About Habitusliving

 

Habitus is a movement for living in design. We’re an intelligent community of original thinkers in constant search of native uniqueness in our region.

 

From our base in Australia, we strive to capture the best edit, curating the stories behind the stories for authentic and expressive living.

 

Habitusliving.com explores the best residential architecture and design in Australia and Asia Pacific.

 

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Design Products
Furniture

Growing IKEA’s Flat Pack Garden

It’s the brand’s external innovation hub Space10 that birthed the idea of the flat pack garden with the Growroom. The Growroom, once built, is a sphere like structure that can let people to grow their own food, herbs and plants in striking, space efficient and sustainable manner. Initially shown off as a concept in late 2016, the Growroom soon attracted interest from design lovers around the world. In order to maintain the ethos of sustainability, the notion of shipping the built Growrooms internationally was quickly nixed, and is released as open source design, that can be built with just a rubber hammer, 17 sheets of plywood, and a CNC milling machine. The Growroom was conceived as a new sustainable alternative to the current global food model, and the open source nature of the design, and being produced from only one material, reflects this. The overlapping levels of the sphere have been designed to make sure that water and light flowing in can reach the vegetation on every level, fmor top to bottom. “Traditional farming takes up a lot of space, but the Growroom has a small spatial footprint as you grow vertically,” say Space10, who developed the design alongside architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum. “The Growroom seeks to support our everyday sense of well being in the cities by creating a small oasis or ‘pause’-architecture in our high paced societal scenery, and enables people to connect with nature as we smell and taste the abundance of herbs and plants.” “On the basis of a spatial experimentation with the urban farming concept, we strive towards creating architecture where atmosphere and sensuousness acts as the primary design factors, to generate poetic spaces with a sense of tranquility,” says Lindhold. Space10 space10.io Words by Andrew McDonald large_1-T7U7qmIj0VFeYXeKExaQHg IMG_2925_Alona-Vibe-2000x1500-1200x900 large_1-QN5_BJRFEHKJF8jMTF9qwAabc
Architecture
NOT HOMES

Smart Choices by Smart People

Artistic flair followed by creative pursuit is one of those things that can find instant success, unfortunately said success can be, at times, fleeting. It’s an infamous catchall of the industry. But just because it happens to one, doesn’t mean it will happen to all. Take Ginger&Smart. In the company of a handful of other well-known Australian Fashion labels the duo have been around for 15 years finding steady success and steadily growing recognition. To open their new flagship store in Pacific Fair, Brisbane, they’ve enlisted the help of Melbourne-based interior architect David Flack of Flack Studio. A bold blend of colours hallmarks the space. Soft pink walls greet clients towards the front of the store, while a deep, petrol green awaits them at the back end. Plush carpet, heavy curtains, marble, American Oak and Fibonacci Stone coral terrazzo tiles offer diversity in materials and texture. As the flooring for the majority of the store it’s the coral terrazzo tiles that ground the space, featuring an elegant balance of orange and pink pigments with the accents of white, grey and shell. The end result is a space at once elevated yet unpretentious – in perfect accord with the label. Flack Studio flackstudio.com.au Ginger and Smart gingerandsmart.com Fibonacci Stone fibonaccistone.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Photography by Toby Scott Ginger & Smart | Habitus Living Ginger & Smart | Habitus Living Ginger & Smart | Habitus Living Ginger & Smart | Habitus Living Ginger & Smart | Habitus Livingabc
Design Hunters

All Grown Up: Australia’s Contemporary Arts World

When one is asked to conjure up an image of the world’s best art galleries, we think of the Louvre, or MoMA in New York. We are unlikely to immediately think of one from Australia/The Asia-Pacific – but they’re certainly up there. In fact, though Australia’s galleries and museums may not contain as many thousands of artefacts as those in Europe or North America, they offer their visitors a brave new world of visitor interactivity – a notion which plays a considerable part in the survival of cultural institutions as popular hubs of urban culture. Shoppy_Nervescape_001_F Perhaps Australia-versus-Europe comparison is unfair, considering the comparative youth of the modern Australian art culture. You see, this summer Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) is ten-years-young. As GOMA celebrates its tenth birthday with activities ongoing into April, this young and exciting gallery showcases not only some of the most stimulating artists from the local, Asia-Pacific and international art worlds, but a variety of diverse experiences forward-thinking curators are using to redefine what it means to “go to an art gallery.” Thanks to the innovative approaches applied by those such as Geraldine Barlow, GOMA’s Curator of International Art, “going to an art gallery” is no longer a dry stroll through oppressively hushed hallways, squinting to read the fine print alongside each work. CAVEnick_Heard_SugarSpin_011_Edited_F Barlow speaks enthusiastically of the success the gallery has had in using the birthday anniversary’s main exhibition – Sugar Spin: You, me, art and everything – to prove the imaginative ways contemporary art is created and how it can be enjoyed as an experience which engages more than one sense. Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir’s work Nervescape (a touchable landscape of neon-bright synthetic hair - pictured) and others featured in these celebrations provoke awe in their use of the dramatic open spaces to fully immerse visitors in the drama of an installation. Shoppy_Nervescape_install_F Arnardóttir’s work, Barlow revealed, can itself be “snuggled” into in certain places, creating nooks and dimples. The bold approach of allowing art to show the wear and tear of its viewers – giving in to the naughty, slightly childish and wholly postmodern urge to turn accepted ideas on their heads – complete the picture of a gallery which believes that art and fun are not only mutually exclusive, but perhaps best enjoyed together. But this is more than a cute theme for a tenth birthday party. GOMA has long been the envy of other states which themselves have an excellent reputation for fostering children’s interests in art with youth programs. Its specially dedicated Children’s Art Centre regularly engages exciting artists such as Arnardóttir (or “Shoppy” as kids affectionately call her) to hold workshops and create art with children using their own special materials and styles of expertise. GOMA_CAC_MirrorMirror_HrafnhildurArnadottir_20161128_msherwood_013_F Standing at rightly proud at the end of its first decade, GOMA reminds us that although Australian art may be “a child” in comparison to that of other countries, it is entering a new period of maturity that will be key to art’s survival as entertainment.   Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art qagoma.qld.gov.au   Photography courtesy of QAGOMA.   This article was originally published in McGrath Magazine 11.02abc
Design Products
Furniture

Keeping it in the family with Douglas & Bec

Douglas and Bec may have been in business for 10 years but it is a relationship that has been for a lifetime. Based in Auckland, New Zealand, Douglas and Bec is the partnership between father and daughter Douglas Snelling and Bec Dowie who create handmade furniture and lighting that is as timeless as their relationship and values. While Bec was studying for her Bachelor in Fine Arts she started making things with her father, who has a background in engineering and farming. “Growing up on a farm I used to help dad make and fix things and I always loved working together and learning from him,” Bec explains. “Today it is fundamentally still the same process as when we started: I design and Douglas makes. However, now he oversees his team of cabinetmakers and focuses more on product development.” DouglasBec_HabitusLiving6 Douglas and Bec designs and produces lighting and furniture that is timeless, refined and playful and uses rich natural materials. Their work has simplicity and honesty, which is reflective of their own “less is more” lifestyle as they reside rurally and source locally. Staying local is also Douglas and Bec’s approach to craftsmanship and manufacturing, with each product made in New Zealand via a network of suppliers and makers. This not only feeds the local industry but also allows Douglas and Bec to be more experimental. In 2014 Douglas and Bec opened a showroom and office in Collingwood, Melbourne, which has fuelled overseas interest and commissions. This includes working closely with Sydney design firm Arent&Pyke to create bespoke furniture for the award-winning Alex Hotel in Perth. “It was a mammoth and super valuable job and it really highlighted our capabilities in producing custom pieces for large-scale projects,” Bec says. They also designed and manufactured lighting features for projects throughout Australia and worldwide, including the Garden State Hotel in Melbourne, Hotel Panache in Paris and Whitegrass restaurant in Singapore. DouglasBec_HabitusLiving1 Douglas and Bec also releases its own collections with the latest, Pare, inspired by New Zealand’s regionalist art movement. Bec translated the beauty, honesty and isolation of rural life in New Zealand, as depicted by painters such as Rita Angus and Christopher Perkins, into lighting and furniture in which tones of moss green, stone, fog and warm chestnut are juxtaposed with veiny marbles, bright cool whites and brushed brass components. While Bec has her ambitions firmly set on developing their international following, keeping production local remains a priority. Indeed, like Douglas and Bec who have been making things together since Bec was young, the fundamental relationships and values of their business have not changed. Words by Rebecca Gross
Photography: Café Laffare – Steve Xeu. All other images courtesy of Douglas and Bec
DouglasBec_HabitusLiving4 DouglasBec_HabitusLiving7DouglasBec_HabitusLiving4 DouglasBec_HabitusLiving10  abc
Architecture
NOT HOMES
Places

Penta Café – Where Air is Made Solid

It’s in Melbourne’s Elsternwick that you’ll find the modernist expression of café culture that is Penta. Upon entering you’re greeted with a polished grey concrete floor plane, lightly ground back to reveal loose ends of aggregate. This honest and genuine expression of materials speaks to the nature of the café itself; true and unpretentious, yet not afraid to show off with a little flair. Penta is the brainchild of the crew behind Legacy, Temperance Society and Mob Espresso and is the result of a carefully considered design by RITZ&GHOUGASSIAN. With a menu showcasing an array of healthy and colourful dining options, the meals on offer are given a muted and minimalist background to allow them to be the real stars of the case. Orthogonally designed concrete elements seem to rise up from the floor, creating a coffee and waiting station, set off with terrazzo clad plinths for seating. The walls of Penta have been clad in a veil of perforated aluminium, folding itself across the architectural creases of the walls, as well as separating the kitchen from the larger dining area. Conceptually, the interior of Penta has been designed to rest at horizon line between the two opposing elements of concrete and air. The heaviness of the concrete ground plane grounds the entire café with a firm base, yet it is juxtaposed against the open void the perforated metal cladding provides throughout. Seating is handled through striking deep cigar leaf coloured leather, folded loosely over stainless steel rods. This is not only a visually arresting and comfortable solution, it also drives home the connected nature of Melbourne’s café culture, as you quite literally share a space of the café with other patrons. The space is given life, and more air (literally) through fern trees dotted around the café, casting leafy, fibres shadows across interior metal skin. RITZ&GHOUGASSIAN ritzghougassian.com Words by Andrew McDonald Photography by Tom Blachford Penta_lowres-1 Penta_lowres-9 Penta_lowres-8 Penta_lowres-7 Penta_lowres-5 Penta_lowres-3 Penta_lowres-2 Penta_lowres-12 Penta_lowres-13 Penta_lowres-14 Penta_lowres-4 Penta_lowres-11 Penta_lowres-10abc
Design Products
Furniture

Intelligent Seating from Herman Miller

Take a second to think of a seating concept that can morph into multiple chair designs based on your varying needs. Can you? The new Herman Miller Keyn range by London studio forpeople is a collection of meeting and side chairs designed for modern collaborative workspaces. The revolutionary design, available in Australia through Living Edge, allows you to tailor a chair for different spaces from the boardroom, meeting room and workstations to the café to the home with the interchangeable base, cradle, shell and upholstery. Much more than a modular seating concept, the Keyn chair responds to the user’s changing postures automatically, reclining up to 10 degrees for comfort. Living Edge livingedge.com.auabc
Design Hunters
People

In Conversation With… Keinton Butler

Senior Curator of Architecture & Design at Sydney’s Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences You're Australian, but lived in London for 10 years. What were you doing there? I actually arrived in London via Spain. I spent a couple of years in Barcelona, exploring Spanish architecture and going to many, many art galleries and museums. Although my background is in furniture design, my time in Spain helped to develop my interest in fine art. Didn’t you work with Damien Hirst at some point? Eventually I moved to London and started working for Damien on his contemporary art publishing project and through that role established two of his London galleries. Later, I took a Master’s degree in Curating Contemporary Design at the Design Museum and after I graduated, worked as an independent design curator for cultural organisations like the London Design Festival and the British Council. I also set up a curatorial project space which was led by a cross-disciplinary and socially engaged exhibition program and I co-founded a British furniture start-up, Beynon. It was a busy time, but the creative environment in London is so inspiring it encourages you to work hard. The role of Senior Curator of Architecture & Design at MAAS is a new one. Why has it been created and how do you intend to fulfil your role? Design and architecture are two of the museum’s key disciplines and the creation of this role marks a renewed approach to critically examine contemporary design. We are currently developing a strategy for design and architecture which will include some important new acquisitions and exhibitions that will reflect contemporary design practice. We will also be delivering a series of programs, events and commissions. Of course the Sydney Design Festival, which is run by the MAAS will continue to be an important part of what we do. So your furniture design background is coming in handy. It provides me with some industry insight, but more importantly it means that I am experienced in working in a very interdisciplinary and collaborative way. In my current role I’m working closely with the local and international design communities to explore key issues facing designers today, and I’m focussed on building relationships and sharing this knowledge. Ultimately I want to promote understanding and appreciation of contemporary design and architecture and to develop initiatives that enable the museum to do that in ways that are really engaging for our audiences. I understand you are broadening the scope of the MAAS's geographical zone of interest. Can you tell me a bit about the rationale behind that? Having recently moved back to Australia I’ve been so inspired by the diversity of design practice both here and in Asia, and my primary focus is to explore contemporary design from the Asia Pacific region. We are seeing substantial growth in creativity and innovation from our neighbouring countries, many of which until recently were classed as emerging economies. The scale and speed of change taking place in Asia has created a real optimism for the future, which is in stark contrast to what is happening in Europe. This is an exciting position for us to be in and there are real opportunities for Australia and for our designers to be part of this growth. Part of our role as one of Australia’s leading design museums is to support our local design community. Perhaps one of the ways we can do that is to facilitate some of the connections or collaborative opportunities that are on our doorstep.

You have your first big exhibition coming up at the museum early next year, to align with the new dates of the Sydney Design Festival. Can you tell me a little about what we can expect?

We will be exploring an expanded definition of design and will be tapping into some key trends in design practice. As our needs become more complex, many contemporary designers are now undertaking independent research projects in order to inform their work. The exhibition will reflect this and will feature some really exciting work. We look forward to sharing it with you! Interview by Stephen Toddabc
Architecture
Homes

Don’t you just hate when things work out perfectly?

Have you ever been caught between two design styles and which you prefer? Let’s pretend that was a rhetoric question because chances are – whether you’re in this industry or a keen observer – you’ve been faced with such a dilemma countless times. There are so many directions in which the architecture and interior design of a house can go and while they all have compelling drawcards, they may not necessarily match each other – and so we’re left with a decision to make. A dilemma, if you will. As architects and interior designers it’s not an easy decision to make but for residents and homeowners it’s even harder – they’re the ones that need to live in – and with – the end result. Industry professionals may have a preference but they also get to work across many projects, likely of differing design styles. A contemporary project one day could be followed by a Heritage Listed house the next; and Brutalist building the day after. They get to have their cake and eat it, too. Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living But the owners of this house in Malvern, Melbourne, in the face of dilemma, made a decision. While they loved their Edwardian-style home’s period charm, they needed the ease and simplicity of a contemporary home to raise their young family. But rather than relocate, they reinvented. The front façade was retained and a second storey added towards the rear makes the most of an enviable northern aspect. New informal living spaces find their place at ground level and open out to an outdoor entertaining area and pool while the children’s bedroom are above. Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Through out the home large windows are set deep in to the façade simultaneously providing solar protection and advantageous views of the suburb’s greenery and parklands nearby. I guess they too got to have their cake and eat it. Neil Architecture neilarchitecture.com.au Words by Holly Cunneen Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Living Neil Architecture Wheatland Rd Habitus | Livingabc
Design Hunters
People

State Of Kin: Encouraging Perth’s appetite for incredible design

When the Salomone family get together at dinner, the conversation isn’t about the weather. Instead it’s the floor finish for one of their projects, how to execute a style of tile that no longer exists, or how to maximise the use of exposed concrete ceilings. These family affairs consist of brothers and builders, Gino and Steve Salomone (State Of Kin directors) and their children; Steve’s daughter Alessandra Salomone, an Interior Designer, Gino’s son Donny Salomone, also a builder, and finally Donny’s wife, Ara Salomone, a graduate of architecture who hails from a bloodline of architects. “For our State Of Kin team, having the ability to talk about projects freely and whenever we need to, has proved hugely beneficial,” says Alessandra. “We have all grown up with these conversations and brainstorming sessions being the norm, working through complex designs is nothing new.” The team’s current project, The Shutter House, provides local design with a global appeal and is quickly gaining interest from the Western Australian design community for its high-level of customised details and moveable façade. “This unique mechanical feature transforms the residence from a private space, to one that opens out to the natural landscape,” says Ara. Bespoke details have been conceived and executed by the whole State Of Kin team, with everyone on deck for the hand-seeding of the 1970s inspired terrazzo tiles and the oiling and staining of prototypes for the parquetry floors. Enthusiastic about bringing a fresh perspective to Perth’s urban fabric, State Of Kin are blending their expertise to create interesting work that enhances the local’s appreciation of design, quality and art. “Nothing should ever be ‘too hard’ when working towards exceptional designs,” says Ara. “We will continue to push the usual boundaries and spend time and energy sourcing the right trades and suppliers (wherever they may be in the world) to ensure our designs are executed exactly the way we intended.” By launching State Of Kin, the family is now able to implement every project detail with a responsive and complementing team, as well as introduce Perth to incredible design possibilities. State Of Kin stateofkin.com.au Words by Clare Ryan StateofKin-HabitusLiving3abc
Architecture
Homes

No Muss, No Fuss – Three Generations Under One Roof

The Wong family, who work in the building and construction industry, have expressed their appreciation for architecture and design through their new home. The SS3 House – situated in the residential suburbs of Petaling Jaya, Kuala Lumpur – is a 4,600 square-feet bungalow that was built from scratch, possessing 30-feet tall windows that generously brighten and amplify its voluminous interiors, maximising space quality. To build their dream home, the Wongs sought the help of Seshan Design. “We had many ideas and needed someone who was willing to listen to us, exchange ideas and challenge us, and Seshan Design fulfilled that. It was instant chemistry with the team,” says Mrs Wong, who lives in the new house with her husband, son and in-laws. SS3 House | Habitus Living The objective was to build a functional and spacious home tailored to a three-generation family. “[We wanted] a modern, organic-looking house that bore hints of the past,” Mrs Wong adds, pointing to the family’s penchant for vintage furniture and accessories from the ’60s and ’70s. Raw materials, composed of natural grey and white hues, offered a fitting backdrop for the client’s vintage furniture. While excessive concrete is often deemed as ‘cold’, the family’s eclectic collection imbued the spacious house with a sense of familiarity and warmth. Continuing the retro aesthetic, the open staircase made up of solid timber treads and steel balustrades was inspired by traditional grills commonly found in Malaysia. In the living room, broken Ipoh marble tiles recall flooring from a similar era. SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living The SS3 House also drew inspiration from the industrial aesthetic, which formed part of the client’s brief. According to Ramesh Seshan, founder of Seshan Design, this look and feel is extremely popular amongst young architects in Malaysia. The combination of raw materials such as concrete, plaster and brick, with light touches of finished materials, such as timber and marble, offered a new interpretation of the aesthetic. The designers from Seshan Design take pride in their ability to magnify space quality. Seshan says, “We would like to think we’re good at making small spaces look larger than they actually are.” An approach they like to take is to create ‘line of sight’ that allow occupants and visitors to see from one space into the next and beyond through double volume spaces and mezzanines. SS3 House | Habitus Living Standing on the ground floor of the SS3 House, open views are granted in various spots of the house, enhancing the overall spatial experience. “It enables both levels of the house to interact visually with one another. For homes with children, it is always useful [to create a line of sight] as you can watch them. Larger volumes also bring about other benefits, such as increased natural lighting and ventilation,” he adds. The living spaces were positioned according to the direction of the sun and geomancy requirements. The pool and public areas face the East to get the morning sun. Vertical cement board strips screen the master bathroom and keep air-conditioning units hidden. SS3 House | Habitus Living The ends of the first storey lanai overlooking the pool have been abruptly tapered to open up the space for visual articulation. This three-sided lanai was inspired by the work of Italian architect Carlo Scarpa, whom Seshan admires. The lanai functions as an entertainment space. A sliding grill feature that calls to mind old shophouses can be drawn to open up the space or closed to divide. For a family that frequently entertains, the lanai has quickly become a favourite hangout. Seshan Design facebook.com/seshandesign Words by Stephanie Peh Photography by Rupajiwa Studio SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living SS3 House | Habitus Living  abc
Architecture
Homes

Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay

Sydney is yet to embrace houseboats like other world cities such as Vancouver, London and Amsterdam. In fact there are only four permanently moored houseboats in Sydney Harbour. One of those is this two-storey houseboat anchored in Pearl Bay, Mosman, which was once the permanent home of its owners and their children, but is now their holiday house and entertaining space. Recently restored and redesigned by Michelle Macarounas of Infinite.Design, this heavenly houseboat is now sea- and style-worthy. The houseboat was originally constructed from parts of a barge that would transport produce across Middle Harbour before construction of the Spit Bridge in the 1950s. Tasked with giving the houseboat a new life as a floating holiday home, Michelle restored the original heritage features out of respect for its history, and upgraded the anchored abode to become a restful retreat on the water. “Nature definitely took front and centre,” Michelle explains. “We wanted to ensure the surroundings and view took priority visually. That meant a very pared back aesthetic and simple clean lines and the use of natural materials that referenced the landscape.” Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living The open living and kitchen area and lower deck are on the first floor, as well as a double bedroom and ensuite. The master suite is upstairs, with a large bathroom, reading area and spacious entertaining deck. “Light, ventilation and open spaces were very important to give a sense of space and the feeling of a ‘house’ on the water, rather then a cramped boat,” says Michelle. Inside, the light, neutral palette and timber-framed doors and windows showcase the views of Sydney Harbour. While outside, the “River Stone” cladding visually merges with the both the surrounding vegetation and blue waters. Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Michelle restored heritage features, such as the windows, while transforming other original elements into contemporary custom joinery. Marine grade components ensure the houseboat is watertight, and all mechanics, hydraulics, electrical and facilities were upgraded, as were the finishes and fixtures. As a holiday house and entertaining space, the houseboat means its owners can have the best of living on both land and sea. There’s no need to worry about the grass being greener; or in this case, the water being bluer. Infinite Design 0404 327 633 Words by Rebecca Gross Photography by Prue Rosco Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living Mosman Houseboat | Habitus Living  abc
Happenings
What's On

Australia’s Favourite Architecture Conference Returns to Sydney

The word’s out and we’re all over it: The Australian Institute of Architects have released the theme, and the first four international speakers, for the hotly anticipated National Architecture Conference in 2017. The theme is ‘Praxis’ – the process by which a theory, lesson, or skill is enacted – and the conference will endeavor to explore the processes of thought, engagement and action in architecture and design; gently hinting at the point where theory informs practice. By the same token the theme will work to encourage reflection and action in recognizing rich and diverse architectural practices from renowned studios the world over. So far, speakers include; Eva Castro of Plasma Studio, China; Rahul Mehrotra of RMA Architects, India; Winy Maas of MVRDV, Netherlands; and Sheila O’Donnell and John Tuomey of O’Donnell and Tuomey, Ireland. The program has been curated by Ken Maher, the Institute’s national president, and Helen Lochhead, dean of the UNSW’s Faculty of Built Environment. It will be held at the recently renovated International Convention Centre in Sydney designed by HASSELL + Populous, from 4 to 6 May 2017. The National Architecture Conference 2017 wp.architecture.com.au Australian Institute of Architects architecture.com.auabc