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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters

Have you heard? Habitus has a new Guest Feature Editor

Paris-based for twenty years between 1990 and 2010, Stephen Todd developed a significant international profile as a writer and editor of repute. Over the years, he has contributed essays on art, architecture, fashion and design to newspapers including The New York Times, The Guardian, The Independent and Le Monde, and magazines including Wallpaper*, Fantastic Man and the American edition of Vogue. In 1999, he launched Numéro magazine, Paris, which remains an industry reference to this day. In 2005, he inaugurated concept+image, Paris, a boutique branding and communication agency specializing in brand extension programs (exhibitions, catalogues, advertising) for luxury clients including Moët et Chandon, Woolmark, Swarovski, and Kopenhagen Fur. He was the Director of Branding & Communication (Global) for Swarovski International for three years. Returning to Australia in 2010 he has since divided his time between Central West NSW and the bright lights within the big smoke. Today he is the Design Editor of the Australian Financial Review Magazine and our regular guest Feature Editor of IN HABITUS VERITAS. Within those 26+ pages, he proposes an intoxicating lineup of exclusive content, provocative engagement with top creatives across the Asia-Pacific region, and an opinionated mix of insightful interviews and incisive texts. With as much talent as experience there was no hesitation in inviting him onto the jury and to be a part of our inaugural INDE. Awards, or didn't you know that? Keep your eyes peeled for Habitus #35, the Eccentric issue, on sale 7 March. It’s the first of a spectacular many to come! Portrait by Anthony Geernaertabc
Architecture
Homes

Design Destination: Piermont

In recent years, visitors to the mainland’s formerly unfashionable regional cousin have become decidedly more cosmopolitan than the traditional Kathmandu-clad nomad. Leveraging off the cult-status cool of Hobart’s Museum of Old and New Art, and with world-class local produce to tempt the most discerning travelling gourmand, Tassie is now attracting a contemporary breed of style-savvy tourists. And where do they stay when they’re in town? On Tasmania’s picturesque eastern coast, one option may be at the Piermont Retreat. Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living “We hope people feel that they can really escape here, and be able to live like they’re at home,” says Juan Maiz Casas, who joins his wife, Marie von Haniel, as owner and operator of Piermont. Marie’s father, Ruprecht von Haniel-Niethammer, purchased the property in the mid-nineties with the intention of growing walnut trees for timber. While this pursuit ultimately proved unsuccessful, the location lent itself to becoming an ideal spot for guest accommodation. Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Juan and Maria have since added to the first cottages built by Ruprecht, with now more than twenty self-contained units and suites currently on site, and plans for new properties available for private ownership in the wings. For this next phase in the evolution of Piermont, the pair sought to retain a sense of continuity. Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living “While we wanted to refresh the experience, it was important to us to stay true to the heritage of the location,” Juan says. Melbourne-based firm Hecker Guthrie was brought on board to provide design solutions for interiors in the restaurant and accommodation, along with Jackson Clements Burrows who developed the architectural response for new units on the site. Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living “I find that as society becomes more switched on, we are seeing more and more really considered projects in regional areas,” says Hamish Guthrie of Hecker Guthrie. “And a much greater understanding of the value of good design.” ‘Good’ design in this case translates to a tailored approach, evoking the distinct appeal of the area through the work of local craftspeople. The original Piermont cottages are sustainably built to weather the harsh conditions, using stone, rammed earth and Tasmanian timbers, and the additional properties by JCB will carry through this site-specific materiality in a smart modern iteration. Hecker Guthrie’s interiors put organic tactility at the fore, with rooms decked out in local timber surfaces, leathers and linens. Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living In view of the brutally beautiful Freycinet Peninsula, as Hamish explains, the suites are “designed so you can live in a very open way – connected to the landscape”. With generous yet strategic glazing, the architecture works to establish privacy between cottages while framing the scenery beyond. “It’s a great thing to be able to work in such a scenic place. Being constantly in the presence of nature grounds your perspective”. Piermont piermont.com.au Hecker Guthrie heckerguthrie.com Jackson Clements Burrows Architects jcba.com.au Photography by Sharyn Cairns 3D imagery by Gabriel Saunders Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Living Piermont Retreat | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Lo & Behold The Warehouse Hotel restoration is complete

Remember late last year when we spoke about The Warehouse Hotel? (Here’s a refresher.) Located along the old Straits of Malacca trade route in Singapore, in an area that was once rife with secret societies, underground activity and liquor distilleries, the 37-room hotel boasts an aesthetic that blends the air of a bygone era with modern-day Singapore. “Our focus has been to protect the property’s legacy, while creating a fresh perspective on the term ‘industrial’. The environment is warm and sophisticated to prevent it from being too obviously grounded in what has been before,” says Chris Lee, head designer and founder of Asylum, who, brought on by The Lo & Behold Group, were charged with the interior design. The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living There’s also a push towards supporting – and showcasing – local designers and businesses. In-room tea and coffee mugs are from a local ceramic studio. The actual tea and coffee selection, along with bicycles, artwork and guidebooks, are likewise collated from local Singaporean makers and the ‘Minibars of Vice’ have been expressly curated to showcase Southeast Asian products. The Warehouse Hotel thewarehousehotel.com Zarch Collaboratives – lead architect zarch.com.sg Asylum – interior design theasylum.com.sg Words by Holly Cunneen The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Living The Warehouse Hotel | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

The State of Architecture + Design Today

On the first day of 2017, every single newspaper across the globe seemed – at least to me – to be focused on three main issues that will come to define our position internationally in the year ahead: 1. The importance of industrial strategy in the face of an internationally shaky economic climate and dwindling resources. 2. Greater social cohesion in light of increased immigration, travel and diaspora. 3. Negotiating stakeholder positions as a result of border fortification in first-world countries (a sadly top-agenda item in both the pending Trump Presidency and post-Brexit negotiations, alike). And while every single newspaper tolled the bell of despair, not one offered solution – merely journalistic catcalls and finger-pointing in the direction of Washington and London. Here’s where I believe we, the Asia Pacific A+D community, are uniquely positioned to help. Last month I reported on the findings of the World Bank for the Asia Pacific region in the years ahead. While we continue to experience a buoyant economic climate – projected to remain happily resilient through to 2020 – our region’s steadfast commitment to penetrating globalised economic and cultural relationships means several exciting things for the A+D industry. Firstly, it means far more than simply a growing market. Our foresight by which we’ve embraced Asia Pacific’s cultural diversity has allowed us to back industrial strategy with regionally-sensitive awareness. Across the full spectrum of Asia Pacific’s A+D sector, our creative and commercial practitioners are enjoying a particularly favourable position: the ability to manufacture locally, to an extremely high quality of market expectation, on a global scale of distribution and demand. I want to know: how did we get here? The industry across Asia Pacific today was certainly a different landscape twenty years ago (where, the full capacity of our region’s combined manufacturing was more than 48% lower than it is today; where the gap between socio-economic demographics was shockingly vast, and nationally disparate; and where our combined region represented the world’s lowest ratings of internet and media penetration). Unlike many of our European and American counterparts, in particular, the Asia Pacific A+D world has appeared to at once embrace and eschew the influence of globalisation. We’ve embraced it insofar as never has the international demand for our design been higher, never has our market been more buoyant, and never has the international attention been more pointed in our direction as a new frontier in A+D innovation. But, at the same time, we appeared to have eschewed elements of globalisation too. Throughout Europe and the USA we hear reports everyday that creative industries are feeling the deleterious effects of globalisation on national industries. While many national manufacturing sectors across the world contribute less and less to their national GDP, those very same industries in our region appear to have escaped the consolidation and subsumed competition in the name of ‘race to the bottom’. I want to know how design has remained, for us, a thoughtful activity – one which is central to the identity of our region and its inhabitants in an increasingly region-less world. This is where our 2017 INDE.Awards seeks to understand and recognise the innovation, bravery and intelligence of Asia Pacific’s A+D world. Our expert panel of judges and Indesign Media Asia Pacific editors across Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Indonesia have always understood that today’s design scene has emerged from an enduring legacy of early practitioners: Our Luminaries. Voting for the 2017 Luminary is now open and we are proud to present this shortlist of inspiring individuals who have all changed the world of A+D as we know it today. Each individual in the shortlist of our Indesign Luminaries represents the enduring legacy of confidence – confidence in the creative potential of our region; confidence in the power of inspiration and mentorship; and confidence, primarily, in the ongoing visionary possibilities of design. We are proud to announce that voting for your 2017 INDE. Luminary is currently open – and you get to decide! Words by David Congramabc
Happenings
What's On

Who Has Changed the World of Design … For YOU?

We at Indesign Media Asia Pacific have always understood that the legacy of A+D is the work of many hands – many individuals who may cast a long shadow across many disciplines or excel ahead of the pack in one. For over 16 years, we have celebrated our industry’s leading lights: our Luminaries. And, for the 2017 INDE.Awards, we look forward to adding another Luminary to our prestigious alumni. Recognising the ongoing contribution of one icon to our industry, your 2017 Luminary will represent the richness of our region’s creative diversity and our industry’s innovative spirit. In short, your 2017 Luminary will stand for the individuality, expertise, bravery and intelligence of Asia Pacific’s A+D world. As such, we are very proud to announce the shortlist for 2017’s Luminary. Our editors across Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and Indonesia have compiled a lineup of A+D’s most influential innovators whose enduring legacy continues to inspire the shape the world of design yesterday, today and tomorrow. Each of your 2017 Luminary nominees practice a form of design as ‘way-finding’: their legacies illustrate the personal, visceral responses we experience living through design. Their ‘way-finding’ work reflects and directs the nature of modern ways of living: the smallness and immensity of our world is exemplified here, simultaneously. For the inaugural year of the INDE.Awards, you get to decide your 2017 Luminary. Presenting the 2017 shortlist for the inaugural INDE.Awards [gallery ids="56369,56374,56373,56372,56371,56370"] Sonny Chan Founder of  Chan Sau Yan Associates, is one of our region’s most comprehensive and diverse architectural practitioners. After having graduated as an architect in 1963 at the Northern Polytechnic of London and thereafter trumping off his formal vocational instruction in Tropical Studies at the Architectural Association School the following year, Sonny Chan has worked in London with Arup Associates before returning to the Asia Pacific region to continue his practice with Kumpulan Akitek. After serving 29 years as a Senior Partner he founded his present practice Chan Sau Yan Associates (now incorporated into the renowned CSYA PTE LTD). With a truly global portfolio of work, his experience stretches as across an array of sectors including commercial, residential, recreational, and tourism projects. In part, such diversity is reflected through Chan’s ongoing commitment to fostering emerging design and architectural talent throughout the region. Chan has also served as a longtime tutor, examiner and adjunct professor in the School of Architecture (National University Singapore), and as an external critic at the University Malaya. Paul Hecker and Hamish Guthrie Founders of Hecker Guthrie, Paul Hecker and Hamish Guthrie draw on the foundations of design with principles that have been developed over ten years of practice. Their work is renowned for an ongoing commitment to authenticity, consideration and enthusiasm, always characterised by outstanding results. As a multidisciplinary practice, Hecker Guthrie’s approach to design has been to create a unique identity for all projects. This authenticity has resonated in the design solutions they have proposed over the years, as well as in the selection of materials and knowledge-sharing their work offers. The firm’s body of work stretches across the hospitality, residential, retail and commercial sectors, and the pair work both locally and abroad with each design drawing on their expertise in integrating interiors, building, objects and gardens together. Kerry Hill Kerry Hill is the director of the Singapore and Australia design practice Kerry Hill Architects, and has been a notably influential figure in South East Asian architecture for over 30 years. Having designed some of the most ambitious architectural projects across the Asia Pacific region, Hill’s work has an iconic sense of modernism within the realms of traditional settings. With an ever-growing portfolio of hotel, resort, residential, mixed use and public project work, Hill’s lauded designs are featured across the Asia Pacific region, and have been published in books, journals and magazines across the world. Hill has also been an eminent guest speaker at the Universities of Hawaii, Western Australia, Queensland and Singapore, and at national conventions in India, Sri Lanka and Australia. Nik Karalis Woods Bagot CEO, Nik Karalis, possesses a diverse portfolio of civic, architectural and interior projects. As a designer, his work has received acclaim to the tune of prominent design awards in Australia and abroad. Not content with success in the architectural world, Karalis has also worked under the Woods Bagot research and publishing sub-brand, Public, to bring many top architectural publications to the world, and along the way has transformed Woods Bagot into a globally relevant architectural practice. Karalis’ work crosses many boundaries, ranging from master planning, civic and commercial buildings, to intimate interiors. It’s Karalis’ ability to move between these complex disciplines that that ensures Woods Bagot’s success across multiple project types. William Smart William Smart is the founder and leader of Smart Design Studio, an architecture studio that channels a sense of pure modernism for the 21st century. Leading a team of over 35, Smart’s team designs with rigour and imbues meaning into all of their projects. Believing that each new work is a chance for new opportunities, Smart harnesses the personalities and requirements of clients to achieve a bespoke and catered result. Smart’s career has spanned across architecture and interiors of many forms, always with respect to the environment in which a project sits. Mun Summ Wong and Richard Hassell Founders of Singapore’s WOHA, Wong and Hassell have a well-earned reputation for their combination of strong environmental and social principles, and top-level design talent. The pair have lead WOHA in designing a number of innovative, highly influential projects across the world. The duo’s best-known projects have been widely championed as benchmarks for sustainable design in the face of global climate change. WOHA’s architectural approach answers the joint crises of a changing world, unprecedented population growth in cities, and increasingly dysfunctional infrastructure. Wong and Hassell have lead a team intent upon improving the day-to-day existence of city residents. Voting is currently open and it’s your choice. Vote for the 2017 Luminary who has made a difference to you. Words by David Congramabc
Architecture
Homes

A “Naturally Comfortable” Home Makes Sustainability Look Easy

To infinity and beyond!! ...from the comfort of your very own home. That was the case for a young family of three who, wonderfully content with the locality in which they resided, reached out to Ben Callery Architects in order to whip their Heritage-listed home into tip-top (read: sustainable) shape. The council regulations and requirements for Heritage buildings are notoriously stringent (read: difficult) to work with. Add to that to clients adamant for a sustainably-minded, “naturally comfortable” home, this was going to be no easy feat. Beyond House | Habitus Living Somehow Ben et al. were to work with a narrow 6-metre-wide block; tackle a north-facing front façade; retain the two front rooms while working natural light, sun, warmth and air circulation through to the back of the house (where the living spaces are located); combat overshadowing from neighbouring buildings (which you can imagine made it difficult to set up solar energy); and add a second storey hidden from the streetscape. Somehow, they pulled it off. Beyond House | Habitus Living Sustainability is a part of the residents' everyday life – they do all their commuting by bicycle, on occasion a flexicar – so the house had to be an extension of this. In addition to the new environmentally-friendly systems put in place, the use of recycled materials was paramount in the design of the new portion of the house. Materials from the old house and components of the back rooms that were demolished were worked into the new rooms as much as possible. This took the form of their 8-year-old kitchen that was dismantled, re-configured and re-assembled in their new kitchen; locally sourced and radially sawn external timber cladding; local Victorian hardwood timber framed, double glazed, low-e coated windows; and two 3500-litre corrugated metal water tanks used for laundry, toilet flushing and gardening. Beyond House | Habitus Living A lot of time, money, planning, energy and emotional investment went into the renovation of this terrace, and while hard work shouldn’t necessarily be a deterrent, it often is. It would have been a lot easier for this small and relatively young family to pack their things and move to a bigger house on a bigger block with less council-imposed restrictions – and they certainly did consider it. But, quite simply, they didn’t want to. Ben Callery Architects bencallery.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Peter Bennetts Beyond House | Habitus Living Beyond House | Habitus Living Beyond House | Habitus Living Beyond House | Habitus Living Beyond House | Habitus Living Beyond House | Habitus Livingabc
ADVERTORIALS
Design Products
Fixed & Fitted

Stay Flexible with Modular Cooktops

Designed to sit alone flush, or ideally combined to form a modular and seamless kitchen working space, The Gaggenau Vario cooktop 400 series and 200 series have been designed to satisfy even the most demanding of private chefs.

The two Vario cooktops series provide the design loving aspiring or expert chef with a variety of unique and specialized appliances. Made from solid stainless steel, each range presents a connected seamless and modular cooktop system. Alongside gas are induction cooktops and the special appliances such as the electric grill, steamer, Teppan Yaki and deep fryer – all accompanied by effortless and clever ventilation elements.

The Vario cooktops series features reassuring professional touches at every turn, promising a truly authentic culinary creative experience for the home chef. Combine with the 60cm Ovens 400 series or 200 series for the complete culinary experience or the EB 388, an exceptional 90cm wide oven with 78 litres of large-scale cooking capacity. It is a classic icon that is utterly distinctive and almost entirely handmade, showcasing its timeless design for the past thirty years.

Gaggenau knows that each cook and chef will want to express themselves a little differently; from seasoning to timing to temperature, every recipe is personalized. They know that what’s required is a cooking space that offers excellent performance, lifelong quality and bold design.

The ranges, including built in espresso machines, combination steam ovens, microwave ovens and warming drawers have been crafted to all fit freely, but perfectly together. In the 400 series, add the vacuuming drawer to the combination steam oven, and sous-vide cooking will become a natural part of the culinary repertoire. Whichever range you pick, the winner is the kitchen and the cook who uses them.

Gaggenau gaggenau.com/au/ 83239_BOPCMPBSPWSP200_3_extabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Colourful Captain Grey – Isn’t it Ironic?

When Melbourne-based Jean-Pierre Biasol recently travelled to Miami, he did what every Art Deco enthusiast would be crazy not to do – visit South Beach. The Miami Beach neighbourhood is a playground for the rich, famous and beautiful, known for its white-sand beaches and glamorous nightclubs. It also boasts one of the world’s highest concentrations of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne architecture, with over 800 historic buildings comprising the Miami Art Deco District. The area’s most distinct feature is undoubtedly the duo-tone pastel palettes of its heritage facades. And it is where Biasol (the Principal of Biasol: Design Studio) drew his inspiration when conceptualising the fit-out for newly opened Essendon eatery Captain Grey. As he explains, “The café’s building has an Art Deco heritage and this provided my design cue. I looked at the coloured facades of the Miami Art Deco District and reimagined them as a palette of burnt orange and pale indigo, which I then applied in the interior, along with sandy beige.” Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living There’s something deliciously appealing about injecting a little Miami glam into the heart of Essendon. However, Biasol exercised restraint in his application so the result doesn’t resemble a themed restaurant, rather an airy retreat where patrons can relax comfortably. This bright, breezy atmosphere is also helped by the corner site’s original sash windows that generously flank both street elevations and let in an abundance of natural light throughout the day. Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living Captain Grey’s pale indigo walls deliver a subdued backdrop against which Biasol has introduced key colour and material accents for elegant flourish. The most striking finish is the burnt orange on the custom stools and tubular steel table legs; so rich it immediately attracts attention. Drawing the eye down serves to highlight the floor and counter’s luxe stone tiling, which is arranged in a simple pattern. This geometric motif of white, nougat and platinum is a subtle Art Deco reference too and further displays Biasol’s stylistic light touch. Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living To add visual depth he finished the shelves, separate dining room table legs and stools in dark indigo, while brass light fittings above the counter are another discreet nod to the era’s high-end glamour. The tastefully understated scheme succeeds because Biasol’s minimalist interpretation of a much-loved architectural style feels completely at home in this suburban Australian setting. Biasol: Design Studio biasol.com.au Words by Leanne Amodeo Photography by Daniel Aulsebrook Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Living Captian Grey Habitus Living | Habitus Livingabc
Happenings
What's On

Put it to the People

Thanksgiving Day 1942, New York City Hollywood Theatre. Every single person in attendance, sitting in the darkened cinema, was ignorant of the momentous cultural instance at which they were present. So much of the next 79 years was hanging on this moment. Casablanca: opening night. Now one of the most celebrated films in cinematic history, no-one (in the audience or even in the production) had the foresight to predict that the ultimate underdog would eventually come to define the direction of modern cinema for over the next 7 decades. So what can Design Hunters learn from Casablanca? Look past the modernist Marrakech aesthetic. Look past the lush, noirish interior designs. Look, that is, at the film itself. One of Hollywood’s most frazzled productions, an atrociously shoestring budget, an unfinished script and a reel that only received the final edits on the week of the premiere, Casablanca had nothing going for it – apparently. No marketing, a questionable leading man (certainly not a romantic lead), a nobody leading lady (certainly not in USA), and a host of German ex-pat actors (certainly not P.C. in 1942). In short: no brand, just talent. There is an important lesson that Asia Pacific’s A+D community can learn from this strange history of Casablanca. Undoubtedly, our industry places stress on the importance of branding. This is neither surprising nor undue. But in a market increasingly preoccupied by the vicissitudes of promotion and expansion across the globe, our industry’s emerging talent is beset by unique challenges. Not dissimilar to those challenges which faced Casablanca – if we put war aside – emerging talent in today’s A+D community has to grapple with a pointedly over-capacity workforce over-saturated with the noise of competitive marketing on a global scale. Leveraging oneself as emerging talent in a trend-entrenched marketplace is by no means easy. But if Bergman and Bogart have taught us anything, you needn’t follow the trend – spark one! For the 2017 INDE.Awards, we want to celebrate trend-sparkers and we’ve noticed that “this looks like the beginning of a beautiful friendship”. Our expert panel of judges and Indesign Media Asia Pacific editors have kept their finger on the pulse of what A+D will look like tomorrow. Across our region, our INDE experts have selected a shortlist of emerging A+D talent that eschews trends, old rules and infuses their creative output with the spirit of innovation and questioning. Indesign Media Asia Pacific is proud to announce that voting for your 2017 INDE. Prodigy is currently open – and you get to decide! Presenting the 2017 Prodigy shortlist for the inaugural INDE. Awards [gallery ids="56290,56291,56292,56293,56294,56295,56296,56297"]  abc
Happenings
What's On

The machine is no longer the enemy

For too long the Southern Hemisphere has been trailing in the shadows of our Northern counterparts, gratefully heaping up their lukewarm leftovers across disciplines such as fashion, textiles, colour design and interiors. They’re roughly the words of Li Edelkoort. But things are about to change. Actually, change is already in motion. David Clark and Philip Fimmano, Art Director at Studio Edelkoort, have joined forces to give us the Trend Union Seminar. Hosted by the former and presented by the later, the seminar has come at a time when we stand to gain the most; “at a time when trends from the Southern Hemisphere are so influential,” says Philip. Instead of following in the footsteps of the Northern Hemisphere, “consider being a season before [them],” adds Li. “Following [their] trends is no longer an option. Now the Southern Hemisphere should adopt its own style and discipline, its own crafts and creations. Emancipation is the way to grow up.” For David, it’s as much about fostering the next generation of creatives as it is about developing the skillset – and foundation of knowledge – of the current. The industry is a community and growing as whole, building each other up, will see individual success. “Education is so important. Exposing people to ideas that they would not normally encounter. Especially in this part of the world, it’s important to take these opportunities when we can,” he says. Edelkoort Inc. have worked with fashion clients such as Armani and Zegna and price points from Zara to Prada. In the interior world they work with textile weavers such as Rubelli, furniture makers such as Dedon, and architects such as UN Studio. They’ve collaborated with giants such as Nissan, Coca Cola, Time Warner, Camper, Disney, Estee Lauder, L’Oriel, GAP, Marks and Spencer, Seiko, Rado, Siemens and Whirlpool amongst others. Trend Union is renowned in both the fashion and interior industries for guiding creatives through the latest developments and trends in colour, textiles, materials, design and strategic thinking. It’ll be a rare and privileged few who get the opportunity to sit these seminars revealing anthropological and sociological perspectives of the future consumer - how they will live and how they will behave. “New Materialism is a contemporary movement that advocates the vibrancy of matter and that materials have their own energy – something that animists and shamans have believed for centuries. Young designers are certainly participating in this conversation, using machines to serve their purposes, reprogramming antiquated robots to construct their designs, hacking 3D printers to boost their ceramic forms and repurposing old mechanical looms to forge fresh creations. Suddenly the machine is no longer the enemy of making but the handmaid of the designer: enabling, embellishing and advancing production processes. Man and machine finally merge and become one.” Li Edelkoort. The seminars will take place in Sydney on Wednesday 11 January 2017 and Melbourne 12 January 2017. Words by Holly Cunneen Trend Union Seminar |Habitus Living Design by Pieke Bergmansabc
Architecture
Homes

Love at First Sight

Much like falling in love, they say you just ‘know’ when you step inside your forever home. This was precisely the experience for Sash and Roze when they spontaneously dropped by an open home at Paddington, Brisbane, a few years ago. “When I first walked in I didn’t even look at the house I just saw the view and said, ‘I am buying this house,’” Roze says. So compelling was the view, across the rooftops of the character suburb and taking in an eastern panorama of the city, that the house itself went unnoticed. The modest, yet charming workers cottage was in a state of decay and it was really only after purchase at auction that Sash and Roze accepted the fact that was it was uninhabitable. View House | Habitus Living Architect Karen Ognibene stepped in to steer the couple away from their idea to demolish the historic timber house. She convinced them of the opportunities to renovate and graft to the back, a contemporary extension which would do justice to the prospect that stole their hearts at the initial inspection. “The slope and program really drove the design,” Karen says. “A big part of it was maximising the view from as many spaces as possible, knowing it was going to be three storeys.” The extension positions an open planned living space between an upper level bedroom suite and a lower level rumpus room. Spaces are finessed in ways which channel views toward the east whilst simultaneously establishing a sense of refuge. Material and texture play a big part in this with Blackbutt timber used extensively to bring a sense of containment and tactility to rooms and to visually reference the tectonics of the historic timber house. View House | Habitus Living The kitchen is an exercise in marrying beauty and functionality. Joinery is crafted to appear like a seamless wall of timber which visually recedes between the timber surfaces of floor and ceiling. A frameless corner window establishes an unimpeded view to the horizon. “The kitchen is the most workable kitchen I have ever had,” Roze says. “It’s nice to have connectivity to the deck.” A Victorian Ash timber staircase shares in the virtues of many other rooms and spaces, all of which are dedicated to using quality natural materials and expert craftsmanship. “Every cut on the stringer and treads is made by hand,” Sash says. “It’s a thing of beauty. It just makes me feel good to walk around it, to use it and to admire it.” KOandCO Architecture koandcompany.com.au Words by Michelle Bailey Photography by Kate Mathieson View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Living View House | Habitus Livingabc
Design Products
Furniture

Greater than the Sum of its Parts

Designed for Missana, Half is the latest piece to emerge from Spanish studio Cuatro Cuatros. The chair follows on from the light, Mart Stam inspired Trampolin seat launched earlier this year. This time, the Valencia based designers Cristina Ródenas and Adrián M. Almonacid have used oak semi circular legs in an thoughtful design of halves meeting halves. The chair is inspired by Japanese aesthetics, and Gestalt psychology - the idea that the whole of an object or scene is more important than its individual parts. Or, as Anais Nin has said, 'We do not see the world as it is; we see it as we are.' Cuatro Cuatros' hand made Half is a play on perception - its semi circular legs shaped in halves fit together seamlessly, creating a full circle when chairs are side by side. Even the upholstery reflects that very same half and full circle game, crafting a never ending visual perspective. Missana is available in Australia at Innerspace. half-cuatro-cuatros-missana-01 half-cuatro-cuatros-missana-03 half-cuatro-cuatros-missana-04 half-cuatro-cuatros-missana-05abc