About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Architecture
Homes

Seven Years in the Making and Worth Every Moment

Over the past seven years, the architects at Archier have been liaising with a longtime friend to renovate and build a retirement house. These conversations lead to discussions of the garden – an essential aspect of the retirement plan for the clients. The ground plan was then designed around this desire to be permanently engaged with the garden. Rather than a simple glass cube, Archier took a unique approach that saw the garden articulated around the house, and the house then interweaving with the garden. This design sees each room corresponding with a facet if the outdoor garden – each with their own unique aesthetic and compositional ideas. The clients, retired Tasmanian teacher Carmel and her partner Richard, had a specific look in mind for their home, one that would allow them to indulge in their shared love of gardening, but also one that doesn’t see such a clear distinction between the design of the interior and the exterior. "I have always wanted to build from scratch, right from a child I have loved buildings,” says Carmel, “Richard and I are both so into gardening and believe in sustainability – we have already landscaped the bones of the garden and have the vegie garden up and running. The house is all about courtyards as rooms with different themes. We are outdoors people and believe there should be a seamless flow between outdoors and indoors.” Such an open build presented interesting challenges to deal with in the Tasmanian climate. To solve the issue of warmth, and create a sense of flow in the space, full walls of double-glazing and a restrained materials palette establishes the connection between inside and out. The Five Yards House has already secured two major AIA awards in the Tasmanian chapter 2016, taking home the awards for New Residential Architecture – Houses and Sustainability gongs. With a design like this, it’s easy to see why. Archier archier.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Adam Gibson AJG_0780 AJG_9192 AJG_0423 AJG_0809 AJG_8947 Untitled-1 AJG_0799  abc
Happenings
What's On

We Won’t Start the Party Without You

Submissions for our 2017 INDE.Awards have been flooding into our offices – and we couldn't be more excited, surprised, and impressed by the breadth and calibre of the entries so far. For what is surely shaping up to be this region's most inspiring and innovative awards programme for A+D to date, you certainly don't want to miss out on marking your mark. And now that we're well into February, we thought it only fair to extend the entries period for the 2017 INDE.Awards to FEBRUARY 17th. Because 2017 INDE.Awards is all about recognising the innovation, bravery and diversity of Asia Pacific's A+D world, we think that YOU are essential.  

With more than 10 awards up for grabs, which INDE are YOU ...?

  Are you an architect, designer (or even a hybrid of the two)? If so, we've got our eyes set on you for INDE's Design Studio award. We know that you're a forward-thinker who creates voraciously to change perceptions through design. Why not go here and tell us all about it? Or, maybe you fancy yourself a bit of a mover-and-shaker? You believe that design pushes us to new frontiers and actively creates a better world. After all, you're an Influencer ... and we've got an award for that too! Enter here and demonstrate how your progressive designs are shaping tomorrow. Newbie? Not to worry. The world of A+D is a welcoming one, and we want to help the future generations of the creative community. So we've brought back Indesign's famed Launch Pad to help nurture and celebrate authentic and innovative emerging design. If you're relatively new to the game then we want to support you. Visit here – we want to help. But what if you want your latest work to be recognised too? We know that not all objects are created equal: the way they function, what they signify, how they interact with the human interface is always radically different. And your work is different, as a result. Show us your latest here, and be in the running to win our region's finest award in industrial design for The Object. We know that living well means responding well to one's surroundings. Be it a homestead, shophouse or apartment tower, our homes are as varied as they are numerous. The INDE award for Living Space recognises our region's most inspiring home. Do you think it might be one you designed? Tell us here. Some of the most impressive spaces are those where we all interact and play. In 2017, The Social Space award honours a space that tells a relevant story, captures the imagination, and brings people together. All you need to do is tell us its story here. But our workplaces are just as innovative, too. We get that – and that's why our awards programme would be incomplete without recognising the talent of our region's designers in the corporate sphere. The Work Space award celebrates the fact that our workplaces are as social and cultural, as they are functional. We want to hear all about how your workspace design meets the demands of work and the needs of people – so show us, here. Everyone is looking forward to hearing who will take home the grand prize of the 2017 INDE.Awards. The Building award recognised a project that advances architecture and its capacity to respond to place-specific currents. You're in with a strong chance, so make sure you go here to have your project rightly celebrated.
It's been a big year so far, and even though you're late we get it – a LOT has been going on. So we're giving you all a bit more time.The entry period for the 2017 INDE.Awards has been extended to February 17th, 2017.
Enter now to be recognised among Asia Pacific’s most progressive buildings, spaces, objects, proposals and people.
We award those who break barriers and do great things...
And that's you.
abc
Design Products
Furniture

Part 2 of the Habitus Hottest 100

cover image: Tidal Sunlounge designed by Trent Jansen for TAIT On the back of the Australia Day weekend (a lovely long one for some), Habitus presents the second installation of the Hottest 100 moments of design from 2016. With only 34 spots left, what pieces are you anticipating? Let us know in the comments below! Holly Cunneen Deputy Editor Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Eclipse Pendant from Cafe Culture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living SP01 Parisi table and Jeanette chair from Space Furniture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Finley sofa by JD.Lee Furniture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Breeze Modular sofa by TAIT Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Cub Chair from DesignbyThem Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Ernest Bed by Gwenaël Nicolas and Swing Chair by Patricia Urquiola for Objets Nomades, a collection of furniture and accessories by Louis Vuitton Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Lounge Chair by Marcel Wanders from Objets Nomades by Louis Vuitton Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living PK52 Professor Desk by Carl Hansen from Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Georgian Bluffs surface from Caesarstone Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Messing table by Heerenhuis from Spence&Lyda Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Vilda chair by Gemla from SeehoSu Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Niloo lounge designed by Khodi Feiz for by Artifort from KE-ZU Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Bordeaux console from BoConcept Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Tango coat stand from Cafe Culture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Palladio tables designed by Claesson Koivisto Rune for Artifort from KE-ZU Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Cap pendant light by Ay Illuminate from Spence&Lyda Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Dreams sideboard from AJAR Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Piggyback chair from Cafe Culture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Linear White collection from Smeg Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living e15 KERMAN Sofa from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Industrial M extension dining table from Curious Grace   Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Freeman seating system from Minotti Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living BassamFellows Asymmetric Sofa from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Hector sofa by Erik Jorgensen from Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Athena chair from BoConcept Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Edouard sofa by B&B Italia from Space Furniture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Carl Hansen Woodlines Collection from Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living 'Eccentric' hardware by Rogerseller Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living DishDrawer dishwasher from Fisher & Paykel Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Intent Observer Gift Kit from Aesop Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Colander dining chairs from Fanuli Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Harry holders from DesignbyThem abc
Architecture
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted
Homes

Merging Past with Present: Modern Heritage Homes

Moving a century-old homestead in Brisbane’s Coorparoo was no easy feat, yet the heritage townhouse formed the centrepiece of Your Style Home’s ambitious boutique development so utmost care was taken to ensure that the building would remain intact during the move. Shifting a dramatic 11 meters diagonally, there was a constant danger of the home buckling in on itself, but Your Style Homes’ Nick Crang says the final result has made the endeavour well worth the effort. YSH_Raby002 “Before we acquire a site, we take into context the site’s streetscape and surrounding suburb which informs our ultimate vision for the project,” explains Mr Crang. “The existing structure was the primary focus and the modern construction had to be complementary. We put a great deal of consideration into how to blend the old and new while still paying homage to the existing 100 year old structure.” YSH_U6Raby001 Since the move, the original homestead has been spliced into two generous townhouses refitted with contemporary interiors, and is now accompanied by six brand new townhomes that are a modern interpretation of the original homestead. Crang says of the refurbished heritage townhouses that, “Internally they now have a traditional yet modern contemporary feel but with the quality build of a new home, and we achieved this without destroying the heritage of the existing structure. We essentially rebuilt the entire existing home exactly how it already was with the convenience of modern day interiors.” YSH_U6Raby009 “The brand new townhouses are deliberately more contemporary than the style of the existing structure to reflect the revitalisation that is occurring in Coorparoo, however there is a common theme in the selections to ensure the townhomes relate well with respect to materials, colour palette, finishes and even appliances” continues Crang. “The external materials are the biggest difference. We tried to have a more contemporary feel on the new ones than the existing, to create some contrast within the development.” YSH_U6Raby015 On the inside, solid timber flooring accompanies a neutral palette of minimalist white and grey, with the kitchen sporting Smeg appliances and the bathroom fitted out with Rogerseller’s Vitra Nest Pans with Peak buttons and Inwall Cisterns, Vitra X-Line Tapware, Metropole basins, Flow showers and Solo baths. For Crang, a successful development is, “one that has been well considered without its inhabitants necessarily realising this. If you’re living comfortably without restrictions or inconveniences, it's because consideration was given to the space and what’s been decided works. We wanted to create that feeling where when you walk in, you can feel the quality. People might not necessarily know why, but you can just tell it's been thoughtfully designed.” YSH_Raby_details017 “The brief was to be timeless. It's a 100 year old building and we didn't want the project to be gimmicky or obsolete in another three to five years, so we had to be very selective,” says Crang, “We use Rogerseller a lot because they are similarly committed to quality and design, and it's the touch and feel of their products that create the impact I'm talking about. When you don't know why, but it just feels well put together. I don’t think you have to be an expert to walk in and turn on a tap and know that it feels like a good quality tap.” YSH_U6Raby006 With the aim of creating a boutique series of townhouses, Your Style Houses’ Aspect development has been an inspiring exploration of balancing the fine line between heritage and modernity in the heart of Brisbane. Rogerseller rogerseller.com.au   Architecture, design and development by Your Style Homes Images courtesy of Your Style Homes Words by Christina Rae  abc
Design Hunters
People

Branching Out: Concrete Furniture by Brad Wray

As a complement to his architectural practice, designing furniture became a natural progression for Brad Wray. “It’s important to be able to go into the workshop and forget about work for the day – doing something so hands-on is great for your mental health,” says Brad. Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Living His cleverly detailed collection of concrete and timber furniture includes dining and coffee tables, serving paddles, watch and jewellery boxes, as well as a trendy baby change table – a design triumph for Brad and his wife, architect Ellie Farrell, who are young parents themselves. Incidentally, one of Brad’s earlier projects was handmade as a gift for Ellie: a jewellery box, with concrete panels that swing open to reveal internal compartments. Family is a great driver of Brad’s work, and it comes as no surprise that both he and practice partner Nicholas Russo have exceedingly handy parents. Wray senior, now semi-retired, was a successful builder for 30 years, while Nick’s father is a sculptor with a background in teaching woodwork. Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad’s magazine stable, originally dreamed up as a gift for his dad, is a multifunctional piece that speaks to design lovers and avid readers alike. Its angular concrete form holds a removable wooden panel, which neatly transforms the piece from timber-topped side table to magazine holder. When upended, the stable becomes a sturdy concrete stool. “When people think of concrete, they see it as being rock solid, but actually because it’s so fluid to work with it presents a whole lot of different challenges,” Brad says. “Especially when you put it next to timber, an organic, living thing that warps and twists – so it was a real learning exercise to bring those materials together.” The practical and experimental research into materials and construction methods is essential to Branch Studio Architects’ approach. Their studio in Orchard is used as a testing ground for architectural concepts, and Brad Wray Workshop is an extension of this creative hub. Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad’s furniture is functional and fun; robust enough to weather our Australian climate whilst looking perfectly at home indoors. However, while he and his family enjoy living with his creations, it appears his pursuit may have hit saturation point at home. “I read somewhere that Zaha Hadid’s house was filled with all her own works, which I thought was kind of eccentric – but when I looked around, I realised my place was getting pretty crowded with mine!” Brad says. Brad Wray Workshop designs on commission. Brad Wray Workshop bradwrayworkshop.com Branch Studio Architects branchstudioarchitects.com Words by Sandra Tan Photography by Brad Wray Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Living Brad Wray | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Duplex and the City

The Sydney dwelling sits shoulder to shoulder with neighbouring apartment buildings, which presented a unique opportunity for the renovating designers Luigi Rosselli Architects. Ultimately, the design saw two separate homes transformed into a four-storey block, complete with basement car park, cellar, ground floor garden apartment, and two-storey penthouse. The original design of the townhouses was largely retained, with just forty-percent of the existing structure demolished – mainly the dysfunctional rooms at the back of the property – which left space for the design and construction of a contemporary four-storey structure that is generous in internal space while still being economical in external design. The front of the property retains its original Queen Anne leadlight windows, liver toned brickwork and timber shingles so as preserve the building’s aesthetic marriage with the existing street style. This allows the reveal of the refined front rooms of the apartments’ modernist open living spaces and generous terraces to stand a visually arresting and striking juxtaposition of styles. The duality of this design is reflected the personalities of the residents too – urbane and modern, yet loaded with old world culture and family history, passionate about modern art, architecture and urban living. Every millimetre of space in the duplex been carefully planned to condense the content of a large house, into an inner city pad. A careful blend between storage options and elegance in interiors was considered throughout the design, as exemplified by a library and study area with room for a comfortable armchair tucked beside the Jacobs Ladder stair. This space climbs to a glazed roof hatch and a landscaped roof terrace; a perfect spot to indulge in city skyline views or a dip in the spa pool. Luigi Rosselli Architects luigirosselli.com Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Justin Alexander / Edward Birch luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---014 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---013 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---012 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---011 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---010 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---009 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---006 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---005 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---004 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---003 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---002 luigi-rosselli-architects---duplex-in-the-city---001  abc
Design Products
Furniture

The Habitus Hottest 100 – Part 1

cover image: BD Barcelona Monkey Table from Living Edge When we first had the idea to pull together a Habitus take on Triple J’s Hottest 100 for 2016, I must admit I was unsure we’d find a full 100 new designs. Logistics – and time – permitting, I was even less convinced we’d find 100 great quality, new designs worth the mention. Turns out my concern was misplaced. Bar a handful of pleasant surprises and how-did-I-miss-that double takes, collating this list was like a trip down memory lane. A gathering of old friends I’d once been so excited to meet and now – irrespective of their youth – feel so nostalgic for. Despite being spoiled for choice one hundred is a still a big number so we’ve broken it up into three digestible, bite-sized pieces – in case you missed it. Now it’s your turn, join us in celebrating a year of great design across the Asia-Pac region. Holly Cunneen Deputy Editor | Habitus   Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Palissade outdoor collection by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for HAY. Available through Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Objects by Fritz Hansen from Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living The Dawson Modular sofa from Arthur G Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living 3 Wise Men from the Forest collection by Knock on Wood Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Indiana indoor-outdoor sofa from Minotti Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Icelandic Pampa Mariposa Shorn White Chair from Curious Grace Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Intill sofa from Spence & Lyda Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Genius Loci kitchen designed by Gabriele Centazzo for Valcucine Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Tortuga Armchair designed by Studio Nadadora for Sancal from KE-ZU Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living The Wes lounge (in hommage to the highly stylised films of Wes Anderson) by designer Tom Fereday for Zenith Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living TIM glass pendant by BOMMA from Spence & Lyda Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Sika dining table and chairs by TIDE Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living SERA clamp by Mingardo from HUB Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Joost Baker's Vertical Garden for Schiavello Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Featherston Scape armchair c.1960, relaunched 2016 at Grazia&Co Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Noah sideboard from Jardan Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Molecule rug from the MINDSCAPE collection by Gavin Harris from Designer Rugs Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Mila Chairs by Franco Crea Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living ELEMENTA by Mingardo from HUB Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Creed Divano lounge from Minotti Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Camille sofa by Anaca Studio Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Cicca coffee table from Cafe Culture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Rene Bike Sling hanger from Cafe Culture Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living BD Barcelona Aquário Cabinet from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Limited edition Breakstool by Nathan Yong, relaunched in partnership with Gallery & Co Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Bertoia Diamond Chair in 18-karat gold from Knoll Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Nest tables by Adam Goodrum for Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Bower armchair by Adam Goodrum for Cult Design Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living The Zeno Light sofa from Fanuli Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living Herman Miller Spot Stools designed by Michael Anastassiades from Living Edge Hottest 100 of 2016 - Habitus Living U Chain series of pendants and wall lights by Volker Haugabc
Design Hunters
People

Who Is The World’s Best Female Chef?

We’re very much in the age of the self-taught aficionado across most – if not all – fields. You no longer need to train night and day, year after year, at the world’s most expensive and prestigious institutions. Your affluence no longer affects your agency. The success of Adele, Richard Branson, Masterchef, Susan Boyle, countless bloggers across the world and now Ana, are cases in point. In another life she was a national ski champion however – another trope of the world’s current climate – she made a drastic career change. In 2000 Ana and her sommelier husband Valter took over from Valter’s father at the family restaurant, Hisa Franko, in Korbarid. Ana Ros | Habitus Living Growing up in Slovenia she was heavily influenced by her own countries native dishes as much as the cultural food of countries such as Italy, Hungary, Austria and Croatia, with which Slovenia neighboured. As a result her menu bestows traditional dishes, ingredients and her culinary heritage, yet is presented with audacious and unexpected twists. The historic building (c.1860) in which Hisa Franko is housed boasts the perfect aesthetic to complement her food. “Ana Roš is a very worthy recipient of this year’s World’s Best Female Chef honour. Her precision, attention to detail and imagination distinguish her as a true leader in global gastronomy,” says William Drew, Group Editor of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. Ana Ros | Habitus Living But Ana isn’t only feeding the world, she’s teaching us too. She has mentored underprivileged girls in India, connected with recovering addicts in an effort to teach them how to cook, and annually hosts local children in her kitchen. “It is a big responsibility to accept this award,” notes Ana, “especially as a self-taught cook, but the recognition provides an opportunity for people to reassess Slovenia as an interesting gastronomic destination.” Ana Ros will be presented with the honour as The World’s Best Restaurants awards ceremony at the historic Royal Exhibition Building in Melbourne 5 April, 2017. Words by Holly Cunneen Food Photography by Suzan Gabrijan Ana Ros | Habitus Living Ana Ros | Habitus Living Ana Ros | Habitus Living Ana Ros | Habitus Living Ana Ros | Habitus Living Ana Ros | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters

Exploring the World of the Stone Age Folk

The collaboration was launched at the Interior Design Show Toronto, which ran in late January, and is launched as a part of the 2017 Designer Collaboration Programme. The collaboration project has been running since 2013 and has seen the boundaries of experiential design pushed into artistic new realms, with work from nendo, Raw Edges, Philippe Malouin and Tom Dixon previously taking place under the banner. This year, Jaime Hayon has used Caesarstone tiles to create a whimsical universe of old meets new art, titled Stone Age Folk. The installation comprises a series of seven new experimental yet functional furniture pieces that transport Caesarstone’s signature quartz into exciting new contexts. It's a mix of Hayon’s legendary craftsmanship and the established quality of Caesarstone that these pieces are as beautiful and successful as they are. The Toronto installation welcomed visitors in an open gallery space where the pieces where on display. The installation included “face cabinets”, large scale “bird-like dining tables” and smaller scale coffee tables featuring animated characters alongside a mask. Each piece is handcrafted by Hayon, and serves as an utterly unique object of design, and as a statement of the power of design to transform materials. Caesarstone tiles, typically used for kitchen and bathroom surfaces, are here used in highly decorative form – as a fantastical component in a fantasy world. Hayon’s creations serve as an inspirational message about the power of outside the box design. The installation heavily reflects the overall inspiration for the yearlong collaboration between Caesarstone and Hayon, which draws inspiration from fauna, the natural world, and folklore from different cultures. These references are met with Hayon’s signature playfulness and curiosity, resulting in fresh and visionary takes on Caesarstone quartz. “In working with Caesarstone, I became curious about what’s doable through material and technology,” says Jaime on the collaboration “Caesarstone material inspires designers and creatives to think of new ideas and bring novelty and innovation through creativity. “This is what the installation for Caesarstone is about- this sort of combination of ideas, from folklore to fauna to colour to material to stone to furniture, ideas which result in unique pieces that can be functional or completely surreal and non-functional. Its about mixing the ingredients with our own intuition to create a new world, inspired by the possibilities of the material.” Caesarstone caesarstone.com.au Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Vicky-Lam IDS-installation,-Face-cabinet--image-credit-to-VIcky-Lam Jaime-Hayon-and-Face-Mirror---image-by-Liah-Chesnokov IDS-installation,-Hayon-Portrait---image-credit-Vicky-Lam IDS-installation,-Face-table--image-credit-Vicky-Lam IDS-installation,-Face-mask-and-Face-Cabinet--image-credit-Vicky-Lam  abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

The Ripple Effect

Located along the scenic Qiandao Lake in Hangzhou, Ripple Hotel is a collection of 12 duplex villas designed as a hotel for small families or couples seeking a leisurely weekend in Hangzhou. While the architecture, conceived by German firm GMP, exhibits a strong Bauhaus design sensibility, the interiors, designed by Shanghai-based studio XL MUSE Architectural Design, pay homage to Hangzhou with its use of natural materials and colourful fabrics. As the hotel’s name implies, Qiandao Lake – or rather the movement of its ripples – is a motif that threads through the various design elements. The design team at XL MUSE says of the inspiration, “[We] want the hotel to appear like a microcosm of Hangzhou’s natural landscape. We want the grandeur of nature to be translated into the architectural space.” At the reception hall, a boat hangs down from the ceiling. Carved from real wood, it doubles up as hotel reception desk and objet d’art. As your eyes are brought further up, the ceiling is weaved from throngs of thin bamboo. Oars act as a divider, providing guests with a quiet moment before they’re led to their rooms. All natural materials are locally sourced. Incorporating so much nature, so to speak, into the design is not without its challenges. “As bamboo is a natural material, prior treatment is needed to ensure that it is anti-corrosive and damp-proof,” the design team notes. The above spatial arrangement is repeated in the individual hotel rooms. Interiors are vast, with separate and distinct spaces carved out for the dining, living and sleeping quarters, making it ideal for longer stays. In the living room, the curved sofa is wrapped in bright hues, adding a splash of colour to the otherwise muted palette. The arc is also meant to mimic the moment “when a pebble is thrown into the water, causing ripples”. Pendant lamps are made from bamboo hats, a nod to Hangzhou’s agricultural history. The floor-to-ceiling windows allow sunlight to flood in by day, and bring in views of the picturesque Qiandao Lake and surrounding landscape. This composition is brought indoors, too, with a branch, part of a vine or a dash of pebbles reimagined as paintings. XL MUSE Architectural Design xl-muse.com GMP gmp-architekten.de Ripple-01 The Ripple Hotel | Habitus Liiving Ripple-04 Ripple-05 Ripple-06 Ripple-07abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

This Retail Space for Designer Department Store, JOOOS is Super E-P-I-C

Is it me, or is retail design getting insanely theatrical? I guess its no surprise really, when you think about the changing nature of consumer behavior from in-store to online; the bricks and mortar operations need to stay completive somehow. And how are they doing it? By creating a spectacle of course! Because why not? We as an industry have a real opportunity here to stretch our creative wings a bit and go a little nuts with the glitter and black-lighting; to get “aggressively outrageous” as I like to call it. Your inner child will love these projects, and that’s kind of the point, to create something so spectacularly wondrous that you have no choice to engage with it. Located on the ground floor of a commercial building on Xingguang Avenue in Hangzhou, China, X+living (previously XL-muse) has created a retail and dressing room experience intended to compete with what it describes as the ‘emptiness’ of online shopping. The JOOOS fitting room integrated the top 100 fashion brands from the sales list of retail site tmall.com, and selected four collections for representation within the project. By investing in the ‘event’ of shopping, X+living hopes to create an immersive retail experience that can effectively compete with and exist alongside the online experience. Sounds great, huh? But how do you create a retail ‘event’ on a daily basis? Here, X-living developed a series of design devices, some even with integrated technology, to almost literally, bring the space to life. The most tech-savvy initiative to this end is to social element of the store. Facing the street is an interactive screen, connected to the Internet, where visitors can browse and shop the collection before heading inside. “This is the most distinctive feature of JOOOS fitting room,” explains X+living’s design director, Li Xiang. “Building an offline fitting experience in the online age through ubiquitous screens.” Each fitting room is equipped with a rest area, makeup area and yes, even a selfie area, meaning the online element is still thoroughly present in its physical space. Xiang hopes that the design of the environment “inspires users to really ‘get something’, or even get involved in the space.” Outside of these quirky digital elements, the interior design approach was driven by a need to create a more ‘human’ feel, particular when it came to the brands housed within the store. Four brands are represented in the space: Mori Girl Collection, Celebrity Collection, OL Collection and Fashionable Girl Collection. To create a greater sense of connection between customers and brand, X-living used the labels themselves as a kind of moodboard and design template to inspire the interior concepts of each brand’s allocated space. Here, the four brands divide the store into four distinctly designed ‘ecosystems’. A muted palette of pastel pinks and off-whites define the Mori Girl section, with ceiling high bamboo poles criss-crossing the room. Hemp rope — strung between the arms of bamboo — becomes a clothing rail, while mirrors are embedded at the points of intersection. Calm, muted colours with textured fittings offset the modernity of the clothes on show with the primitive materials used to display them. The Celebrity Collection area is defined by a series of life size birdcages. Likened to a Victorian crinoline or dress frame, the display is intended to evoke the feeling of royalty, a modern reinterpretation of the princess aesthetic. Cages on the floor each house a separate display of clothing, and are mirrored on the ceiling as lamp shades. The fitting rooms are located inside a larger cage whose curved surface has been covered in mirrored glass. The OL Collection area moves away from a subtle palette as imagined as a darker, more mature space. A concrete floor, concrete painted walls and framed track lighting create a space that is concise and reserved. A fireplace and wood veneer help to soften the texture of the area, while the minimal black frames used for display both delimit and decorate the room. Finally, the fashionable Girl area is bursting with block colour. Giant buttons float from the ceiling like flying saucers, while metal grids and cubes populate the space. The weaving of colour and folded lines is used to build up a dynamic space that reflects bold personality and playful characteristics. Traffic mirrors hang from above, reflecting the patterned textile floor and sustaining the areas aesthetic vibrancy. It’s all theatre, and it’s spot on for where the future of retail design lies. XL-Muse XL-MUSE.COM Photography by Shao Feng joos001 joos003 joos013 joos014 joos016 joos018 joos029 joos030  abc
Architecture
Homes

Inside A House with an Atrium

It is not an easy accomplishment to design a house that retains a façade of privacy on its public-facing exterior, yet feels bright, inviting and filled with natural light behind its public face. Yet, it is a spatial juxtaposition that appears as a natural solution within the aptly named House with an Atrium by RT+Q Architects, which has designed the residence to make the maximum use of its site and to respond to the owners’ programmatic requirements. Atrium House | Habitus Living From the very beginning, the clients – a couple with three children – expressed their desire for a design that would allow plenty of daylight into the interiors of their house. A challenging task for a site situated on a North-South facing plot of land and sandwiched between two other residential properties. The configuration of the rectangular plot also hindered the design team at RT+Q from designing big openings at the East- and West-facing façades. As a solution, the team chose to design a house with a large, double-volume atrium that pierced the first and second levels of the residence, bringing in light and air without attracting too much heat from the afternoon sun. Atrium House | Habitus Living “One feature of a lot of our buildings is that their front façades do not give too much away but, internally, the houses still feel very open,” says Rene Tan, Director of RT+Q Architects, highlighting the recurring theme within a lot of firm’s projects. Within the House with an Atrium, too, the titular central void is instrumental in creating a sense of openness and space from the inside. Atrium House | Habitus Living With the courtyard and its two-storey high green wall, the configuration of the communal spaces around the inviting atrium became a logical choice. On the first floor, the design team positioned the gallery and the dining area directly across from each other, providing expansive, unobstructed views of activities taking place at the opposite, East and West ends of the house, while placing a spacious living room at the front of the house facing out to the vibrant green wall. On the second floor, the team designed a master suite overlooking the atrium’s courtyard and the spaces below, giving the clients a broad overview of the entire house from the comfort of their room. Other bedrooms were given more privacy by being set back from the atrium via elongated circulation spaces around the internal courtyard. Atrium House | Habitus Living In a similar, strategic move, the RT+Q team incorporated open light courts and glass floors above selected areas of the basement to bring natural light below ground and make the lobby, tuition and entertainment areas, as well as various service spaces, a welcoming, well-lit continuation of the family spaces above. The choice of materials, like light grey concrete and marble throughout the basement and upper floors, further enabled the team to create a sense of space and openness within the 7,700 square foot home. Atrium House | Habitus Living The team took special delight in designing the first-storey staircase, which was crafted in the same spirit of bringing lightness and various transparencies into the dwelling. “The owners were adventurous enough to go with a different kind of staircase,” says project lead Allan Tongol. “As a result, we went with perforated steel as a chosen material for the treads and the rises, making the whole structure, just like the house itself, look transparent and light.” RT+Q Architects rtnq.com Photography by Chiel de Nooyer Atrium House | Habitus Living Atrium House | Habitus Living Atrium House | Habitus Living Atrium House | Habitus Livingabc