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Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Hunters
People

Sandra Tan – meet our Melbourne Editor-at-Large

Drawing on her interior design training and experience as a published writer and editor in the A&D space, Sandra has a keen curiosity for the big ideas and finer details influencing design today. Sandra will be delving behind the scenes of the latest projects, sharing insightful conversations with Melbourne creatives and celebrating our abundant local talent through Habitus and Indesign’s print and online channels. She also forms part of Indesign’s C-Gen (Content Generation) team, a new in-house agency dedicated to producing dynamic tailored content. Based in Collingwood, Tan is surrounded by architects and designers. “We have so many talented neighbours,” Sandra says, “and I’m looking forward to meeting them all!” Portrait by Stephen Latchmanabc
Architecture
Homes

Designing On a Slope

The six-bedroom home on the foreshore of Gordon's Bay, Coogee, was built for a young family, and incorporates a north-facing courtyard that allows a sense of light and air into the centre of the home. The main challenge of the home, designed by Madeleine Blanchfield Architects, was the steepness of the hilly site. In order to strike the ideal marriage between privacy and views, the design of the home cantilevers out of the side of the hill to the east, with three-storey high concrete walls framing the main spine and staircase. Large bays of operable timber louvres control the privacy inside, and maintain views, while the entry offers a vista from Gordon Avenue through the stair void. Spread over three levels, the Gordon’s Bay House has an elevated main living, kitchen and dining space and a casual, lower level which opens onto the garden and vista. The use of courtyards and mature trees framing the home reinforce the importance of the local landscape and site of the design. Borrowed views through these courtyards bring a sense of clarity to the design and ensure a permanent connection to the garden and the bay. The aesthetic, like the home’s owners, is elegant and unpretentious. The Gordon’s Bay House is a place for living, and for finding pleasure in simple things, from the qualities of light, to space and honest materials. The architecture aims to deliver thoughtful details and enjoyable spaces. Madeleine Blanchfield Architects madeleineblanchfield.com Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Felix Forrest and Robert Walsh 6214 6224 6221 6215 6227abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Welcome to Little Hugh

There’s no shortage of new hospitality venues in Melbourne winning awards for outstanding interior design. The city boasts some of this country’s most dynamic fit-outs and Biasol Design Studio’s contribution to the distinct design landscape of what is Australia’s fastest growing capital, has been nothing short of potent. The Prahran-based practice’s most recent fit-out for Little Hugh cafe in Nunawading allowed Principal Jean-Pierre Biasol to collaborate with a previous client, the team behind modern eatery Hutch & Co. In wanting to give the community “something to call its own”, Biasol took inspiration from the eastern suburb’s notably industrial character. “It was an opportunity to experiment with new technologies and fabrication methods that reference Nunawading’s manufacturing history,” says Jean-Pierre. Little Hugh | Habitus Living Biasol’s design concept is based on computational geometry informed by Delauney triangulation. And his resulting scheme features a bold series of tessellated panels wrapping the walls and ceiling, making for an experience that’s as immersive as it is visually stimulating. The arrangement of interlocking panels was configured with digital modelling and CNC routing was used to produce a meticulous outcome that lends the 110sqm space a decorative, textural element. Despite the complex detailing, the overall effect is one of restrained elegance due in no small part to Biasol’s pared-back styling and minimalist furniture selections. Little Hugh’s only colour accent is a flourish of deep teal on a corner wall section and banquette seating, as well as on the coffee machine. It breaks up the lightness of the panels, concrete flooring and lime-washed birch counter by creating just the right amount of visual contrast. As Jean-Pierre explains, “The fit-out’s material palette actually centres around this pale timber and by pairing it with such a rich teal, we accentuate the geometry of the interior surfaces.” Little Hugh | Habitus Living Interestingly, the counter is constructed from stacked sheets of timber angled to complement the patterning of the walls and ceiling. While the generously sized structure’s form echoes those of the tessellated panels, its bespoke shape softens the geometric features of the fit-out by introducing a handcrafted sensibility. This sense of balance is what ultimately defines the interior design and makes the long, narrow space so undeniably striking and alluring. Biasol Design Studio biasol.com.au Words by Leanne Amodeo Photography by Ari Hatzis Little Hugh | Habitus Living Little Hugh | Habitus Living Little Hugh | Habitus Living Little Hugh | Habitus Living Little Hugh | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

The Plump Duck Sydney by DS17

If you’re a trendy, inner-city Sydneysider, you’ll have no doubt patroned glam culinary hotspots like Alpha Restaurant, Beta Bar and the recently launched Nour in Surry Hills. But what you might not know, is that each of these locales have something in common: they are all designed by the acclaimed master of hospitality, interior architect Paul Papadopoulos of DS17. With a sparkling trail of chic Sydney restaurants behind him, Papadopoulos was commissioned to undertake one of Sydney’s most anticipated restaurant launches of the decade, The Plump Duck. The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living Housed in the CBD’s bustling World Square precinct, this impressive $10 million fitout combines the influences of ancient China with modern accents. A dramatic four-metre terracotta warrior statue greets guests upon entry, while the interior features traditional Chinese artworks, calligraphy and sculptures. Seating 250 people, the interior spreads over two levels with decadent and stylish private rooms and public dining spaces, both in and outdoor. What’s most remarkable about Papadopoulos’ fitout however, it the sheer volume of detailed materiality he has managed to harmonise throughout the massive space. The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living Prominently placed terracotta soldiers feature at the entry of the restaurant, adjacent to the semi-open kitchen area, giving the kitchen this lovely authentic, Chinese-street-market feel. This is coupled with finely carved Chinese woodworks, which are used as whole panels and even entire walls. This intensity of timber contributes to what is a wonderful den-like atmosphere, driven especially the lighting, which warms the dim yet cosy nooks of the restaurant. Throughout the two levels, Papadopoulos has used a mixture of gold and red in his colour palette, which permeates the fixtures, fittings, furnishings and lighting. The space practically glows with red and gold. There are cavalcades of ancient Chinese artifacts scattered throughout the interior, however it miraculously never feels cluttered or kitsch, more of a nod to traditional. The Plump Duck is a mastery of materiality on a vast scale, and is as much an accomplishment in interior design imagination as it is of culinary greatness. Either way, not to be missed. Words by Sophia Watson The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living The  Plump Duck | Habitus Living The  Plump Duck | Habitus Livingabc
Architecture
Homes

Life on the edge of New Zealand’s largest city

Tucked into the bush-clad foothills of the Waitakere Ranges, the Forest House by Fearon Hay paints a picture of a rural lifestyle on the edge of the city. The owners grow their own vegetables, butcher their own meat and make their own wine, and have built a house and workshop fit to handle their young and active family. Part-farm house, part-manor house, the assembly has a timelessness enhanced by classic forms and natural materials. Twin gables create an elegant language of rain-shedding roofs. Their wide eaves and verandas recall other Pacific Rim architectures – the generous roof canopies of traditional and contemporary Japanese architecture, and the light-weight thatched roofs of the Pacific Islands. They speak of shelter, protection and enclosure – a foil to the surrounding rainforest, the beating sun, heavy rain, and year-round westerlies blowing in from the Tasman Ocean. Read the full story in Habitus issue #34, available now. Photography by Simon Wilson Styling by Amelia Holmes Forest House | Habitus Living Forest House | Habitus Living Forest House | Habitus Living Forest House | Habitus Living Forest House | Habitus Living Forest House | Habitus Livingabc