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Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes

THE HOMES THAT ARE LIVING LARGE WITH LESS

Box by the Sea Situated on the NSW South Coast and boasting 270-degree views of the ocean, it’s not hard to live with less in this residence. What more could you need? Even want? Making the most of uninterrupted views all rooms open up to outdoor areas leading onto the headland at the northern end of the beach or the hinterland beyond if not the beach itself. Nature is on your doorstep. SDS-1031-Lamble-Residence-05-exterior-rear   LSD Residence What better time to downsize than when your beloved offspring fly the coup. Narrow and long this minimalist abode is made up of three central blocks and two interstitial zones containing the entrance, staircase and kitchen. The colour palette makes the most of warm, blonde timbers and double-glazed glass to soften the dominant concrete structure. LSD House - Davidov Partners Architect | Habitus Living   Contemporary Beach Shack Luxury doesn’t necessarily go hand-in-hand with opulence or excess and the Contemporary Beach Shack, a three-storey modern take on a quintessential Aussie trope, is case in point. Home to a family of seven the size was a necessity and a calm approach to the interior design was a non-negotiable. Clovelly Beach Shack | Habitus Living   The Farmhouse This semi-rural farmhouse and wholly active cattle farm was a both a challenge and opportunity for Rachcoff Vella architects and much of their inspiration was taken from the surrounding landscape. Farmhouse_168254abc
Happenings
What's On

The Hair-Raising Work Of Madeline Isakson

For more the forty years, Adelaide’s JamFactory creative hub has nurtured excellence in design through a rigorous, atelier-based system of mentoring and hands-on learning alongside accomplished leaders in the fields of wood working, glass blowing, ceramics and metal working. The annual Generate exhibition this year showcases the work of nine artists, designers and makers emerging from the 2016 Associate program – four from the Furniture Studio, three from the Glass Studio and two from the Metal Design Studio (The Ceramics Studio is absent from the show, but represented in the JamFactory retail outlet and its own JamFactory home collection). Associates at the JamFactory have already attained tertiary qualifications from a wide variety of national and international institutions and the diversity of their JamFactory work is testimony to this of breadth of intent. Madeline Isakson, for instance, studied at the California College of the Arts, and then spent a semester in the furniture program at the Australian National University. “It was during my time at ANU that I discovered the burgeoning arts and design scene that is currently happening in Australia. During my studies in San Francisco I realized that is was a great place for art collectors but not necessarily for artists, so I chose to come back to Australia. I had heard about the JamFactory and I thought it sounded the perfect place to really push myself and my career, and to be surrounded by like minded young creatives. Adelaide is the modern Laurel Canyon of the arts scene. It's because of my time here that my style has evolved and I have been able to explore the more quirky, the really wild side of design. Isakson’s Samson chair is a standout at the year’s Generate show. Part of a three-piece collection that includes a nest of tables cast in aluminium on a form made from discarded cardboard and a cluster of pendant lamps created by dipping disused paper towels in ceramic slip, the Samson is made from real human hair and is intended to examine our standards of beauty. “Hair is such an amazing material,” Isakson says. “While it’s still attached to the body it is beautiful, even sexual. But once it’s detached it becomes something horrific, bizarre.” Generate is curated by JamFactory’s Assistant Curator Lara Merrington. Until January 22, Jam Factory, 19 Morphett Street Adelaide, SA 5000 Jam Factory jamfactory.com.au/pages/exhibitions Words by Stephen Todd FurChair 3Chairs JAM_FACTORY_148_161017_ JAM_FACTORY_168_161017_ JAM_FACTORY_176_161017_ JAM_FACTORY_196_161017_abc
Architecture
Homes

The Heart and Soul of Bondi

Say the words ‘Palm Springs Modernism’ in a room full of architects or architecture-lovers and you will receive appreciative nods and sighs, probably some zealous gesticulating. It’s one of the most identifiable, coveted and replicated architectural styles of the last century, but – like any other – the appeal is not just pure principles, but what they represent. “My attraction to Modernist architecture came from a fascination with the Hollywood icons of the 50s and 60s, particularly the Rat Pack” says John Musca, resident and owner of this sophisticated Bondi home. “The [Modernist] houses symbolised everything I associated with the stars, from martinis by the pool to flamboyant cigarette-in-hand conversations by stone fireplaces, concrete plains and endless glass.” Bondi Modern | Habitus Living Palm Springs Modernism is replicated all over the world. Many may be shallow, stylistic treatments that pay no consideration to the formal foundations or philosophical underpinnings of the genre, this Bondi home has depth. Read the full story in Habitus issue #34, available now. Andrew Donaldson Architecture & Design andrewdonaldson.com.au Words by Nicky Lobo Photography by Brett Boardman Bondi Modern | Habitus Living Bondi Modern | Habitus Living Bondi Modern | Habitus Living Bondi Modern | Habitus Living Bondi Modern | Habitus Living Bondi Modern | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Finishes

Something Beginning With

Tropical nature in all its resplendent beauty served as the inspiration for the new range of finishes from Something Beginning With, which mark the launch of Spring/Summer 16/17 collection. The colourful, tactile collection of hues and material options was conceived in-house by Something Beginning With, and are available across its range of furniture. Debuted at Melbourne’s Heidi Museum of Modern Art, the range is launched alongside the newly unveiled Ari Day Bed. An evolution of the Ari sofa range, the day bed is designed with soft, sweeping curves, designed to inject a sense of comfort and simplicity, form home living spaces to commercial reception areas and more. The Spring/Summer 16/17 collection’s lush tropical vibes pop out against a backdrop of modernist design. In bringing together the finishes, Something Beginning With has referenced botanical hues of nature, with shades of greens, sharp lemon yellow and calm blues, offset against blush pinks and fiery reds. “This unique colour and material spectrum has been carefully curated and designed to produce interesting relationships and richly nuanced combinations between SBW’s products, resulting in a visually captivating, balanced and beautiful resolved collection of products,” says SBW design team Lisa Vincitorio and Laelie Berzon. “The effervescent, tropically-inspired greens, coupled with the plethora of contrasting materials, colours and textures, enables designers to create a dynamic interplay between finish and form. It also allows you to individually customise your SBW pieces to create a dramatically changing look that can be translated into an array of applications,” says Ms Berzon. Something Beginning With somethingbeginningwith.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Ren-Chair-Collection Oscar-Sofa-and-Cushions,-Otto-Side-and-Coffee-Table,-Oscar-Chair Oscar-Sofa-and-Cushions,-Otto-Side-and-Coffee-Table,-Oscar-Chair_2 Oscar-Sofa-and-Cushion-with-Otto-Side-and-Coffee-Table Oscar-Sofa-and-Cushion-with-Oscar-Coffee-Table 8.-Ren-Chair-Collection_Gothic-Gold,-French-Bow-and-Viper-Red 7.-Oscar-Sofa-and-Cushion,-Oscar-Chair,-Oscar-Coffee-Table 6.-Oscar-Sofa-and-Cushion-with-Lili-Side-Tableabc
Happenings
What's On

Get Off The Grid

Melbournians unite. Let’s come together and get real about the future. The world’s natural resources are quickly diminishing at a time when our population is growing at an equally rapid rate. Off The Grid Festival is Australia’s first solar powered, zero-waste musical and arts festival dedicated to ensuring we’re moving in the right direction. Off The Grid Festival | Habitus Living The feeling of festival being that a sustainable future isn’t just possible, it’s inevitable, the end goal is to make Melbourne a completely self-sufficient city. And despite receiving no help from the local, state of federal governments, the organisers are intent on achieving this goal. Off The Grid Festival | Habitus Living In addition to live music and local art enticing festival lovers there will also be a second stage, The Palimpsest, on which professions will speak, discuss and debate ways to move forward. These talks will present some of Australia’s leading environmentalists, architects, activists, entrepreneurs and foodies centre stage to have their voices heard. Off The Grid Festival | Habitus Living Panelists include Adele Winteridge, Bronwyn Johnson, Clare Cousins, Ellen Sandell, Joost Bakker, Natalie Isaacs, Paul Gorrie, Peter Malatt, Rob Murray-Leach, Tane Hunter and Timothy Hill. If all of the above doesn’t do it for you then how about a little bit of poetic justice? The return of the festival marks the Summer Solstice in homage to the power of the sun. Get amongst it. Off The Grid Festival offthegrid.global Words by Holly Cunneen Off The Grid Festival | Habitus Living Off The Grid Festival | Habitus Living Off The Grid Festival | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Patrick and Tamsin Johnson – A Force to be Reckoned With

The Johnsons’ eponymous studio in Sydney’s Paddington is a world of seductive charm, nonchalance, and quiet humour. Part gallery and part atelier, it’s a visual feast of unrehearsed panache laced with wit. Everything is suffused with care and tellingly curated with same. “For us,” says Patrick Johnson, the brand’s founder and chief designer, “I love that our products and our spaces really highlight the way they’re made”. This romancing of the artisanal has put P.Johnson Tailors on the international scene in a country that otherwise lacks a tailoring pedigree. After spending the better part of the last decade learning his craft in London and sourcing cloth from north Italian weavers, he has opened studios in three continents and thereby dressed a global élite of elegantly waisted men. But though his initials hang above the door, he unabashedly asserts that his wife, interior designer Tamsin Johnson, “is in more ways than I can know, core to the essence of what we’ve created”. Patrick&Tamsin Johnson | Habitus Living With graciousness and the occasional wry anecdote the couple speak eloquently about collaboration enlivening their work. Read the full story in Habitus issue #34, available now. P.Johnson Tailors pjt.com Tamsin Johnson Interior Design tamsinjohnson.com.au Words by David Congram Photography by Rob Palmer Patrick&Tamsin Johnson | Habitus Living Patrick&Tamsin Johnson | Habitus Living Patrick&Tamsin Johnson | Habitus Living Patrick&Tamsin Johnson | Habitus Living Patrick&Tamsin Johnson | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Hotel Meets Home in the Lahinch House

From the first meeting with clients Angie and Vic, and their Dalmatian Pirate, the brief was always to create a dramatic statement with the design. An impression of awe upon entering was the main goal for the Lahinch House. The house was conceived with a focus on entertaining guests; a space the owners could regularly host revelers and family. With this in mind, Lachlan Shepherd Architects had a two pronged approach to the design, which had to first function firstly as a home to its two full-time occupants, and their Dalmatian, and secondly as a kind of luxury hotel. This was no second thought in the design, with each guest bedroom provided with its own ensuite and robe areas, creating a type of "check-in" space for guests to relax in before moving into the main living zones of the house. The planning responds to the site surroundings through turning its back on the one adjacent neighbor, preferring to face and open to the beautiful golf course views to the south and east. Large expanses of glazing work to draw the rolling golf greens and sand dunes beyond into the home, blurring the distinction between outside and in. The main kitchen and living space continue this blurring distinction, this time to an integrated plunge pool. Heated year-round, the pool serves as a practical, usable swimming pool as well as doubles as a water feature, which can be viewed from all living zones. There are no walls diving the lounge, kitchen, dining, and sitting zones, instead, these spaces are separated visually through design, and spatially by the sunken lounge area. The Lahinch House, whilst highly detailed and technical in its design/construction, also represents an honest, low-maintenance and warm home Lachlan Shepherd Architects lachlanshepherd.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Ben Hosking 6049 6048 6047 6044 6043 6039 6038 6037abc
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Now Trending – White for Kitchens

White surfaces, and sleek contemporary design in appliances, are key to pulling off the mixed zone look successfully, and Smeg, is leading the change here with its new Linear collection. Comprising a series of designer proportioned, stylishly elegant white ovens in white glass and stainless steel, the range has a pure aesthetic, ideal for a contemporary kitchen. The use of white in a kitchen creates the sense of seamless space – a white induction cooktop on a white marble benchtop would make for an eye catching yet simultaneously minimalist design. The new Linear collection comprises 60cm and 70cm ovens, together with compact ovens, coffee machine, warming drawer, induction hobs plus gas on glass cooktops in two widths – 72cm and 60cm. Technology features prominently in the new Linear collection – Thermoseal oven technology ensures an ideal atmospheric balance required for optimum cooking conditions. The streamlined aesthetics of the ceramic glass gas cooktop hide its durability – the white ceramic glass resists heats of up to 800°C! On the technology side, the Smeg SmartSense Plus induction cooktops offer total control and accuracy over temperatures and cooking times, with each zone able to be pre-programmed to heat to full power and then automatically reduce to a predetermined level. The range allows a choice of sizes in both the gas and induction cooktops, while the 60cm and 45cm built-in ovens offer many options. The range is complemented by a built in coffee machine design in matching white, juxtaposed with an equally minimalist and contemporary black. Smeg smeg.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Smeg-SA190MW-White-induction-LS Smeg-PVA175CB_V1_HR Smeg-SFA4130VCB_HRabc
Architecture
Homes

Reinventing an Inter-war Heritage Home

A retired couple sought to downsize their home to comfortably accommodate themselves, an adult family member, and frequent visits from a large family cohort that live nearby within their inter-war heritage house. Conscious of the home’s history, Lai Cheong Brown took a playful and careful approach to balancing the original Art Deco and Inter-war motifs, with a modern approach to living. Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living “In a heritage overlay, the design response needs to accommodate all of the expansion to the rear of the block,” say Rowan Brown and Christina Lai Cheong of Lai Cheong Brown when describing the delicate balancing act of working with heritage buildings. The exterior of the home has been repaired to maintain the original clinker brick facade, chimney, and tiled roof of the house, whilst the extension maintains this aesthetic with a use of re-used and recycled clinker bricks. Wrought iron gates were also crafted specially for the home, modelled after the Art Deco style of the original 1930s ironwork. Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living For the interiors, Rowan and Christina reimagined the internal layout, converting the old master suite into a new integrated apartment complete with its own bathroom, laundry and kitchen facilities meant to be a contained space for the adult family member to reside in. The rest of the house and the new extension has become living space for the retired couple, as well as a larger communal space for visiting family. Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Contrasting with the clinker brick facade, the inside of the home uses a rich mix of timber, with timber flooring from Royal Oak Floors, and a neutral colour palette to give the house a cosy feel. In the extension, a striking lantern roof has been built utilising dark blue dry pressed brickwork, giving the space added height and grandeur. A rich walnut hallway connects the extension with the original dwelling, centering the home and providing a spacious, light-filled space for social occasions. The bathrooms add a playful twist to the home, with colourful tiling used for a pop of personality.  Lai Cheong Brown laicheongbrown.com Words by Christina Rae. Photography by Jaime Diaz-Berrio. ARCHITECT Lai Cheong Brown BUILDER Smart Building Concepts STRUCTURAL ENGINEER BHS Consultants BUILDING SURVEYOR Floreancig Smith CABINETMAKER We Make Cabinets Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Living Clerestory House - Lai Cheong Brown | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

Joni Waka: Leaving No Stone Unturned

Every day Joni Waka travels everywhere, with his faithful dog Bogie, a glorious looking Rhodesian Ridgeback. Joni may embody the idea of living in design, but his identity is hard to pin down. He is one of the only American Jews with a Japanese passport. He has been living in Asia for over 30 years. He speaks 12 languages and can curse effectively in 8. So the myth goes, Joni was sent from Manchuria to India to go to school with just a dog and man servant. Around the age of 20, he landed back in Japan and fell in love with the culture. Today he calls art his ‘religion’. “The wilder the better. That’s my motto. I love to push myself to the edge to find out who I am or what I am about,” he says. To Joni good design is simple and original. Something that shows historical or ethnic reference to the designer’s culture and a splash of satire. “I live design as a passion, maybe as an addiction,” he says. “I do it by continually updating, and surrounding myself with the next wave of cutting-edge design; Everything, from the clothes, accessories and eyeglasses I wear, to the car I drive, to the house, garden and neighbourhood I live in. “I access design through the shops and restaurants I frequent, the dishes I eat from, the chairs I sit on to the leash and collar my dog wears. I like to leave no stone unturned.” His favourite architects are a global bunch including; Shigeru Ban, Sanaa, Ole Scheeren, Tonkin Zulaikha Greer and Klein & Dytham. His favourite interior Designer is Shinichiro Ogata of Simplicity. Joni’s own home is a bit different. “I just sold my last house, it was called The Dog House and it was designed by Joseph Kosuth. It was built by traditional Japanese temple carpenters and covered with 21 neon word art works, all famous quotes about dogs, 10 in English and 11 in Japanese all made on Venetian glass framed and mounted on black stainless steel. My next house for which I am currently searching a location, is designed by the artist Ai Weiwei.” Joni’s enmeshment in the global architecture design scene is no accident. He says he’s achieved this,“By living it.” Joni loves Australia, but fears Sydney has too many rules. He finds the building codes too strict. “It hinders creativity,” he says. “In Tokyo you can build anything anywhere,” he says. Despite the young scene in Sydney, Joni loves Australia’s optimism. “Australians have taken great inspiration from Japan and further enhanced Australian design from Milton Moon to Lucas Chirnside,” he says. When it comes to presenting himself in public, Joni is very specific. He is never seen without this ultimate accessory, his dog Bogie. “The dog is my alter ego. I like to show Tokyo through the eyes of my dog as a satire of the famous 100 yr old Japanese novel by Soseki Natsume: Wagahai Neko (I Am A Cat),” he says. Art Bank Tokyo artbanktokyo.com The Art Foundation theartfoundation.com Words by Belinda Aucott. Photography by Aimee Crouch courtesy of BresicWhitney and PM Cook. JoniWaka_09 DSC_7220abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Not Just Another Brick in the Wall

Taking design cues from Brick Lane (two words) in London, Bricklane (one word) in Sydney’s Double Bay showcases a summery palette of cool, tertiary colours with a slightly chalky, 1960s feel: dirty sage green, soft calamine pink blush, putty crème and AZB Verona Grey. The eclectic mix and cultural hotspot characteristic of the London destination has inspired the Sydney location’s vibrant nature, clashing colours and strong focus on artisanal design and original artwork. Bricklane | Habitus Living Bricklane | Habitus Living With venues like Pink Salt and Casablanca on his CV, Alex Zabotto-Bentley of AZBCreative – the man behind the interior design – is no stranger to the area. And places like Kittyhawk, Goodbar, The Emerald Room and Mad Pizza show a folio that’s at once diverse yet distinctive. Rendered concrete lines the walls inside Bricklane and is met by a clean white ceiling to emphasize the matt black support beams. Encaustic tiles line the floors in one area, and the table tops in another. Italian Carrera marble marks café-style tables inside while Tasmanian Oak timber finished with a bull-nose edge line the bar counter. The number of chairs throughout the venue nearly matches the amount of different styles, which include timber and rattan chairs – in both bar and dining varieties – as well as buttery soft leather dining chairs. Bricklane | Habitus Living Bricklane | Habitus Living To match such diverse styling Alex has curated layers of contemporary artworks against historically significant pieces and original posters. “I want patrons to have a deeper connection with the environment. Art is such an exciting medium as a layer for interiors and brings a magical energy to a space,” he says. “It is important that we create a space that can showcase the work of artists and artisans and bring their work to a wider audience…Part of the joy of interior design is collecting beautiful elements and placing them in a space for the world to experience.” Bricklane | Habitus Living With deliberate nods to London, French, and even Slovenian design, Bricklane is a melange of European style translated to suit Sydney’s laidback elite. AZBCreative azbthecreative.com Bricklane brick-lane.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photogrpahy by Jennifer Soo and Jason Jowett Bricklane | Habitus Living Bricklane | Habitus Living Bricklane | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Discover The Architectural Lives Of Eight Great Cities

The Cities of Architecture new lecture series from the ACCA is set to focus on the recent contemporary architectural, urban and significance of our world, through the lens of eight different locations. Cities of Architecture will bring together architects, writers and experts to discuss the art, philosophy, social history and popular culture of each city. Kicking off on February 16, the year will see a series of eight talks that reveal how we live, interact, play and grow in different urban landscapes.   The program… 16 Feb - Program launch at MPavilion 20 March – Tokyo, Japan. With Marika Neustupny, Director, NMBW Architecture Studio 10 April – Venice, Italy. With Stuart Harrison, Director, HAW. 15 May – Houston, USA. With Donald Bates, Director LAB architecture studio. 19 June – Madrid, Spain. Presented by Qianyi Lim, Founding Partner and Architect at SIBLING.

17 July – Shanghai, ChinaPresented by James Brearley, Partner Brearley Architects & Urbanists (BAU).

14 August – Barcelona, Spain. With Mark Burry, Executive Architect, Sagrada Familia Basilica 18 September - Isfahan, Iran. With Justine Clark, writer, editor. 16 October – Guadalajara, Mexico. With Diego Ramirez-Lovering, head of architecture, Monash University. The Australian Centre for Contemporary Art accaonline.org.auabc