together, NGV has devoted six gallery spaces to the show. This means entire rooms showcasing everything from Western Desert painting and Elcho Island textiles to recent acquisitions by photographic and digital artists Destiny Deacon and Bindi Cole Chocka and the extraordinary found-object sculptures of Jenny Crompton. Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Living Jenny’s exquisite 32-piece suspended installation Sea Country Spirits is a standout of the show. It recently took out both the Sculpture Trail and People’s Choice Awards in the 2016 Lorne Sculpture Biennale. Like all Crompton’s work it’s meticulous and mysterious. It emerged intuitively over 18 months as she wove together all manner of natural materials from copper wire to kangaroo bones and baby cockatoos feathers plucked from wattle trees over three molting seasons. Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Living Jenny fossicks for the objects that inform her work on walks at Point Addis beach near her Bellbrae home on Victoria’s Surf Coast. She listens deeply to whatever calls her – from seaweed to a bloom of dried bluebottle skeletons – and adapts her themes and techniques to suit. A self-taught artist who only discovered her Aboriginal heritage seven years ago, Jenny has always felt guided in her creative process. “I really do believe in my work that I’m guided by my ancestors,” she says. “To me it is a sensory thing. In Aboriginal spirituality it’s deep listening to the land.” Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Living Having Sea Country Spirits included in Who’s Afraid of Colour? is clearly a huge thrill. “It’s a truly remarkable and highly significant exhibition,” Jenny says. “I’m pretty much in awe of all the other works, as you can well imagine.”   Who’s Afraid of Colour? is on now at The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia until April 2017. ngv.vic.gov.au/exhibition/whos-afraid-of-colour Jenny Crompton jennycrompton.com.au  Words by Kath Dolan Photography by Wayne Taylor and courtesy of the NGV Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Living Who's Afraid of Colour? | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Places

Feeling Right at Home in a Restaurant

South Brisbane eatery Gauge is picking up accolades all over the place, from high commendations for its interior design to the Restaurant of the Year gong at the Brisbane Times 2017 Good Food Guide awards. The restaurant’s recent recognition across multiple sectors serves to reinforce the current expectations of new hospitality venues to not just serve nice food, but to offer holistic dining experiences. Unsurprisingly, architect Matthew Eagle had a collaborative working relationship with Gauge owner Jeremy Batten and his resulting concept responds effectively to a clear-cut brief. “Jeremy wanted a functional and flexible space that strongly reinforces a commitment to quality service, local ingredients and innovative food all in an urban setting,” says the founder of Burleigh Heads-based ME Architects. Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living Generating a sense of place meant connecting the 72sqm restaurant with busy Grey Street and the nearby Queensland Museum. Eagle achieves this by opening up the facade with full-length windows and outdoor seating, making for a bright and airy interior. The fit-out still stands in stark contrast to the outdoor environment however, by providing patrons with a visually subdued sanctuary. As Eagle explains, “The idea was to also create a space that was inviting, familiar and warm.” Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living Loosely dividing the dining area into three zones (window seating, communal table and intimate alcove) allows patrons to choose how they want to experience Gauge. But it’s the boldly domestic scale of the overall scheme that ultimately resonates, lending the interior a welcoming ambience. This is heightened by the honey-coloured blackbutt floorboards and tabletops, which compliment the open kitchen’s brass detailing. Eagle minimises the hard edges of the full-length blackened steel window frames by judiciously incorporating select dark pieces into the scheme, namely Lab De Stu’s elegant Popper pendant light and Hay’s wire chair. Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living The crisp white walls and ceiling are the perfect canvas upon which to introduce a colour accent and Eagle does so effectively. “We wanted a colour that complemented the blackened steel, brass and timber,” he says. “But it also had to reinforce the natural, calm qualities of the space.” His choice of aqua for the custom tables’ legs, Thimble counter stools (also by Lab De Stu) and alcove is bold yet elegant, an effortless feature that isn’t laboured. Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living Eagle’s cleverly sly yet subtle references to the local architectural vernacular, in particular his use of VJ boards and cover strip mouldings, further adds to the fit-out’s clean, stylish appeal. These unexpected elements of discreet craftsmanship coupled with the minimalist furnishings makes for a sophisticated aesthetic, while the dining experience remains refreshingly unpretentious. ME Architects mearchitect.com.au Photography by Toby Scott Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Living Gauge by ME Architects | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Meet the timber craftsman from country Western Australia

Timber craftsman Nathan Day of Nathan Day Design resides in a small coastal town in Western Australia, where his family home is as authentic and honest as the inspiring furniture he creates, using production methods from the past and present. Before he set up shop in Dunsborough, Nathan went on an expedition to England in 2003 to track down and hopefully work with famous furniture designer and maker John Makepeace. Nathan Day | Habitus Living “I flew to England and called him a couple of times, but he wasn’t getting back to me, so I borrowed a car and drove for three hours to the English country side to track him down - I didn't have an address, so my mate and I just started asking people on the street if they knew where he lived,” explains Nathan. Nathan and his partner of nearly 20 years, Savanna, built their home three years ago on a suburban block in Dunsborough, where they live with their daughters, Lolah, six, and Josie, three. Nathan Day | Habitus Living The open planned living evokes a sense of space, so much so that Lolah and Josie often ride their bikes throughout the home. “When we moved in we still had the concrete slab down. We weren’t too hung-up on looking after it, so we let the girls ride around. Now we have timber flooring and we still let them enjoy themselves, to a degree,” says Nathan. Nathan Day | Habitus Living The bones of the uncluttered home are white walls and dark timber floors. This minimal colour palette highlights the clean lines of Nathan’s furniture designs, allowing the pieces to sit harmoniously in the space. Read the full story in Habitus issue #34, available now. Nathan Day Design nathandaydesign.com.au Words by Clare Ryan Photography by Lajos Varga Nathan Day | Habitus Living Nathan Day | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Who is Jesse Bennett?

Led by Jesse and his wife Anne-Marie Campagnolo (an interior designer) Jesse Bennett Studio is renowned for its project Planchonella House, which won The Robin Boyd Award for Residential Design (Houses - New Category) at the 2015 National Architecture Awards. The project also scooped up the Australian House of the Year and Best House over 200m3 at the Houses Awards 2015. Recently Jesse has been working on an extension to a 90s beach shack in Kurrimine Beach, Queensland, which sees his creative approach to materiality at work again. As the couple’s own home, Planchonella House provides a glimpse into Jesse's mind, his approach to architecture, and the design principles he embraces. From the custom-made furniture and hardware to the careful selection of materials and challenging integration with the surrounding landscape, the choices he’s made are an example of what Jesse believes to be the common factor across his creative output; “striving to achieve thoughtful, timeless architecture coupled with inventive detailing and character.” Jesse Bennett | Habitus Living Jesse says there are three attitudes and aspirations that steer his practice; “changing people’s lives with the power of architecture, creating joyful spaces for people to inhabit and engage, and easing the complexity of daily life with functional planning and innovation.” Each of these represent his overall goal to enrich the lives of others through his craft. Perhaps the biggest role Jesse plays is enhancing the health and wellbeing of his clients. When thinking of health, architecture might not be the first thing that springs to mind but this, he believes, is the role of an architect. “As architects we can contribute and enhance the way people view and experience the world,” he says. “Architecture has an enormous impact on our lives and wellbeing – not only on the way we perform daily tasks, but also on our emotional state, which in turn alters the way we view and experience the world. Jesse Bennett | Habitus Living “A plethora of research has been done in this field; measuring people’s psychological responses to their physical environment. When people live in beautifully functional spaces that incorporate natural light, and accommodate their basic physical needs and speaks to their emotional ones – they are happier and more positive. Conversely, living in badly planned spaces tends to make people frustrated, less creative and increasingly negative. So of course this is a major factor of a person’s well being.” The relationship between architect and client is what makes for the best kind of home – one that enhances the wellbeing of those who will live there. This, Jesse says, is what leads to truly great architecture. Jesse Bennett | Habitus Living The Hitlist Jesse Bennett what's your favourite... Chair model: Safari Chair by Kaare Klint, 1933 Residential space: Residence Elio Pietro Donati Tozzi by Decio Tozzi Public space: Aesop store, James Street by MARCH studio Mass produced good: The Slinky Item in your studio: La Pavoni, 1965 lever pull coffee machine Piece of technology: YouTube, streaming music all day Historical figure: Danny Lyon Vice: Charcoal chicken Virtue: Eating an entire charcoal chicken   Words by Ashley Tucker Jesse Bennett | Habitus Living Jesse Bennett | Habitus Living Jesse Bennett | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

INDE.Awards 2017 : The Worry + Wealth of Global Design

Never has the focus on the Asia Pacific region been more concentrated than it is today. While the European economic climate continues to splutter its way through yet another damning lull, and the American political climate continues to… well… (how can one put it nicely?) friskily romp about in misguided self-confidence, the world is starting to turn Asia Pacific-ward. Why? In one word: poise. While the world’s historically heavyweight powers dither and fidget into an increasingly uncertain tomorrow, our region appears to be embracing the future with an advanced degree of self-composure. The most recent Asia Pacific Economic Update: October 2016 from the World Bank expects Asia Pacific to enjoy consistent and resilient growth beyond 2020 – principally achieved through our steadfast commitment to penetrating globalised economic and cultural relationships over the past decade. Covering just over one-third for the earth’s surface, Asia Pacific is home to more than 5 billion people; and of that 5 billion, the population of a middle to upper-middle class across Asia Pacific is expected to comprise 37% of the worldwide middle-class population in the next three years. For the A+D community, however, this means far more than just a growing market. Our wholesale service capacity – our capacity, that is, for local manufacture on a global scale of distribution – requires a far greater degree of sensitivity and respect for the diversity of cultures and market behaviours than ever before. Our growing economic vigour due to successful integration into global political and monetary flows behoves much more than thoughtlessly swamping the market with same-same design. This is where the INDE.Awards begins and ends. And in order to find and recognise the best of the best, we’re relying on the careful curatorial eye of a prestigious judging panel that – collectively – understand and embrace the importance of subtleties of national difference held in balance with the extraordinary potential of regional diversity throughout Asia Pacific. The INDE.Awards 2017 Jury [gallery ids="56178,56173,56176,56177,56174,56179,56172,56180,56175"]

The INDE.Awards is proud to announce the Official INDE. Jury of 2017:

Indesign Luminary Sue Carr represents over four decades of influential work as Principal Director of Carr. Her extensive career serves as a pronounced reminder that an instrumental element needed to support the future of this thriving industry, is the ameliorated dual role of educator and practitioner A+D-wide.

As Senior Associate at WOHA, Chan Ee Mun understands the nuance and diversity of regional design throughout Asia Pacific. Based in Singapore, his impressive portfolio of work covers residential, heritage, institutional and hospitality sectors undergoing the widespread effects of growing urban development. Meanwhile, across the Pacific, American Industrial Designer, Stephen Burks, is widely recognised as one of the most influential young design thinkers on the international stage. His recent Man Made project bridges the gap between authentic developing world production (needed ever-increasingly across our region), industrial manufacturing and contemporary design. Of equal global reach, Stephen Todd has held his finger on the pulse of global design for almost three decades. Todd’s professional history is littered across the pages of the industry’s major international design, political and cultural publications including The New York Times, The Guardian, The Australian, Le Monde, The Financial Review, Blueprint, Wallpaper*, British Elle Décor and American Vogue. After founding Utzon Architects with his father Jørn, Jan Utzon’s professional practice maintains comparable global reach: from Sydney to Copenhagen, Hawaii to Jutland, Zimbabwe to Mexico. In each instance, the truly extraordinary creative potential of local creative thinking infuses the resulting project – a theme of influence seen likewise in his father's design of the Sydney Opera House. One of Australia’s premier multi-talented entertainers, Tim Ross’ involvement in the social commentary of the A+D community is inspired. Active in spreading the enthusiasm and a spirit of questioning design and architecture throughout the region, Ross has recently presented a two-part series – Streets of Your Town (ABC) – exploring the buildings, histories and stories behind Australia’s myriad suburbs. Founder of interdisciplinary design practice Foolscap Studio Adele Winteridge is active across the commercial, hospitality, residential and public domain sectors. Alongside her team, Winteridge is driven by the guiding philosophy that design holds the transformative power to create spaces and cultural experiences that bind communities and develop local identity. Lyndon Neri and Rosanna Hu of Neri&Hu are among some of this region’s premier A+D talent. However, looking past their award-winning suite of architecture and interiors, their undying commitment to nurturing the creative professionals of tomorrow throughout Asia Pacific remains an inspiration to many. Raj Nandan has long understood that the A+D talent across Asia Pacific is next-to-none. As CEO and Founder of the region’s largest A+D media house – Indesign Media Asia Pacific – he has continued to champion the deep potential of design to transform our communities across print titles, digital platforms and experiential avenues in Melbourne, Sydney, Perth, Brisbane, Singapore, Hong Kong, Indonesia and India in the years ahead. The INDE.Awards wishes to welcome our Official Jury for 2017. Representing standout submissions from all Asia Pacific nations, INDE. commemorates home-grown bravery, innovation, drive and the local spirit of all architecture and design achievements on our collective doorstep. INDE. Awardsabc
Architecture
Homes

Hotel Meets Home in the Lahinch House

From the first meeting with clients Angie and Vic, and their Dalmatian Pirate, the brief was always to create a dramatic statement with the design. An impression of awe upon entering was the main goal for the Lahinch House. The house was conceived with a focus on entertaining guests; a space the owners could regularly host revelers and family. With this in mind, Lachlan Shepherd Architects had a two pronged approach to the design, which had to first function firstly as a home to its two full-time occupants, and their Dalmatian, and secondly as a kind of luxury hotel. This was no second thought in the design, with each guest bedroom provided with its own ensuite and robe areas, creating a type of "check-in" space for guests to relax in before moving into the main living zones of the house. The planning responds to the site surroundings through turning its back on the one adjacent neighbor, preferring to face and open to the beautiful golf course views to the south and east. Large expanses of glazing work to draw the rolling golf greens and sand dunes beyond into the home, blurring the distinction between outside and in. The main kitchen and living space continue this blurring distinction, this time to an integrated plunge pool. Heated year-round, the pool serves as a practical, usable swimming pool as well as doubles as a water feature, which can be viewed from all living zones. There are no walls diving the lounge, kitchen, dining, and sitting zones, instead, these spaces are separated visually through design, and spatially by the sunken lounge area. The Lahinch House, whilst highly detailed and technical in its design/construction, also represents an honest, low-maintenance and warm home Lachlan Shepherd Architects lachlanshepherd.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Ben Hosking 6049 6048 6047 6044 6043 6039 6038 6037abc
Architecture
Homes

A Plot in Common

When an old house changes hands, the new owners often only get the briefest glimpses of its intimate history as a home for other people, but in those rare situations where past lives are revealed, the experience can be so rich and rewarding. A Plot in Common | Habitus Living This has been the case for the Shoo family, who relocated a few years ago from the Gold Coast to a small farm an hour or so north of Melbourne. The Ben and Tash Shoo have thrown themselves into the local community, but it’s been the relationship they’ve forged with their neighbour, Bruce, who lived on their farm as a small boy, which has arguably been most enlightening. His illuminating stories have covered everything from the nineteenth-century origins of the beautiful brick barn to how his dad bought plans for their house from The Age in the 1940s, as part of Robin Boyd’s Small Homes Service. A Plot in Common | Habitus Living 70 years later, Ben has designed a modern extension to the house, Tash is curating an ongoing series of gatherings and workshops to support and connect the local community of artists and artisans, and their family is living off the land, growing veggies and fruit, and breeding and raising animals for meat. This property was already rich with history, and that richness is echoed in the daily life of its latest occupants. Read the full story in Habitus issue #34, available now. Words by Mark Scruby Photography by Marnie Hawson A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Living A Plot in Common | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

THE HOMES THAT MAKE ‘BOXY’ LOOK COOL

Balmoral House Designed by architects Clinton Murray and Polly Harbison, the Balmoral House sits on Sydney’s lower shore and takes inspiration from Brutalism as much as art. “Art formed a pivotal aspect in designing the Balmoral House,” we wrote. “The form, setting, landscape and art are all inspired by a gallery’s sensibility as a fluid and interrelated system, with ‘art’ being treated as the third occupant of the house.” Balmoral House - Habitus Living   Skyline Drive Designing his own home, Skyline Drive, was both a blessing and a curse for architect Feras Raffoul of FGR Architects. He wasn’t constrained by the preferences of others (read: clients) but he also had a lot more emotionally invested. He chose concrete and glass to be the headlining materials in this act for their ability to develop patina over time as well as play against each other. Skyline Drive | Habitus Living   Frame House The Frame House by Carr Design Group is essentially a big black square of steel and zinc behind a tall concrete fence. And yet despite its imposing presence it’s somehow light and airy. Perhaps it has something to do with the floor-to-ceiling glass walls and doors. Or the fact that the entire ground floor can be opened up allowing for cross ventilation. We’re definitely picking up what they’re putting down. Frame House | Habitus Living   Tomorrow’s Concrete A home that’s heavy on the concrete is counteracted by teal feature doors and accents of timber scattered throughout. More than this however the family had a keen desire to seamlessly blend indoor and outdoor spaces – one that was realised by Studio Benicio. 1705abc
Architecture
Homes

THE HOMES THAT RE-INVENTED THEMSELVES

Traditional Japanese Home Earlier this year we wrote about a Tokyo-based architecture firm, Keiji Ashizawa Designs, who were charged with renovating a traditional-style home located in central Tokyo. The end result saw a fusing of the traditional features of the original house with a modern – and functional – interior. DKCR_120_DC59255_L   Brisbane Workers Cottage When an interior designer and architect come together in work and life you get spaces like the Brisbane Workers Cottage. Despite a narrow plan the original build had high ceilings which afforded a sense of light and openness – clearly the mood they were after given the new additions are largely open plan and connected to the outdoors. CFJ_Highgate-Hill-House-42   Breeze Block House One of the more memorable residential projects of 2016, the Breeze Block House by Architect Prineas was hot on the lips of many this year – and for good reason. It’s no easy feat to bring an air of excitement back to the suburbs, but that’s exactly what they did – championing the use of Australian iconic breeze blocks no less. Breeze Block House - Interiors - Habitus Living   Mid-Century Modern The premise of this Mid-Century Modern renovation by Nest Architects was to look at a space from a new perspective. Not that you’d know from the home that resulted but that’s a lot easier said than done. There are subtle clues and characteristic features that give a genuine nod to the era, but they’re amongst a more contemporary colour palette and selection of materials. 06abc
Architecture
Homes

THE HOMES YOU WON’T BELIEVE ARE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE CITY

Eco Smart Studio LEAD It’s hard to believe this studio apartment is just 400-square-feet and located within the beating heart of Hong Kong, on Hollywood Road, Central. Bespoke furniture and cabinetry cleverly maximise and conceal storage while double-glazed windows keep the buzz of the city outside. A rooftop terrace provides a place to relax, meditate, exercise or enjoy enviable views of the city’s skyline. Eco Smart House | Habitus Living   Unfurled House A Federation façade on one end and a modern, monochromatic structure on the other. Cellular rooms and various indoor-outdoor connections make up the Unfurled House. Christopher Polly Architect has created a series of conflicting – and yet unbroken – spaces within the Unfurled House. Unfurled House | Christopher Polly | Habitus Living   High House Tim Ross may have likened the humble terrace to creepy-crawlies calling them the cockroaches of the design world – the impression being that they just won’t die – earlier this year at MID, but he obviously hadn’t seen the High House by Dan Gayfer Design – an inner-city terrace dreams are made of. Dan Gayfer - High House | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

THE HOMES WE FOUND AMONG THE GUM TREES

Red Soil House The residents of this impressive feat of architecture, realised at the hands of Phorm Architecture + Design, can almost reach out and touch the gum trees blowing in the wind alongside their bedroom window. An appreciation for the natural surrounds was high on the list of priorities for the Red Soil House and as a result red corrugated iron walls emanate the soil beneath and an “aerial courtyard” provides enviable views of the rolling hills beyond. Red Soil House – Architecture – Habitus Living   Tamborine House Situated smack bang in the middle of five acres of luscious green meadow and mature vegetation, the Tamborine House, a one-storey glass home by Nielson Workshop, capitalises on its surrounding views in every sense possible. “A muted interior palette of warm timber floors and white kitchen cabinetry give focus to the vibrant strains of colour outside,” we wrote. “Black accents in the form of furniture, fireplace and curtains encircling the room, offset the brightness of a space flooded with natural light.” MtTamborine_24   Yandoit House A historic church built in the late 19th Century doesn’t necessarily make for the easiest of renovations, but the essence of the original building was nonetheless kept in tact. The new addition takes its design cues from the surrounding landscape as much the antiquated church: timber panelling on the exterior mimics the muted brown bushland while the kitchen island bench within marks the place where the church altar once stood. Yandoit House | Habitus Living   Invisible House Designed as a quiet retreat for a Sydney-based filmmaker and artist, and much-needed getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city, the aptly named Invisible House by Peter Stutchbury Architecture, is immersed within the Australian Bush and surrounded on all fronts by native eucalyptus and gum trees. Invisible House | Habitus Livingabc